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National Red Ribbon Campaign October 24 - 31

"Drug Free, I Have The Power"

Red Ribbon history: Enrique Camarena 1943 - 1985:  An American Hero

 October 5, 2005 -- It was February 7, 1985 at 2 p.m., a warm winter afternoon in Guadalajara, Mexico, when U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration agent Enrique (Kiki) Camarena locked his badge and revolver in his desk drawer and left to meet his wife for lunch. Kiki unsuspectingly crossed the street to his pickup truck. While unlocking the doors to his vehicle, he was grabbed by five men who shoved him into a beige Volkswagen. One month later, his body was discovered in a shallow grave.  Kiki and his informant, Alfredo Zavala Avelar, were savagely and grotesquely murdered.

    Kiki joined the DEA in 1974 and asked to be transferred to Guadalajara, Mexico, the center of the drug trafficking empire. While investigating a multi-billion dollar drug scam, he confiscated thousands of pounds of cocaine, and hundreds of thousands of pounds of marijuana. He suspected the drug scam involved officers of the Mexican army, police and government. Kiki was a believer that one person CAN make a difference and he sacrificed his life to prevent drugs from entering the United States.

    In 1985, the National Federation of Parents for Drug Free Youth joined with DEA and implemented a Red Ribbon campaign that spread to places as far away as Europe. The National Red Ribbon campaign is celebrated every year October 24 - 31, and is dedicated to Kiki Camarena and all of the people who have been wrongly killed due to the violence caused by drugs.

    Since then, millions of Americans have become involved in, and been touched by the Red Ribbon Campaign efforts. No other single drug prevention movement has impacted so many lives.

    The Red Ribbon Campaign is an opportunity to send a consistent "No Drug" message to people everywhere.  The Carlisle Barracks community is invited and highly encouraged to take part in this year's celebration. The following activities and events will take place Oct. 24 - 31.

 

Saturday, Oct. 22

  • Decorate Youth Center - all youth are invited to join the staff in decorating the center, refreshments will be provided.

 

Monday, Oct. 24

  • "Plant A Promise," CDC children will plant red tulips at the center, 9 a.m., McGruff will help.

  • Posters and baskets of red ribbons will be distributed throughout post at various locations. Pick one up, wear it proudly and receive discounts at various locations.

  • Guards will hand out Red Ribbons at the gates in the morning.

 

Tuesday, Oct. 25

  • Official kickoff - Garrison Commander will tie the first red ribbon on a tree @ 1600 ceremony in front of the Youth Center.  Selected youth will assist, and the community is invited. McGruff will be present.

  • Celebrate McGruff's 25th birthday - cake, cards.

  • Youth decorate the installation trees with ribbons.

  • Youth will "Plant A Promise" red tulips as part of celebration.

  • Refreshments will be provided in Youth Center following the event.

    

Wednesday, Oct. 26    

  • A display table will be set-up at the Post Exchange and soccer fields with give-away gifts from 4 - 5:30 p.m. McGruff will be present along with PMO reps.

  • Movie-night at youth center (videos on drug-free awareness) free snacks

 

Friday, Oct. 28

  • Last day for poster contest entries

  • Youth Services will host a "Drug-Free" Awareness Lock-in for grades 6 - 12.

  • Ghost Walk, 7-9 p.m. , LVCC

  • Adult Halloween Party at the LVCC

 

Monday, Oct. 31

  • Winners of poster contest announced at parade

  • Halloween parade on Indian Field at 5 p.m.

  • DARE vehicle and McGruff will be present from 4:30- 6 p.m.

  • Halloween Party at LVCC, 7-10 p.m., for grades 6 - 12.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tom Zimmerman, Public Affairs Office

Post, Scouts and lawyers team up to improve trail

 

Sept. 24, 2005 - Youth and families from Carlisle Barracks, area Boy and Girl Scouts and members of the Central Pennsylvania's Association of Corporate Counsel, rolled up their sleeves and devoted the morning to planting, digging and mulching along the Army Heritage Trail.

    This local effort is part of the 12th annual National Public Lands Day and brought together the volunteers to build a two-acre wildflower garden on the southern portion of the trail.  Bluebird and butterfly habitats were placed around the garden to create a sanctuary for the wildlife.

    For the past seven years, Carlisle Barracks has participated in the National Public Lands Day, which promotes the care of public lands. Post Boy and Girl Scout troops have used this opportunity to earn awards for community service and also to learn more about the environment. Their volunteer efforts also saves thousands of dollars in labor each year.

     "This is to help educate our youth and the Carlisle Barracks community about the importance of our environment," said Keith Bailey, the post's Biological Science Technician. "The work that is accomplished saves Carlisle Barracks an estimated $10,000 in work each year that would not be completed if the community did not lend a hand."

     Public land improvements at Carlisle Barracks over the years include the Historical Marker by Thorpe Hall, shrubs and perennials at 12 monuments around post, and development of new wildlife habitats. National Public Lands Day is an annual event founded by the National Environment Education and Training Foundation. This nationwide volunteer effort is the largest of its kind with more than 500 sites throughout the country.

 

 "We have planted trees, developed walking trails along the Letort Spring Run, and improved the historical walking tour around Carlisle Barracks by planting flowers and performing maintenance," Bailey said. "We have also established no-mow areas for post wild life."

     In previous years, Carlisle Barracks received grants from the Department of Defense to purchase supplies for public land improvement. President George W. Bush and the Governors of 30 states formally recognized National Public Lands Day in 2001.  Last year nearly 80,000 volunteers worked in 550 locations and in every state. Nine federal agencies also participate in this annual day of caring for shared lands.

   The Carlisle Barracks project was completed in advance of the upcoming "Civil War Day" event on Oct. 8 at the Army Heritage Trail.  Activities and living history demonstrations will take place along the trail for the enjoyment of the public. 

    National Public Lands Day maintains the legacy of the Civilian Conservation Corps, an army of 3 million Americans who in the 1930's countered the devastation of the Dust Bowl and the American chestnut blight by planting more than 3 billion trees, building 800 state parks, and fighting forest fires.

 

 

Tom Zimmerman, Public Affairs Office

Carlisle Barracks establishes Sexual Assault Response board

 

    Sept. 28, 2005 -- Sexual assault isn't a subject most people like to discuss, but the facts are that it happens every day, all over the country and in every walk of life. The Army unfortunately is not immune to it, but has taken steps to help prevent and provide support to those who have been victims.

     At Carlisle Barracks, this means the establishment of a Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) team.

    "While sexual assault is not a known problem at Carlisle Barracks, we need to make sure that we are doing all we can to prevent it from happening to anyone, and to support them in any way possible if they have been a victim," said Anne Hurst, Family Advocacy Program Manager and SAPR team member. "Our job here is to take care of our Soldiers, employees and family members."

    In May 2004, an Army Task Force made 14 major findings to improve the service's sexual assault prevention and response program. These were developed into an action plan of 239 recommendations. Since August 2004, when the Sexual Assault Action Plan was approved, the Army staff has been systematically putting in place actions related to policy, training/education, incident response, investigations, victim services, and program improvement.
    As part of this initiative, the SAPR team conducts annual training on sexual assault prevention and education, but also serves as a support system for victims. Members of the team include the Chapel, Dunham Clinic and Army Community Services. Carlisle Barracks has established Memorandums of Understanding with Carlisle Hospital to support victims as well.

    "We make sure to do whatever we can to help in the event of an incident," said Hurst. "We help them physically, emotionally and accompany them to the hospital. We provide both an immediate response and long-term support."

    In addition to the establishment of the SAPRs, DoD has also issued a new restricted reporting policy for reporting sexual assaults.  Restricted reporting allows a sexual assault victim, on a confidential basis, to disclose the details of his/her assault to specifically identified individuals and receive medical treatment and counseling, without triggering the official investigative process. To use this type of reporting a victim would involve the posts SAPR board.

   "Through our research, we have learned that providing confidentiality to victims will actually increase the probability that cases will be reported, cases that are currently unknown to us," said David S.C. Chu, Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness.  "While we want to sustain good order and discipline by holding those who assault their fellow service members accountable for their actions, first and foremost we want victims to come forward for help."

    According to the new policy, restricted reporting is "intended to give a victim additional time and increased control over the release and management of his/her personal information, and to empower him/her to seek relevant information and support to make more informed decisions about participating in a criminal investigation."   Even if the victim chooses not to pursue an official investigation, this additional reporting avenue gives commanders a clearer picture of the sexual violence within their command, and enhances a commander's ability to provide a safe environment that contributes to the well-being and mission-readiness of all of its members." The policy memorandum can be found at http://www.defenselink.mil/news/Mar2005/d20050318dsd.pdf

    The bottom line is that the Army and DoD are committed to sexual assault prevention.

    "The Army has a commitment to eradicating sexual assault through clear policy, awareness training, care and support for sexual assault victims and punishment for offenders," said Lt. Col. Mary Dooley-Bernard, deputy director of Family Programs and Family Advocacy Program manager for the U.S. Army Community and Family Support Center.
    For more information contact Anne Hurst at 245-3775.

 

 

 

Post offers classes to help you stay in shape

    With the holiday season fast approaching, why not start now to get in shape instead of waiting until the extra stress and pounds accumulate?

