Banner Archive for September 2008
 

Exercise slated for Sept. 30

On Sept. 30, from 2:30-3:30 a.m., DES will conduct a installation police exercise that will require the closing of the Ashburn Gate. It should take about an hour and will require blocking Ashburn Road near Route 11.

    During this time, entry will only be permitted through the Claremont Road Gate. This should have minimal impact on traffic and the installation, based on the time of day it is scheduled.

            DES conducts these types of measures each month to test and exercise our security systems.

 


Public invited to attend National Public Lands Day on AHEC Trail

Community members are welcome to head out to the Army Heritage Trail Saturday, Sept. 27 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. to celebrate National Public Lands Day. The Carlisle Senior and Ambassador Girl Scouts will be providing a living exhibit the contributions women have  made to military history. Highlights in the exhibit include Molly Pitcher, Helen Fairchild, Dr. Mary E. Walker, Medic Monica Brown and Sgt. Leigh Ann Hester.

The Army Heritage and Education Center and the Army Heritage Trail are located at 950 Soldiers Drive in Carlisle.


Star Wars: Clone Wars moved to Saturday

Sept. 22, 2008 – "Star Wars - Clone Wars," (Rated PG)  will now be shown at Reynolds Theater on Saturday, Sept. 27. It was originally scheduled to be shown on Friday, Sept. 26.

   "Tropic Thunder" will be shown on Friday.

 


Market at Washingtonburg 

   
   


Kelly Schloesser, Army War College Public Affairs Office
Local National Guard Troops head to Iraq

 

Sgt. Dan Kankiewicz holds his 6-week-old son Donovan for the last time before deploying to Iraq with the 56th Styker Brigade's 108th Field Artillery, Pennsylvania Army National Guard. Photo by Kelly Schloesser.

 

    Sept. 19, 2008 -- It was a bittersweet goodbye on the morning of Sept. 19 for the Soldiers and Families of the 1st Battalion, 108 Field Artillery as they gathered for a farewell ceremony at their headquarters off Calvary Road in Carlisle. 

    "It's my fourth deployment to Iraq, so on one hand it's no big deal," said Sgt. Ken Miller, standing alongside his wife Deb. "Still, it's never easy leaving your family," he continued.  

    The vast majority of the Soldiers were deploying for the second, third, or fourth time and shared similar sentiments. Over and over, it was echoed 'we at least know what to expect this time around.' Even spouses commented on 'getting into a routine again.'

    Holding his son, Sgt. Dan Kankiewicz said, "I guess I am really indifferent, it's going to be harder for my wife to take care of our kids while I'm gone, so I think she is carrying a bigger burden." Kankiewicz was last in Iraq in 2004, and said he is looking forward to seeing the progress made since that time. 

    Many spouses also had a shared since of relief, agreeing that at least it was Iraq and not Afghanistan, which 'seems to be worse now.'

    Children dressed in ACUs and holding American flags listened as the battalion commander, Lt. Col. Corey Lake, gave a brief speech thanking families for bearing this hardship.  In his 23 years of service he has never seen anything more resilient than an Army Family, he commented.

    Brig. Gen. Randall R. Marchi, the Assistant Adjutant General of the Pennsylvania National Guard, also kept the families in mind during his farewell speech. In closing he said, "I thank you all for your professionalism and dedication.  And I promise you, I will have your Soldier home for Christmas." 

    The Soldiers will first spend the next several months training at Camp Shelby, Mississippi before deploying to Iraq for the year.   

 


 

Defense Travel Management Office release
Travel Card Program transition

   Sept. 18, 2008 -- DoD's current Government Travel Charge Card (GTCC) contract with Bank of America is ending this year. Citi® was awarded the contract as the new GTCC provider and will continue to support the mission needs of over 1.2 million DoD travel cardholders.

   As the Travel Card Program transitions from one vendor to another, all government travel cardholders begain receiving new cards in August 2008.  If you do not receive a new card by October 1, 2008 please contact your Agency Program Coordinator.

    Cardholders are advised to con­firm their mailing addresses on file with Bank of America® as new travel cards will be mailed to that address.

    Current cards expire on November 29, 2008, at 11:59 p.m. Eastern Standard Time (EST). New GTCCs issued by Citi® will be ready for use on November 30, 2008, at 12:00 a.m. EST.

    Important Note: Verify receipt of your new travel card immediately by phone or online (http://www.citimanager.com/dodtravel), to ensure that you will be able to use it on November 30, 2008. Contact infor­mation for verification will be printed on a sticker affixed to the new card. As part of the receipt verification proc­ess, you must agree to the Terms & Conditions in order to use your new card.

    For more information contact Donna Horton, Agency Program Coordinator (APC), 717-245-4077.


Pulitzer historian to speak to public, Army War College students

David Kennedy: How the United States Won World War II 

    Carlisle Barracks, Pa. – Pulitzer-awardee Dr. David M. Kennedy will speak about America's role in World War II and the nation's decisions that continue to reverberate today.  The lecture is free, open to the public, and scheduled Thursday, Sept 18 at 7:15 p.m. at the Army War College's Bliss Hall. The event is sponsored by the Army War College Foundation in support of the student body.

    "No one knows more about how wars have changed America," said Dr. Conrad Crane, director of the Military History Institute.  "That's been his life's work." Kennedy will review the American decisions about how to fight WW2 – leading to Winston Churchill's comment in 1946 that, "The United States stands at this moment at the summit of the world."

    David M. Kennedy, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and professor, has taught at Stanford University since 1967 and was named the Donald J. McLachlan Professor of History in 1993. His many books include the 1971 Bancroft prize-winning Birth Control in America; 1981 Pulitzer Prize finalist Over Here: The First World War and American Society, and Freedom From Fear, which won the Pulitzer Prize in history in 2000.

 


Seminar softball teams jockey for position

Sept. 18, 2008 – The top seeds for the end-of-season softball tournament were still up for grabs as the final days of the season ticked down on Sept. 17.  The regular season is slated to end Sept. 23, with the tournament beginning shortly after. Teams will be seeded according to their regular season finish.  

Below are photos from games played on Sept. 17. The first contest was between Seminars 12 and 15. The second was between Seminars 13 and 14. Photos by Thomas Zimmerman.

   
   
   
   


Changes coming for Commercial Travel Office

Sept. 18, 2008 -- At 4 p.m. hrs on Sept. 26, the Carlson Travel Office at New Cumberland Army Depot will close. As a result, effective Sept. 29, the new Commercial Travel Office (CTO) supporting all Carlisle Barracks employees will be physically located at Fort Campbell, Ky. In order to book future travel, refer to the information below.  

CWT\SatoTravel

Fort Campbell

Bldg 871 Bastogne Ave | Fort Campbell, KY 42223

Reservations:  (931) 431-6664 Fax  (931) 431-9922

Email:   ftcamofito@carlson.com 

General Office Information

Office Hours:                                         7:30 a.m.–3:45 p.m. CST

                                                            Monday – Friday (closed Federal Holidays)

Toll Free Commercial Number:            (800) 296-2959

Local Reservation Number(s):              (931) 431-6664                 

Toll Free Fax Number:                         (866) 832-8547

Local Fax Number:                                (931)  431-9922

Email:                                                   ftcamofito@carlson.com

Emergency After Hours Service

24 Hr. Emergency Services After-hours: (800) 468-2863

International Travelers, call collect          (800)468-2863 

Point of Contacts

Lilo O'Bryant, Supervisor

Fort. Campbell, KY      

Business Number:                                 608-269-8442

Accts Served By Ft. Campbell                                 Accts to be served by Ft. Campbell

Ft. Campbell                                                                Ft. Campbell

Blue Grass Army Depot                                              Blue Grass Army Depot

USPFO Kentucky                                                        USPFO Annville, PA

USPFO Ohio                                                               Letterkenny, PA

COE Louisville                                                           Tobyhanna Depot (possible purchase)

COE Cincinnati                                                           Carlisle Barracks

COE Huntington                                                         157th Infantry Brigade PA

                                                                                    US Army Security Assistance , PA

                                                                                    USPFO Kentucky

                                                                                    USPFO Ohio

 

 

 


Public Affairs staff report
Market at Washingtonburg to transport visitors to 18th century

A file photo shows a weapons demonstration that was part of the Army Heritage and Education Centers' “Market at Washingtonburg” event Sept. 15, 2007. This years event will take place Sept. 19-21 and will showcase 18th century war fighting tactics and also highlighted the many shops and business who supported the armies of the time. Over the course of the weekend, more than 300 living histories will share the stories and experiences of the people who lived during the period when Carlisle Barracks was established in 1757. Photo by Charity Murtorff.

Sept. 18, 2008 -- The Carlisle Barracks community is invited to the Army Heritage and Education Center's "The Market at Washingtonburg"; a recreated 18th century military encampment and marketplace from Sept. 19 to 21. The three-day, free event open to the public  and traces the early history of Carlisle Barracks from the French and Indian War through the American Revolution when the Barracks was known as Washingtonburg. 

    While there, visitors can talk with one of the more than 300 living history interpreters from the French and Indian War and Revolutionary War eras that will be on hand to answer questions and perform live demonstrations; witness period infantry and artillery tactics; observe an 18th century military court martial; take a peek at a fully operational blacksmith shop; or interact with the many crafters, artisans and sutlers while they create and sell an array of 18th century items.

       In addition to the many performances and educational lectures throughout the weekend, a variety of books will also be available for purchase at the book sale in Ridgway Hall and food venders will be available on site.

Tents have been set up on the Army Heritage Trail in preparation for the event. Photo by Thomas Zimmerman.

    For additional information visit www.usahec.org or call 717.245.3641.


