Banner Archive for July 2017
 

 

Army War College leadership shift: MG Rapp to MG Kem

TRADOC CDR: Kem selected to prepare leaders for relevancy in complex world  

July 28, 2017 -- Maj. Gen. John S. Kem became the 51st Commandant of the U.S. Army War College July 28 in a formal ceremony in Bliss Hall. Soldiers, families, and friends of the Army War College honored the Army’s traditions and heritage in welcoming Kem and saluting Maj. Gen. William E. ‘Bill’ Rapp who has served as the 50th Commandant from July 2014 to July 2017.

Maj. Gen. Bill Rapp passes the unit colors in a traditional representation of the transfer of command of the U.S. Army War College to Maj. Gen. John Kem during a change of command ceremony in Bliss Hall, July 28 Gen. David G. Perkins, commanding general of the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, presided over the Change of Command event, and Rapp's retirement ceremony which followed.

 

Presiding officer Gen. David Perkins began his remarks by noting the significant representation from the United States Military Academy. Colleagues from Rapp’s class of 1984 and Kem’s class of 1985 spoke to the enduring value of relationships and to the professional military educational thread woven through Army careers, from West Point/ ROTC colleges to Senior Service College.

Kem represents that Army education thread, having stood up Army University which is one of the largest university systems in the nation, said Perkins, the commanding general of the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command.

“We only have one war college in the Army,” said Perkins, to the hundreds in the auditorium. “We have lots of battalion, brigade commanders and they’re all great, do great things but we only have one person that runs the Army War College and all that goes with it …. So, we looked far but we did not have to look long,” he said. “We knew right where to look and that is to someone who has been very involved in changing how we develop our leaders in the Army and making sure we are preparing them to be much better leaders.”

Perkins referred to both Rapp and Kem as unique individuals, even as he drew attention to similarities in career path and character. Both have outstanding and impeccable academic credentials, he said. “Not only do they move easily among the ranks of academic … and those who think about the future, but they are combat proven leaders …. They lead the ranks of academic and lead the ranks of soldiers.

“They both are doing, and have done, what they do best – and that is to become visionary leaders and impart their knowledge on to others,” said Perkins.

Perkins honored outgoing Commandant Rapp’s vision to increase the relevancy of the Army War College.  “He set upon a path to do that:  revamped the academic program;  spent a lot of time getting the right folks in here, instructors and professors -- his reputation was no small part of that, of people wanting to come here and work with him;  has increased the outreach of the war college not only within the Army but other academic institutions, think tanks, taking part in the broader discussion about strategic leadership and vision and what’s involved with that;  has had a significant role in completely revamping our general officer education process to make them better strategic leaders and what we want across our officer corps but not only that: our noncommissioned officer corps … with regards to our nominative sergeants major, the war college being the center of gravity for that, taking them to the next level.

“For the Army War College, [relevancy] has increased dramatically and its impacts are felt well beyond the Army,” said Perkins.

“More importantly, [Rapp] has increased the relevancy of the graduates. That is really what we want, to make the graduates that come out of here more relevant to the world that they’re going to -- this complex world where strategic leadership is becoming more and more important,” said Perkins.

 “I had the distinct honor to do the commencement ceremony earlier today – the summer graduating class -- and a couple of the graduates came to me afterwards,” he recounted, and quoted one’s thoughts about his Army War College education: ‘In a logical manner it forced me to think long term and then convey my thoughts in a way that would make a compelling argument to those who don’t have the background that I’m working with’.

“When you think about it,’ said Perkins, “that’s the definition of what we want our strategic leaders to do…. thinking differently, thinking broader and thinking longer term, and then having to build a compelling argument out of that. I can’t think of a better graduation criteria.”

“As a senior leader in the Army, I feel very blessed to be able to transition here from a great leadership and mentorship team, in Bill and Debbie to another great leadership and mentorship team in John and Martha. “We want to continue the momentum that the Rapps have started here, and as we bring the Kems on we absolutely know that will be the case.”

 Major General John S. Kem, U.S. Army  

Commandant, U.S. Army War College

MG John S. Kem is the 51st Commandant of the U.S. Army War College.  Kem was commissioned in 1985 through the United States Military Academy (USMA) at West Point, NY, where he graduated as a distinguished cadet and earned a bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering.  He later earned a Master’s of Science in Environmental Engineering and a Masters of Business Administration (Kellogg Business School) from Northwestern University.  His military education includes the Engineer Officer Basic Course, the Engineer Officer Advanced Course, the Army Command and General Staff College, and the Industrial College of the Armed Forces where he earned a Master’s of Science in National Resource Management. He is a registered Professional Engineer in Virginia and a Chartered Financial Analyst.

Most recently, MG Kem served as the first Provost of the Army University and Deputy Commandant of the Command and General Staff College (CGSC).  He oversaw the reorganization of the Army’s education enterprise into a university structure, maximizing efforts to achieve valid academic credit for Soldiers’ education and experience, consolidating and improving the Curriculum and Faculty Development Programs and developing the Army University Press, the publishing arm of the Army University that includes “Military Review,” “The NCO Journal,” and the Combat Studies Institute.  Additionally, MG Kem was responsible for the day-to-day operations of CGSC including:  the Command and General Staff School, the School of Advanced Military Studies, the School for Command Preparation, the Army Management Staff College, the Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation at Fort Benning, GA, and the Warrant Officer Career College at Fort Rucker, AL.