 

Carlisle Barracks offers the following classes --

 

Yoga Class - Monday, 5-6 p.m. - Root Hall Gym

Aerobics Class - Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, 9-11 a.m. - Thorpe Hall Gym

Aerobics Class - Wednesday, 6-7 p.m. - Thorpe Hall Gym

For more information call 245-4343 or 4029

 

Aerobic Karate - Tae Bo Class - Tuesday and Thursday, 6-7 p.m. - Thorpe Hall Gym

Tae kwon do Class - Tuesday and Thursday, 4:30-5:30 p.m. - Thorpe Hall Gym

Family Tae kwon do Class - Monday and Wednesday, 4:30-5:30 p.m. - Thorpe Hall Gym

    For more information call 245-4921

 

 

New thrift shop hours

    The thrift shop shopping days are Tue and Wed, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. and they will accept consignments on either day between 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. In addition, the shop is open the first and third Tuesday evenings each month from 7 p.m. - 9 p.m.   Contact the Thrift Shop staff at 243-1434 for more information.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fire Prevention Week, Oct. 9-15

    Carlisle Barracks will join with the rest of the nation in observing National Fire Prevention Week Oct. 9-15.  This year's theme is "Use Candles with Care:  When you go out, blow out!"  Team up with people with whom you live, work, play, and worship so that all of you will be better prepared to prevent, and if necessary, survive a fire.

    Some recent statistics:

  • There were more than 3,900 civilian fire deaths last year. 

  • Civilian fire injuries rose to 17,785, with and 103 deaths

  • Fire Departments across the United States responded to 1,550,500 fires. 

  • Every 20 seconds a fire department responded to a fire somewhere in the U.S.

Some things you should can do:

  • Two ways to get out of a building. 

  • Take the time during Fire Prevention Week to test your smoke detectors. 

  • Follow the manufacturer's instructions when using alternative heating appliances.  

  • Never use a stove as an alternate heat source

  • Always be attentive when cooking.

 

 

 

Maj. Gen. David Huntoon, U.S. Army War College Commandant

Post mourns three Barracks employees

    September 23, 2005 -- It is with heavy hearts that Carlisle Barracks marks the recent deaths of three co-workers; each man passing unexpectedly, each in the prime of his life.    

    Joseph Schaeffer (55) passed away in mid-August.  He was a long term employee and contractor at Carlisle Barracks, having served most recently with Logistics and Maintenance in Bliss Hall before retiring five years ago and joining JB Services, a janitorial contractor.  Joseph was a resident of Carlisle and he leaves behind two grown children and several grandchildren.  He was known to many as a skilled handy man and to others as a talented artist.  To Carlisle Barracks he was a valued employee whose contributions enhanced our mission and improved our quality of life. 

    Randolph Scott (47) passed away on September 10th at his home in Mont Alto, PA.  A long term government employee, Randolph Scott came from Letterkenny to Carlisle Barracks in 1993 to provide security support to the newly completed Collins Hall.  Over the next 12 years he became an integral member of the War College and Barracks information, technical, and security education organization. All who met him remember his friendly smile and welcoming greeting.  Randolph will always be remembered for his professionalism and his friendly and engaging personality; he touched many lives. He is survived by his wife, Frieda, a daughter Octavia (15), his parents, eight siblings and a very large extended family. 

     Officer Nelson Mohammad (50) passed away unexpectedly on Tuesday, September 20th in Harrisburg.  He served as a DA Police Officer at Carlisle Barracks since November 2004, and was one of the first officers to complete the training and conversion of the Barracks police force from military to civilian officers. Officer Mohammad held the rank of Sergeant First Class and worked as a Desk Sergeant and Patrol Supervisor. He was a member of the PA State Police and retired in 2001 at the rank of Sergeant after 20 years of service. Officer Mohammed was a veteran of the U.S. Navy, and is credited with sea service aboard the USS Guam (LPH-9).  He is survived by his wife Jennifer, a daughter, Christina (17), and a son, Nelson Bryant III (26).

    On behalf of the entire Carlisle Barracks community, I would like to express condolences to the Schaeffer, Scott, and Mohammad families . We share with you a real sense of loss.   We truly hope that the respect and affection we had for Joseph, for Randolph, and for Nelson will, in some measure, ease your sorrow , and that our recognition of their contributions to the United States Army War College and Carlisle Barracks will be a continued source of pride. 

 

 

Tom Zimmerman, Public Affairs Office

Thailand officer inducted into IF Hall of Fame

Sept. 15, 2005 -- A highly distinguished member of the U.S. Army War College Class of 1985 was recognized Sept. 15 in Bliss Hall.

    Gen. Oud Buangbon, Thailand's outgoing Permanent Secretary of Defense, became the 24th member of the U.S. Army War College's International Fellows Hall of Fame and the first member of his graduating class to receive the honor. The USAWC Class of 1985 also included retired Army General Tommy Franks and General John Keane.

    "General Oud has been a significant influence in Thailand's commitment to the war on terrorism and international peacekeeping operations," said Maj. Gen. David Huntoon, USAWC commandant during the ceremony. "General Oud has demonstrated remarkable strategic competence and courage in leading his nations armed forces, and in doing so has brought great honor to his alma mater, the U. S Army War College."

    Huntoon went on to point out how instrumental Oud's leadership was to the response following the Tsunami disaster of 2004.

    "The Royal Thai government, with the leadership of General Oud mounted an extraordinary humanitarian assistance and relief effort and also hosted the multi-national disaster relief hub at the Royal Thai Navy Air Base in Utaphao, " said Huntoon.   

 

    

   Oud stated in his remarks during the ceremony that the relationship between nations like the United States and Thailand are essential in today's environment.

    "This honor does not only reflect a personal accomplishment, but also comradeship and cooperation between our two nations," said Oud. "I strongly believe that the close relationship between our two countries will continue to grow and we will support each other in time of need. This cooperation is essential to hold successful campaigns against terrorism, poverty, social disorders and other non-traditional security threats."  

    Oud then reflected on his time at the USAWC and how it helped him later in his career.

     "I am deeply honored to receive this honor and to return to the place where I had learned and advanced my skill in strategy, leadership and management," he said. "It has been 20 years but does not seem that long to me and that is because I have so many fond memories here at Carlisle Barracks."

    Oud's 43-year military career will end next month, but this induction was clearly a high point in his career.

    "My induction to the Hall of Fame is truly the honor of a lifetime," he said. "This is a prestigious recognition from a prestigious institution."

    Oud was joined at the ceremony by his wife, Thai Maj. Gen. Woranuch Buangbon, and one of their two sons, Thai First Lt. Sirapatt Buangbon, currently enrolled in the advanced armor course at Fort Knox, Ky.
   

 

Tom Zimmerman, Public Affairs Office

CFC 2005 officially underway

September 22, 2005 -- You can make a difference this year in someone's life by donating to the Combined Federal Campaign, the largest workplace charity drive in the country.
     The CFC, which will run at Carlisle Barracks from Sept. 22 through Nov. 1, enables community members to contribute to more than 2,000 local, national and international health, welfare and emergency relief organizations. The program works on a bi-weekly payroll deduction, and participants can donate any amount over $1.00 per pay period.  Participants have the option to select which agencies they wish to contribute to. Any federal employee may contribute to the program by check, cash or payroll deduction.

    "CFC is the only authorized solicitation of employees in the federal workplace on behalf of charitable organizations," said Cora Johnson, Carlisle Barracks CFC Campaign Manager. "It continues to be the largest and most successful workplace fundraising model in the world. This year, many local, national and international voluntary agencies will benefit from your thoughtfulness and generosity."

    Carlisle Barracks and the United Way of Greater Carlisle are a part of the Greater Harrisburg Area Combined Federal Campaign.  In 2004, Carlisle Barracks raised $118,987.60, beating it's goal by more than $8,000. This year the goal is $110,000.
    These charities range from military, veteran and patriotic organizations to human and civil rights organizations to environmental organizations to religious and cultural organizations.
    To receive CFC funds, organizations must meet strict standards - they must have tax-exempt non-profit status; they must provide service, benefits or assistance to activities that promote human well-being; they must spend no more than 25 percent of their revenue on fundraising; and they must not disclose the names of CFC contributors, among other rules.
    Soldiers and Department of the Army civilians can donate to the CFC by contacting their unit representative or calling 245-4720 or 245-4357.
 

Department Key persons:

Dental Clinic: Staff Sgt. Lamb/ Sgt. Fashola

Post Exchange:  Linda Wells

International Fellows Office: Kay Preslar

USAG: Staff Sgt. Hampton/ Spc. Daley

Department of Academic Affairs: Laura Popielski

Student Operations/SSC Fellows:  Sgt. Gaines/ Spc. Dorville

DRM: Daniel Lorenz

CIO: Christine Celona

CSL: Master Sgt. Reeder

Dunham Health Clinic: Sgt. Douglas/ Sgt. Burney

Vet Command: Sgt. First Class Gilmore/ Sgt. Daniel Wilson

 

Note:  The next scheduled training for key persons will be Sept. 28 at 10:30 a.m.in building 632.


For $10 per pay period, you've got the power to:
· Help environmental advocates in Nepal draft that country's first standards for water and air quality
· Improve Medicare coverage for 50 low-income elderly people
· Provide 18 hours of training in leadership, conflict resolution, cross-cultural sensitivity, and community organizing for a teenager
· Provide school supplies, food, and medical care for AIDS orphans in Africa
· Provide two hearing aids for low income, hearing-impaired people this year
· Support a mobile clinic in remote rural area for an entire day
· Provide a student with lunch at school each day
· Bring a waiting American child together with a loving, lifetime adoptive family

For $15 per pay period, you've got the power to:
· Save the life of an abused child
· Provide a homebound AIDS patient with groceries for a full year
· Provide a hungry preschooler who lives in the slums of Bombay an education and a nutritious meal
· Open a student's eyes to the conditions of the world's poor through a short-term mission trip
· Provide a solar energy system for an entire village
· Help efforts to configure compounds so that the children can take medicines orally as opposed to injection
· Provide a scholarship for an underprivileged person to travel to Central America or Haiti to document and witness human rights abuses, then return to the US to work for change
· Make and sustain one school-based mentoring match for an at risk youth

Data from the Combined Federal Campaign of the National Capital Area (www.cfcnca.org)

    (Editors note: Some information for this story came from an ARNEWS story)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sgt. David Hopkins, Public Affairs Office

Carlisle Barracks takes time to thank, support military retirees

 

September 19, 2005-More than 600 military retirees converged on Carlisle Barracks on Sept. 17, for the annual Retiree Appreciation Day and to take advantage of post services.