Thomas Zimmerman, Army War College Public Affairs Office
USAWC celebrates Air Force birthday

Air Force Col. Lee Deremer, Senior Air Force Representative at the Army War College, speaks to students, staff and faculty during the celebration of the Air Force birthday Sept. 18 on the Root Hall patio. Photo by Scott Finger.

 Sept. 18, 2008 – U.S. Army War College students, staff and faculty took time on Sept. 18 to celebrate the 61 years of service to the nation by the U.S. Air Force. During a short ceremony on the Root Hall patio, the history and heritage of the Air Force was discussed before a rousing rendition of the Air Force Song.  

   Attendees were also treated to a flyover by a EC-130 from the 193rd Special Operations Wing (Pennsylvania ANG) based at Harrisburg Int'l Airport. The aircraft was enroute to an air refueling rendezvous with follow-on training.

 

 

Happy Birthday, Air Force!

Acting Secretary of the Air Force Michael B. Donley and Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Norton A. Schwartz

To the Airmen of the United States Air Force and their families:

    Happy Birthday! On September 18, 1947, our Nation established the United States Air Force, signifying the commitment of the American people to leverage the most precise and reliable technology available for our defense in the air. Our core functions have evolved since that historic day, but our responsibility to project America's strength and compassion remains steady. Today, America's Airmen deliver Global Vigilance, Reach and Power for the joint team through unrivaled air, space and cyber capabilities.
    The actions of Airmen and their families build upon a tremendous heritage of integrity, service and excellence. Your dedication to mission and devotion to duty are obvious to all. We are proud of your efforts to win today's joint fight, and we know that your commitment to mission during joint, coalition and interagency operations - now and in the future - is steadfast.
    In the past year, America's Airmen have delivered humanitarian aid to those in need and passed the milestone of one million sorties generated in support of the Global War on Terror. You have operated the Nation's space enterprise and stood watch over America's nuclear arsenal. You stood alongside ground and special operations forces as Battlefield Airmen, defended against rogue actors in cyberspace and cared for the sick and wounded. You have made a global impact that spans the spectrum of conflict, all the while defending the homeland. 


The post was treated to a flyover by an Air Force C-130 out of Harrisburg as part of the celebration. 
Photo by Scott Finger.  
  

 

Our Air Force has faced unprecedented challenges during the past year, and several events have highlighted the fact that attention to detail must form the foundation of our every action. We are addressing several strategic issues, such as strengthening the Air Force nuclear and acquisition enterprises. We know that every Airman is fully committed to the high standards of excellence that are our hallmark, and that through this commitment, we will fully restore our external credibility and our own inner confidence.
    As we celebrate the United States Air Force's 61st birthday, we call upon America's Airmen to reflect upon and commit to honoring the inspiring legacy with which we have been entrusted. 
    Happy Birthday, United States Air Force - fly, fight, win!

POW\MIAs also remembered

    Each year, a Presidential Proclamation designates the third Friday in September as National POW/MIA   Recognition Day, but there the search for those lost hasn't stopped.  

    The mission of the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) is to achieve the fullest possible accounting of all Americans missing as a result of the nation's past conflicts. The highest priority of the organization is the return of any living Americans that remain prisoners of war. To date, the U.S. government has not found any evidence that there are still American POWs in captivity from past U.S. conflicts.

    Each year, JPAC conducts at least five recovery missions associated with the Korean War, ten missions in Southeast Asia for Vietnam War cases, and ten missions in other areas of the world to search for MIAs associated with World War II and the Cold War.

    To date, over 1,400 Americans have been identified. The Central Identification Laboratory identifies, on average, about six individuals a month.

    JPAC is located on the island of Oahu in Hawaii. The command was activated on Oct. 1, 2003, created from the merger of the 30-year-old U.S. Army Central Identification Laboratory, Hawaii, and the 11-year-old Joint Task Force - Full Accounting. Commanded by a flag officer, JPAC is manned by approximately 400 handpicked Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines and Department of the Navy civilians. The laboratory portion of JPAC, referred to as the Central Identification Laboratory (CIL), is the largest forensic anthropology laboratory in the world.

    JPAC also maintains three permanent overseas detachments, each commanded by a lieutenant colonel, to assist with command and control, logistics and in-country support during investigation and recovery operations. They are Detachment One located in Bangkok, Thailand, Detachment Two in Hanoi, Vietnam and Detachment Three in Vientiane, Laos. JPAC has a fourth detachment, Detachment Four, located at Camp Smith, Hawaii, responsible for recovery team personnel when they are not deployed.

Chairman Notes Air Force's 61st Birthday

WASHINGTON, Sept. 18, 2008 - Navy Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, issued the following message to the nation's airmen to commemorate the Air Force's 61st birthday today:

    Leonardo DaVinci said, "Once you have tasted flight you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward." When it comes to flying and fighting, no one knows this more ... nor does it better ... than the United States Air Force.

    On this, your 61st birthday, we pause to say thanks to all Active Duty, National Guard, Reserve and Civilian Airmen who are always looking up – and looking out – to protect America in the great spaces of the sky. Every day air, space and missile crews ... security, medical and mission support forces ... constantly stand freedom's watch.

    Airmen like you and your families serve a cause greater than yourselves ... you make all the difference. When Americans look up, they see thousands of contrails carrying freedom and hope across the globe. And when Americans look up, they see the greatest Air Force the world has ever known!

    On behalf of the Joint Chiefs, and every man and woman in uniform, I offer my gratitude and congratulations to you and your families. Happy birthday!

Sincerely,

M.G. MULLEN

Admiral, U.S. Navy

 

 

 


Spc. Jennifer Rick, U.S. Army War College Public Affairs Office
What's happening at Youth Services?

September 18, 2008 – The Army is committed to strengthening Soldiers and their families, and has been consistently working toward improving its programs and facilities for Army families. Take a look at some of the upcoming programs being offered by Child, Youth & School Services . 

Current
    Child, Youth & School Services wants every child to do the best they can at everything – especially their school work, which is why they offer a homework tutor program.
    Twice a week, on Mondays and Thursdays, two teachers from the South Middleton school district are available at Youth Services from 4:30 to 6 p.m. to help kids with their math, science, writing, or any other homework they have, explained Bob Salviano, Youth Services director.

    The program is free of charge, but the child must be registered at Youth Services, and registered in the program. 

 Margo Geise of South Middleton Elementary School helps Sean Donovan and Ben Burns with their homework at Child, Youth and School Services. The Homework Tutor Program is a free service for children registered at Youth Services. Photo by Spc. Jennifer Rick.

    Also being offered are instructional classes, such as billiards. There will be two sessions of the class, the first starting Sept. 30 and the second starting Nov. 4. The four weeks of classes are held on Tuesdays and Thursdays each week. The class will be taught by Clyde Sutton, owner of the Billiard Barn in Carlisle.

    Guitar lessons are also scheduled to start in November. Michael Yinger, who has a college background in music, plays multiple instruments, has played in plays and on cruise ships, will be teaching the class.   

    One or two times each month, Youth Services has some kind of fun outing for the kids, said Salviano. The next outing planned is a skating party on Sept. 27. Children age eight and up are welcomed to attend. A deposit is required before the trip, but will be returned when the child attends the party.

Ongoing

    The Youth Sports Fitness program features Outdoor Adventure, a monthly trip to outdoor activities. On Sept. 20, participants will be heading to Ski Roundtop for the High Adventure Ropes Course. Other activities to look for in the future include indoor and outdoor rock climbing, skiing, snowboarding and tubing, hiking and whitewater rafting.

Upcoming

   Youth Services spices up Halloween by holding the annual Halloween Parade for the kids. They will line up and march around Indian Field, led by the Carlisle Barracks Fire Department. The youths' costumes will be judged in three categories: storybook, most original and funniest. Prizes will be awarded to the top finishers.

    Trick-or-treating on post will follow the parade.

    For middle school and teenage kids, a Halloween party will be held at the Letort View Community Center from 7 to 10 p.m.  The free event will have food, drinks, a DJ and karaoke.

    For more information on these and other upcoming events call Youth Services at 245-4555.  You can also check the Carlisle Barracks Community Calendar.

 

 


Marshall Ridge road closure Sept. 22

 Sept. 18, 2008 -- Balfour Beatty Construction has scheduled installation of an asphalt top coat at the new intersection at the entrance to Marshall Ridge Phase 1 construction on Monday, Sept. 22.

    This will mean a closure of the Marshall Road from the bridge at the Strike Zone to the top of the hill at the entrance to Marshall Ridge Phase 1. This section of road will be closed after the last school bus clears this area at approximately 3:30 p.m. and will remain closed until 7 a.m. Tues, Sept. 23.

 


 By Maj. Karen E. Hawkins, DeCA dietitian
Check your cholesterol at the door

FORT LEE, Va. – You are what you eat is so true when it comes to controlling cholesterol. Instead of a hamburger with french fries, how about grilled salmon and a baked sweet potato for dinner? Your heart will love you for it as growing evidence shows that eating foods high in omega 3s, soluble fiber, nuts, olive oil and plant stanols or sterols can help lower cholesterol. And with high cholesterol being one of the major risk factors for heart disease, controlling those levels is important for a healthy heart.

Go fish
    Salmon and other cold-water fish are high in omega 3s, which have cholesterol-lowering benefits. Omega 3 fatty acids also help the heart by reducing blood pressure and the risk of blood clots. Research shows that for those who have had a heart attack, fish oil, which has omega 3s, reduces the risk of sudden death. The American Heart Association recommends eating at least two servings of fish a week, and notes salmon, trout, herring, mackerel, tuna and sardines as having the highest levels of omega 3s. If you don't like fish, add ground flaxseed and walnuts to your diet along with using canola oil. You can also get omega 3s by taking 500–1000 milligrams of fish oil pills daily. If you get a fish burp from taking the pills, then look for the coated variety or the ones labeled "burp less" so you can get the benefits without a fishy aftertaste. The Food and Drug Administration recommends a maximum of 3 grams of omega 3s, with no more than 2 grams per day from a dietary supplement.