MG Kem’s previous command assignments include the Commanding General United States Army Corps of Engineers Northwestern Division in Portland, OR from 2013 to 2015; the Europe District, North Atlantic Division, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers from 2008 to 2011; the 16th Engineer Battalion, 1st Armored Division, Germany, and Operation Iraqi Freedom, from 2003 to 2005, and Company A, 307th Engineer Battalion, 82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, NC, from 1991 to 1992.

Previous assignments include serving as Chief, Programs Division, Office of the Chief, Legislative Liaison, Washington; Director, Coalition-Joint Engineering Directorate, NATO Training Mission-Afghanistan; Executive Officer to the Director Joint Improved Explosive Device Defeat Organization, Washington; Military Assistant to the Secretary of the Army, Washington; Congressional Fellow, Washington; Operations Officer, 10th Engineer Battalion and Operations Officer, 3rd Engineer Brigade, Fort Stewart, GA; and Assistant Professor, Department of Social Sciences, USMA.  During the early part of his career, he also served as a CPT in the 307th Engineer Battalion, 82nd Airborne Division during Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm; as a LT in the 16th Engineer Battalion, 1st Armored Division, West Germany, and Boeselager Reconnaissance Platoon Leader, 1st Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment, 1st Armored Division.

MG Kem’s awards and decorations include the Defense Superior Service Medal, Legion of Merit (w/Oak Leaf Cluster), Bronze Star Medal (w/Oak Leaf Cluster), Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Army Meritorious Service Medal (w/7 Oak Leaf Clusters), Army Commendation Medal, Army Achievement Medal, the Combat Action Badge, Ranger Tab, Senior Parachutist Badge, Air Assault Badge, Pathfinder Badge, and Army Staff Identification Badge.

Kem was born in Chicago.  He and his wife Martha have three children.

 

 

 

 

 


TRADOC Commander to Army War College graduates: Invest this education in your units

Canadian Col. Matthew Haussmann and U.S. Army Col. Alan Alexander and their seminar mates are all smiles after receiving their diplomas. The graduation ceremony marked the end of the two-year program for a class of 336 Army officers, 4 Navy, 3 Air Force, 10 Marines, 27 Federal Civilians, and 5 International Officers from 5 different countries.

 

For a highlight video visit https://youtu.be/x7tYGixQUt8

For photos visit https://www.flickr.com/photos/usawc/ 

 

 

CARLISLE BARRACKS, Pa. (July 28, 2017) – “This class exemplifies grit, determination and professionalism,” said Maj. Gen. Bill Rapp as he addressed his final graduating class as the commandant of the U.S. Army War College, 2014-2017.  From Wheelock Bandstand he congratulated 385 members of the Distance Class of 2017 seated on the historic parade ground here. The student body of competitively selected senior leaders from the U.S. military, US federal agencies, and international officers earned a Master’s degree in Strategic Studies today.

“My thanks to you for your great attitude and effort over the past 24 months, and to the faculty and staff of the U.S. Army War College for your professionalism and skills as teachers and mentors.  Being the gold standard for strategic leader education and idea development comes from having a world class faculty,” he noted before introducing as guest speaker the commanding general of the U.S. Army’s Training and Doctrine Command, Gen. David Perkins.

 “You have been the quintessential leader, and strongest advocate the Army can have for producing great students like this,” said Perkins to Rapp, recognizing Rapp’s contributions in shaping the Army War College.

“You don’t get a better setting than this,” said Perkins, as he turned to the graduates, faculty, family and friends in a salute to Army heritage. “A great, historic Army post with well-manicured grounds, marshal music being played by the band, and the smoke of artillery fire wafting over the audience,” he said about the TRADOC Band and Pa. National Guard’s 1-108 Field Artillery salute at the start of the ceremony.

“It looks like something we just put together in Hollywood, but no, it is real.”

Gen. David Perkins, Commanding General of U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, speaks at the graduation of the Army War College Distance Class of 2017, July 28 on the historic parade grounds of Carlisle Barracks. Perkins congratulated the 385 students for their hard work and dedication during two years leading to a Master’s Degree in Strategic Studies.  

Perkins encouraged the graduates with personal insights about leading a life of value through leadership that others value.

“As we are about to recognize you today for a great accomplishment.… We have given you great intellectual capability and attributes,” he said, and asked, “What are you going to do with them?”

 “When you go back to your unit and your community, they should know that you’ve been through something special -- you have much more capability than you used to have – without even looking at that diploma,” said Perkins. “If you look at life that way, I guarantee what you’re going to find is this investment that you’ll put back into your unit: it will multiple tenfold.

“And, when people look back on serving with you, what they’re going to talk about is what kind of person you were. What they’re going to talk about is how you influenced them,” he said. “My experience is your subordinates don’t care what’s on your resume. Your subordinates care about what kind of person you are, and what kind of leader you are.”

Maj. Gen. Bill Rapp, U.S. Army War College Commandant, spoke to the USAWC Distance Education Class of 2017 for the last time as commandant. It marked his final graduation ceremony leading the college, as Rapp transferred command to Maj. Gen. John Kem in a ceremony later that day. Rapp officially closed his 33-year Army career with a ceremony following the change of command.

