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Tom Zimmerman, Public Affairs Office

Post support agencies rise to the occasion

   

    Feb. 7, 2003 -- On Feb. 3, two people were killed, 25 families were forced from their homes, 13 people were injured and asbestos may have contaminated Young Hall. Of course, all of this was just an exercise, and it went so well you may not have even noticed.

    You also probably didn't notice the behind-the-scene actions taken by many agencies at Carlisle Barracks and its partners from Cumberland County, especially that of the Directorate of Community Activities and Army Community Services.  

     In coordination with Cumberland County emergency services, the Carlisle Medical Research Center and the Cumberland County Emergency Operations Center, Carlisle Barracks exercised its plans and procedures in the event of a mass-casualty and fire scenario.

    "The purpose of these is to see where our plans are strong, and to see where we need to improve, " said Lt. Col. Tim Polaske, from the operations division, who oversaw the exercise. "What was more important, though, was utilizing and exercising the relationships we have within the community."

        The intent of the exercise according to Polaske was to "execute as much as possible, and simulate as little as possible." This meant that the agencies and directorates involved actually made the calls and made the necessary arrangements. This was especially true for the Directorate of Community Activities, which had the hard task of finding shelter for the displaced families, consoling those who "had" lost loved ones, and providing blankets, clothing and whatever else was needed.

     "Our job was to help the families that had been affected, and to make sure that they had what they needed until the were able to return home, whenever that might be," said Ken Thompson, acting DCA director. "When it became apparent that it might be for an extended period of time, we didn't hesitate to reach out for some assistance."

   Initially Thompson and his team coordinated with the Department of Public Works to place the families in post housing, but knew it was a short-term solution.

    "We reached out to the Cumberland County Red Cross, who extended their assistance, and put those families without homes up in hotels in the Carlisle Area and provided them food," said Thompson.  

    "We wanted to make sure that their needs were met, with as little delay as possible," he said.  

    In addition to coordinating with the Red Cross, ACS also set up a Family Assistance Center at the post chapel, which helped the families in the hours after the fire.

    "We need a place where the families can go for information and help if they need it," said Brenda Sampson, ACS director. "We want them to know we're here to help in any way we can."

    To further involve the community members, DCA set up a donation site at their offices for people to donate clothing, blankets and other everyday needs to help meet the shortfalls of equipment.

     "In a situation like this, the entire post community would pitch in and help wherever they could," said Thompson. "We identified some shortfalls and saw what we did well in the event of an actual event."

    In addition to the work done by the DCA and ACS, relationships were exercised with Cumberland County.  As part of the exercise both fire and medical support was needed, and was provided by Cumberland County in coordination with the county's 911 center.

    "We treat the installation as another one of our communities," said Ted Wise, the 911 / Emergency Management Coordinator.  "As part of that, we lend and ask for support wherever we can in the event of an emergency. It's a two-way street that benefits everyone."

     And according to Polaske, this is exactly why the exercises are done.

     "We live in a world where everyone needs to work together, and through exercises like these, we've made some great relationships in the event we ever need them, " he said.  

           

Allison Foreman, Special to the Banner

Olenda Johnson: the first African American woman to teach at Army War College
   
Feb. 6, 2003 -- Olenda Johnson left a position as the associate professor of management at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University in June to become a visiting professor of organizational behavior here at the Army War College.
    She has spent the past six months lecturing to military leaders from across the country about strategic leadership and talking with them about the importance of national security.
    "I love it there," Johnson said recently during a trip back to North Carolina. "It's been fascinating, to say the least, to be a fly on the wall."
    Johnson is the first African-American woman to teach at the college,  beginning in August - the start of the college's academic year.
    "There is a phrase they use at the War College: Drinking from a fire hose," Johnson said. "I was thrown right into it.''
    Her father, Olen, retired from the Air Force when she was 11 years old. But that did not prepare her for all of the military terms and procedures used so frequently at the college.
    She got a top security clearance and quickly learned military language, which she said is made up of mostly acronyms. She also talked with other faculty members about everything from interpreting the curriculum to setting up a seating chart.
    For example, "You cannot have two infantrymen next to each other," Johnson said.
    Infantrymen are the "front-line" people and tend to be aggressive.
    If you want to have classroom dialogue around a conference table, it's better to put them on either side of the instructor instead of in front of her. That way, they won't have automatic control of the discussion.
    "I would have just alphabetized them," Johnson joked.
    Throughout the year, Johnson will teach her students about strategic leadership and how it applies to the military. She will also teach students about the business side of "how the Army runs" and critical thinking skills so that they can make long-term decisions for all branches of the U.S. military.