Go oatmeal
   
Oatmeal has soluble fiber, which helps lower the low-density lipoprotein (LDL), the "bad" cholesterol. You can also get soluble fiber in foods such as beans, pears, apples, psyllium and barley. Eat 1½ cups of cooked oatmeal along with a banana to get about 10 grams of soluble fiber. You need at least 10 grams of soluble fiber a day to lower your total and LDL cholesterol.

Go nuts
    Growing evidence suggests eating walnuts and almonds can help reduce blood cholesterol while keeping blood vessels healthy and flexible. Nuts are high in calories, but eating only a small handful will help do the job. Try using a handful of walnuts or almonds on your salad instead of meat, cheese or croutons.

Go olive oil
    Olive oil has lots of antioxidants that can lower your "bad" cholesterol while leaving your "good" – or HDL – cholesterol alone. The Food and Drug Administration recommends using two tablespoons of olive oil a day to get its heart-healthy benefits. Try using olive oil in marinade or mixed with vinegar as a salad dressing. For an Italian flair, mix olive oil with crushed garlic and use it as a bread dip instead of margarine or butter. You can get the most antioxidants by choosing extra virgin olive oil due to it being less processed than regular olive oil.

Go plants and sterols
    Look for the margarines, orange juice and yogurt drinks fortified with plant sterols to help reduce cholesterol by more than 10 percent. You need at least 2 grams – which equals two 8-ounce glasses of orange juice fortified with plant sterols a day to help lower cholesterol. If you are watching your budget, and who isn't these days, it may be most economical to get the plant stanols or sterols from fortified juice or margarines. The American Heart Association recommends foods fortified with plant sterols for people with LDL cholesterol levels of more than 160 milligrams per deciliter. Making changes to your diet like reducing the amount of saturated fat or avoiding foods with trans fats can help you lower your cholesterol. Something simple to do is just switch from whole milk to 1 percent milk and lose 9 grams of saturated fat in one serving. Small changes like this are good for your waistline along with your heart, while helping to control cholesterol.

    For more information about eating out, visit http://www.commissaries.com, go to Ask the Dietitian and post your questions on the DeCA Dietitian Forum and be sure to look for other useful information in the Dietitian's Voice archive. Also, sign up with the DeCA Dietitian on www.twitter.com and get messages sent to your cell phone today! 
    For delicious recipes, check out Kay's Kitchen. And to enjoy all of your commissary benefit
sign up for the Commissary Connection.

 

About DeCA: The Defense Commissary Agency operates a worldwide chain of commissaries providing groceries to military personnel, retirees and their families in a safe and secure shopping environment. Authorized patrons purchase items at cost plus a 5-percent surcharge, which covers the costs of building new commissaries and modernizing existing ones. Shoppers save an average of more than 30 percent on their purchases compared to commercial prices – savings worth about $3,000 annually for a family of four. A core military family support element, and a valued part of military pay and benefits, commissaries contribute to family readiness, enhance the quality of life for America's military and their families, and help recruit and retain the best and brightest men and women to serve their country.


Garrison Lane closure Sept. 18

Sept. 17, 2008 -- Garrison Lane will be blocked from 6:30 a.m. –noon, Thursday, Sept. 18 from the Anne Ely turn-in to Guardhouse Lane for painting of parking spaces. Residents and employees are asked to make sure no vehicles are left overnight in this area.

 


Ready Army: Making a family emergency plan

Sept. 17, 2008 -- One of the most important tools you and your family can have to protect yourself in possible emergencies is a family emergency plan. It is important that you plan ahead as a family for all types of emergencies and responses. Everyone in the family should understand what to do, where to go and what to take in the event of an emergency.

Be Informed

·         Find out what disasters are most likely to happen in your area and the history of their occurrence.

·         Stay informed of any specific instructions or information you may need to know regarding these specific disasters.

Establish an Evacuation Procedure

·         Know your installation's evacuation plan.

·         As a family, discuss where you will go in the event of an emergency.

·         Discuss where your children will go if they are in school at the time of the emergency, and make sure they understand where you will intend to be.

·         Be aware that in the event of an emergency, phone lines and cell phone towers may be out. It may be necessary to have a contingency plan for reaching each other. Consider using text messaging if normal communication options are not available.

·         Plan how you will evacuate family members with special needs.

·         Include pets in your family plan.

Develop a Family Communications Procedure

·         Develop a comprehensive procedure as a family for communicating in the event that you are separated during an emergency.

·         Create a sheet or card with all the phone numbers and information every individual in the family may need, including an in-case-of-emergency (ICE) name and number.

·         Make sure every member of the family has a copy of the communications procedure.

·         Save the ICE information in everyone's cell phone.

·         Be aware that in the event of an emergency, phone lines and cell phone towers may be out. It may be necessary to have a contingency plan for reaching each other.

Practice Your Plan

·         Set up practice evacuations or shelter-in-place drills for your family to ensure everyone knows what to do and where to go in the event of an emergency.

·         Keep your emergency supply kit up to date, replacing water and perishables periodically. Make sure everyone knows where it is and to take it when sheltering or evacuating.

·         Check your smoke alarms regularly.

Where to Find Additional Information

·         American Red Cross—www.redcross.org/services/prepare/0,1082,0_80_,00.html

·         Department of Homeland Security (Ready.gov)—www.ready.gov/america/makeaplan/index.html

·         Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)—www.fema.gov/plan/prepare/index.shtm 


Kelly Schloesser, Army War College Public Affairs Office
'Dress for success' provides tips for professionals

  

Rita Gworek, a  Washington D.C. fashion consultant, talks about the importance of choosing the right sleeve length during the Military Family Program's "Dressing for the Workplace" event in the Bliss Hall Auditorium Sept. 15. Photo by Thomas Zimmerman.

Sept. 17, 2008 -- Sometimes how you dress and present yourself is just as important as what you say, that was the message at the Military Family Program's "Dressing for the Workplace" event in the Bliss Hall Auditorium Sept. 15.
    Students, spouses, and community members in attendance and watching were advised in everything from dressing for your body type to what shoes are appropriate for a business setting.

    "All programs that MFP holds are need based and every year students, as well as their spouses, have a hard time making the transition from military to civilian clothing," said Joe York, MFP director.

    In order to ease this transition, Washington D.C. fashion consultant Rita Gworek of Image by Rita, gave two, separate hour-long presentations, one for men and one for women, directing them to be more conscious of their fashion decisions. 

    "Dressing for the workplace is all about communication," stated Gworek. "If you want to communicate that you are a business professional to those around you then you should be aware of what color, accessories, shoes, or even sleeve lengths communicate this objective."

    Gworek supplied both a handout and slide show presentation providing the audience with visual guidance.  Before and after pictures of professionals flooded the auditorium screen as the consultant pointed out the simple changes made from one ensemble to another "more professional and more put together" ensemble.  

    "Each of you is used to wearing a uniform, just think of a suit as your civilian uniform," said Gworek.

    Gworek also took a hand on approach with volunteers in the audience.  Several women allowed Gworek to make adjustments to their jackets or skirts and add accessories while on the center stage.  Many audience members lined up after Gworek finished her presentation for a one- on-one consultation.

    "Honestly, I've been so busy with work these past few years I haven't paid any attention to what I should be wearing so I am glad I could come to this and ask her a few questions," said Jimmie Vaughn, Army War College student.  

    The presentation was light-hearted at many moments, such as when Gworek attested that women can indeed wear white shoes after Labor Day. However, it ultimately highlighted that clothing matters in a workplace and it can carry serious implications, especially here at Carlisle Barracks. 

    Vaughn went on to point out this value in this MFP event.

    "We are a global society and it is important how we present ourselves to others here and in the international community."

    MFP holds nearly 40 open events throughout the year throughout the Carlisle Barracks community.  Upcoming events include a presentation on Army Emergency Relief on September 24, as well as a trip to Washington D.C. on October 6 for the AUSA Convention.

Tips for women:

·         Always have your suits tailored to fit your body, even 1/4" can make a significant difference.

·         Add shoulder pads to business suits, dresses, and jackets, they make you look thinner.

·         In a business setting, it is best to wear the darkest shade of a color. For instance, Navy and Black convey formality and sophistication.

·         Invest in the basics. When buying suits choose solid colors and textures, Black, Grey, Navy, or Brown. Then mix and match.

 

Tips for men:

·         It's not how much money you spend on the suit, it's how it looks on you.

·         Each time you wear a suit, brush it off completely before wearing. Doing so make sure it's free of dirt and debris.

·         Hang your suits on wooden hangers, this helps minimize damage to the fabric. Also buy pants hangers and hang matching ties with the suit, this saves time when putting your suit together.

·         Dark blues and grays are the best for business suits. Lighter colors are for more social occasions. White shirts are suggested.

 

 

 


DLIFLC activates free online language materials shopping cart

PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, Calif. - The Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center (DLIFLC) activated its new Language Materials Distribution System (LMDS) website July 1, making available hundreds of language survival kits and other materials free of charge to deploying service members. To view the shopping cart, go to: https://lmds.dliflc.edu

    * The website offers Language Survival Kits - pocket size booklets with audio CDs, in over 30 languages, ranging in topics from public affairs, cordon and search, to medical terminology.  

    * DLIFLC also offers new Headstart language DVD programs that use cutting-edge technology and computer animation to teach 80-hours of self-paced lessons and are designed to teach survival phrases in Iraqi Arabic, and Afghan Dari and Pashto.

    * Language materials can be viewed, downloaded, and ordered at www.dliflc.edu under the Products tab. You must register and receive DLIFLC account approval before placing your order. Some products are not available for download to the general public.