Among the graduates are 336 Army, 3 Air Force, 10 Marine Corps and 4 Navy officers; 27 senior federal civilian employees; and 5 international officers from Botswana, Taiwan, Canada, United Kingdom, and Mexico.

Several students spoke of their experiences in applying new knowledge, analysis and decision-making processes.

“I was especially drawn to [the curriculum] primarily because I deal with a full array of national security, homeland security, and foreign affairs related issues,” said student Sean Snyder, who spoke of the linkage between his studies to his responsibilities as a Congressional staffer.

“While I feel I’ve had a good understanding and grasp of the rationale for a lot of those policy recommendations and why the Army and the other services, for that matter, do what they do, I thought this would be a good opportunity to shorten that proverbial distance between the Pentagon and the Hill,” he said. “I think it was a good opportunity to get first-hand integration and communication with the men and woman who are definitely going to be the future leaders of our Army.

The majority of the class is composed of guardsman and reservists, who complete a two year program, which is the equivalent of the Army War College Resident Program and results in the same diploma and Master of Strategic Studies Degree.

“The briefings that we get are from, literally, the experts at the national level on key issues -- whether it’s the Army, or procurement, or national defense, or leadership,” said Lt. Col. John Pippy of the Pa. Army National Guard, from Moon, Pa.  “The format ...  allows us to have some real frank discussions with people, and access to key decision makers, and maybe we even share with them some of our thoughts at the lieutenant colonel staff level.”

Another Pa. Army National Guard officer echoed his colleagues' emphasis about applying new learning every day throughout the two-year program.

“I’m a facilities engineer at Tobyhanna Army Depot.  Especially the first year, which focuses a lot on leadership competencies … I would read something and reflect on it for the War College course, and the next day I would have an 'ah-ha moment’ about an issue I was having at work. If I just approached it a little differently … I could change things toward my end state,” said Lt. Col. Patrick Monahan, of Spring Brook Township, Pa.

Christine Stark, Army War College Distance Education Program faculty member, congratulates one of her students after she received her Masters diploma. Each student was part of a seminar learning from their faculty members, fellow students and guest speakers during virtual and residence courses.

The Distance Education Program allows senior leaders to continue to serve and work in their regular full-time job and still receive and Army War College education. The program requires about 15 hours a week, is mainly conducted online and includes 2 two-week summer resident courses at Carlisle Barracks.

Pennsylvania was represented by 13 state residents, four from the Pa. Army National Guard, six from the Army Reserves, two from the active duty Army, and one from the United States Marine Corps.

 

 

The College awards the achievement of faculty and students in the domains teaching, scholarship, and service.
 
Faculty members Army War College Department of Distance Education were selected, by their peers, for exemplifying the highest standards of excellence in teaching, scholarship and service to the Army, joint commands, and federal agencies.    
  
- Dr. Kevin Weddle, awarded for excellence in teaching during the first year courses.
- Col. Frank Frazier, awarded for excellence in teaching during the second year courses.
- Col. Brian Cashman, awarded for excellence in teaching an elective.
 
- Col. Charles Grindle, was honored as an Associate Professor, based upon his accomplishments and potential in the domains of teaching, scholarship and service.
 
These new graduates were recognized as top performers for their excellence in scholarship, writing, and enduring impact within the national security community.
 
Daniel M. Lewin Cyber-Terrorism Technology Writing Award
- Lt. Col. Mark I. Choate, for “A Potential Deterrent: Reinventing the State Sponsor of Terrorism List.”
 
Outstanding Program Research Project
- Ms. Margaret Reach, for “Just War for Small War.”
- Col. David M. Church, for “Information Operations Remedy: The Citizen-Soldier.”
 
The Army War College Foundation Lifetime Alumni Membership Award
- Col. William J. Benner, class president, for his leadership.
 
The above awards are sponsored by the Army War College Foundation.

Improvements to the TRICARE Dental Program
 
On May 1, 2017, United Concordia Companies, Inc. (United Concordia) began managing the TRICARE Dental Program (TDP). Beneficiaries do not need to take any actions to continue their coverage.
 
The TDP is a voluntary dental benefit for eligible active duty family members, National Guard and Reserve members and their families. Several improvements to the TDP include:
 
·         The annual maximum TDP will pay will increase from $1,300 to $1,500
 
·         The TDP will consider sealants a free and preventive treatment, and no longer include a 20 percent cost share
 
·         The auto-enrollment age for family members will lower from age four to one
 
·         For most beneficiaries, the monthly premium rate will decrease
 
The Active Duty Dental Program and TRICARE Retiree Dental Program will not change.
 
The TDP will continue to provide access to a network of civilian dentists around the world. Your access to quality care will not change. However, some dentists currently in the TDP network may leave, while new ones will join. So, those currently enrolled may need to find a new dental provider. To find participating dentists please visit: https://www.uccitdp.com/find-a-dentist/. You may nominate dentists to participate by clicking on “Nominate Your Dentist” on the page linked above and completing a simple form.
 

For more information regarding the TDP, please visit the TRICARE website or www.uccitdp.com.


Changes to Fitness Center & Barracks Crossing hours

One of the most important responsibilities of the federal government is to be a good steward of the taxpayer dollar and this is a responsibility that Carlisle Barracks takes seriously.

To do so Carlisle Barracks is constantly looking at ways to be more efficient and make prudent business decisions, especially in an era of declining resources.