    "It's like moving them from being a salesperson to a key executive of an organization," she said.
    To understand how Johnson got to the War College, one must first understand how she got to A&T.
    In 1994, Johnson was a doctoral student at the University of Pittsburgh, thinking about where she would head next. That's when she got the call from A&T.

    "They weren't even on my radar screen," Johnson said.
    But that didn't faze Quiester Craig, dean of the business and economics school.

    "He said, 'You don't know me. We've never met. But I'm going to do everything in my power to get you to A&T,'" Johnson recalled.
    Johnson's mentor and former professor at Florida A&M University was friends with Craig, and he told him he should take down Johnson's name.

    "And that was it," Johnson said.
    She met with Craig and other A&T leaders in fall 1994. Before she had handed them her resume, they were handing her a stack of apartment guides.
    "A&T is where God wanted me to be."
    Johnson started at A&T in summer 1996, teaching a strategic management class. She later taught organizational behavior, as well.
    While at A&T, Johnson got several research fellowships from the Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute, or DEOMI. The institute, on Patrick Air Force Base in Florida, teaches civilians and members of the Armed Forces about equal opportunity matters.
    Johnson spent the summers of 1997, 1998 and 2000 at the institute, researching forms of racism or perceived racism in the military, racial differences in performance evaluations and religious pluralism.
    In January 2001, Col. Cortez Dial contacted the institute in search of a lecturer for the U.S. Army War College in Pennsylvania. A lieutenant colonel at the institute recommended Johnson.
    Once again, a college that she knew almost nothing about had contacted her. And once again, she was willing to listen.
    Johnson visited the War College in June 2001 for National Security Strategy Week, when the college brings in a select number of business owners, university presidents and state government leaders to talk with military students.
    "Apparently, I said something right during that week," Johnson said.
    Less than four months later, the college asked her to be a visiting professor - a full-time faculty member who would teach at the college for a year.
    Happily, Johnson agreed.
    "I just felt like that was my next step," she said.
    And leaders at the War College are glad she took that step.
    "Her skills of business as well as human relations, as well as her being an Air Force brat made her an ideal force to bring in," Dial said.
    Johnson brings a fresh perspective to the college with her insight, expertise and the fact that she is one of only a few female instructors, he said.
    Johnson said she considered staying on at the War College because her experience has been so rewarding. But she decided in November to return to A&T for fall 2003.
    She missed the Aggie students, faculty and staff. Her parents are also here, having moved last year to High Point.
    Still, Johnson said, she has learned valuable lessons about military devotion and how much officers care about the future of the United States.
    "The learning for me at the War College hasn't stopped, and I don't expect it to stop," she said.
    Editor's note: This article was reprinted with permission from the Jan. 5-11 edition of the "Greensboro News & Record."

 

 

 

Lt. Col. Carol Kerr, Public Affairs Office
Army War College to join TRADOC

    Feb. 27, 2003 --This fall, the Army War College will join other Army schools under the organizational umbrella of the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command.

   Realignment decisions were notable parts of the Army's recent announcement about the Realignment Task Force study. The study of the Army War College, started in February 2002 to cut as much as 20 percent of manpower, resulted in a loss of 26 positions.

   No reduction in force is needed because of positions not filled by permanent workers, said Gerry Silverberg, director of Civilian Personnel here. Two employees in permanent positions will be offered other open positions. Jobs may open for the three affected term employees between now and the October 2003 effective date, he said.

    Effects of the lost positions remain to be seen. "There will be an impact -  fewer electives taught and some changes to the Strategic Crisis Exercise," noted USAWC Chief of Staff Col. Mike Colpo.

    The effects of realignment seem more certain.

    The Army War College move to join TRADOC comes on the heels of the Army Garrison move from TRADOC to the Installation Management Agency's Northeast Region Office. Currently the Army War College reports to the Army's G3, or operations, office. 

    "The Army War College is one of the treasures of our Army," said Commandant Maj. Gen. Robert Ivany. "Every year we have wonderful students, a renowned faculty and a superb installation within a supportive community.
    "None of that will change. Our goal will be to have a seamless transition that will enhance our institution's capability to develop superb strategic leaders," said Ivany.        
CSA to maintain link to USAWC
    The Army leadership continues to value the innovative and insightful conferences and studies produced at this war college, he said. The Chief of Staff of the Army emphasized that AWC access to him and to the Army staff must remain, Ivany noted.
   The Strategic Studies Institute plays a critical role of research and publication in support of the Army and Defense leadership, he continued. That relationship will continue unchanged.