    Booths were setup in Root Hall and in the Bliss Hall foyer with information and the Post Exchange and commissary had special deals to show the retirees that their sacrifices have not been forgotten. Dunham Clinic and the ID card section also had special hours for the day.

     "It is an ideal forum to show retirees that they are a valued and important part of the overall Army family," Darrell Clay, Directorate of Community Activities director.

    Many of the retirees present for the event were regulars who return every year.   

    "This gives me a chance to see if there are any changes in benefits," said Army Lt. Col. (retired) Frederick Williams. "Plus, I can take care of things at the clinic and do some shopping at the PX when I'm here."

    For other retirees it was their first time taking advantage of post resources and they just wanted to see what was here for them.

    "This is the first time I've come down for this," said Sgt. 1st Class (retired) Jim Hoffman, who spent four years in the Air Force and 21 years in the Army. "I really wanted to see what they had and get some information on the benefits for retirees."

    Maj. Gen. David Huntoon, USAWC commandant, spoke during the opening event and thanked the retirees for their service to their country.

    "It is noble to serve," said Huntoon. "Whether you are in law enforcement, the medical field or in the military; it is noble to serve. I thank you for your service."

 

 

 

 

 

Tom Zimmerman, Public Affairs Office

Post water conservations measures  

    Due to a lack of recent rains, post residents are asked to help conserve water by taking the following conservations measures.

§         Watering of residential lawns at all quarters is prohibited.

§         Outdoor plants may be watered with a hand-held hose equipped with an automatic shut-off nozzle.  Watering of this type may only occur during the hours of 5 pm to 9 am.

§         The use of water for washing paved surfaces such as streets, roads, sidewalks, driveways, garages, decks and patios is prohibited.

§         Vehicles may be washed twice per month with buckets or a controlled hose.  The pre-rinse and rinse of the vehicle should not exceed two minutes of flow.  You are strongly urged to use commercial car washes located around Carlisle Barracks.  These car washes have approved control devices that conserve water, and many have the capability to recycle water.

     For more information contact DPW at 245-3746.

 

 

 

 

Carol Kerr, Public Affairs Office

AHEC to create a Civil War Day on Army Heritage Trail, Oct. 8

Heckaman Collection opens to the public

    Civil War Day is an Army Heritage & Education Center event that fits the bill - whatever your interest.  Saturday, Oct. 8 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., something of interest awaits history lovers and those 'in like' with military history.  Much of the living history action is set on the beautiful tree-line one-mile Army Heritage Trail, where volunteers have created wildflower, butterfly and bluebird sanctuaries. More awaits inside the still-new Ridgway Hall. 

Opportunities for a new way of learning about our military history heritage--

--Civil War Day on the Army Heritage Trail features living history demonstrations by 'Union Soldiers' preparing for a winter encampment in 1861. In Union uniform, and "in character," the Soldiers will drill recruits, exercise cavalry drills, test artillery, fire rifles, build winter log cabins,  prepare a corduroy road to last the winter, and recreate the tone and detail of 19th century wartime service.

--Visitors will find the cook house interesting - but prefer to eat at the LVCC food stand.

--Midday, the Heckaman Collection public introduction:  a remarkably accurate and complete collection of everything Soldiers wore, carried, fired - from the closing days of the Civil War to 1940.  Mrs. Heckaman will speak about her late husband's crusade to create the renowned collection of military history.

--Get the rest of the story of the Civil War Soldiers' life from historian/ storytellers who can detail the color and the drudgery of the life and times of the Union Army Soldier. 

--"The Army Wore Blue" lines the walls of Ridgway Hall's second floor bridge. The Civil War and Frontier Wars photography features the work of famous and anonymous photographers who captured the faces, actions and spirits of the years when Soldiers wore blue.  The walk down long-ago Soldiers' memory lane leads to the gallery collection:  examples and promise of more exhibits to be seen in the future AHEC Visitors Center and Museum.

 

Book sale to offer unique finds at the AHEC Civil War Day

    A public book sale will be conducted in conjunction with Civil War Day, October 8 at Ridgway Hall. Most of the books are related to military history; others include first-edition romance and mystery novels, as well as biographies.  All proceeds of the book sale will support the Military History Institute of AHEC.

    The sponsoring organization, Friends of the Omar N. Bradley Foundation, is a private support organization dedicated to supporting the MHI.  No item offered for sale is or ever has been U.S. government property.

 

Sgt. David Hopkins, Public Affairs Office

Post Soldier walking to raise money for cancer research

    September 16, 2005-A Carlisle Barracks Soldier will trek 39 miles through New York City to raise money for cancer research.

    Sgt. Karla Illingsworth, Executive Services Operations Noncommissioned Officer, will walk in the annual Avon Walk for Breast Cancer in New York City on Oct. 1 and 2.

    "I will be walking a marathon and a half over two days," said Illingsworth.

    The walk, which will start early in the morning of Oct. 1, will take place throughout Manhattan; 26 miles the first day and 13 the second day. The participants will be spending the night in a tent village known as 'Wellness Village.'

    Since the beginning of the walk in 1992, Avon has raised over $350 million dollars in the 50 countries that hold the annual walk, which is used to support research to find a cure for breast cancer.

    "I'm doing this because I know a lot of people who have had cancer and I have seen what they had to go through," said Illingsworth. "It's a horrible illness and I admire the strength of the people who have to fight through the healing process."

    Illingsworth must raise $1,850 by Oct. 1 to participate in the walk and she is about žth of the way to that goal.

    "I'm hoping I can raise the rest of the money before then," said Illingsworth. "It's a great cause and it will help a lot of people."

    To support the cancer walk you can go to the Avon Walk for Breast Cancer web site at http://www.avonwalk.org/ or call Sgt. Illingsworth at 245-4689.  

 

 

Pennsylvania State Department of Environmental Protection release   

Two Human Cases Bring West Nile Total for Year to 15

HARRISBURG--(September 22) State officials today reported two additional human cases of West Nile Virus, bringing Pennsylvania's total for the year to 17.  No human cases have been reported in Cumberland County.

    Certain species of mosquitoes carry West Nile virus, which, when transmitted to people, can cause West Nile encephalitis, an infection that can result in an inflammation of the brain. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, all residents of areas where virus activity has been identified are at risk of getting West Nile encephalitis; people over 50 have the highest risk of severe disease.

    There are things every individual can do around the home to help eliminate mosquito-breeding areas. Some of these tips include:

· Dispose of tin cans, plastic containers, ceramic pots or similar water-holding containers that have collected on your property.

· Pay attention to discarded tires. Stagnant water in tires are where most mosquitoes breed.

· Drill holes in the bottom of recycling containers left outdoors.

· Have clogged roof gutters cleaned every year, particularly if the leaves from surrounding trees have a tendency to plug up the drains. Roof gutters can produce millions of mosquitoes each season.

· Turn over plastic wading pools when not in use. Stagnant water in a wading pool becomes a place for mosquitoes to breed.

· Turn over wheelbarrows and don't let water stagnate in birdbaths. Both provide breeding habitats for domestic mosquitoes.

· Aerate ornamental pools or stock them with fish. Water gardens can become major mosquito producers if they are allowed to stagnate. Clean and chlorinate swimming pools not in use. A swimming pool left untended by a family on vacation for a month can produce enough mosquitoes to result in neighborhood-wide complaints. Mosquitoes may even breed in the water that collects on pool covers.

· Use landscaping to eliminate standing water that collects on your property. Mosquitoes may breed in any puddle that lasts for more than four days.

· For standing water that can't be eliminated, homeowners can buy Bti products at lawn and garden, outdoor supply, home improvement, and other stores. This naturally occurring bacteria kills mosquito larvae but is safe for people, pets, aquatic life and plants.

In addition, here are some simple precautions to prevent mosquito bites, particularly for those individuals who are most at risk:

· Make sure screens fit tightly over doors and windows to keep mosquitoes out of homes.

· Consider wearing long-sleeved shirts, long pants and socks when outdoors, particularly when mosquitoes are most active at dawn and dusk, or in areas known for having large numbers of mosquitoes.

· When possible, reduce outdoor exposure at dawn and dusk during peak mosquito periods, usually April through October.

· Use insect repellents according to the manufacturer's instructions. An effective repellent will contain DEET. Consult with a pediatrician or family physician if you have questions about the use of repellent on children, as repellent is not recommended for children under the age of two months.

    For more information about West Nile virus and the state's surveillance and control program, go to www.westnile.state.pa.us.

 

 

 

 

Sgt. David Hopkins, Public Affairs Office

Secretary of the Army Harvey visits post, lays out Army's plan for future

September 14, 2005-The Secretary of The Army made his first visit to Carlisle Barracks to speak to U.S. Army War College students, and spend time learning more about what he called "one of the great assets to the Army."

    Francis Harvey, the 19th Secretary of the Army, visited the post Sept. 13 to observe some of the programs and resources offered at the Army's Senior Service school.

    In a briefing in the Bliss Hall Auditorium, Harvey spoke to the students about his priorities for the Army.  He spoke of Soldiers and their families, land forces required to win the Global War on Terrorism, the transformation of the Army, leadership, major acquisition programs, financial resources to execute the Army plan, and partnership and relationships.

    Harvey also visited with organizations on post that support the War College, including Ridgway Hall, home of the Military History Institute, the Army Physical Fitness and Research Institute, and Collins Hall.

    Before heading back to D.C. on Sept. 14, Harvey spoke to members of the local media and answered their questions about the USAWC and the state of the Army.

    "These are our future leaders," said Harvey about the students of the USAWC in answering a question about his visit to Carlisle Barracks. "We want to share what our vision is.what our strategy is.what transformations are taking place. This is one of the great think tanks of the Army,' said Harvey. "It is a great asset."