    POC for this press release is MAJ Scott Swanson (831) 242 5376 scott.t.swanson@us.army.mil

 


Seminar Softball season enters home stretch

  Sept. 12, 2008 -- Teams in the U.S. Army War College Seminar Softball season are jockeying for position as the season winds down in anticipation for the season-ending single elimination tournament. The regular season is slated to end Sept. 23, with the tournament beginning shortly after. Team will be seeded according to their regular season finish.  

Below are photos from games played on Sept. 10. The first contest was between Seminar 19 and 17. The second was between Seminars 20 and 16. The current standings can be found here. Photos by Thomas Zimmerman.

   
   
   
   
 


Upcoming ITR Events

--- NYC Day-On-Your-Own DATE: 9/13/08 - $45 p/p  

--- Baltimore Inner Harbor/Spirit of Baltimore Luncheon Cruise DATE: 9/23/08 - $48 p/p

--- Hersheypark tickets - Open weekends through September $33.75 adults $25.25 JR/SR (3-8, 55-69)

--- PA Renaissance Faire Tickets Available - Weekends thru October Regular discounted admission -- Adults $21.95 and Children 3-11 $8.00

-- Gaither Homecoming Giant Center, Hershey PA DATE: 9/27/08 - $41.50

-- Lipizzaner Stallions Giant Center, Hershey PA DATE: 10/3/08 - $30.00

 


AUSA Military Family Forum trip sign up

Sept. 11, 2008 -- The Military Family Program is hosting a bus trip for 44 people to the AUSA Family Forum to be presented on Monday, Oct. 6.

    The keynote speaker for the Family Forum on Monday is the Chief of Staff of the Army, General Casey, who will update the Army Family Covenant and the Soldier Family Action Plan. Please see here for the complete agenda. You will have time in the morning to tour the Family Program Pavilion on the exhibit floor which includes a number of exhibitors that provide support and resources to Military Families.

    The timelines for the trip are as follows: We will Have a 44-Passenger War College Bus.

        * Sept. 12 –Oct.2 - Sign up for the trip, Call or email Joe York at 245-4787 or email joe.york1@us.army.mil

        * Depart from The PX PARKING LOT on Monday, Oct. 6 AT 7 a.m.

        * Arrive DC Convention Center around 9 a.m.

        * Depart DC Convention Center around 5 p.m.

        * Arrive back at the PX Parking lot around 7 p.m.

    There is no charge for the trip, dress will be business casual, I will be onsite to assist you, as this event is spread over a very large area. I arranged for a group to go down last year and they really enjoyed the Family Forum and hearing the very latest plans and programs being implemented by the Army Staff for Military Families.

    For questions call or email Joe York at 245-4787 or email joe.york1@us.army.mil

 


Carlisle Barracks to hold Fall Yard Sale

Carlisle Barracks will hold it's Fall Yard Sale on Saturday, September 13 from 7a.m. to 2 p.m.

-Only Carlisle Barracks residents, students, staff, or valid DoD ID Card holders (retirees and Department of the Army Civilians at Carlisle Barracks) may participate as vendors.

-Carlisle Barracks residents may set-up displays in their yards.

-Spaces will also be available in the parking lot of the Directorate of Family, Morale and Welfare, Building 632.

 -Individuals requiring space in the DFMWR parking lot area must coordinate with the Sports Office at 245-4029.

 

***GENERAL PUBLIC WELCOMED***


  

 

Spc. Jennifer Rick, U.S. Army War College Public Affairs Office
Carlisle remembers, reflects on Patriot Day

U.S. Army War College Commandant Maj. Gen. Robert Williams speaks at an observance held Sept. 11 in honor of those who lost their lives in 2001. Photo by Suzanne Reynolds.

September 12, 2008 –Community members, local and state leaders and members of the military community gathered in the Veterans Memorial Court Yard in downtown Carlisle on Sept. 11 to pause and reflect on the events and those who lost their lives seven years ago.
        The AMVETS Post 274 Ladies Auxiliary and the Marine Corps League of Carlisle organized the event that nearly 100 people attended. 
    The observance featured music by the Town Band of Carlisle, opening and closing prayers by Marine Corps Chaplain Dick Shaffer, a gun salute by the Cumberland County Honor Guard, music from bagpiper Tim Lovely, and several guest speakers, including State Senator Pat Vance, Rep. Will Gabig, County Commissioner Rick Rovegno, and U.S. Army War College Commandant Maj. Gen. Robert Williams.
    "It's one of those defining moments where each one knows exactly where we were and what we were doing," said Vance of the events in 2001.
    She also commented on the aftermath.
    "We have endured as a country. The American spirit has prevailed."
    Williams also had words for the American public.     
   "Americans across the land are sharing in remembrance of the 3,000 people whose lives were lost Sept. 11, 2001," Williams said. "They remember the victims as well as the responders who fought to save them."
    He went on to highlight the work and dedication of the country's military.
    "Since 9/11, U.S. servicemembers have stepped up to fight the war on terror. I've had the honor of serving with these courageous men and women," he said.

 


Electrical Outage schedule Oct. 2008

    Sept. 11, 2008 -- Beginning Oct. 6 and running through Oct. 14 Field Support Services, Inc. will begin testing our 15KV electrical cables throughout the installation.  The schedule can be found here.

    This required testing helps DPW identify any problems with our electrical distribution system to preclude unplanned power outages.  Testing will require electrical outages of up to three hours to selected activities on Carlisle Barracks and family housing. 

    Activities identified by an asterisk on the attached schedule will experience an outage.  Testing of cables supporting other activities will not interfere with normal operations and activities will not experience an outage.  Activities programmed to experience an outage will be notified by email. 

    Activities programmed for an outage that will interfere with a mission essential function should contact Fred Dupert FSSI Facility Superintendent at 245-4661 or cell 717-580-3876.

 


Strategic and Operational Art Film and Discussion Program Oct. schedule

    The AY09 Campaign Analysis Course (CAC) is offering an optional Strategic and Operational Art Film and Discussion Program. A series of films addressing strategic and operational themes will be shown throughout the academic year on Tuesday evenings, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m., in Wil Waschoe Auditorium. A discussion period moderated by a faculty instructor familiar with the period and issues addressed will follow each film. The Association of the U.S. Army supports the program which is open to all students, staff, faculty, and retirees. The films showing in October are listed below. Come and join us the following evenings for professional discussion of an important episode in the evolution of the military art.

Date Showing               Title  /  Issues                                                                                            Moderator

Oct. 14                                     Julius Caesar, The Battle of Alesia / Leadership, Strategy,                           Dr. John Bonin

                                                     Operational Art

Oct. 21                                     MacArthur / Strategy, Campaign Planning, Ethics                                        Dr. Jerry Comello

Oct. 28                                     Khartoum / Leadership, Strategy, Diplomacy, Ethics                                   COL Thomas Dempsey

 


Military Family Program Dress for Success Workshop

    A personal and corporate image consultant will present a "Dress for Success" workshop for both men and women on Monday, 15 September 2008, from 11:45 a.m.-  to 12:45 p.m. (Men) and 12:45 to 1:45 p.m. (Women) in Bliss Hall Auditorium.

     The workshop will present examples of professional wardrobing for men and women, dressing "rich" on a small budget, and selecting the appropriate attire for any occasion.  The consultant will also display and explain business; business casual and casual attire; how to dress for your body type; and quality, cost, and buying tips.  

    This workshop is open to the entire Carlisle Barracks community.  If you would like to attend, please be at Bliss Hall by 11:45 a.m. Sept. 15.

    For further information, contact Joe York at 245-4787 or joe.york1@us.army.mil 


Market at Washingtonburg scheduled for Sept. 19-21

Please join us during our three day event, September 19-21st in celebrating the early history of Carlisle Barracks at "The Market at Washingtonburg".  The Army Heritage and Education Center (AHEC) will host a series of programs and demonstrations that emulate the conditions of the 18th century military encampment and marketplace.

Visitors will be able to witness and engage with an extensive array of living history interpreters and exhibits from French and Indian War and Revolutionary War military units as they come to life portraying significant times in our military history.

Friday, 19 September will feature special educational tours of the historical camp for local school and youth organizations.  It will enable children to gain a greater understanding of the military and the history surrounding Carlisle Barracks.  Saturday and Sunday will consist of demonstrations of 18th century field and revolutionary war tactics as well as a period court-martial and parade for the camp commandant.

In addition to the event, visitors can also peruse the usual exhibits along the Army Heritage Trail, which include a World War I trench, a Revolutionary War Redoubt, French and Indian War way station, a variety of Civil War cabins, a World War II company area, and the newly constructed Vietnam fire base.

The event is free and open to the public.  There is ample parking on site and handicapped parking if needed.  While here you can indulge in a variety of foods provided by numerous venders, choose to attend a lecture or even rummage through the many books that will be available for purchase at the book sale in Ridgway Hall.

Click here for the Market at Washingtonburg schedule of events

For more information, please visit www.usahec.org or call 717-245.3641.


Inspector General Support Information

Sept. 11, 2008 -- Inspector General support to the USAWC is provided by the TRADOC IG.  If you have concerns or issues that cannot be resolved through your chain of command and require IG assistance, you may contact Lt. Col. Dean Redden at 757-788-5413 or DSN 680-5413.

    The TRADOC IG Web page provides information in following subject areas: Rules of Engagement, Before You Call the IG, Confidentiality, IG Appropriate?, Submit IG Request, IG FAQs and Additional Contacts.  This information can accessed at the following link:

http://www.tradoc.army.mil/ig/

 


Patriot Day, 2008
A Proclamation by the President of the United States of America

    September 11, 2001, was etched into America's memory when 19 terrorists attacked us with barbarity unequaled in our history. On Patriot Day, we cherish the memory of the thousands of innocent victims lost, extend our thoughts and prayers to their families, and honor the heroic men and women who risked and sacrificed their lives so others might survive.