During the last few weeks Carlisle Barracks leaders closely scrutinized all MWR programs looking at facility and program utilization and the needs of the Carlisle Barracks community in order to maintain the best quality services at the current level of resourcing. As a result there have been changes to the hours of operations and new fee schedule for the on-post fitness centers, and reduced hours for Barracks Crossings.
The Indian Field and Thorpe Hall gyms will close an hour earlier during the week and Indian Field Fitness Center will be closed on weekends. The changes create an anticipated $58,000 in savings in manpower costs. These savings can then be utilized in other MWR programs such as Automotive, Arts and Framing, Outdoor Recreation, Bowling and Leisure Travel Services.

Effective July 1, the following changes will be in effect:

Indian Field Fitness Center

Open Monday-Friday, 5 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Closed on weekends

Root Hall Gym

Open Monday-Friday, 5 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Sat. – Closed

Sun- Closed

Basketball & Racquetball Court

Monday-Friday 5 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Sat. 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Thorpe Hall Gym

Open Monday-Friday 5 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Saturday 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Sunday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Fee schedule to take effect Aug. 1

Another change is that Carlisle Barracks will be implementing IMCOM-mandated charges for fitness classes. Active duty service members, Military Reservists, Blue and Gold Star family members, International Fellows and members of the National Guard are exempt from fees. Starting Aug. 1, the fees will be as follows:

·         $200 unlimited classes, per year

·         $20 unlimited classes per person, per month

·         $350 unlimited classes per family, per year

·         $35 unlimited classes per family, per month

·         $3 per individual class

 

MWR leadership surveyed local fitness centers seeking to make the on-post fitness centers the preferred options for patrons.  “We took a hard look and in fact, many fitness centers in the area charge enrollment fees and higher monthly and per class fees,” said Liz Knouse, MWR director. The fees are designed to simply cover operating costs and are not unique to Carlisle Barracks as most installations including Fort Hood, Fort Bliss, Fort Campbell and others have already implemented fees. Additionally, Carlisle Barracks is one of the only MWRs that has exemptions for actively serving members.


Veteran Army medic awarded Medal of Honor

Watch the Medal of Honor ceremony live webcast, today at 3:00 p.m. EDT 

President Donald Trump awarded the Medal of Honor to Spc. 5 James McCloughan at the White House, July 31. McCloughan was awarded the Medal of Honor for his heroic acts during the Vietnam War as a combat medic.

McCloughan distinguished himself during 48 hours of close-combat fighting against enemy forces, May 13-15, 1969. At the time, then-Pfc. McCloughan was serving as a combat medic with Company C, 3rd Battalion, 21st Infantry, 196th Light Infantry Brigade, Americal Division, in the Republic of Vietnam.

On the morning of May 13, 1969, “Charlie Company” was combat assaulted into an area near Tam K? and Nui Yon Hill and came under small arms and machine gun fire. During the combat assault, two American helicopters were shot down, one of which had crashed roughly 100 meters from the company’s position. With fierce enemy gun fire surrounding the position, a rescue helicopter could not land. Instead, a squad was sent out and ordered to bring the pilot and crew back to Charlie Company’s defense perimeter.

When the squad reached the perimeter around the crash site, they saw a wounded Soldier lying on the ground nearby, too injured to move. McCloughan ran 100 meters to the Soldier through an open field, ducking and dodging the crossfire of his company and a charging platoon of North Vietnamese Army. Upon reaching the wounded Soldier, McCloughan shouldered him and raced back to the company, saving his fellow Soldier from being captured or killed.

Later that afternoon, 2nd Platoon was ordered to scout the area near Nui Yon Hill. The platoon was ambushed by a large NVA force and sustained heavy casualties. McCloughan entered a trench as American airstrikes were being dropped on the nearby NVA targets. Looking over the top of his trench, McCloughan saw two Soldiers without weapons, huddled near a bush.

With complete disregard for his life and personal safety, McCloughan handed his weapon to a fellow warrior, leaped on the berm of the trench and ran low to the ground toward the ambush and the two U.S. Soldiers. While McCloughan was looking for wounds on the men, a rocket-propelled grenade exploded and pelted him with shrapnel. He pulled the two Soldiers back into the safety of a trench. McCloughan ignored a direct order to stay back and braved an enemy assault, moving into the kill zone on four more occasions to extract wounded comrades.

On May 14, 1st Platoon was ordered to move out toward Nui Yon Hill. The Platoon advanced to the initial trench line, and were approaching the second trench when they saw the enemy moving in the grass ahead of them. The Americans fired on the NVA while an airstrike was called on the enemy’s position. The platoon then received orders to continue forward, but they were ambushed. The medic from 1st Platoon was killed, leaving McCloughan as the sole medical specialist in the company. In the intense battle, McCloughan was wounded a second time by small arms fire and shrapnel from a RPG while rendering aid to two Soldiers in an open rice paddy.

In the final phases of the attack, two companies from the NVA and an element of 700 soldiers from a Viet Cong regiment descended upon Company C’s position on three sides. McCloughan, again with complete disregard for his life, went into the crossfire numerous times throughout the battle to extract wounded Soldiers, while also fighting the enemy. His relentless, courageous action inspired and motivated his comrades to fight for their survival. When supplies ran low, McCloughan volunteered to hold a blinking light in an open area as a marker for a nighttime resupply drop. He remained steadfast while bullets landed all around him and RPGs flew over his exposed body.

