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Army Responds to Hurricane Irma

The U.S. Army (including Active Duty, U.S. Army Reserve, and Army National Guard) remains involved in, or prepared to support State, Territory, or other Federal Agencies such as FEMA, as part of Hurricane Irma relief operations.

Virgin Islands National Guard members arrive at the Port Authority facility on St. Croix where they are processed for travel on military aircraft. Tennessee Air National Guard members, alongside VING personnel staff, screen and review credentials before local, military and federal personnel board aircraft on Sept. 9, 2017, for movement to St. Thomas after Hurricane Irma ravaged the island. (Courtesy of the Virgin Islands National Guard)

Governors are best postured to determine the needs of their residents and establish response priorities, and are currently using Army National Guard Soldiers to help meet those needs. The Army has prepositioned or is in the process of positioning equipment and personnel in the affected areas to ensure adequate resources are readily available if/when needed.

Here are a few highlights as of 5pm Eastern time, 10 September 2017:

•  The current Total Army response for Hurricane Irma is more than 9,900 Soldiers and U. S. Army Corps of Engineers civilians in the U.S. Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, and the continental United States. 

•  The Army has six aircraft, almost 500 trucks, and more than 80 generators committed to relief efforts.  The Army has more than 150 aircraft, almost 600 generators, 150 boats, and nearly 3,000 trucks on standby to support response efforts if called upon.

•  Army National Guard Soldiers from Florida, South Carolina, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands are currently on State Active Duty status and are either responding, or prepared to respond to each Governor’s priorities. Additionally, National Guard units in Florida, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina are conducting routine inactive duty training, which they will utilize to prepare for a Hurricane Irma response, if required.

A group of Soldiers with the Florida National Guard’s Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear Emergency Response Force-Package inflate a zodiac boat used in the rescue operations of civilians during disasters such as Hurricane Irma. The CERF-P joins the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the New York State Division of Homeland Security & Emergency Services and Urban Search and Rescue at a staging in Orlando while they await reconnaissance and rescue missions. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Carmen Fleischmann)

The Army Corps of Engineers is already working in the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico to assist

•  The Corps is also monitoring conditions at the Herbert Hoover Dike (Lake Okeechobee) and continue to provide expert status updates.

•  The Army also has active-duty officers assigned with FEMA Regions II, IV, and V Headquarters to assist with providing expert military advice on storm response efforts.