    Since 9/11, we have recognized the threat posed by terrorists to the safety of the American people and worked to protect our homeland by fighting terrorists abroad. We are confronting terrorism by advancing freedom, liberty, and prosperity as an alternative to the ideologies of hatred and repression. Our Nation pays tribute to our courageous men and women in uniform serving around the world and the devoted members of our law enforcement, public safety, and intelligence communities at home who work night and day to protect us from harm and preserve the freedom of this great Nation.

    Seven years ago, ordinary citizens rose to the challenge, united in prayer, and responded with extraordinary acts of courage, with some giving their lives for the country they loved. On Patriot Day, we remember all those who were taken from us in an instant and seek their lasting memorial in a safer and more hopeful world. We must not allow our resolve to be weakened by the passage of time. We will meet the test that history has given us and continue to fight to rid the world of terrorism and promote liberty around the globe.

    By a joint resolution approved December 18, 2001 (Public Law 107-89), the Congress has designated September 11 of each year as "Patriot Day."

    NOW, THEREFORE, I, GEORGE W. BUSH, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim September 11, 2008, as Patriot Day. I call upon the Governors of the United States and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, as well as appropriate officials of all units of government, to direct that the flag be flown at half-staff on Patriot Day. I also call upon the people of the United States to observe Patriot Day with appropriate ceremonies, activities, and remembrance services, to display the flag at half-staff from their homes on that day, and to observe a moment of silence beginning at 8:46 a.m. eastern daylight time to honor the innocent Americans and people from around the world who lost their lives as a result of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.

    IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eighth day of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand eight, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-third.

GEORGE W. BUSH

 

 


Jim Garamone, American Forces Press Service
Pentagon Memorial Dedication Recalls 9/11 Sacrifices

 

The Pentagon Memorial is made up of 184 memorial units representing each individual who lost their lives during the terrorist attack. Defense Dept. photo by Army Staff Sgt. Michael J. Carden

 

WASHINGTON, Sept. 11, 2008 – On the seventh anniversary of the day a hijacked airliner slammed into the Pentagon, President Bush today dedicated a memorial near the crash site, calling it not only a place of remembrance, but also a reminder of the resilience of the American spirit.

    The attacks in New York and at the Pentagon and the thwarted hijacking of United Flight 93, which crashed in Pennsylvania, are events that "changed our world forever," President Bush during his remarks at the dedication ceremony.
    "The years that followed have seen justice delivered to evil men and battles fought in distant lands," the president said. "But each year on this day, our thoughts return to this place. Here we remember those who died, and here, on this solemn anniversary, we dedicate a memorial that will enshrine their memory for all time."
    The president said the memorial will be a place of remembrance, and a place where those who lost family and friends can find solace. But it is more, he said.
    "For all our citizens, this memorial will be a reminder of the resilience of the American spirit," Bush told the audience. "As we walk among the benches, we will remember there could have been many more lives lost."
    The memorial also will remind Americans that "when buildings fell, heroes rose," Bush said. In the Pentagon, employees ran into smoke-filled corridors to guide co-workers to safety. In New York, firefighters and police rushed up the stairs of the World Trade Center as the towers neared collapse. "Passengers aboard Flight 93 charged the cockpit and laid down their lives to spare countless others," he said. "One of the worst days in America's history saw some of the bravest acts in America's history."
   The events of Sept. 11 still sear Americans, said Navy Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.
   "Even for all the pain, it heals us to come back here and reflect on the suffering and the sacrifice of that day," he said.
    American servicemembers serving around the world in harm's way remember that sacrifice, and are dedicated to the memory of the innocents who died in the attacks. They are resolved that it doesn't happen again, the chairman said.
    "I see it in their eyes -- the eyes of every one of our soldiers, sailors, airmen, Marines and Coast Guardsmen who, at this very moment, stand watch anywhere, any time, ready to do their duty," Mullen said. "The enduring resolve to take the fight to our enemies – those who brought the fight here – burns strong within each and every one of our servicemen and women. It is that resolve that will always return us here to this spot -- this 'vision-place of souls.'"
    Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said the memorial consecrates the Pentagon.


   

The official party holds a moment of silence during the Pentagon Memorial dedication ceremony Sept. 11, 2008. The national memorial is the first to be dedicated to those killed at the Pentagon on Sept. 11, 2001. The site contains 184 inscribed memorial units honoring the 59 people aboard American Airlines Flight 77 and the 125 in the building who lost their lives that day. U.S. Army photo by D. Myles Cullen.

    "With this memorial we pay our respects to 184 souls; to the many who were injured; and to the families who still grieve," the secretary said. "While no public display can make up for the injustice, or lessen the pain of these losses, the one that we dedicate today binds all of America to the dead and their survivors. Your suffering and your solace, so personal to you, become the nation's as well.
    "From now on, the Pentagon is more than a symbol of government, more than the seat of military affairs," he continued. "It is also a place of remembrance."
    The president also honored Americans who decided to defend the nation in a time of war.
    "When our enemies attacked the Pentagon, they pierced the rings of this building, but they could not break the resolve of the United States armed forces," he said. "Since 9/11, our troops have taken the fight to the terrorists abroad, so we do not have to face them here at home. Thanks to the brave men and women and all those who work to keep us safe, there has not been another attack on our soil in 2,557 days."
    Donald H. Rumsfeld, the defense secretary on the day of the attacks, also spoke at the dedication. The former secretary – who ran to the site of the attack and helped triage the victims – said Americans will not forget what the attack meant to the United States.
    "In the sinister logic of its perpetrators and in the suffering of its victims, Sept. 11 was among the darkest days for Americans," he said. "But it was also a day when, it can be said, America rediscovered its special grace: the American people's capacity for courage, for goodwill and for sacrifice."
    Rumsfeld said the dedication of the memorial was a day to "renew our vows to never forget how this long struggle began, and to never forget those who fell first."
    Today's dedication is the culmination of an effort so Americans remember what happened when terrorists flew American Airlines Flight 77 into the Pentagon Sept. 11, 2001, Jim Laychak, president of the Pentagon Memorial Fund, said.
    Laychak lost his brother, David, aboard Flight 77. He helped to raise more than $15 million in private funds to make the memorial a reality.
    "We want people to remember what happened here," he said in his remarks at the dedication ceremony. "We want people to remember our loved ones. We want people to remember the feeling that swept through our country after 9/11 – that feeling of taking care of all those who were in such pain."
    As part of the dedication of the Pentagon Memorial, announcers read the names of all those killed aboard the flight and in the building. From Paul Ambrose to Yuguang Zheng, the names went on. Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, Defense Department civilians, passengers and crew, several sets of husbands and wives and a whole family: 184 innocent lives lost at 9:36 a.m. on Sept. 11, 2001.
    As the announcers read the names, pictures of those killed – smiling at the camera or in official military photos – put faces to names. A sailor rang a ship's bell after each name was read.
    The memorial opens to the public today at 7 p.m. and will remain open 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

 

 


What to do if you suspect a friend or loved one is suicidal

-Do take it seriously. 70% of all people who commit suicide give some warning of their intentions to a friend or
member of their family.

-Do be willing to listen. Even if professional help is needed, your friend or loved one will be more willing to seek help if
you have listened to him or her.

-Do voice your concern. Take the initiative to ask what is troubling your friend or loved one, and attempt to overcome
any reluctance on their part to talk about it.

-Do let the person know you care and understand. Reassure your friend or loved one that he or she is not alone.
Explain that, although powerful, suicidal feelings are temporary, depression can be treated, and problems can be
solved.

-Do ask if the person has a specific plan for committing suicide, and how far he or she has gone in carrying it out.
(Note: asking about suicide does not cause a person to think about – or commit – suicide. This is a myth.)

-Do get professional help immediately. Bring your friend or loved one to the nearest emergency room or crisis center.
(If the person is already in treatment, contact his or her clinician.) Your friend or loved one will be more likely to seek
help if you accompany him or her.

-Do follow up on treatment. Take an active role in following up with the treatment process and medications.
Be sure to notify the physician about any unexpected side effects or changes in behavior.

-If for any reason you are unsure, uncomfortable, or unable to take action, find a healthcare professional with whom to share your concerns or contact Military OneSource: Stateside 1-800-342-9647 or Overseas 1-800-3429-6477. Whatever you choose to do, the important thing is to make the effort.

Below is a questionnaire to helpo determine the risk of suicide.

Are you worried about a friend or loved one?

 


Carlisle Barracks parking lot to close

    The parking lot adjacent to Building 314 & 315 on Lovell Avenue will be closed on September 13 and 14, from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. for Motorcycle Safety Training.


War College Library to display personal items  

   The U.S. Army War College library invites you to display your collectibles, art works or handicrafts for everyone to enjoy. The locked, six-sided glass case is approximately twenty inches in diameter and has room for four shelves of small to medium sized objects.

    Past displays have included Ukrainian Easter eggs, World War I relics, African masks and artifacts, antique dolls and books, military patches and miniatures.

    Stop by to view the current eye-catching display items, on loan from the International Fellows Office.

    To schedule your display, please visit the Library or email CARL_ATWC-ALB@us.army.mil


Pentagon Memorial Opening to the Public

WASHINGTON, DC- The Pentagon Memorial will be open to the public on September 11, 2008, from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. This will be the first opportunity for the general public to view the Memorial in remembrance of the lives lost on 9/11 at the Pentagon and on American Airlines Flight 77. The opening will include a multimedia tribute highlighting stories of

9/11 survivors and family members of victims.