APFRI &  MHI tightens ties to USAWC

   The Military History Institute will stay with the USAWC as part of the newly-formed Army Heritage and Education Center. It will align with the U.S. Army Garrison here. The Realignment Task Force found advantages for the Army's exceptional military history resource AHEC to continue its educational ties with the AWC faculty and students. 

    The Army Physical Fitness Research Institute will change reporting and resourcing relationships to the Army medical community. A Memorandum of Understanding with the Army Surgeon General will lock in long-term plans to co-locate APFRI with the college and continue support to AWC students - even as it expands its mission to serve the larger Army.

Peacekeeping Institute era to end

    The Peacekeeping Institute will disband. One or two PKI instructors will be absorbed into the AWC faculty. The RTF determined that the PKI activities amounted to "mission creep," since it was not in the original AWC mandate, according to Colpo.

USAWC will meet the challenge of change

    Secretary of the Army Thomas White established the Army RTF on June 25, 2001. It started with a shake-down of the Army Headquarters and moved, in January, to field operating agencies like the Army War College, and the major command headquarters, like TRADOC. The DA goal was to free manpower, civilian and military, to support warfighting.
    Starting with the option to cut up to 20 percent of positions here, the RTF team initially identified 64 positions - a 14 percent cut. A number of factors reduced the final job loss.

    Extensive staff work through 2002 identified the enormous amount and variety of work produced at the Army War College. Research, publications, workshops and exercises complement the AWC students' education and contribute to the Army and Defense Dept. leadership. The RTF team also weighed the effects of realignments, A76 job cuts, and critical demands for educational technology before dropping the final number to 26.

    "Changes are affecting every level of the Army, realigning across every echelon," said Ivany. His staff will now create a plan - an annex to the AWC Strategic Plan - to smoothly transition to TRADOC.  Despite the uncertainty and the change, the commandant expressed confidence in the college and the community.

    "We have met every challenge for a century and we will meet these challenges as well," he said.

 

 

Tom Zimmerman, Public Affairs Office

First phase of smallpox vaccinations completed at Dunham  

 

   Feb. 25, 2003 --Phase 1b vaccinations of the Army's Smallpox Vaccination Program have been completed at the Dunham U.S Army Health Clinic according to Col. Gordon Miller, the clinic commander.

    "This phase was for those selected healthcare workers who we considered to be first contact/responder employees," he said. This included not only clinic providers, but also nursing and clerical staff, military and civilian.  The total number immunized to date is 21.  

    Col. Miller also wanted to let people know who was eligible for the vaccination.  

    "Army War College students and other active duty personnel who have orders or request for orders to an area or assignment requiring vaccination may be eligible barring any heath concerns," Miller said. "There are rigid requirements and screening criteria for vaccination." Anyone with questions or concerns should stop by the clinic for further assistance.

   During this period, Miller pointed out that the entire education process has been good for him and his staff as well.

    "I think it's been good for everyone. It helps us to remember the importance of vaccination and the protection it provides to our troops. It also forces us to be better prepared, both physically and mentally, for contingencies we didn't even anticipate two or three years ago.  There are still things we need to be concerned about."         

 

 

Break the ICE . tell DOC how they're doing!

     March 5, 2003 --The number one measure of the success of any service organization is customer satisfaction. The Army Contracting Agency has implemented the Department of Defense Interactive Customer Evaluation (ICE) system to allow customers to submit real-time comments and to receive rapid responses from managers.

    The Directorate of Contracting at Carlisle Barracks encourages you to visit the following website and provide feedback: http://ice.disa.mil/index.cfm?fa=card&site_id=174&service_provider_id=80040.

The link to this on-line Customer Comment Card is also provided in the e-mail signature block of all DOC employees. If you have any questions, please contact Kelly Cluck at 245-3961.

 

 

Sierra Brings you Online Enrollment and Fee Payment 

    TRICARE and Sierra Military Health Services, Inc. (SMHS) make it simple for you to enroll and pay your TRICARE Prime enrollment fees any time, day or night.  Just a couple of mouse clicks put you on the path to online enrollment.

    To enroll online, visit www.sierramilitary.com and click on the Enrollment link, then select Online Enrollment.  It will prompt you through the entire enrollment process, including fee payment for retirees.  Enrollment fees must be paid using a valid credit card when using the Internet.

    Active Duty and Retired sponsors can enroll themselves and their family members any time. After completing the enrollment online, print out and sign the signature page and either fax or mail to Sierra. Signature pages must be received before the 20th of the month in order for enrollment to be effective the first day of the following month.

    Activated Reservists, National Guard members and their families are not eligible to enroll online as they are required to submit copies of their orders with their enrollment form. 