 

 

 

Sgt. David Hopkins, Public Affairs Office

Post reflects on American tragedy

 September 12, 2005-Carlisle Barracks took time to reflect on the events of Sept. 11, 2001 during a remembrance ceremony on Sept. 12, where U.S. Army War College students, staff and faculty, and post residents gathered in front of Root Hall.

    "Who among you cannot recall exactly where you were on the 11th of Sept. 2001?" asked Maj. Gen. David Huntoon, U.S. Army War College commandant. "Who has not felt again the lump in the throat as the images of that day are replayed and stories retold?"

    While many lives were lost that day, Huntoon reminded those in attendance the fate of those who use terror as a tool.

   "It's hard for free people to comprehend the mix of extremism and hatred that leads terrorists to murder innocent men, women and children," said Huntoon. "But perhaps we can tell them this: throughout human history there have been those who seek power through fear and mass murder but eventually all of them.every one.has fallen."

    Huntoon's words, which centered on a remembering the tragedy of the past and focusing on the future, praised everyone in attendance for answering the call to duty and asked them to recommit themselves to the defense of our country.

    "You are answering the call to duty that has marked the selfless service of Americans since the Revolutionary War, a call that the entire nation must answer today more than ever," said Huntoon. "On this anniversary of 9-11, all of us who live on this installation and work in this great community should recommit ourselves to the defense of our country and its ideals of liberty and justice for all."

 

 

Tom Zimmerman, Public Affairs Office

Post loudspeaker system to improve public awareness and safety

September 14, 2005 - Work is nearly complete on a new loudspeaker system aimed at giving the post another option in emergency management.

    The new three-part loudspeaker array system will allow the installation to send out important information through three-1600 watt loudspeaker arrays. The speakers will be installed on the two post water towers and one on a pole near Collins Hall and the Forbes Ave. housing area.

    "These systems will allow us to send short messages very quickly to everyone working and living on Carlisle Barracks," said Barry Farquhar, post force protection officer. The system currently in place is only about 200 watts. "You will definitely notice a difference when this system is in use."

    The new, more powerful system will definitely get your attention.

    "The way the system is designed it's high enough off of the ground that you could be standing underneath it when it's operating and not suffer any hearing problems," said Farquhar. "It's very powerful but very safe too."

    The new loudspeaker system will be used to convey safety or community protection information, according to Farquhar. The system automatically tests itself silently every few seconds. The $115,000 system is computer maintained and will have two locations where the messages can be developed and delivered.

    This is the second in a three-phase public awareness program.

    "Phase one was the implementation of the Communicator, the automated phone system," said Farquhar. "The third and final phase is to retro-fit each building on post with a strobe and voice system. This system will allow the people working in each building to know exactly when to evacuate and what the problem is instead of the generic alarm that we currently have."

    The third phase is currently undergoing a cost analysis. 

    Each of these programs are designed with the goal of enhancing public safety on the installation.

    "We working hard to make sure that in the event of an emergency we are able to get the information to people as quickly and efficiently as possible," said Farquhar. The loudspeaker system is expected to be operational in November.

 

Carlisle Barracks security receives high praise, continues work to keep post safe

    Carlisle Barracks takes security very seriously and as a result has earned high marks and praise from the government agency whose job it is to analyze the safety and security of military installations.

    The Joint Staff Integrated Vulnerability Assessments team came to post recently to take a look at the posts force protection measures from a terrorists perspective.

    "We invited them in so we could gauge how we are doing at improving our physical security and force protection measures," said Barry Farquhar, post force protection officer. "They came back with a very favorable assessment and only a few things that we needed to work on."

    Department of Defense guidelines require that each installation have a higher headquarters anti-terrorism and force protection assessment at least every three years. The last post assessment was in 2002 and the post continues to receive high marks.

    "It really helps to bring in a fresh set of eyes to help evaluate our programs," said Farquhar.

    Two organizations on post were singled out for praise, the Installation Operations Center and the DOIM. 

    "The team was impressed at the relationship with local and state authorities with respect to sharing information," according to Farquhar. "Also, the DOIM was recognized for the excellent job they do in keeping our computer networks secure, specifically the Information Assurance department."

    "Both of those groups got high marks from the JSIVA team for their hard work," said Farquhar.

    Overall, the team was very pleased with the job done at Carlisle Barracks, but Farquhar didn't take too long to celebrate.

    "We've got to keep working at and improving what we're doing," he said. "Our enemies are constantly looking for new ways to attack us so we need to stay hard at work to keep our people and installations safe."

 

 

 

Sgt. David Hopkins, Public Affairs Office

Safe Driving is no accident

September 14, 2005-It was Drivers Education all over again for participants in the safety driving competition on post Sept. 14. 

   The event was coordinated by the South-Central Penn. Department of Highway Safety.

    The first-ever post driving competition, had 13 competitors and consisted of three parts, an obstacle course, a written test and a test on road signage. Participants drove Saturn Ions, which were on loan from Saturn of Carlisle.

    "The serpentine obstacle was the most difficult part of the course," said Marianne Manning, one of the participants.

    Most of the participants found the competition challenging, but rewarding.

    "I came out to see what it was all about and I learned a lot," said Manning. "I really need to be more observant on the road."

    "It was really hard," said Pfc. Jhassel De Los Santos, human resource specialist at Dunham Health Clinic, who has only been driving for a year. "I did this because I wanted to be able to drive safer on the streets."

    The winners of the competition were (1st place), Spc. Tomica Torrez, (2nd place) Sgt. Walter Kelly, and (3rd place), Sgt. 1st Class Joseph Kallhoff, all from the veterinary command. Each winner received gift certificates to the bowling alley, golf course, Barracks Crossing and the LVCC. The prizes were donated by MWR.

 

 

Sgt. David Hopkins, Public Affairs Office

IFs learn about America and life in the United States

September 22, 2005-The International Fellows of the U.S. Army War College have a daunting task every year when they arrive in the United States, many of them for the first time. They are faced with a new lifestyle, new state and national laws and learning a new culture.

    "The Field Studies Program is designed to assist the international military students in acquiring a balanced understanding of U.S. society, institutions and goals," said Kevin Bremer, deputy director of the USAWC IF program. The program consists of a variety of trips, events and orientations to help the IFs adjust and understand their new environment.

    The IF Reception is the first event the IFs and their families attend after arriving at the USAWC. This first event gives the students and their families the chance to meet the other IFs and get to know them in a relaxed environment.  

    "It's to establish a point of contact or a relationship between the International Fellows and the staff of the IF office," said Emilio Montanez, international military student specialist. 

    The IFs participate in everything from trips to the Amish country to a trip to the county courthouse to learn about U.S. government. A highlight of their orientation was a trip to a Harrisburg Senators game on City Island.

    "The IFs were given a quick lesson on how baseball is played before going to the game. Many were playing the game for the first time," said Montanez.

    The IFs capped off their trips with a visit to the nations capital to see the sights and learn about the history of the United States.

    While in D.C. the IF students visited the Tomb of the Unknowns and were part of a wreath laying ceremony. 

    "The 40 students, representing 40 different countries around the world, paid respect and honored the place that represents so much for this country," said Montanez.

    The USAWC hopes that through the trips and education about life in the U.S. the IFs will adjust to life quickly so they can focus on their studies.

    "Hopefully, if we have been successful, by the halfway point of their tour, the IFs will be dealing with the issues they encounter completely and confidently," said Bremer. "However, we are always available to assist when asked or required."

 

 

Gen. Richard B. Myers, USAF

Chairman's Birthday Message to the U.S. Air Force

 On the 18th of September, 1947, our Nation created the United States Air Force. Over the last 57 years, the Air Force has changed dramatically, employing new technology and responding to a changing world. Today, we plan and fight as a Joint and Total Force, and the US Air Force is performing all of its missions superbly, from patrolling the skies of America, airlifting supplies to Afghanistan and fighting in Iraq.

    The War on Terrorism is a war we must win, to preserve our freedoms and protect our way of life. The U.S. Air Force has a crucial role in this war, accomplishing vital expeditionary and long range combat missions, along with dozens of other missions critical to our national security: flying satellites, controlling airfields, maintaining our ballistic missile fleet, training technicians and leaders, and many more. Preserving our liberties takes determination, hard work and talent. The task is huge, but I stand completely confident that America's Airmen are up to the challenge.

    Today's Air Force inherits a tremendous legacy: a century of flight and a history of boundless accomplishments. That legacy is in very good hands. On behalf of the Joint Chiefs, to all the men and women in the United States Air Force who serve, and have served, I thank you. Happy Birthday, U.S. Air Force!

 

 

Work continues on Civil war cabins along the  Heritage Trail

Circle the date - Saturday, October 8 - for a special family-friendly event at the Heritage Trail, adjacent to MHI's Ridgway Hall. Scores of "living historians" will immerse visitors in the hardships, worries and camaraderie of Civil War Soldiers preparing for winter encampment. From building winter lodges, to building a "corduroy road," testing artillery and rifles and yet more marching! . the "Soldiers" and units in period clothing (and attitude) will recreate the Civil War Soldier's experience. Inside Ridgway Hall, specialists will tell the accompanying story of the Civil War Soldier.

What you'll see on the Heritage Trail -

  • Village Restorations craftsmen constructing a set of Civil War barracks using historic plans and workmanship to recreate the claustrophobia of a winter lodge

  • A French and Indian way-station under construction

  • Traditions Field will be readied to stage re-creations of Civil War camp life

  • The one-mile trail moves the visitor through time and place to a key point of military history, with weapons and equipment and explanatory markers . and more to come over the course of the next year

 

 

Lt. Col. Merideth Bucher, Public Affairs Office

Volunteers still needed for restoration project along Army Heritage Trail 

Bluebird and butterfly sanctuary included in master plan

September 15, 2005 -- The Army Heritage Trail will bloom with activity as area volunteers join the largest single-day restoration effort for America's public lands. This local effort is part of the 12th annual National Public Lands Day (NPLD) and will take place on Saturday, September 24, from 8 a.m. through 1 p.m., near the Army Heritage and Education Center campus.