    The Pentagon Memorial contains 184 memorial units, each of which is dedicated to an individual victim by its unique placement within the collective field. The field is organized as a timeline of the victims'

ages, moving from the youngest, three-year-old Dana Falkenberg to the oldest, John D. Yamnicky, 71.

    Each memorial unit is specifically positioned in order to distinguish victims on board American Airlines Flight 77 from victims within the Pentagon. The memorial units representing the 59 lives lost on American Airlines Flight 77 are positioned so that a visitor to the park will face the sky when reading the name of the victim to whom that unit is dedicated.

    When standing at a memorial unit dedicated to a victim who was inside the Pentagon, the visitor sees the victim's name and the Pentagon in the same view.

    For information on how to access the Pentagon Memorial, please refer to the Memorial Visitors section at http://www.defenselink.mil/home/features/2008/0708_memorial/.

 


Post looking into mass transportation program

Sept. 10, 2008 – Carlisle Barracks is looking for employees who would be interested in a mass transportation program operating from the Chambersburg and Shippensburg areas to the post for work.

    "Departure from Chambersburg would be the Scotland Exit Park and Ride and departure from Shippensburg would be the K-Mart parking lot," said Donna Horton, Resources Management Analyst. .  There is a similar bus shuttle service now that operates from Shippensburg to Mechanicsburg Naval Depot. The government provides up to $115 per month for reimbursement. 

    This program, if implemented, would be open to all DoD, NAF and military employees. Interested persons should contact Donna Horton at 245-4077.

    For more information see the attached memo.

 


Defense Commissary Agency release
Schuckenbrock DeCA's new director of public health and safety 

FORT LEE, Va. – Army Col. David Schuckenbrock is DeCA's new director of public health and safety, Defense Commissary Agency officials announced. He replaces Col. Perry Chumley, who is now assigned to Fort Bragg, N.C.

    Schuckenbrock reported to DeCA Aug. 7 from San Antonio, where he served as commander, Great Plains Regional Veterinary Command, Fort Sam Houston, Texas. As DeCA's director of public health and safety, he is responsible for leading a staff that plans and implements the agency's consumer health and safety programs.

    "DeCA is responsible for providing the safest product and shopping environment possible for our customers," said DeCA Director and Chief Executive Officer Philip E. Sakowitz Jr. "We are confident that with his experience Colonel Schuckenbrock will maintain the agency's high standards as a safe food source for DoD."

    When Schuckenbrock completed his tour at the Great Plains Regional Veterinary Command this summer it marked nine years that he had commanded veterinary districts or regions.

    Schuckenbrock entered active duty as a captain in 1981, three years after receiving his commission in the Army Reserve. His previous assignments included stops at Carswell Air Force Base, Texas; Carlisle Barracks, Pa.; Fort Shafter, Hawaii; Army and Air Force Exchange Service headquarters in Dallas; and several short deployments to the Persian Gulf and Africa.

    "I look forward to assisting and enabling the Defense Commissary Agency in providing a tremendous quality-of-life benefit to warriors and their families, with a constant focus on enhancing public health and safety," Schuckenbrock said. "I'm proud to support those who protect and defend our country today, as well as those who have served so honorably in the past."

    Schuckenbrock has a Bachelor of Science degree in biology from Missouri Western State College, Saint Joseph, Mo.; a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from the University of Missouri-Columbia; and a Master of Public Health degree from the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences in Bethesda, Md. He is also a graduate of the Command and General Staff College, and is board-certified by the American College of Veterinary Preventive Medicine. 

 


Softball game postoned  

Due to the condition of the softball field and the weather the Seminar Softball Games for Tuesday, 9 September have been postponed.  They will be rescheduled at a later date.


 Travel card changes - What You Need to Know

Key Facts

  • All travel, purchase, and fleet cards are expiring after a 10-year master contract with Bank of America.
  • In January 2008, the Department of Defense (DoD) awarded a contract, to Citi® bank to be the new contractor.
  • Current DoD Government Travel Charge Cards will expire on November 29, 2008 at 11:59 p.m. Eastern Standard Time (EST); New cards issued by Citi®, will be ready for use beginning November 30, 2008 at 12:00 a.m. EST.

Receiving Your New Card

  • New Government Travel Charge Cards (GTCCs) will be mailed during September 2008.
  • Cards will be mailed to your mailing address on file with Bank of America®. To check your profile, please call Bank of America® or log on to the EAGLS.
  • If you are scheduled for a Permanent Change Station (PCS) move, please make sure that your address and date of move is on file with Bank of America® or updated in EAGLS. Agency Program Coordinators (APCs-Donna Horton) will not have the option to forward the mail to your new address. Please contact the APC at your new PDS upon arrival.
  • If you do not receive your new travel card by October 15, 2008, notify your APC.

After Receiving Your New Card

  • Do not dispose of either the current GTCC or the new card issued by Citi®, as current cards do not expire until November 29, 2008 at 11:59 p.m. EST.
  • Immediately verify receipt of the new travel card to ensure that it will be available for use on November 30, 2008.
  • As part of the receipt verification process, you must agree to the Terms & Conditions in order to use your new GTCC.
  • Cardholders will need to pay all outstanding, undisputed charges on their GTCC issued by Bank of America®. Call the phone number on the back of the card to request a statement or contact your APC for further assistance.
  • After the cutover (November 29, 2008), Bank of America® will continue to accept and receive payments for charges previously made on its cards.

Traveling During the Cutover

  • If you will be traveling during the cutover (November 29-30, 2008), be sure to carry both cards. Charge all official travel expenses up to and including, November 29, 2008, on your current GTCC issue by Bank of America®. Travel expenses incurred after 12:00 a.m. EST on November 30, 2008 should be charged to your new GTCC issued by Citi®.

What to Expect

  • Since the new card will also be VISA® branded, you'll have the same worldwide charging privileges as you do with the current program.
  • Charge limits will remain the same and APCs will continue to have the authority to raise limits to meet mission requirements.

Attention all readers – MWR Book Exchange  

    Sept. 8, 2008 -- MWR has arranged for and is sponsoring a book exchange in the lobby of 632 Wright Ave, the same building as the Carlisle Barracks Thrift Shop.

    To participate, drop by 632 Wright Ave between 7:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday thru Friday.  You can exchange one book for another or borrow a book to read and return it when done.  This will be done on the honor system.

    There is a bulletin board above the bookshelf if you want to note a book or author you might be looking for. 

    Donations have been made by the Thrift Shop and the Bookery, which is part of the Friends of the Bosler Library.

    For more information contact Mary Anne Turnbaugh at 245-4696.

 


Dunham U.S. Army Health Clinic closures for FY09

October 2008
10 – Closed – Quarterly Commander's Forum a.m. / Training Holiday p.m.
13 – Closed – Columbus Day Holiday

November 2008
10 – Closed – Training Holiday
11 – Closed – Veterans Day Holiday
27– Closed – Thanksgiving Day Holiday
28 – Closed – Training Holiday

December 2008
5 – Closed at 1200 – Post Holiday Party p.m.
25 – Closed – Christmas Day Holiday
26 – Closed – Training Holiday 

January 2009
1 – Closed - New Year's Day Holiday
2 – Closed – Training Holiday
16 – Closed – Quarterly Commander's Forum a.m. / Training Holiday p.m.
19 – Closed - Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Holiday

February 2009
13 – Closed – Training Holiday
16 – Closed – President's Day Holiday 

March 2009

April 2009
2 – Closed at 1230 – Quarterly Commander's Forum (1300)

May 2009
22 – Closed – Training Holiday
25 – Closed – Memorial Day Holiday 

June 2009

 

July 2009
3 – Closed – Independence Day Holiday (observed)
6 – Closed – Training Holiday
9 – Closed at 1230 – Quarterly Commander's Forum (1300) 

August 2009

 

September 2009
4 – Closed – Training Holiday
7 – Closed – Labor Day Holiday


Upcoming MWR events

Letort View Community Center   245-3991

Sept. 12 – Seafood Buffet, reservations required

Sept. 18 – "Wing Nite" at the Tiki Bar, 4 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Sept. 21 – Sunday brunch, 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., reservations required

Fall Ballroom Dancing – classes begin Sept. 29. Sign up now!

 

Strike Zone Bowling Center   245-4109

Every Friday – Cosmic Bowling from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Every Saturday – Family Cosmic Bowling from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Join us for NFL Sundays – Introducing two big sreens t.v.'s over lanes

 

Sports   245-4343/4029

Sept. 13 – Fall Yard Sale

 

Army Community Services – 245-4352

Sept. 9 – Advanced Financial Planning Workshop, 8:30 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Sept. 11 – German Coffee Club, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m.

Sept. 17 – Re-entry from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m.

Sept. 17 – Newcomer's Orientation Briefing from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Sept. 18 – Waiting Family members, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Sept. 18 – Sponsorship meeting, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Sept. 19 – Overseas briefing, 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Sept. 20 – VTC (Seminar 21) 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

 

Information, Ticketing and Registration – 245-3309/4048

Sept. 13 – New York City Day On Your Own. Get tickets now! $45 per person.

 

Spouses Club – Luncheons: 216-233-9205 Trips: 254-6882

Sept. 10 – Walking Tour of Carlisle, meet in Post Exchange parking lot at 8:15 a.m.

Sept. 17 – Spouses Club Luncheon, LVCC 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

 

 

 


"Gifts to Army" website benefits Soldiers and families

What is it?

The new "Gifts to Army" Web site is an online resource developed to streamline and process gifts to the Army that benefit Soldiers and Families. This Web site will provide the public an online resource to answer the question: "How can I help?"  With the on-going conflict, the public wants to know how it can help with money, goods or services to help relieve many of the stresses and strains that Soldiers now deal with on a daily basis. 

The Web site can be found on army.mil at: http://giftstoarmy.army.mil

 

Why was it developed?