    Once enrolled, retirees can make quarterly or annual fee payments online.  Visit www.sierramilitary.com, click on Enrollment, then link to Pay Enrollment Fees.  Have your credit card ready to use this secure payment system. 

    Visit www.sierramilitary.com for more TRICARE information and to enroll in TRICARE Prime

 

 

 

Staff Sgt. Jeffrey T. Ege, Public Affairs Office

New MHI director faces more than just 'old' business

 

     Feb. 26, 2003 --February brought more than dusty manuscripts and old photos for military historian Dr. Conrad Crane.

    Crane, who became director of the Military History Institute Feb. 1, has discovered that there is much that he needs to do in preparation for the institute's move into a new building next Spring and Summer.

    His predecessor, Col. Jim Costigan, explained the kinds of challenges Crane will face in the next year.

    "Dr. Crane is facing the challenges of running day-to-day operations, supporting the service to Army War College and the nation while preparing to move MHI's vast collection, which has been here for many years, to a new location," Costigan said. "It's a heck of a challenge. Plus, he's still getting used to his new job."

    "We plan to keep our patron services up as much as we can," Crane said. "MHI is open to anybody -- military scholars, civilian and military; Army War College students; family members trying to find out about past relatives and what they did, et cetera. We have a very broad clientele and will continue to try to serve them all through the transition."

    MHI is making the move as a result of the creation of the Army Heritage and Education Center.

    The AHEC complex, to be located off Army Heritage Drive just outside the post's Claremont Road gate, has been designed to be a world-class archival, educational and historical facility incorporating MHI, an Education Center, the Army Heritage Museum, and a Conservation and Restoration Facility. The complex will preserve, display and interpret the treasures of American military history for the American public.

    MHI preserves more than nine million items documenting the history of the U.S. military. Its collection includes books, periodicals, photographs, manuscripts - such as diaries, letters and memoirs - military publications and manuals, maps, and oral histories.

    Construction of the new MHI portion of the AHEC complex began Nov. 5 by the Mascaro Construction Company of Pittsburgh. The $11+ million construction, funded by the Army, is scheduled to be complete in February 2004, and the completed facility is scheduled to be open to the public in June 2004. The estimated $100 million needed for the remainder of the work on the complex will come from grants and donations through the private Army Heritage Center Foundation and is expected to be finished in late 2006 or 2007.

    The ceremonial groundbreaking for the AHEC was held Nov. 18 at 10:30 a.m.  Attending the ceremony were Pennsylvania's senior Senator, Arlen Specter, and Secretary of the Army Thomas White.

    Costigan moved into the position of director of the now-forming AHEC upon Crane's assumption of his new duties.

    "Colonel Costigan's move allows him to look forward to handle the key issues for the creation of the AHEC, such as getting the new museum built and hiring people -- because that's going to be a much larger complex than what we have now," Crane said.

    Crane was formerly the General Douglas MacArthur Chair of Research in the Strategic Studies Institute since December 2001. Before that, he served in SSI as a research professor of military strategy since September 2000.

    Crane joined SSI after a 26-year military career that concluded with nine years as Professor of History at the U.S. Military Academy. He holds a B.S. from the USMA and an M.A. and PhD from Stanford University. He is also a graduate of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College and the U.S. Army War College.

    Learn more about the treasures at the Military History Institute: www.carlisle.army.mil/  and more about the Military Heritage Foundation's commitment to history and education - and how to help: www.armyheritage.org.

 

 

 

Lt. Col. Carol Kerr, Public Affairs Office

Become knowledge-centric and love it

 

    The Army is transforming into a network-centric, knowledge-based force. The goal is to improve decision dominance for warfighters and business managers.

    Across the Army and throughout Carlisle Barracks, internet users tap into the Army's single portal - www.us.army.mil -- providing universal access to Army Knowledge Online.

    On October 1, 2002, the Army activated the U.S. Army Network Enterprise Technology Command. Directly reporting to the Army G6 Chief Information Officer, NETCOM is the Army's single authority for information management. NETCOM now provides centralized technical control over all functions associated with network operations, management, and defense. [see www.netcom.army.mil]

    New Army goals will consolidate servers and reduce by half the number of Army web applications. "By reducing this so-called information-technology "footprint," the money we save can be reinvested in high-priority IT programs/ systems or requirements," according to Lt. Gen. Peter Cuviello, the Army's CIO/ G6.

    It's happening here as well.