McCloughan’s Army awards and decorations include the Bronze Star Medal with “V” device and Oak Leaf Cluster, the Purple Heart with Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster, the Good Conduct Medal, the Vietnam Service Medal with three Bronze Service Stars, the Army Valorous Unit Citation, National Defense Service Medal, the Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal with “60” Device, the Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry with palms and one Oak Leaf Cluster, the Combat Medical Badge, and the M16 Expert Rifle Badge.

He currently lives in South Haven, Michigan with his wife Chérie.


Army War College to host retirement, farewell for Maj. Gen. & Mrs Rapp

MG Rapp's retirement ceremony will be live-streamed at 2:30 pm: www.armywarcollege.edu/live.

Major General William E. ‘Bill’ Rapp began his Army career in 1984 when he graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point and was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the Army Corps of Engineers.

Thirty-three years later, Rapp will close his Army career at the United States Army War College at a retirement ceremony Friday, July 28 at 2:30 p.m. in Bliss Hall, Carlisle Barracks.  The ceremony will be officiated by Gen. David Perkins, commander of the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command.

Rapp’s retirement coincides with the change of command at Carlisle Barracks, that day at 1 p.m., when command and control of the Army War College and Carlisle Barracks will pass from 50thCommandant Maj. Gen. Bill Rapp to Maj. Gen. John Kem.

In the intervening years, Rapp’s career led him from New York to Iraq, Germany, and Japan. Highlights are many. He commanded an airborne engineer company during Operation Desert Storm; the 55thEngineer Battalion (Combat) (Mech) in Bamberg, Germany;  the 555thCombat Engineer Group deployed in support of the 101stAirborne Division for Operation Iraqi Freedom. In 2008, he served as Commanding General of the Northwestern Division of the Corps of Engineers, in Portland, Ore.

He served as Military Assistant to the Secretary of the Army (Civil Works) before battalion command, followed command by the Council of Foreign Relations Fellowship at the Institute for International Peace Studies in Tokyo.  Before his group command, he served as the I Corps Chief of Plans and followed command with duty in Iraq as the director of the Commander’s Initiatives Group, serving under Gen. David Petraeus in Multi-National Forces-Iraq.

Following ACOE division command, Rapp served as the 72ndCommandant of Cadets at the United States Military Academy; the National Support Commander and Deputy Commanding General for Support of U.S. Forces, Afghanistan; and Chief of Army Legislative Liaison prior to service as the Commanding General of Carlisle Barracks.

His studies led to a Bachelor of Arts from USMA, Master’s degrees in Political Science and in National Security Policy, and a Ph.D. in Political Science from Stanford.

Maj. Gen. Rapp’s path led him to marry Debbie Biggi, Army Nurse.  The couple’s three children have followed their parents’ footsteps into the Army, all three through a West Point education.

Farewell to the 50thCommandant: appreciation of his enduring contributions

The Army War College community will gather to farewell their 50thCommandant and acknowledge his undoubted legacy, educating the nation’s strategic leaders.

During Rapp’s leadership at the Army War College, he fundamentally transformed the College through a vision and strategy to advance the institution’s quality and contributions to the nation -- in strategic leader education and development, advancing knowledge, outreach and service to the Army and Joint Force, and quality of life and institutional support.

 

The Army responded to his vision and leadership by assigning the College responsibility for the Army’s executive development program for general officers; commitment of Army funding for CSA-directed annual research projects; and, designation by the Army as the executive agent within the Department of Defense for stability operations and foreign humanitarian assistance.

 

Among his refinements are the Senior Leader Sustainment Program for student-officers, addition of a third Basic Strategic Art Program course, and successful accreditations by civilian and military oversight bodies.  He oversaw new personnel recruitment policies that attracted highly qualified faculty and staff members to the institution and ensured assignment of talented military officers.

 

Rapp supported the Army’s strategic communication effort through senior leader staff rides for army leadership, corporate leaders, and academic institutions.  He improved public access to the College’s intellectual products through armywarcollege.edu. He lectured and wrote frequently on national security issues, particularly relating to civil-military relations and providing best military advice to senior civilian leaders. 

 

He directed reforms focused on preparing strategic leaders’ moral, ethical, and cognitive ability to operate in the complexity and uncertainty of the 21stcentury security environment.  He guided immersion in mobile learning technology, recognition of superior student achievement supported by course end grades, refinement of the comprehensive oral exam to validate student synthesis of core concepts, and adaptations in the curriculum to further develop critical and creative thinkers who are value-added as strategic advisors and leaders. 

 

 


Maj. Gen. John Kem to take command at Army War College and Carlisle Barracks

Change of command ceremony to be live streamed, 1 pm at www.armywarcollege.edu/live.

Maj. Gen. William E. Rapp, the 50thCommandant of the U.S. Army War College and Senior Mission Commander of Carlisle Barracks will relinquish command to Maj. Gen. John S. Kem in a formal, traditional Army change-of-command ceremony Friday, July 28 at 1 p.m. at Bliss Hall, Carlisle Barracks.

The change of command ceremony will include the passing of the Army War College colors and remarks by the presiding officer, Maj. Gen. Rapp, and Maj. Gen.  Kem.

Gen. David Perkins, commander of the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command will be the presiding officer.