In response to the many requests received from the American public, this Web site was developed to provide the public an online resource to answer their questions on how to help the Army.  The Army Gift Program has existed for many years, however, the law allowing the Army to accept gifts was recently amended allowing the Army to accept gifts to assist Wounded Soldiers, Wounded Civilian Employees and their Families. The Web site centralizes the many venues and paths for public assistance that are part of the Army's overall Gift Program in a streamlined and accessible resource.

 

What is the intent?

This Web site is not intended to solicit donations!  It is intended to:

1.  Provide members of the Army a central location to direct the many requests the Army gets from citizens, organizations and the American public who express an interest in contributing or providing support to Soldiers and Families. 

2.  Provide the American public with information and a method by which citizens, organizations, and corporations can donate cash, goods, or services to benefit Soldiers and their Families.

 

How do I use this resource?

Inform our Soldiers, Civilians and Family Members about this site through command information channels to help facilitate questions from the public who have expressed a desire to support Soldiers through gifts and donations.  This is not a tool intended to be used to solicit gifts—but to provide accessible information to those who ask, "how can I help Soldiers and Families?"

 

Who Manages the Web site?

The Army's Gift Program is managed by the Office of the Administrative Assistant to the Secretary of the Army.  The Army Gift Program has existed for many years, however, the law allowing the Army to accept gifts was recently amended allowing the Army to accept gifts to assist Wounded Soldiers, Wounded Civilian Employees and their Families. The launch of the Web site centralizes the many venues and paths for public assistance that are part of the Army's overall Gift Program.  Contribution options addressed in the Web site include support for the Army, Soldiers and Families, Wounded Warriors, Army installations, Soldier Employment and more.  In addition, information on Army Community Support programs are also provided.

 

Who can I contact with questions?

Questions regarding gift assistance can be emailed to ArmyGiftProgram@hqda.army.mil.


  Spouses Club hosting luncheon Sept. 17

   The Carlisle Barracks Spouses' Club presents BUNCO at their first luncheon, Wednesday, September 17th at the Letort View Community Center.

    The menu will consist of your choice of salads, a sandwich buffet and a sundae bar. Social hour begins at 10:30 a.m. with luncheon to follow at 11:00. With your attendance each and every month throughout the year, you will be eligible for a GRAND prize drawing at our last luncheon. 

    RSVP by NOON, Friday, September 12th to the respective contacts:

    A-I    Shannon Blocker    (717) 836-5335

    J-R    Brenda Moreland    (910) 916-2577

    S-Z    Celeste Williams    (717) 386-5385

 


Ginger Wilson-Gines, Chief, Behavioral Health, Dunham U.S. Army Health Clinic
Suicide – Facts and Myths

    Health care providers and family members are sometimes concerned that asking about thoughts of suicide might cause someone to realistically consider this behavior or "plant a seed" so to speak.  Research debunks this myth and in fact demonstrates that persons considering suicide are willing to respond to questions about their thoughts and behaviors and often these questions play a significant role in their decision to consider other alternatives.  In fact, many people who have considered suicidal behavior indicate that someone caring enough to question them and help them consider other alternatives, made the difference.

    How should questions be asked to assess risk of suicide?  Usually a direct straight forward approach works best.  Health care providers typically develop comfort in having specific questions that assess thoughts of suicide, plans to act on those thoughts, an available means to act on the plans and what specific thoughts or behaviors have prevented the individual from previously acting on these thoughts.  Anyone who has frequent thoughts of death or suicide or a specific plan, should be evaluated by a mental health professional or someone who has specific training in suicide risk assessment.

    Sep 7-13 2008 is National Suicide Prevention Week.  This is an excellent time to consider the people in your life who may be struggling with personal and family problems, depression and particularly our Soldiers and Veterans who may be readjusting to new routines while continuing to be troubled by past experiences.   Now is the best time to ask them those tough questions.  More than 22,000 veterans sought assistance through a special suicide hot line in its first year.  When the hot line began, it was advertised with the slogan, "It takes the courage and strength of a warrior to ask for help."  No truer words have been spoken!

    Suicide leaves many victims behind to pick up the pieces and try to go on while making sense of a senseless action.

    The Dunham Behavioral Health section is beginning a new educational program in the fall to standardize intervention with persons who may be considering suicide.  Health care providers, front desk personnel, military personnel and the greater military community will be offered the opportunity to learn a proven approach to discussing this sensitive subject.  A schedule of classes will be advertised as they become available.  In the meantime, please don't hesitate to contact your Behavioral Health staff at 245-4602 for any type of assistance on this most important topic.

 

 

 


Gerry J. Gilmore, American Forces Press Service
England: Pentagon's 9/11 Memorial 'America's Memorial'

Deputy Secretary of Defense Gordon England speaks at a ceremony held at the Pentagon Memorial site, Sept. 7, 2007, in honor of those who lost their lives in the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attack against the Pentagon. Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Molly A. Burgess.

WASHINGTON - When it is completed in about a year from now, the Pentagon Memorial will commemorate the sacrifice of not only the 184 victims who died here, but also those who perished at the other Sept. 11, 2001, attack sites in New York City and Pennsylvania, Deputy Secretary Gordon R. England said here today.

    "It is very fitting and proper that we remember all those who were killed here that day with this memorial, because this is just not a memorial here at the Pentagon, this is America's memorial," England said at a gathering of Pentagon Memorial Fund managers, private and corporate donors, family members of victims, and construction workers.

    The world experienced irreversible change as a result of the Sept. 11, terrorist attacks on the United States, England said. Nearly 3,000 people were killed at the Twin Towers in New York City, the Pentagon and in Pennsylvania.

    People forget that citizens from 60 different nations were among those who died in the Sept. 11 attacks with terrorist-hijacked airliners, England said next to the memorial's construction site adjacent to the Pentagon.

Jean Barnak, project manager for the Pentagon Memorial, briefs friends and family members of those who lost their lives in the September 11, 2001, terrorist attack against the Pentagon, prior to giving a tour of the site. Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Molly A. Burgess.

    England also saluted America's servicemembers and coalition partners, noting they've "served so magnificently since 9-11 to protect our freedoms and our liberties."

    Jim Laychak, president of the Pentagon Memorial Fund, said key features of the two-acre memorial are 184 illuminated benches that represent each victim of the Pentagon attack. Laychak lost his brother, David, during the attack.

    "You think back about how awful you felt that day," Laychak said. "And, then you come out here and look at the progress that's being made, and you look at what we've done."

    The Pentagon Memorial is "a way to take such a tragic event and turn it into something positive," Laychak said.

    About $15 million has been collected for construction of the memorial so far, he said, noting another $7 million is needed. Victims' families also want to collect another $10 million to be used to maintain the memorial.

    "But, the focus right now is making sure we get the money to finish the construction," Laychak said. Communications firm AT&T and the nation of Taiwan each contributed $1 million toward construction of the Pentagon Memorial, he said. Other donors who've made significant contributions include the nation of Australia, the commonwealth of Virginia, and the state of Maryland, he added.

    Establishing the Pentagon Memorial "is a labor of love for all of us," Laychak said. "It's a labor of love for the families; it's a labor of love for the people that are working on this project.

    "And, I am looking forward to the day a year from now, when I say to people: 'I welcome you to the Pentagon Memorial.'"

 

Note: The entrance to the Pentagon through Corridor 3 will be closed Sept. 3 - 11. All travel to and parking at the Pentagon on Sept. 10 and 11 will be difficult.


Perspectives in Military History presents:"A Tale of Three Cities: How the United States Won World War II"

Dr. David M. Kennedy
Donald J. McLachlan Professor of History
Stanford University

Taking a nation to war is a complex and difficult proposition. Dr. David M. Kennedy will discuss the core premises of American grand strategy in World War II, and their implications for war-fighting, the nature of the victory that was achieved, and the U.S. role in the post-war international order.  The general line of argument is to develop the idea that America's war was like that of no other belligerent. The presentation builds from Winston Churchill's observation in August 1945 that "The United States stand at this moment at the summit of the world," and tries to explain how that came to be -- contrary to popular mythology, not just as an incidental effect of the war's progression, but as a result of some quite specific, concrete decisions to fight a particular kind of war, on a particular time-table, with a particular configuration of forces.

Dr. David M. Kennedy is a Pulitzer Prize-winning historian specializing in American history. He is the Donald J. McLachlan Professor of History at Stanford University and the Director of the Center for the Study of the North American West. Reflecting his interdisciplinary training in American Studies, which combined the fields of history, literature, and economics, Professor Kennedy's scholarship is notable for its integration of economic and cultural analysis with social and political history. His book, Birth Control in America: The Career of Margaret Sanger (1970), embraced the medical, legal, political, and religious dimensions of the subject and helped to pioneer the emerging field of women's history. Over Here: The First World War and American Society (1980) used the history of American involvement in World War I to analyze the American political system, economy, and culture in the early twentieth century. Freedom From Fear: The American People in Depression and War (1999) recounts the history of the United States in the two great crises of the Great Depression and World War II.

Sponsored by the Army War College Foundation

DATE:  Thursday, September 18, 2008

TIME:  The doors open at 6:45 p.m. the talk begins at 7:15 p.m.

PLACE:  Bliss Hall, Carlisle Barracks, PA.

For more information, please call (717) 245-3803.

For updates and any last-minute changes in "Perspectives" meeting times and places, please check the AHEC homepage: www.usahec.org

 


Army Heritage and Education Center trail to close

On the morning of Monday, Sept. 8, the trail at the Army Heritage and Education Center will be closed to be sprayed with herbicide.


Suicide Prevention TipsSuicide Awareness Week September 7-13

Most suicides and suicide attempts are reactions to intense feelings of:

Loneliness - is an emotional state in which a person experiences powerful feelings of emptiness and isolation. Loneliness is more than just the feeling of wanting company or wanting to do something with another person. Loneliness is a feeling of being cut off, disconnected from the world, and alienated from other people.