    The college and the installation are deep in the first phase of a knowledge management initiative. The argument for new ways of "KM" is directly linked to the extraordinary richness of knowledge in the college and on the campus. People are our top asset. But, it's been argued that, "the current organization of data and information is such that knowledge is fragmented, difficult to locate, difficult to share, potentially redundant, inconsistent or not used at all."

   That was the "problem" presented to contractor Science Applications International Corporation. SAIC contractors are mid-way through 85 sets of interviews in all organizations on Carlisle Barracks. The interviews comprise phase I of the KM initiative.

   "Why audit our knowledge?  Knowledge of knowledge assets is a rich source of information about where the strengths of an organization lie," noted Maj. Mike Longarzo, the CIO project manager.

   A workshop at the end of phase I will review and discuss findings and recommendations. A Knowledge Management Working Group, assigned by the deputy commandant, will assist the KM project managers.

 

 

 

Sgt. Shaun Peeler, Public Affairs Office

CSM Watkins bids farewell to Carlisle Barracks, Army

 

Feb. 20, 2003 --He said doesn't know what he's going to do after he retires, but one thing's for sure, he's got to do something, said Sgt. Maj. Don Watkins, command sergeant major here, at his retirement ceremony Feb. 20 at Bliss Hall. 

    "It's truly been a pleasure, and I've had a great ride," Watkins said.  "I have no regrets or complaints.  I'm happy."

    Maj. Gen. Robert R. Ivany, U.S. Army War College commandant, was there to see Watkins off and he had a few comments about Watkins. 

    "He's a great man.  He had a fantastic career and has served in many positions, so just think of all the soldiers he's touched," Ivany said. 

    Ivany explained why he thinks Watkins is so successful.

    "There are three reason. He cared and loved his soldiers. He took on tough issues. He did more than he had to do. 

    "We're going to miss him very much and we thank him dearly for his contributions to the Army," added Ivany.

    Watkins was awarded the Legion of Merit, a Certificate of Retirement, a Certificate of Appreciation for Service in the Armed Forces and an Association of the U.S. Army Certificate of Appreciation, all in recognition of his 30 years of service.

    After receiving his awards, Watkins addressed those in attendance.

    "Everything I do, I do to the best of my ability.  I can leave the military and say I've done the best I could, and I've treated everybody the way they want to be treated," Watkins expressed.

    Watkins also left a message for Carlisle Barracks.

    "No matter how big or small, you can make a difference," added Watkins.  

  

 

Are You Ready? A Guide to Citizen Preparedness

 

    Are You Ready? A Guide to Citizen Preparedness brings together facts on disaster survival techniques, disaster-specific information, and how to prepare for and respond to both natural and man-made disasters.

    As the most comprehensive guide to personal emergency preparedness published by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), Are You Ready? will help individuals prepare themselves and their families for disasters.

    Revised in September 2002, Are You Ready? provides a step-by-step outline on how to prepare a disaster supply kit, emergency planning for people with disabilities, how to locate and evacuate to a shelter, and even contingency planning for family pets. Man-made threats from hazardous materials and terrorism are also treated in detail. The guide details opportunities for every citizen to become involved in safeguarding their neighbors and communities through FEMA's Citizen Corps (www.citizencorps.gov) initiative and Community Emergency Response Team training program.

    For more information or to view the guide online visit www.fema.gov

    For health related information visit the Center for Disease Control at  http://www.cdc.gov/

   See related Army News Story

 

 

 

 

The ARMY messages come to USAWC .... Introducing the AUSA Road Show.

 

    Feb. 20, 2003 --  Three kiosks and displays in Root Hall (library and cafeteria) and Collins Hall bring the Army AUSA messages to audiences who were unable to attend the annual AUSA Meeting. 

    The touch screen format lets you select from five videos and a text version of the speech delivered by CSA General Shinseki at the Eisenhower Luncheon during AUSA.  

The videos are: 

     "Realizing the Army Vision" - An overview of The Army Vision, focusing on three soldiers which explains the three components of the Vision; People, Readiness and Transformation. 

     "Joint Warfighting" - A documentary on Millennium Challenge 02 which illustrates how The Army is testing capabilities on the road to the Objective Force. 

     "Objective Force Warfight" - Viewers will see an actual battle fought in 2015 and experience the capabilities and characteristics of the Objective Force. 

     "The Video Wall" - A series of interviews from key leaders that answers three questions:  Why an Army?... Why this Army?... Why Transform? 

     "Training Soldiers...Growing Leaders" - Learn how The Army is transforming how it trains soldiers and develops leaders to meet the demands of the 21st Century.