Maj. Gen. Kem will be the 51st Commandant of the U.S. Army War College.

Maj. Gen. Kem was commissioned in 1985 through the United States Military Academy (USMA) at West Point, where he graduated as a distinguished cadet and earned a bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering. 

Most recently, Maj. Gen. Kem served as the first Provost of the Army University and Deputy Commandant of the Command and General Staff College (CGSC). As Army University Provost, he oversaw the reorganization of the Army’s education enterprise into a university structure, maximizing efforts to achieve valid academic credit for Soldiers’ education and experience, consolidating and improving the curriculum and faculty development programs and developing the Army University Press, the publishing arm of the Army University that includes “Military Review,” “The NCO Journal,” and the Combat Studies Institute.  He was responsible as well for the day-to-day operations of CGSC, encompassing the Command and General Staff School, School of Advanced Military Studies, School for Command Preparation, Army Management Staff College, Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation at Fort Benning, Ga., and Warrant Officer Career College at Fort Rucker, Ala.

 

Kem’s command assignments include these: Commanding General, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Northwestern Division in Portland, Ore., 2013-2015; Europe District Commander for North Atlantic Division, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008-2011; 16th Engineer Battalion, 1st Armored Division in Germany and in support of OPERATION IRAQI FREEDOM, 2003-2005; and Company A, 307th Engineer Battalion, 82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, N.C., 1991-1992.

Among his Army assignments:  he served as Chief of Programs Division for the Office of the Chief, Legislative Liaison, Wash, D.C.; Director, Coalition-Joint Engineering Directorate, NATO Training Mission-Afghanistan; Executive Officer to the Director Joint Improved Explosive Device Defeat Organization, Wash, D.C.; Military Assistant to the Secretary of the Army, Wash, D.C.; Congressional Fellow, Wash, D.C.; Operations Officer, 10th Engineer Battalion and Operations Officer, 3rd Engineer Brigade, Fort Stewart, Ga.; and Asst. Professor, Department of Social Sciences, USMA.

As a captain he served in Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm in the 307th Engineer Battalion, 82nd Airborne Division; as a lieutenant in 16th Engineer Battalion, 1st Armored Division in the Federal Republic of Germany; and as Boeselager Reconnaissance Platoon Leader, 1st Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment, 1st Armored Division.

 

Kem earned a Master of Science degree in Environmental Engineering and a Master of Business Administration from Northwestern University’s Kellogg Business School.  His military education includes the Engineer Officer Basic and Advanced Courses, Army Command and General Staff College, and Industrial College of the Armed Forces where he earned a Master of Science in National Resource Management. He is a registered Professional Engineer in Virginia and a Chartered Financial Analyst.

He has been awarded the Defense Superior Service Medal, Legion of Merit with Oak Leaf Cluster, Bronze Star Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Army Meritorious Service Medal with seven Oak Leaf Clusters, Army Commendation Medal, Army Achievement Medal, the Combat Action Badge, Ranger Tab, Senior Parachutist Badge, Air Assault Badge, Pathfinder Badge, and Army Staff Identification Badge.

Maj. Gen. Kem was born in Chicago.  He and his wife, Martha, have three children.


Welcome to the Class of 2017 Graduation - July 28 -
to be held OUTDOORS at paradefield
 
 
CARLISLE BARRACKS, Pa. (July 19, 2017) –The graduation ceremony of the U.S. Army War College Distance Class of 2017 is scheduled on Friday, July 28 at 9 a.m. at the Wheelock Bandstand on the historic parade grounds of Carlisle Barracks. This year’s graduating class consists of 336 Army officers, 4 Navy, 3 Air Force, 10 Marines, 27 Civilians, and 5 International Fellows from 5 different countries.
 
All family members and friends are welcome to attend and watch our graduation ceremony. Those unable to attend, can view the entire ceremony live, 9 – 10:30 a.m. at http://armywarcollege.edu/live.
 
For those who are able to join us, the following details will help you plan your visit.
 
In case of weather-related change for the graduation site: check this site, or www.facebook.com/usawc or call 717.245.3700 for updates.
 
 
·   Students must be in seats by 8:30, so you’ll want to plan to arrive with them or at about that time. Before the ceremony begins, you can listen to a pre-event performance by the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Band, and watch our faculty member procession.
 
·   A shuttle will run between 7:30 to 8:45 a.m., (and following the ceremony) between the parking areas and the parade ground.
 
·   If you are driving yourself, enter Carlisle Barracks at the visitor’s entrance, Claremont Gate. For GPS navigation, please use the address: 870 Jim Thorpe Rd., Carlisle, PA 17013, follow the signs to the vehicle access point, and then follow Special Event signs. Security police and parking attendants will assist you.
 
·   Those with disabilities or unable to walk distances will find seating at “Quarters Two.” Parking attendants will direct the driver to the handicapped lot.
 
·   Shortly after the ceremony starts at 9 a.m., Pa. Army National Guard 108th Field Artillery will fire cannon on Indian Field in an honorary salute.
 
·   Bags are subject to security checks at entry to the parade field.
 
·   After the speakers, every student will cross the stage – and professional photos of every student will be available at www.flickr.com/photos/usawc by the end of the day, July 28. Guests are welcome to take photos throughout the ceremony, as well, and a photo area near the stage is available for family/friends’ photo-taking.  
 