    Volunteers from area scouting programs, Carlisle Barracks residents and employees and members of the Central PA Association of Corporate Counsel will roll up their sleeves and devote the morning to planting, digging and mulching along the trail.  

    "We are expecting more than 50 volunteers to come help us improve and beautify the trail," said Keith Bailey, post biological technician and project manager.  

    "Additional volunteers are always needed, even if it is just for an hour or two."  We'll take whatever time people are willing to give," added Bailey. 

    The restoration plan includes a two-acre wildflower garden on the southern portion of the trail.  Bluebird and butterfly habitats will be placed around the garden to create a sanctuary for the wildlife.  Volunteers will also mulch and refine an existing trail leading to the Civil War period cabins. 

    This public works project will be completed in advance of the upcoming "Civil War Day" event on Oct. 8 at the Army Heritage Trail.  Activities and living history demonstrations will take place all along the trail for the enjoyment of the public. 

    National Public Lands Day maintains the legacy of the Civilian Conservation Corps, an army of 3 million Americans who in the 1930's countered the devastation of the Dust Bowl and the American chestnut blight by planting more than 3 billion trees, building 800 state parks, and fighting forest fires.

    This nationwide event gives Americans an opportunity to give back to the very lands they use to hike, bike, and climb, swim, explore, picnic or just plain relax.

    For more information about volunteering and what to bring, contact Bailey at 717-245-3612.  

 

 

 

 

Jeffrey A. Thompson, Physical Security Officer

Physical security of Army computers

    Employees are reminded to ensure that buildings, rooms, and offices are secured where computers are located. At a minimum, such security will consist of closing and locking appropriate doors and windows. Lock small office machines such as portable computers in a locked cabinet or secure them to desktops with an approved security cable.

 

 

Advance tickets for Reynolds Theater to be available in Root Hall, Subway

    Starting Monday, September 19, patrons will be able to purchase tickets in advance for upcoming movies at the Reynolds theater. Tickets for upcoming movies will be available at the Root Hall Bookstore, as well as at Subway. Current ticket prices are $3.50 for adults and $1.75 for children under 12.

 

 

Lt. Col. Lynn Snyder, Director, Resource Management

Policy change affects TDY transportation-related expenses

    September 13, 2005 -- Headquarters, Department of the Army has announced a change in policy for transportation-related expenses while on TDY travel.  Effective Oct. 1, 2005, all military and non-bargaining unit civilian employees are required to use an Individually Billed Account to pay for official travel by air, train or sea.  Currently at Carlisle Barracks, we use the Centrally Billed Account for airline and train travel costs.

    Travelers will have the cost of the airline or train tickets charged to their government travel card and will file for reimbursement when they settle their travel claim.  The cost will no longer be billed to a central account for the installation.  

    The procedure for coordinating air flights or train travel does not change, travelers still contact Carlson-Wagonlit.  The difference is that travelers will provide their government travel credit card account number for Carlson-Wagonlit to bill the cost of the ticket.  The traveler will claim the cost of the ticket and provide a receipt with their travel settlement and include the amount in the split disbursement. DFAS will process the voucher, forwarding the appropriate amount directly to the government travel card company and the balance to the individual traveler.

    Infrequent travelers or travelers who are not authorized a government travel card will continue to use the Centrally Billed Account. DoD financial management regulations require anyone traveling more than two times per year to have a government travel card.

    Donna Horton, Army Travel Card Account coordinator, can be reached at 245-4077 to assist and answer questions concerning the travel card.  Other concerns about this policy change or individual issues can be addressed to Nancy Mallein, 245-4393.

 

 

Electronic Statements available soon to civilians

    September 13, 2005 -- The Department of the Army will soon offer a new way to view civilian Leave and Earnings Statements (LESs) through the Defense Finance and Accounting Service's (DFAS) SmartDocs.  Beginning Oct. 1 2005, employees will receive an email notification that their SmartLES is available, including a hyperlink to the site. 

    The SmartLES is an enhanced LES product that contains two types of embedded links.  One provides an explanatory text about information in specific blocks on the LES; the other allows comparison between current data and the previous pay period data.  The block titles are highlighted in blue.  Click on them, and text boxes will appear, explaining the type of data in that block.  The information in green indicates data that has changed from the prior LES.  Click on the green text to compare current data with data from the prior pay period.  The SmartLES even provides detail on leave used during the pay period and dynamic links to other applications and web sites, such as OPM. 

    The email you receive will appear as "SmartDocs@dfas.mil" in the "From" box.  Clicking on the link within the email establishes a secure socket layer (SSL) connection with an encrypted session, just like logging onto the myPay site.  If preferred, copy and paste the link (https://mypay.dfas.mil) into your web browser or key it in to your web browser directly.  You may even wish to add it as a favorite link for 24/7 access. 

    SmartDocs is a supplemental delivery mechanism and does not replace information currently contained in myPay.  There are no additional user-IDs or passwords; however, to receive the emails and access SmartLES, you must have an email address within the myPay system and a customized myPay PIN.  If you don't have a PIN, go to the myPay web page at https://mypay.dfas.mil request a PIN.  By logging-in to myPay, you can see if your email address is in the system.  If it isn't, you may enter a personal email address under the "Secure Personal Email Address" area to ensure you will receive the email. 

    If you have questions about the Army's implementation of the SmartLES, contact the Donna Horton 717-245-4077, email:  donna.horton@carlisle.army.mil

 

 

Federally Activated National Guard members In support of Hurricane Katrina relief efforts eligible for TRICARE benefits

  September 14, 2005 -- Members of the National Guard federally activated for more than 30 consecutive days in support of Hurricane Katrina relief efforts can receive military health care benefits to include their TRICARE-eligible family members.

    The Deputy Secretary of Defense approved funding for use of the National Guard under Title 32 U.S. Code to support relief efforts effective Aug. 29, 2005. However, it is possible that some National Guard members may remain on state active duty.

    National Guard members' personnel offices should update the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System (DEERS) to reflect eligibility for TRICARE benefits if their personnel are activated under or converted to Title 32 orders. In cases of conversion from state active duty to federal, the DEERS update could occur before orders are received.

    National Guard members who are not sure if they are activated under Title 32 orders should contact their unit's personnel office to clarify their status.

    After DEERS has been updated, family members will be automatically covered under TRICARE Standard and may enroll in TRICARE Prime or Prime Remote, if available in their area.

    Guard members serving on State Orders are not eligible for TRICARE health benefits, although they may be eligible for certain health care benefits through their state.

    For more information about DEERS enrollment, beneficiaries may visit the TRICARE Web site at www.tricare.osd.mil/deers or call the DEERS Support Office at 1-800-538-9552. Beneficiaries can also find the nearest ID card-issuing facility at www.dmdc.osd.mil/rsl/owa/home.

    Beneficiaries may contact the regional contractors: Humana Military Healthcare Services (South region), 1-800-444-5445; HealthNet (North region), 1-877-874-2273; or TriWest (West region), 1-888-874-9378 or visit TRICARE's Web site www.tricare.osd.mil for more information about TRICARE benefits.

 

 

 

Tom Zimmerman, Public Affairs Office

Barracks sample positive for West Nile Virus

 September 8, 2005 -- A mosquito sample (pool) has tested positive for West Nile Virus (WNV) on Carlisle Barracks.

    "The sample was collected on August 29 from a trap located in the field bordered by Pratt Avenue, Letort Lane, Ashburn Drive, and the installation fence line," said Ken Malick, chief of the Dunham Clinic's Environmental Health Section.

    This is the first positive mosquito sample ever collected on Carlisle Barracks. In 2001 a dead crow was found on post and tested positive. No human cases have ever been reported on post.

    Carlisle officials are working closely with state and local officials to control the spread now that there is confirmed viral activity on post

   The post takes a multi-faceted approach to testing to help stop the spread of WNV.  

   "We have been conducting larval mosquito surveys of areas around post all summer long, and collected samples to test when they become adults," said Ken Malick.  "We have also placed gravid traps to collect adult mosquitoes in the area."

    The adult mosquitoes are collected and sent to the U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventative Medicine North at Ft. Meade, Md. for testing.  When a sample tests positive for WNV, the installation is notified within 24 hours.

   Throughout the Spring and Summer, the post treated potential problem areas with a live bacteria that kills mosquitoes before they become airborne.

    "The bacteria is safe for pets and harmless to children and the environment," according to Keith Bailey of the Carlisle Barracks Directorate of Public Works. "It will remain in the soil and reactivate when it becomes wet again, so it will work for a few years." The area where the positive sample was collected has been treated earlier this year.

   This is the first positive sample ever at Carlisle Barracks. The state of Pennsylvania has reported 168 positive samples this year. No human cases have been reported on Carlisle Barracks or in Cumberland County.

    For more information on WNV in Pa., check http://www.westnile.state.pa.us/surv.htm

What you can do

   West Nile Virus is a disease that is spread by infected mosquitoes. The best defenses against the West Nile Virus are to utilize personal protective measures, such as repellent and the wearing of long pants and sleeves, and to take steps to eliminate mosquito breeding sites.  Residents should pay special attention to stagnant water and take steps to remedy the situation.

    There are things every one can do to help eliminate mosquito-breeding areas.

  • If you find a dead bird, leave it there - and phone the Veterinary Clinic at 245-3430.

  • Dispose of tin cans, plastic containers, ceramic pots or similar water-holding containers that have collected on your property.

  • Drill holes in the bottom of recycling containers left outdoors.

  •  Turn over plastic wading pools when not in use.