 

 

 

Tom Zimmerman, Army War College Public Affairs Office

Army War College community pauses to reflect on life of dean 

 

  

Feb. 7, 2003 --  Friends, family, colleagues and admirers packed into the Post Memorial Chapel today to pay respects and remember the life of Col. Kevin Cunningham, the Army War College Dean of Academics who passed away early Monday morning.

    "Everyone who came in contact with Kevin is much better off for having known him," said Chaplain (Col.) Sonny Moore, the post's Protestant Chaplain. "We have gathered here to celebrate his life."

     The memorial was filled with stories of his accomplishments as a soldier, a father and a friend, and others that showed his humorous side. 

     "Kevin had a fish hanging in his office, which was given to him as a gift," said Maj. Gen. Robert Ivany, AWC Commandant. "This was quite frankly the ugliest thing I had ever seen in my life. I asked him one day why he hung it up and he told me, it helps to remind me not to take everything so seriously.

    "That's how Kevin was, he had a way of making you laugh and keeping things in perspective," said Ivany.

    Long-time friends and colleagues shared memories about the life of the 28-year Army man.

    "During the National Security Seminar, James Earl Jones joined Seminar 12 as one of the invited guests" said faculty member and longtime friend Col. Joseph Nunez.  While David was addressing the seminar on the first day, and unbeknownst to him, Kevin flashed up a clip from the movie classic, Dr. Strangelove, showing the scene at the end where they are about to drop the nuclear bomb from the plane.  The bombardier was a very young actor named James Earl Jones, in his very first movie, well before he became famous.  Talk about an outstanding icebreaker to welcome the guests!  Kevin served as a catalyst for hospitality and conviviality."

   Nunez also went on to express some of the words that he felt captured the wide range of qualities that Cunningham possessed.

   "Loving husband, caring father, strong military leader, renowned scholar, visionary dean, book fancier, eclectic film buff, true craftsman, supporter of environmental causes, genealogist, devoted friend and mentor." 

    Cunningham was born in Summit, N.J., on May 28, 1953. His civilian education includes undergraduate studies in International Relations and Government at Georgetown University and a Ph.D. in Political Science at Stanford University. His military education includes the Command and General Staff College, the Armed Forces Staff College and the Army War College.

   Cunningham was commissioned a Military Intelligence Officer in 1975 and served in various positions to include Commander of the 209th MI Company, 501 MI Brigade in Seoul, Korea; Assistant Professor in the Department of Social Sciences, United States Military Academy at West Point; Commander of the 203rd MI Battalion at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Md.

    Since June 2001, he served as the Academic Dean of the Army War College.

    Cunningham is survived by his wife, Linda, a daughter, Kristen, and a sister, Robin Cunningham.

    Ivany noted that those people he touched were there to help during this difficult time.  

"Kevin has given so much and has been an important part of the War College family," said Ivany.

    "One of our most important values is standing by others in their time of need and we will continue to help the family where we can," he said. "He will be missed greatly."

    Nunez closed with a tribute to his friend.

    "My life has been changed for the better having met Kevin, and I know there are many in this room who feel the same way."

    Contributions can be made in memory of Col. Cunningham to the Nature Conservancy, 4245 N. Fairfax Dr., Suite 100, Arlington, Va. 22203, account number 1662616 -- or to the Col. Kevin R. Cunningham International Fellows Writing Award, c/o Army War College Foundation, 122 Forbes Ave, Carlisle, Pa. 17013-5248.

 

 

 

Sgt. Shaun Peeler, Public Affairs Office

Shrader recognized for volunteer work, selfless service

 Feb. 4, 2003 -- Dr. Mary E. Walker volunteered her services as a doctor during the Civil War and became the only woman in nation to receive the Medal of Honor. A Carlisle Barracks resident carries on her spirit today.

    Mary Shrader received the Dr. Mary E. Walker Award Feb. 4 at Root Hall in a ceremony to honor her service to others.

    "It's a privilege to be recognized for your work," said Shrader.  "It goes to show you're noticed and someone in your community is paying attention."

    The award recognizes Army spouses whose service to the country is in the form of volunteering.  The service must directly benefit soldiers or their families or bring great credit on the Army family.

    Shrader began volunteering in 1992 when she established a Family Readiness Group when her husband, Master Sgt. David Shrader, a computer systems information analyst, was assigned to the Beckley Recruiting Station in W.Va.

    In  1997, her husband was reassigned to Fort Richardson, Ala., and she stayed active there with the FRG and as a PTA board member. As a registered nurse, she volunteered as a first aid nurse, and assisted with the Fort Richardson Chapel Children's Choir and the Vacation Bible School. Being a Girl Scout troop leader was one of her favorite things to do, she said.