    A highlight video of the ceremony will be available at:  www.youtube.com/usarmywarcollege shortly following the ceremony.
 
·   Restrooms for spectators will be located in the Thorpe Gym, and porta johns will be situated at the rear of the ceremony site.
 
·   Please remember, there’s no smoking, no selfie sticks, backpacks nor coolers at the ceremony. Water is provided on site.
 
·   We recommend hats and sun screen.
 
·   Dunham Clinic will be open on Thursday, July 27 from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. for patient care and closed July 28 from 7:30 am to 1 p.m. (including the pharmacy), reopening at 1 p.m. and closing at 4:30 p.m.
 
·   The uniform for those graduating will be service dress uniform or equivalent with no head gear for military and business attire for civilians. Faculty will wear academic regalia, service dress uniform or business attire. A final weather and jacket call will be made at 7 a.m. on July 28.
 
·   The inclement Weather Location will be inside Bliss Hall Auditorium for students only. Closed circuit viewing will be provided for guests in the seminar rooms and other venues throughout the Army War College.
 
·   During the ceremony Lovell Avenue, Guardhouse Lane, and Garrison Lane will be closed to traffic with the exception of emergency vehicles.
 
·   Faculty and Staff who normally park in the 314/315 lot, along Lovell Ave. and along Forbes Ave. in front of Building 122 can park along Letort Lane below the 314/315 lot, along Letort Lane between Barry Drive and Butler Rd (temporary parking will be identified along the drive) or in the Collins Hall lots.
 
·   Graduates will pick up their diplomas at the Letort View Community Center immediately following the ceremony. Graduates and their families can also pre-register before July 24, for a brunch to be held in the Letort View Community Center.
 
·   Liberal leave is encouraged for personnel of the Army War College in order to maximize parking, pending supervisor approval.
 
·   VIPs will move to the intersection of Ashburn and Lovell to be directed into one of the VIP lots. All other drivers will need to move as directed by the Police or Parking attendants to designated parking lots and walk or ride the shuttle.
 
·   Faculty and Staff who work in Anne Ely, or normally park in the Anne Ely parking lot, are asked to park in DES or Chapel lots.

Welcome new students, families: Activities, events & good-to-know information

One of the highlights of the Army War College year is the Opening Ceremony, featuring a a drill team demonstration by the U.S. Army 3rd Infantry Regiment, the Old Guard Fife and Drum Corps traditional performance, and a concert by the U.S. Army Band - Pershing's Own. It will take place this year on Aug. 11 at 4 p.m.

 

 

Opportunities abound for new Army War College students and their families to learn more about their new community during a series of welcome events over the next few weeks. Check out the list below, the Banner Online at http://www.armywarcollege.edu/banner, the on-post digital signage and the Community Calendar at http://public.carlisle.army.mil/sites/communitycalendar/default.aspx

July 31 – Aug. 4 - Vacation Bible School at Post Chapel

One of the first opportunities for kids to get to know each other before the school year is the annual Vacation Bible School at the post chapel, which is set for July 21- Aug 4 this year. The program is aimed at children aged 4 through 6th grade. Kids can be registered at the post chapel at 455 Mara Circle. Volunteers are welcome for kids and teens 7th- 12th grade. For more information or to register call 245-4330.

Aug. 1- High School Welcome Jam

Informal, fun, and free for High School Teens in grades 9-12, scheduled for August 1 from 6 to 9 p.m. starting at the Splash Zone Pavilion and ending at the McConnell Youth Center. Find old friends and meet new ones through ice-breakers, group games, dancing, and food.

2- Middle School Welcome Jam

For school students in grades 6-8: scheduled for Aug. 2 from 6 to 9 p.m. at the McConnell Youth Center: free with ice-breakers, group games, dancing, and food.

2-3- HERD 100 Carlisle HS Freshman Orientation

Call the School Liaison Office as soon as possible, 245-4555 to register for limited available seats in this popular freshman orientation and ice-breaker

3- Elementary School Ice Cream Social

Ice cream and fun is the way for children in K-5th grade to enjoy their own 'ice' breaker: scheduled for Thursday, August 3, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the McConnell Youth Center.

4- Downtown Carlisle to host ‘Welcome Jam’ for new War College families as part of First Friday event

The Carlisle Community will unofficially welcome the Class of 2018 and their Families during a Restaurant Walk & Welcome Jam Aug. 4 from 5 to 8 p.m.  There will be food tasting, live music, activities for the whole family and more. Area restaurants will have a priced fixed menu and specials as part of their “First Friday” events, which run during the summer. Families are encouraged to “check in” at the Downtown Carlisle Association tent on the square for a map of downtown and the opportunity win prizes good at local restaurants and

9- Welcome Expo is your key to community services, opportunities

The Welcome Expo is your incredible one-stop information fair to learn about on-post recreation; registration for fitness classes, youth sports, Scouts, trips; AND downtown churches, restaurants, arts, retailers, community-based non-profits, 'deals' and more. In a very informal yet organized setting, students and spouses and kids will enjoy the extraordinary outlay of all that is available to you this year. Welcome Expo tables/ displays are in Thorpe Gym, the LVCC, and the connecting road

10- Local School Orientation

Held in the Army War College’s Bliss Hall, a local school district orientation for parents will be held from 2 to 4 p.m. Representatives from local school districts will be on hand to provide an introduction to their schools and answer questions from parents during breakout sessions.