  • Aerate ornamental pools or stock them with fish. Water gardens can become major mosquito producers if they are allowed to stagnate. Clean and chlorinate swimming pools not in use. Mosquitoes may even breed in the water that collects on pool covers.

In addition, here are some simple precautions to prevent mosquito bites-

  • Make sure screens fit tightly over doors and windows to keep mosquitoes out of homes.

  • Consider wearing long-sleeved shirts, long pants and socks when outdoors, particularly when mosquitoes are most active at dawn and dusk, especially during peak mosquito periods, usually April through October.

  • Use insect repellents according to the manufacturer's instructions. An effective repellent will contain DEET.

 

 For more information on West Nile Virus and Insect Repellants visit http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/westnile/

 

 

 

 

Tom Zimmerman, Public Affairs Office

Post exchange scheduled for 'image upgrade'

September 7, 2005 -- The Carlisle Barracks Post Exchange will have a fresh, new look early next year thanks to some planned renovations.

    "The AAFES vice president visited the Carlisle Post Exchange and announced a major half million renovation project to start in early 2006," said Jack Scott, post PX manager. "Our 1976 facility is dated and due for change."

    Planned changes will include a new shopper-friendly store layout with new carpeting, a self-serve shoe department and expanded military clothing section. The PX will remain open during the renovations.

    This renovation is just the latest in a series of improving the options for post shoppers.

    "The PX has extended operating hours for Subway and Anthony's Pizza to better satisfy customers," said Scott. "Both remain open until 7 p.m."  Also planned is a larger selection of military clothing and possible renovations and upgrades to the Class VI Shoppette.

    The goal is to give shoppers at the post exchange what they want and make it the first and last stop for shoppers, said Scott.

    Scott noted the community connection - the Carlisle PX contributed $300,000 to the Carlisle Barracks community - when he encouraged shoppers to make it a regular stop.  

    "We'll beat prices offered elsewhere within $10. Just ask at the cash register," said Scott.

    Scott also asked customers to tell him what else they'd like to see at the PX.

     "Give us your recommendations," said Scott. "We check the comment box daily."

 

 

Tom Zimmerman, Public Affairs Office

2005 CFC campaign kicks off Sept. 22

 

    September 7, 2005 -- The recent devastation caused by Hurricane Katrina has once again reminded Americans of the need for charitable contributions. But why wait for disasters to occur to make donations to your favorite charity?     

    Once a year, all employees and servicemembers are invited to participate in the Combined Federal Campaign (CFC), which supports many charitable organizations in the Greater Harrisburg- Carlisle- York area.

    "CFC  was established as a uniform fund-raising method in all communities in the United States in which federal employees and military personnel are located," said Cora Johnson, post CFC campaign manager.

    The CFC, which will run at Carlisle Barracks from Sept. 22 through Nov. 1, is an annual program that enables community members to contribute to more than 2,000 local, national and international health, welfare and emergency relief organizations. The program works on a bi-weekly payroll deduction, and participants can donate any amount over $1.00 per pay period.  Participants have the option to select which agencies they wish to contribute to. Any federal employee may contribute to the program by check, cash or payroll deduction.

    "CFC is the only authorized solicitation of employees in the federal workplace on behalf of charitable organizations," said Johnson. "It continues to be the largest and most successful workplace fundraising model in the world. This year, many local, national and international voluntary agencies will benefit from your thoughtfulness and generosity."

    Carlisle Barracks and the United Way of Greater Carlisle are a part of the Greater Harrisburg Area Combined Federal Campaign.  In 2004, Carlisle Barracks raised $118,987.60, beating it's goal by more than $8,000. This year the goal is $110,000.

    The Annual Campaign Kick-Off Luncheon is planned for Sept. 22 at the Officers Club, Mechanicsburg Naval Supply Systems Command Center, 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.  The guest speaker for the event is Jeanne Beatty, founder and executive director of Channels.

    Organizational project managers are still needed, for further information contact Johnson at 245-4720 or 245-4357.

 

 

 

 

American Forces Press Service

DoD updates military support in Katrina's wake

WASHINGTON, Sept. 6, 2005 - Almost 60,000 U.S. servicemembers are aiding in rescue and recovery efforts in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida, Defense Department officials said.

    Army Corps of Engineers personnel have closed the breaches in the levees surrounding New Orleans and have begun pumping out the water that has inundated the city, officials said.

    Roughly 41,500 National Guard personnel are on duty in the area devastated by Hurricane Katrina. Almost 17,500 active duty personnel are on ships or on the ground in the region.

    Joint Task Force Katrina is being relocated to the USS Iwo Jima. The amphibious ship is docked in New Orleans, and the shift will improve command and control of the rescue and recovery efforts, DoD officials said.

    The military is also providing 355 helicopters and 93 airplanes. The aircraft have flown 1,771 sorties to date, including 799 in the past 24 hours, officials said.

    Soldiers from the 82nd Airborne Division, based at Fort Bragg, N.C., and from the 1st Cavalry Division, at Fort Hood, Texas, are arriving in New Orleans. Marines from Camp Pendleton, Calif., and Camp Lejeune, N.C., are moving into the Mississippi region. Also, 1,573 members of the Special Purpose Marine Ground Task Force have arrived in the U.S. Gulf Coast area and are en route to Naval Air Station New Orleans to support relief operations.

    Communications among rescuers has been a problem. DoD is providing 1,500 mobile radios to Mississippi officials. The department will also provide communications support to officials in Louisiana, officials said.

    The Air National Guard is supporting firefighting efforts in the region. Two specially equipped Air Force C-130 aircraft are at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Fla., and available to fly firefighting missions.

Related Site:
Military Support in the Wake of Hurricane Katrina

 

 

 

Beware of charity fraud

    Many scammers and illicit organizations are "phishing" for donations or using false web sites/domains for wrongful purposes, on behalf of Katrina's victims.  Many are using domain names that appear to be valid.  These tactics can and are currently being used to get users/passwords, money through fake foundations, or even lead you to install malicious software.  Rather than responding to an email solicitation, go to www.fema.gov and follow the directions on how to get help or help the disaster victims.

 

 

ID card section closures

    The Carlisle Barracks ID Office will be closed intermittently during the next several weeks due to staff shortages.   

    Please call 245-3533 to confirm the office is open before traveling.

 

Hurricane Katrina alert for military members
    Families of Deployed Army National Guard Soldiers affected by Hurricane Katrina... we ask you to call 1-888-777-7731, the National Guard Bureau Family Program, and identify yourselves so that we may inform deployed Guardsmen of your situation. Any military members or families in need of counseling services may call the Military One Support number at 1-800-342-9647.

 

Tom Zimmerman, Public Affairs Office

What you can do to stop the spread of West Nile Virus

  September 1, 2005 - Pennsylvania has reported seven human cases of West Nile virus for the 2005 season. Last year, 15 cases of human West Nile Virus were detected in Pennsylvania, resulting in two fatalities.

    There have been no positive mosquito samples on Carlisle Barracks or in Cumberland County.

    Certain species of mosquitoes carry West Nile Virus, which, when transmitted to people, can cause West Nile encephalitis, an infection that can result in an inflammation of the brain.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, all residents of areas where virus activity has been identified are at risk of getting West Nile encephalitis; people over 50 have the highest risk of severe disease.

    Carlisle Barracks has a team that cooperates with local authorities to help fight the spread of the virus. The Department of Public Works, Dunham Environmental Health Office and Allegheny District Veterinarian Command have been monitoring the situation and are doing what they can to keep the post safe.

    "Heavy rains may cause some water pools to develop, which is an ideal breeding ground for mosquitoes," said Keith Bailey, post biological science technician. "We will take the necessary steps to help control the mosquitoes should it be required by the Dunham Environmental Health Office."

    Post residents who find a dead bird on post should call the Vet Clinic at 245-4168 or call the Environmental Office at 245-3902. However only "fresh" dead birds can be tested (within 24 hours), and there is no need to test birds with obvious cause of death such as from a predator or car.

    There are things every individual can do around the home to help eliminate mosquito-breeding areas.

§         Dispose of tin cans, plastic containers, ceramic pots or similar water-holding containers that have collected on your property.

§         Pay attention to discarded tires. Stagnant water in tires attracts breeding mosquitoes.

§         Drill holes in the bottom of recycling containers left outdoors.

§         Have clogged roof gutters cleaned every year, particularly if the leaves from surrounding trees have a tendency to plug up the drains. Roof gutters can produce millions of mosquitoes each season.

§         Turn over plastic wading pools when not in use. Stagnant water in a wading pool becomes a place for mosquitoes to breed.

§         Turn over wheelbarrows and don't let water stagnate in birdbaths. Both provide breeding habitats for domestic mosquitoes.

§         Aerate ornamental pools or stock them with fish. Water gardens can become major mosquito producers if they are allowed to stagnate. Clean and chlorinate swimming pools not in use. A swimming pool left untended by a family on vacation for a month can produce enough mosquitoes to result in neighborhood-wide complaints. Mosquitoes may even breed in the water that collects on pool covers.

§         Use landscaping to eliminate standing water that collects on your property. Mosquitoes may breed in any puddle that lasts for more than four days.

§         For standing water that can't be eliminated, homeowners can buy Bti products at lawn and garden, outdoor supply, home improvement, and other stores. This naturally occurring bacteria kills mosquito larvae but is safe for people, pets, aquatic life and plants.

In addition, here are some simple precautions to prevent mosquito bites, particularly for those individuals who are most at risk:

§         Make sure screens fit tightly over doors and windows to keep mosquitoes out of homes.

§         Consider wearing long-sleeved shirts, long pants and socks when outdoors, particularly when mosquitoes are most active at dawn and dusk, or in areas known for having large numbers of mosquitoes.

§         When possible, reduce outdoor exposure at dawn and dusk during peak mosquito periods, usually April through October.