    "It's a great opportunity to teach girls to be a part of their community and make it a better place," said Shrader.  "The children are our future and they need strong leaders."

    While contributing to her community, she managed to further her education with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Health Care Administration.  She is the mother of two daughters, Amanda and Brittany, and supported her husband, David.

    Her husband said he supported his wife just as much as she supported him.  

    "I did everything I could to support her efforts," he said.  "I took care of the kids, when on camping trips, and was apart of the FRG and attended PTA meetings."

    She earned the award, he said.

    "She was being a mom, working at night, going to school, and taking time out to volunteer.  It shows a lot of dedication on her part," David explained.

    The Shrader family has been at Carlisle Barracks since October, and Shrader said she is considering her next project. Whatever it is, she said she wants to keep Amanda and Brittany in mind. 

    "I do a lot of volunteering to show my daughters once you put your mind to something and stick to it, you can do anything," explained Shrader.

     Shrader was nominated and selected for the award in Fort Richardson, but received it here from Maj. Gen Robert R. Ivany, commanding general.

    "It doesn't matter where I got the award. I still consider it an honor," Shrader said.

 

 

WANTED: You!

... to be a member of the Banner Editorial Board. Your opinion matters to us. We would like to know how you feel about how well The Banner and The Banner Online meet your post news and command information needs and how we can improve.

    Once assembled, the board will hold its first lunch meeting at noon, Feb. 25 at the Letort View Community Center. The locations, times, and frequency of subsequent meetings will be decided by the board.

    To apply for board membership, e-mail jeffrey.ege@carlisle.army .mil, stating your status (junior enlisted, spouse of an active-duty officer faculty member/staff, post civilian employee, active-duty officer faculty member/staff, active-duty NCO, or area military retiree), along with the reason why you think you would be a valuable member. Limited spaces are available, so e-mail now!

 

 

Staff Sgt. Jeffrey T. Ege, Public Affairs Office

Watkins looks back on career as he prepares to retire 

 

 

    Feb. 6, 2003 --Some might say that Command Sgt. Maj. Don Watkins is a bit of an overachiever.

    Watkins has blown past every career goal he has set for himself throughout his 30-year career.

    With the date that will mark the end of his time with the Army looming, Watkins has been spending a lot of time looking back and thinking about how he got where he is today, he said.

    Watkins will retire and turn over his responsibilities as post command sergeant major Feb. 20. But his goal when he joined the Army was to make the rank of private first class by the end of his initial three-year enlistment.

    The goal did get altered once or twice through the years, he explained.

    "After I accomplished my first goal, I reenlisted and set a new one - to reach the rank of sergeant major in 20 years," Watkins said. He exceeded that goal when he made the rank of sergeant major in 17 years.

    "Now, it's been 30 years, and I'm still in the Army," he said. "I thought I would do okay, but I never thought I would reach my goals like that."

    Five years as post command sergeant major have been very fulfilling, said Watkins.

    "What's been rewarding about being here is the people," he said. "Carlisle Barracks is a great place to live and work."

    Watkins illustrated the point by describing how well the post community supported him during his bout with cancer in November 1999.

    "I don't think I would have recovered so quickly without the outstanding support of the Carlisle Barracks community," Watkins said.

    Change can be scary for everyone - even a seasoned veteran like Watkins, he said.

    "I came into the Army right out of high school," Watkins said. "I haven't done anything else. I know how to be a soldier, but now I've got to learn how to be a civilian. It's scary."

    He and his wife, Joann, plan to spend his first six months as a civilian living in downtown Carlisle so that his 13-year-old daughter Keyana can finish out the school year here. After that, the North Carolina native says he and his family will likely move back to either his home state or Georgia.

    He plans to work, but he is not yet sure what exactly he would like to do, he said. "I tell my wife, 'I'll find a job doing whatever makes me happy,'" Watkins said.

    His oldest daughter, Jami, 22, is a resident student at Indiana University of Pennsylvania in her junior year.

    The man who will fill Watkins' position here when he retires is no stranger.

    Watkins and incoming Command Sgt. Maj. David Roman were stationed together at the 101st Airborne Division, Fort Campbell, Ky. from 1993-1994. Watkins was the division's operations sergeant major and Roman was the first sergeant for one of the division's companies.

    "I think Sgt. Maj. Roman will do well here," Watkins said. "He's a very experienced sergeant major. When I sat down and talked with him recently, he had a good mindset for dealing with the situations that exist at Carlisle Barracks."

    Roman is currently the command sergeant major for Division Support Command, 2nd Infantry Division, Korea.