11- Class of 2018 Convocation

The 10-month graduate-level program for the Class of ’18 will officially begin with a convocation ceremony in Bliss Hall starting at 8 a.m.

11- Class of 2018 Opening Ceremony

Join your fellow students, staff and faculty of the Army War College and Carlisle Barracks for a memorable set of presentations:  a drill team demonstration by the U.S. Army 3rd Infantry Regiment, the Old Guard Fife and Drum Corps traditional performance, and a concert by the U.S. Army Band - Pershing's Own.

11- Welcome Picnic and Boatyard Wars

Immediately following the Opening Ceremony, the Welcome Picnic and Boatyard Wars is a family-friendly event for Army War College students and their families to get to know each other and engage in friendly competition. A rain-or-shine event held at the pavilion behind the Letort View Community Center, features a BBQ buffet, a “kids corner” featuring a bounce house, coloring contest and more. For more information visit www.carlislemwr.com

18- “Jim Thorpe All American” featured at outdoor film night

Bring your lawn chairs and coolers for a free outdoor movie featuring on of the most decorated athletes in American history and former Carlisle Indian Industrial School student Jim Thorpe on Indian Field. “Gates” open at 7 p.m., with the movie starting around 8:15 p.m. (or dusk). All attendees will receive free candy and popcorn and other snacks will be available. The movie serves as the kick-off to the Strategic Art Film Program, which runs throughout the academic year.

21- First day of school, Carlisle School District


Active shooter training: Do you know what to do?

Unfortunately we’ve all seen on the news incidents of active shooter incidents all around the world. Shopping malls, schools, airports, nightclubs and offices have all been places where these incidents have taken place.

As part of the on-going emergency preparedness program here at Carlisle Barracks, exercises are held regularly on everything from severe weather to simulated IED attacks.

The question is, do you know what to do in the event of an active shooter incident in your building or office?

The Department of Homeland Security defines an active shooter as “an individual actively engaged in killing or attempting to kill people in a confined and other populated area.” In most cases, active shooters use firearms and there is no pattern or method to their selection of victims. Active shooter situations are unpredictable and evolve quickly.

There are a few simple things to remember – run, hide or fight – that is explained in more detail below.

All employees can help prevent and prepare for potential active shooter situations.

ACTION GUIDELINES

  • EVACUATE – Run:If there is an accessible escape path, attempt to evacuate the premises. Be sure to:
    • Have an escape route and plan in mind.
    • Evacuate regardless of whether others agree to follow.
    • Leave your belongings behind.
    • Help others evacuate, if possible.
    • Call 911 when you are safe.
    • Prevent individuals from entering an area where the active shooter may be.
    • Keep your hands visible.
    • Follow the instructions of any police officers.
    • Do not attempt to move wounded people.
  • SHELTER-IN-PLACE – Hide:If evacuation is not possible, find a place to hide where the active shooter is less likely to find you. Your hiding place should:
    • Be out of the active shooter’s view.
    • Provide protection if shots are fired in your direction (i.e. an office with a closed and locked door).
    • Not trap you or restrict your options for movement.
    • To prevent an active shooter from entering your hiding place:
      • Lock the door.
      • Blockade the door with heavy furniture.
    • If the active shooter is nearby:
      • Lock the door.
      • Silence your cell phone and/or pager.
      • Turn off any source of noise (i.e. radio, television).
      • Hide behind large items (i.e. cabinets, desks).
      • Remain quiet.
  • PROTECT YOURSELF – Fight:As a last resort, and only when your life is in imminent danger, attempt to disrupt and/or incapacitate the active shooter by:
    • Acting as aggressively as possible against him/her.
    • Throwing items and improvising weapons.
    • Yelling.
    • Committing to your actions.
  • WHEN POLICE ARRIVE
    • Put down any items in your hands.
    • Keep hands visible.
    • Follow all instructions.
    • Avoid making quick movements towards officers.
    • Do not stop to ask officers for help or direction when evacuating, just proceed in the direction from which officers are entering the premises.

Carlisle Barracks hosting full-scale emergency response exercise July 13

What?

On July 13, Carlisle Barracks will test emergency responses to a mock scenario on post – affecting all on-post buildings to include the Commissary, Exchange, and Navy Credit Union. The force protection exercise is an annual partnership activity, incorporating response teams from Carlisle and Cumberland County.

Who? When?

This year, all employees and visitors to post will be aware of the activities, e.g., temporary closures of roads or buildings. It is designed as a learning experience about individual responsibilities in the event of an actual emergency with an ‘active shooter.’ Visitors will receive guidance to remain in place for a short period of the exercise activities.  All activities are scheduled to occur during the afternoon hours on Thursday, July 13.

Both base gates – at Claremont Road and Route 11 – will close to all traffic for approximately 30 minutes, mid-day.

Resident families and patrons of all post services and retail operations will be affected by temporary building lock-downs, unless a real-world emergency presents itself. Because Dunham Army Health Clinic is closed for training on Thursday afternoons, there will be no impact on healthcare.

As part of exercising the many necessary force protection activities, the workforce will exercise a simulation of a controlled evacuation, testing accountability for all employees and residents.


Ashburn Drive gate closed July 1-4

Just a reminder that the Ashburn Drive gate will be closed July 1-4 and will reopen for normal operations at 6:30 am on July 5.