§         Use insect repellents according to the manufacturer's instructions. An effective repellent will contain DEET. Consult with a pediatrician or family physician if you have questions about the use of repellent on children, as repellent is not recommended for children under the age of two months.

For more information about West Nile virus and the state's surveillance and control program, go to www.westnile.state.pa.us.

 

 

Carol Kerr, Public Affairs Office

Pulitzer Award winner to explore the Leadership of George Washington

Fischer leads the Perspectives in Military History Lecture series starting tonight  

 

    Dr. David Hackett Fischer, Pulitzer Prize winning author of the 2004 history, Washington's Crossing, will inspire and surprise the audience with new insights on George Washington, the man and leader - at a free public lecture, "The Leadership of George Washington," Thursday, Sept 15 at 7:15 p.m. in Bliss Hall.  

    One of America's most creative historians, Fisher is a professor of history at Brandeis University, and the author of Albion's Seed, The Great Wave, and Paul Revere's Ride.  This Ronald A. Roberge Memorial Lecture is the first offering in the renowned Perspectives in Military History Lecture Series, sponsored monthly during the academic year by the AHEC/Military History Institute.

    The Root Hall Book Store will bring Washington's Crossing book sales to Bliss Hall.

 

 

Public Affairs Staff report

Post hosts 31st Annual Retiree Appreciation Day

Carlisle Barracks will host the 31st Annual Military Retiree Appreciation Day here, Saturday, Sept. 17, 2005, from 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. at the U.S. Army War College, Bliss Hall. This event is open to all military retirees, family members, survivors, and pre-retired military personnel.

   Retired Air Force Col. Michael Jordan, from the Military Officer Association of America, will be the keynote speaker.

    Following the keynote address, there will be seminars on TRICARE-for-Life (Over Age 65), TRICARE (Under age 65), Legal Affairs, and Veterans Affairs. Literature will be available from the agencies presenting seminars, as well as from various post activities and military service organizations.

   Also, the Dunham U.S. Army Clinic Pharmacy will be open for business from 7:30 a.m. - 4 p.m. (closed between 1130 and 1200). 

   Identification cards will be issued from 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Bldg. 315, Lovell Ave.

   A luncheon is available at the Letort View Community Center. Pre-payment by check or money order is required the day before the event. For more information, contact the Retirement Services Office, Carlisle Barracks, at 717-245-4501 or 717-245-3984.

 

 

 

 

Tom Zimmerman, Public Affairs Office

Carlisle Barracks Exchange honors retirees with 'Still Serving' weekend

 September 13, 2005 -- The Carlisle Barracks Exchange will honor military retirees during its annual 'Still Serving' weekend, Sept. 16-18, in conjunction with Retiree Appreciation Day.

    Throughout the Still Serving weekend, the Carlisle PX will hold drawings, provide free refreshments, product samples, vendor demonstrations and door prizes.

    As part of the celebration, there is a free advanced screening of a major motion picture on Saturday Sept. 17 at 2 p.m. at the Reynolds Theater. Tickets are available at Subway, the PX and the U.S. Army War College Bookstore in Root Hall, while supplies last. The bookstore will also be open on Saturday Sept. 17 from 8 a.m.- 1:30 p.m.  

    Retirees represent nearly half of Army & Air Force Exchange Services (AAFES) military households.

    "Military retirees make up 42 percent of sponsors eligible to shop AAFES facilities," said Jack Scott, Carlisle PX manager. "While we pause to formally recognize them in September of each year, AAFES and its associates understand that retirees deserve our gratitude 365 days a year."

    Shoppers at the Carlisle Exchange provide needed support for Morale, Welfare and Recreation programs, facilities and non-appropriated fund construction projects such as bowling alleys, community clubs, golf course and child care facilities.

    "Retiree support plays a big part in AAFES' annual dividend. Without their support it would not have been possible for AAFES to return more than $242 million to Armed Forces MWR programs last year," said Scott. 

    Retirees can learn about activities planned for the Carlisle Exchange by calling Jack Scott at 717-243-2463. "AAFES' 'Still Serving' weekend will be full of great information and events," said Scott. "I hope military retirees will make a point to stop by the Carlisle PX for a not-to-be-missed weekend."

 

Suzanne Reynolds, Public Affairs Office

War College to induct new member into IF Hall of Fame

    The U.S. Army War College will induct Gen. Oud Buangbon, Royal Thai Army, into the International Fellows Hall of Fame on Sept. 15. 

  Gen. Oud is a 1985 graduate of the USAWC and holds a Master of Science degree in Public Administration from Shippensburg University.  Gen. Oud was named Deputy Permanent Secretary for Defense in 2001 and in 2003 became the Permanent Secretary for Defense of the Kingdom of Thailand.

  During his Defense Ministry assignments, Gen. Oud influenced Thailand's commitment to the Global War on Terrorism and to international peacekeeping operations.

  In October 2005, after a 43-year military career, Gen. Oud will conclude his military service.    

  The induction ceremony will take place in Bliss Hall at 11:15 a.m. Gen. Oud's wife, Maj. Gen. Woranuch Buangbon, Royal Thai Army will accompany her husband.

 

 

Sgt. David Hopkins, Public Affairs Office

Soldiers meet country music star

 

   August 29, 2005-One of the biggest supporters of servicemembers visited Central Pa. for a concert and some Carlisle Barracks Soldiers got a chance to meet him.

    On August 26, country music star Toby Keith was at Hershey Park Stadium and four Soldiers received tickets and backstage passes to meet him.

    "When an artist like Toby Keith takes time out of his busy life to visit with and thank Soldiers, it shows a young Soldier like me that someone cares for our efforts," said Pfc. George Galesky, veterinary technician. "More entertainers should really take the time and thank our troops."

    Shooter Jennings and Lee Ann Womack were the opening acts for Keith who has visited Iraq on more than one occasion to sing for troops and boost morale. He also has several songs about Soldiers and the war effort in the Middle East.

    Before Keith went on stage for his performance, about 100 people, including the post Soldiers went backstage for a short meet and greet session.

    "Meeting him was a great experience because he was very down to earth and personable," said Karla Illingsworth, executive services operations NCO.

    The concert started with explosions and pyrotechnics on stage as the former semiprofessional football player stepped up to the microphone and began did what made him famous, sing blue-collar country music.

    When it was all over, Keith saluted the audience and exited the stage, leaving the Soldiers with the feeling that someone notices the work they do everyday.

    "I am thankful that he takes the time to share the admiration and appreciation for what Soldiers do and represent," said Illingsworth. "You don't hear many people sharing their admiration and appreciation for Soldiers the way that Toby Keith does.  I enjoy his music and his spirit."

 

Tom Zimmerman, Public Affairs Office

Are you feeding the enemy information?

OPSEC and the World Wide Web

 

   

September 1, 2005 -- OPSEC, what does it mean to you? What does it mean to all of us? Operational Security refers to the protection of information that is not classified, but possibly sensitive.

    Small pieces of information by themselves may seem irrelevant but, when pieced together, show our adversaries, how we operate, what our tactics are, how our security functions and what our weaknesses may be.

    "We do a good job of protecting our classified information, but most of the intelligence in the world is collected from open sources," said Barry Shughart, OPSEC Officer, Carlisle Barracks Force Protection Division.  "Our adversaries can hide in the woodwork and anonymously capture our most precious secrets from the internet.  They can call us on the phone and we'll tell them.  We give them access to our business, to our infrastructure, and to our families.  Not on purpose, but it's all out there."

    Maybe you think that since your work isn't classified or you believe that your work isn't important that OPSEC doesn't apply to you.  Think again. The information you possess could be the critical data needed to complete an adversary's operational mosaic. Many seemingly unimportant and unrelated items of information from multiple sources can be pieced together to form a comprehensive and damaging picture of our intentions and capabilities.

    The following is an excerpt from an article written in 2003 by Dafna Linzer, of the Associated Press, titled "Al Qaeda Uses Internet Extensively." It shows the importance of computers and the internet to Al Qaeda intelligence gathering.
    "In the tiny towns that dot the Pakistani mountains east of the Afghan border, small shops that seemingly offer residents little more than dusty packs of cigarettes and canned goods are stocked with one more essential - computers with Internet access. It is from this area, in northwest Pakistan, that U.S. intelligence in recent weeks has picked up on increased communications among al Qaeda members, according to U.S. officials."

    So, what does this mean to all the people living and working on Carlisle Barracks?"

    "Have you taken a picture of a family member standing by a piece of military equipment? Have you been in Iraq or Afghanistan and had your photo taken and e-mailed it home?" asked Shughart. "Did you e-mail the pictures, or post them on a family web site. If so, they can be accessed by anyone. Pictures like this are showing up on the internet, in BLOGS and most disturbingly in the hands of the enemy."

    This issue is so critical to the safety and security of our country that the Chief of Staff of the Army has directed that all organizations review OPSEC programs and re-emphasize its importance.

 

What OPSEC means to you

Some advice from Barry Farquhar, post Force Protection Officer. 

What is OPSEC?

Operations Security (OPSEC) is an analytic process used to deny an adversary information - generally unclassified - concerning our intentions and capabilities by identifying, controlling, and protecting indicators associated with our planning processes or operations. OPSEC does not replace other security disciplines - it supplements them.

 

OPSEC - A New Mindset

Our attention to security must change now. The events of September 11th, 2001 proved there is a demonstrated and known threat. How many times have we heard that terrorism is a threat? But, most of us thought it could only happen elsewhere - not in America.

Unfortunately, we have suffered several terrorist attacks in recent years - the Oklahoma City and U.S.S. Cole attacks, and the tragic events that unfolded on September 11, 2001. In these cases, the adversary was successful because they knew our vulnerabilities. Americans at large provided much of what was used against us. The only thing our enemies brought to the table was their personal agenda and their resolve.

As federal employees, we are the representatives of the people. We develop, we plan, we execute - the American people trust us to do our jobs and keep them safe. The mishandling of information can put everything at risk and cost the lives of many Americans.