Worthlessness – is an emotional state in which a person feels low, and they lack any feelings of being valued by others.

Hopelessness - is a spiritual/relational issue. It often stems from feeling disconnected from a higher power or other people. Connection with a higher power and other people is a key to helping individuals to withstand grief and loss. This connection allows individuals to rebound from most severe disappointments of life.

Helplessness – is a condition or event where the Soldier thinks that they have no control over their situation and whatever they do is futile such as repeated failures, receipt of a "Dear John or Dear Joan" letter, etc.

Guilt- is a primary emotion experienced by people who believe that they have done something wrong.

Depression - is considered when one of the following two elements is present for a period of at least twoweeks: 
    -Depressed mood or inability to experience life pleasures. If one of these elements is identified,depression is diagnosed when five symptoms from the list below are presented over a two-week period.
     -
Feelings of overwhelming sadness and/or fear, or the seeming inability to feel emotion (emptiness). 
     -
A decrease in the amount of interest or pleasure in all, or almost all, daily activities.Changing appetite and marked weight gain or loss.
     -
Disturbed sleep patterns, such as insomnia, loss of REM sleep, or excessive sleep (Hypersomnia). 
     -
Psychomotor agitation or retardation nearly every day. 
     -
Fatigue, mental or physical, also loss of energy. 
     -
Intense feelings of guilt, helplessness, hopelessness, worthlessness, isolation/loneliness and/or anxiety.
     -
Trouble concentrating, keeping focus or making decisions or a generalized slowing and memory difficulties. 
    
Recurrent thoughts of death (not just fear of dying), desire to just "lie down and die" or "stop breathing," recurrent suicidal ideation without a specific plan, or a suicide attempt or a specific plan for committing suicide. 
    
Feeling and/or fear of being abandoned by those close to the individual.

    For some individuals, a combination of many factors may cause depression. For others, a single factor may trigger the illness.

     Depression often is related to the following:
     -
Imbalance of brain chemicals called neurotransmitters - Changes in these brain chemicals may cause or contribute to clinical depression.
     -
Negative thinking patterns - People who are pessimistic, have low self-esteem, worry excessively, or feel they have little control over life events are more likely to develop clinical depression.
     -
Family history of depression – A genetic history of clinical depression can increase one's risk for developing the illness. But depression also occurs in people who have had no family members with depression.
     -
Difficult life events – Events such as the death of a loved one, divorce, financial strains, history of trauma, moving to a new location or significant loss can contribute to the onset of clinical depression.
     -
Frequent and excessive alcohol consumption – Drinking large amounts of alcohol on a regular basis can sometimes lead to clinical depression. Excessive alcohol consumption is also sometimes a symptom of depression.

 

Important Telephone Numbers

CRISIS INTERVENTION:

Cumberland/Perry:     717-243-6005

Dauphin:     717-232-7511

Franklin:     717-264-2555

York:     717-852-5320                        

 

HOTLINES                                                                          

Childline (child abuse hotline): 1 800 – 932 - 0313

Domestic Violence: 1 – 800 – 852 – 2102

Teen Line: 1 – 800 – 722 – 5385

Poison Control: 1 – 800 – 521 – 6110

Carlisle Barracks Police: 717 – 245 – 4115

Tricare: 1 – 877 – 874 – 2273

Family Advocacy Victim program: Anne Hurst, 717-245-3777

 

DAHC BEHAVIORAL HEALTH:     717-245-4602

 

RAPE CRISIS

1-888-727-2877

Emergency: 911

 

LIFE LINES

Wounded Soldier and Family Hotline – 1-800-984-8523

www.armyfamiliesonline.org – 1-800-833-6622

www.militaryonesource.com – 1-800-342-9647

National Suicide Hotline – 1-800-SUICIDE

www.suicidepreventionlifline.org – 1-800-273-TALK (8255)

 

    For additional information/training go to www.army.mil home page Top Headlines. Type into search engine "Suicide Prevention" – go to "Watch out for Your Buddy." Scroll down to bottom of page and click on Suicide Training.

    Contact the Army Substance Abuse Office for additional information at 245 – 4576.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Suicide Prevention TipsSuicide Awareness 7 – 13 September

 

This information is to be used as a training aid for the Soldier's and

leadership's Suicide Prevention awareness briefs.

 

Most suicides and suicide attempts are reactions to intense feelings of:

Loneliness - is an emotional state in which a person experiences powerful feelings of emptiness and isolation. Loneliness is more than just the feeling of wanting company or wanting to do something with another person. Loneliness is a feeling of being cut off, disconnected from the world, and alienated from other people.

 

Worthlessness – is an emotional state in which a person feels low, and they lack any feelings of being valued by others.

 

Hopelessness - is a spiritual/relational issue. It often stems from feeling disconnected from a higher power or other people. Connection with a higher power and other people is a key to helping individuals to withstand grief and loss. This connection allows individuals to rebound from most severe disappointments of life.

 

Helplessness – is a condition or event where the Soldier thinks that they have no control over their situation and whatever they do is futile such as repeated failures, receipt of a "Dear John or Dear Joan" letter, etc.

 

Guilt- is a primary emotion experienced by people who believe that they have done something wrong.

 

Depression - is considered when one of the following two elements is present for a period of at least twoweeks:

depressed mood or inability to experience life pleasures. If one of these elements is identified,depression is diagnosed when five symptoms from the list below are presented over a two-week period.

 

Feelings of overwhelming sadness and/or fear, or the seeming inability to feel emotion (emptiness).

 

A decrease in the amount of interest or pleasure in all, or almost all, daily activities.Changing appetite and marked weight gain or loss.

 

 Disturbed sleep patterns, such as insomnia, loss of REM sleep, or excessive sleep (Hypersomnia).

 

Psychomotor agitation or retardation nearly every day.

 

Fatigue, mental or physical, also loss of energy.

Intense feelings of guilt, helplessness, hopelessness, worthlessness, isolation/loneliness and/or anxiety.

 

Trouble concentrating, keeping focus or making decisions or a generalized slowing and memory difficulties.

 

Recurrent thoughts of death (not just fear of dying), desire to just "lie down and die" or "stop breathing," recurrent suicidal ideation without a specific plan, or a suicide attempt or a specific plan for committing suicide.

 

Feeling and/or fear of being abandoned by those close to the individual.

 

For some individuals, a combination of many factors may cause depression. For others, a single factor may trigger the illness.

 

 

Depression often is related to the following:

 

Imbalance of brain chemicals called neurotransmitters - Changes in these brain chemicals may cause or contribute to clinical depression.

 

Negative thinking patterns - People who are pessimistic, have low self-esteem, worry excessively, or feel they have little control over life events are more likely to develop clinical depression.

 

Family history of depression – A genetic history of clinical depression can increase one's risk for developing the illness. But depression also occurs in people who have had no family members with depression.

 

Difficult life events – Events such as the death of a loved one, divorce, financial strains, history of trauma, moving to a new location or significant loss can contribute to the onset of clinical depression.

 

Frequent and excessive alcohol consumption – Drinking large amounts of alcohol on a regular basis can sometimes lead to clinical depression. Excessive alcohol consumption is also sometimes a symptom of depression.

 

           

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                Important Telephone Numbers

 

Crisis Intervention                                                             DAHC Behavioral Health 

 

Cumberland/Perry: 717 – 243 - 6005                             717 – 245 – 4602

 

Dauphin: 717 - 232 - 7511                                                 Rape Crisis                         

 

Franklin: 717 - 264 - 2555                                                 1- 888 – 727 - 2877

 

York: 717 – 852 - 5320                                                       Emergency - 911

 

HOTLINES                                                                          

 

Childline (child abuse hotline): 1 800 – 932 - 0313

 

Domestic Violence: 1 – 800 – 852 – 2102

 

Teen Line: 1 – 800 – 722 – 5385

 

Poison Control: 1 – 800 – 521 – 6110

 

Carlisle Barracks Police: 717 – 245 – 4115

Tricare: 1 – 877 – 874 – 2273

Family Advocacy Victim program: Anne Hurst @ 717 – 245 – 3777

 

Life Lines

 

Wounded Soldier and Family Hotline – 1-800-984-8523

 

www.armyfamiliesonline.org – 1-800-833-6622

 

www.militaryonesource.com – 1-800-342-9647

 

National Suicide Hotline – 1-800-SUICIDE

 

www.suicidepreventionlifline.org – 1-800-273-TALK (8255)

 

 

For additional information/training go to www.army.mil home page Top Headlines. Type into search engine "Suicide Prevention" – go to "Watch out for Your Buddy." Scroll down to bottom of page and click on Suicide Training.

   Contact the Army Substance Abuse Office for additional information at 245-4576.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Electrical outages planned for October  

Beginning the week of October 5, Field Support Services, Inc. will begin testing 15KV electrical cables throughout the installation. This required testing helps DPW identify any problems with our electrical distribution system to preclude unplanned power outages. Testing will require electrical outages of up to three hours to all activities on Carlisle Barracks and family housing. DPW and FSSI will work with customers to develop a detailed schedule by date and time to minimize disruptions to installations organizations and family members. A schedule will be posted on the CBNET Spotlight and activities will also be notified via email. 


5k run to benefit the Fisher House Foundation slated for October 18

The 2008 Old Fort Ritchie Run 5k is scheduled for Saturday, October 18, on the grounds of the former Army post in Cascade, Md. Participants can register online by going to www.active.com and searching for event "1625984". The entrance fee is $25 and includes a commemorative T-shirt for those registered NLT October 1. The top three men and top three women finishers will receive prizes. This event benefits the Fisher House Foundation.  For more information, please send email to ftritchie5k@gmail.com.