    Watkins' retirement ceremony is scheduled for 10:30-11:30 a.m., Feb. 20 in Bliss Hall. His farewell luncheon is scheduled for 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. at the Letort View Community Center. A retreat ceremony commemorating the end of Watkins' career is scheduled for 4:30-5 p.m. at the post flag pole.

    Roman will arrive on post and assume his new responsibilities in March.

  

 


Allison Foreman, Special to the Banner

Olenda Johnson: the first African American woman to teach at Army War College

   
Feb, 6, 2003 -- Olenda Johnson left a position as the associate professor of management at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University in June to become a visiting professor of organizational behavior here at the Army War College.
    She has spent the past six months lecturing to military leaders from across the country about strategic leadership and talking with them about the importance of national security.
    "I love it there," Johnson said recently during a trip back to North Carolina. "It's been fascinating, to say the least, to be a fly on the wall."
    Johnson is the first African-American woman to teach at the college,  beginning in August - the start of the college's academic year.
    "There is a phrase they use at the War College: Drinking from a fire hose," Johnson said. "I was thrown right into it.''
    Her father, Olen, retired from the Air Force when she was 11 years old. But that did not prepare her for all of the military terms and procedures used so frequently at the college.
    She got a top security clearance and quickly learned military language, which she said is made up of mostly acronyms. She also talked with other faculty members about everything from interpreting the curriculum to setting up a seating chart.
    For example, "You cannot have two infantrymen next to each other," Johnson said.
    Infantrymen are the "front-line" people and tend to be aggressive.
    If you want to have classroom dialogue around a conference table, it's better to put them on either side of the instructor instead of in front of her. That way, they won't have automatic control of the discussion.
    "I would have just alphabetized them," Johnson joked.
    Throughout the year, Johnson will teach her students about strategic leadership and how it applies to the military. She will also teach students about the business side of "how the Army runs" and critical thinking skills so that they can make long-term decisions for all branches of the U.S. military.

    "It's like moving them from being a salesperson to a key executive of an organization," she said.
    To understand how Johnson got to the War College, one must first understand how she got to A&T.
    In 1994, Johnson was a doctoral student at the University of Pittsburgh, thinking about where she would head next. That's when she got the call from A&T.

    "They weren't even on my radar screen," Johnson said.
    But that didn't faze Quiester Craig, dean of the business and economics school.

    "He said, 'You don't know me. We've never met. But I'm going to do everything in my power to get you to A&T,'" Johnson recalled.
    Johnson's mentor and former professor at Florida A&M University was friends with Craig, and he told him he should take down Johnson's name.

    "And that was it," Johnson said.
    She met with Craig and other A&T leaders in fall 1994. Before she had handed them her resume, they were handing her a stack of apartment guides.
    "A&T is where God wanted me to be."
    Johnson started at A&T in summer 1996, teaching a strategic management class. She later taught organizational behavior, as well.
    While at A&T, Johnson got several research fellowships from the Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute, or DEOMI. The institute, on Patrick Air Force Base in Florida, teaches civilians and members of the Armed Forces about equal opportunity matters.
    Johnson spent the summers of 1997, 1998 and 2000 at the institute, researching forms of racism or perceived racism in the military, racial differences in performance evaluations and religious pluralism.
    In January 2001, Col. Cortez Dial contacted the institute in search of a lecturer for the U.S. Army War College in Pennsylvania. A lieutenant colonel at the institute recommended Johnson.
    Once again, a college that she knew almost nothing about had contacted her. And once again, she was willing to listen.
    Johnson visited the War College in June 2001 for National Security Strategy Week, when the college brings in a select number of business owners, university presidents and state government leaders to talk with military students.
    "Apparently, I said something right during that week," Johnson said.
    Less than four months later, the college asked her to be a visiting professor - a full-time faculty member who would teach at the college for a year.
    Happily, Johnson agreed.
    "I just felt like that was my next step," she said.
    And leaders at the War College are glad she took that step.
    "Her skills of business as well as human relations, as well as her being an Air Force brat made her an ideal force to bring in," Dial said.
    Johnson brings a fresh perspective to the college with her insight, expertise and the fact that she is one of only a few female instructors, he said.
    Johnson said she considered staying on at the War College because her experience has been so rewarding. But she decided in November to return to A&T for fall 2003.
    She missed the Aggie students, faculty and staff. Her parents are also here, having moved last year to High Point.
    Still, Johnson said, she has learned valuable lessons about military devotion and how much officers care about the future of the United States.
    "The learning for me at the War College hasn't stopped, and I don't expect it to stop," she said.
    Editor's note: This article was reprinted with permission from the Jan. 5-11 edition of the "Greensboro News & Record."