 

Why is it important that we learn about OPSEC?

The information that is often used against us is not classified information; it is information that is openly available to anyone who knows where to look and what to ask.

Operations Security is a tool that our adversaries believe in ... and one that we in the United States Government need to understand and integrate into our daily routine. Our work is information, and not all of it is classified. What we don't always realize is how much we are giving away by our predictable behavior, casual conversations, routine acquisitions and other Internet information. We must be careful of what we are revealing - failure to do so could provide our adversaries with the information they need to execute additional terrorist acts.

 

What can I do to help thwart any future attempts to harm the United States of America?

We can all incorporate OPSEC into our everyday work routine. Practicing operations security will help you accomplish your goals. When you do something, ask yourself, "What could an adversary glean from the knowledge of this activity? Is it revealing information about what we do and how we do it?" It is helpful to view yourself and what you're doing as an adversary would. For example, what can be gained by observing your actions or reading what you place on a website?

 

What are OPSEC indicators?

What do people observe about your schedule? What do you do when you go to work? What are you revealing by your predictable routines and the way you do business - these are indicators. OPSEC helps people identify the indicators that are giving away information about missions, activities, and operations.

 

Who is the adversary?

Let's not focus strictly on terrorists right now. Remember that there are other adversaries - for example, foreign intelligence services that continue to collect information on us that could be used to hurt us in the future.

We sometimes only focus on what just happened - but it is a certainty that our adversaries will continually look for and find any weak links.     

 

What are the capabilities of our adversary?

We can never underestimate the capabilities or strength of conviction of terrorists or any other adversary. Nothing is more dangerous than people who are willing to die for a cause.

 

What is the risk?

The terrorist threat existed prior to September 11th, 2001. We just did not believe that such a horrific thing could ever happen. Everything we do involves risk - the application of the OPSEC process develops effective countermeasures to help us accomplish our future missions - by analyzing and minimizing the risk that we may inadvertently reveal critical information to our adversaries.

 

    If you suspect an OPSEC violation has occurred, please call the Force Protection Division at 245-4934 or Security at 245-3233.

 

 

Sgt. David Hopkins, Public Affairs Office

Brown recluse spider bites post firefighter

 August 29, 2005-Last month, Ed Beam, shift captain for the Carlisle Barracks' fire department, was doing some yard work at his home in Walnut Bottom when he felt a sting on the little finger on his left hand. He shook the hand aggressively to get rid of whatever it was that had bitten him and then went on with his chores. He thought it was only a bee sting or a little bug bite. He didn't expect a bite from a potentially deadly spider that normally doesn't even live in this part of the country.

    Later that day Beam felt a burning sensation in his finger and it began to swell. Over the next week, Beam went to several doctors to find out what was wrong with his finger, which was getting continuously larger and hurting more. Finally, after four doctors turned him away with no answers, he went to a surgeon to have an unrelated procedure performed. The surgeon saw his finger and decided to work on that first.

    "The surgeon shot some Novocain into the finger and then cut into it with a scalpel," said Beam. "He pulled out a bunch of dead tissue that was white and black." The doctor told him he was bitten by a brown recluse spider.

    The surgeon left the wound open so it could drain and so Beam could keep it clean.

    Since the doctor cleaned out the wound, Beam has had to open it several times a day to remove dead tissue and to pour peroxide into the opening to prevent the spread of gangrene.

    "For a while we thought he might lose his finger," said Deb Beam, his wife.

    Even though brown recluse spiders are not native to this area, the best way to protect yourself is by knowing what to look for and how to reduce the number of spiders in your home. 

 

Some things to look for are:

  • Six eyes arranged in pairs, with one pair in front and a pair on either side

  • A dark violin shape on the cephalothorax, the part of the body where the legs are attached

  • Uniformly light-colored legs

  • Uniformly colored abdomen, which can vary from cream to dark brown depending on what it has eaten, however, it will never have two colors of pigment at the same time

  • No spines on the legs, only fine hairs

  • Recluses make small retreat webs behind objects, never out in the open

  • It is about 3/8 of an inch in body length

Identify a brown recluse spider bite

    If there is a mark on you that you think may be a spider biter, examine it very closely. A spider bite will have two separate puncture marks about 1/16 of an inch apart. If there is only one puncture, it is probably from something else. Brown recluse spiders are not known to be able to bite through fabric or even the thick skin layers on the palm of the hands or bottom of the feet.

Effects of a brown recluse bite

    Once bitten, the venom in a brown recluse spider bite will begin to kill cells. The venom comes into contact with living cells and they simply die.  The result of this is a painful wound. Fatalities are rare, but are most dangerous to children, the elderly and people who are in poor physical condition.

What to do if you are bitten

    If bitten, remain calm and immediately seek medical attention. Apply an icepack directly to the bite area to relieve swelling and pain. Collect the spider, if possible, for identification by a spider expert. Even a mangled specimen has diagnostic value.

Preventing spider bites

    Brown Recluse spiders are not native to this area, but as Beam found out, they have made their way to other locations around the country.  To help lower the risk of spider bites, follow the guidelines below.

  • Shake out clothing and shoes before getting dressed

  • Wear gloves when handling firewood, lumber and rocks (be sure to inspect the gloves for spiders before putting them on)

  • Move your bed away from the wall

  • Exercise care when handling cardboard boxes (spiders are often found in the space under folded cardboard flaps)

  • Install tight-fitting screens on windows and doors

  • Seal or calk cracks and crevices where spiders can enter the house

  • Install yellow or sodium vapor light bulbs outdoors since these attract fewer insects for spiders to feed upon

  • Tape the edges of cardboard boxes to prevent spider entry

  • Use plastic bags to store loose items in the garage, basement and attic

  • Remove trash, old boxes, old clothing, wood piles, rock piles and other unwanted items

  • Do not stack wood against the house

  • Clean up dead insects that the brown recluse spider can feed on

 

     Some information used in this story is from a study by the Ohio State University.

 

Hurricane Katrina alert for military members
    Families of Deployed Army National Guard Soldiers affected by Hurricane Katrina... we ask you to call 1-888-777-7731, the National Guard Bureau Family Program, and identify yourselves so that we may inform deployed Guardsmen of your situation. Any military members or families in need of counseling services may call the Military One Support number at 1-800-342-9647.

 

Tom Zimmerman, Public Affairs Office

What you can do to stop the spread of West Nile Virus

   September 1, 2005 - Pennsylvania has reported seven human cases of West Nile virus for the 2005 season. Last year, 15 cases of human West Nile Virus were detected in Pennsylvania, resulting in two fatalities.

    There have been no positive mosquito samples on Carlisle Barracks or in Cumberland County.

    Certain species of mosquitoes carry West Nile Virus, which, when transmitted to people, can cause West Nile encephalitis, an infection that can result in an inflammation of the brain.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, all residents of areas where virus activity has been identified are at risk of getting West Nile encephalitis; people over 50 have the highest risk of severe disease.

    Carlisle Barracks has a team that cooperates with local authorities to help fight the spread of the virus. The Department of Public Works, Dunham Environmental Health Office and Allegheny District Veterinarian Command have been monitoring the situation and are doing what they can to keep the post safe.

    "Heavy rains may cause some water pools to develop, which is an ideal breeding ground for mosquitoes," said Keith Bailey, post biological science technician. "We will take the necessary steps to help control the mosquitoes should it be required by the Dunham Environmental Health Office."

    Post residents who find a dead bird on post should call the Vet Clinic at 245-4168 or call the Environmental Office at 245-3902. However only "fresh" dead birds can be tested (within 24 hours), and there is no need to test birds with obvious cause of death such as from a predator or car.

    There are things every individual can do around the home to help eliminate mosquito-breeding areas.

§         Dispose of tin cans, plastic containers, ceramic pots or similar water-holding containers that have collected on your property.

§         Pay attention to discarded tires. Stagnant water in tires attracts breeding mosquitoes.

§         Drill holes in the bottom of recycling containers left outdoors.

§         Have clogged roof gutters cleaned every year, particularly if the leaves from surrounding trees have a tendency to plug up the drains. Roof gutters can produce millions of mosquitoes each season.

§         Turn over plastic wading pools when not in use. Stagnant water in a wading pool becomes a place for mosquitoes to breed.

§         Turn over wheelbarrows and don't let water stagnate in birdbaths. Both provide breeding habitats for domestic mosquitoes.

§         Aerate ornamental pools or stock them with fish. Water gardens can become major mosquito producers if they are allowed to stagnate. Clean and chlorinate swimming pools not in use. A swimming pool left untended by a family on vacation for a month can produce enough mosquitoes to result in neighborhood-wide complaints. Mosquitoes may even breed in the water that collects on pool covers.

§         Use landscaping to eliminate standing water that collects on your property. Mosquitoes may breed in any puddle that lasts for more than four days.

§         For standing water that can't be eliminated, homeowners can buy Bti products at lawn and garden, outdoor supply, home improvement, and other stores. This naturally occurring bacteria kills mosquito larvae but is safe for people, pets, aquatic life and plants.

In addition, here are some simple precautions to prevent mosquito bites, particularly for those individuals who are most at risk:

§         Make sure screens fit tightly over doors and windows to keep mosquitoes out of homes.

§         Consider wearing long-sleeved shirts, long pants and socks when outdoors, particularly when mosquitoes are most active at dawn and dusk, or in areas known for having large numbers of mosquitoes.

§         When possible, reduce outdoor exposure at dawn and dusk during peak mosquito periods, usually April through October.

§         Use insect repellents according to the manufacturer's instructions. An effective repellent will contain DEET. Consult with a pediatrician or family physician if you have questions about the use of repellent on children, as repellent is not recommended for children under the age of two months.

For more information about West Nile virus and the state's surveillance and control program, go to www.westnile.state.pa.us.