Banner Archive for July 2011
 

August is anti-terrorism awareness month

See something suspicious? Go here to report it on the Carlisle Barracks iWatch

 

 

What is it?

The Army’s antiterrorism (AT) program protects personnel, information, property, and facilities in all locations and situations against terrorist activities. To prepare for long-term success the Army must embed AT awareness, training, leader development, and education across the force. That level of awareness and vigilance is our most certain defense against terrorist attack.

Why is it important to the Army?

Antiterrorism awareness empowers the entire Army (units, leaders, Soldiers, DA civilians, families, and contractors) to take prevention measures and serve as “sensors” which extend the overall protection posture of the force. This year AT awareness month focuses on high priority areas such as AT doctrinal principles (supporting the fourth quarter fiscal year 2011 (4QFY11)theme), suspicious activity reporting, integrating AT into the operations process, and active shooter response.

What is the Army doing?

Some of the Army’s most significant AT initiatives for FY2011 include continued implementation of iWATCH Army, development of AT doctrine, and the execution of the second annual AT Awareness Month.

iWATCH Army: iWATCH Army is a nation-wide modern version of the neighborhood watch program focused on the threat of terrorist activity. iWATCH Army is designed to heighten public awareness to the indicators of terrorist activity and encourage reporting of suspicious activity to Military Police or local law enforcement for investigation.

Field Manual 3-37.2 (Antiterrorism): published in February 2011, this manual provides AT doctrinal guidance, establishes AT principles, and integrates AT into the operations process.

Antiterrorism Awareness Month: The purpose of AT Awareness Month is to instill Army-wide heightened awareness and vigilance to prevent and protect Army critical resources from acts of terrorism. In support of AT awareness month and other initiatives, the Department of the Army, Office of the Provost Marshal General (OPMG) developed numerous AT products and tools to support the field. These products are available on the Army OPMG Antiterrorism Enterprise Portal (on AKO). The OPMG (AT Branch) will establish an AT information booth in the Pentagon from August 1-3, 2011, while Army commands will establish their own ways of observing AT Awareness Month.

What continued efforts does the Army have planned for the future?

Other on-going initiatives include:
• Implementation of a DoD revised terrorist threat reporting system - "eGuardian"
• Development of a Standalone Facilities Antiterrorism Handbook
• Continued integration of AT into the Army Protection Program

Resources:

AKO log-in required:
Army Antiterrorism Enterprise Portal (ATEP) and iWATCH Army

iSALUTE (Counterintelligence Reporting Portal)


Related article:
August brings Army's second anti-terrorism awareness month


What parents need to know about college drinking

Information provided by the Army Substance Abuse Program – 245-4576 

A Snapshot of Annual High-Risk College Drinking Consequences

The consequences of excessive and underage drinking affect virtually all college campuses, college communities, and college students, whether they choose to drink or not.

  • Death: 1,825 college students between the ages of 18 and 24 die from alcohol-related unintentional injuries, including motor vehicle crashes (Hingson et al., 2009).
  • Injury: 599,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are unintentionally injured under the influence of alcohol (Hingson et al., 2009).
  • Assault: 696,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are assaulted by another student who has been drinking (Hingson et al., 2009).
  • Sexual Abuse: 97,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are victims of alcohol-related sexual assault or date rape (Hingson et al., 2009).
  • Unsafe Sex:400,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 had unprotected sex and more than 100,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 report having been too intoxicated to know if they consented to having sex (Hingson et al., 2002).
  • Academic Problems:About 25 percent of college students report academic consequences of their drinking including missing class, falling behind, doing poorly on exams or papers, and receiving lower grades overall (Engs et al., 1996; Presley et al., 1996a,1996b;Wechsler et al., 2002).
  • Health Problems/Suicide Attempts:More than 150,000 students develop an alcohol-related health problem (Hingson et al., 2002), and between 1.2 and 1.5 percent of students indicate that they tried to commit suicide within the past year due to drinking or drug use (Presley et al., 1998).
  • Drunk Driving:3,360,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 drive under the influence of alcohol (Hingson et al., 2009).
  • Vandalism:About 11 percent of college student drinkers report that they have damaged property while under the influence of alcohol (Wechsler et al., 2002).
  • Property Damage:More than 25 percent of administrators from schools with relatively low drinking levels and over 50 percent from schools with high drinking levels say their campuses have a "moderate" or "major" problem with alcohol-related property damage (Wechsler et al., 1995).
  • Police Involvement:About 5 percent of 4-year college students are involved with the police or campus security as a result of their drinking (Wechsler et al., 2002), and  110,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are arrested for an alcohol-related violation such as public drunkenness or driving under the influence (Hingson et al., 2002).
  • Alcohol Abuse and Dependence:31 percent of college students met criteria for a diagnosis of alcohol abuse and 6 percent for a diagnosis of alcohol dependence in the past 12 months, according to questionnaire-based self-reports about their drinking (Knight et al., 2002).

 

PARENTS ARE A PRIMARY INFLUENCE.As a parent of a College Freshman – Stay involved:

 

  • Pay special attention to your son’s or daughter’s experiences and activities during the crucial first 6 weeks on campus. With a great deal of free time, many students initiate heavy drinking during these early days of college, and the potential exists for excessive alcohol consumption to interfere with successful adaptation to campus life. You should know that about one-third of first-year students fail to enroll for their second year.
  • Find out if there is a program during orientation that educates students about campus policies related to alcohol use. If there is one, attend with your son or daughter, or at least be familiar with the name of the person who is responsible for campus counseling programs.
  • Inquire about and make certain you understand the college’s “parental notification” policy.
  • Call your son or daughter frequently during the first 6 weeks of college.
  • Inquire about their roommates, the roommates’ behavior, and how disagreements are settled or disruptive behavior dealt with.
  • Make sure that your son or daughter understands the penalties for underage drinking, public drunkenness, using a fake ID, driving under the influence, assault, and other alcohol-related offenses. Indicate to them that you have asked the college/university to keep you informed of infractions to school alcohol policies. (for alcohol policies on college campuses see www.collegedrinkingprevention.gov/policies).
  • Make certain that they understand how alcohol use can lead to date rape, violence, and academic failure.
  • Stay actively involved in the life of your child.

Staff Sgt. Corey Baltos, and Thomas Zimmerman, Army War College Public Affairs
Army War College celebrates Distance Class of 2011 graduation

Maj. Gen. Gregg Martin, USAWC Commandant, speaks to the 365 members of the Distance Education Class of 2011, during the graduation ceremony on July 22. Photos by Tyler Davis.

For students of every graduate receiving their diploma go here

For more photos visit the USAWC Facebook page

For videos visit the USAWC YouTube page

 

 July 22, 2011 -- One more challenge faced the senior officers as they celebrated completion of two years of internet-based studies at the Army War College’s distance education program. The largest graduation class in college history received their diplomas on a day of record-breaking heat, July 22, at historic Carlisle Barracks.

The USAWC Distance Class of 2011 completed a two-year curriculum in strategic studies. The graduating colonels and lieutenant colonels represent the Army, Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force – most of the members of Reserve of National Guard – and 14 senior federal civilians and senior military officers representing Canada, Estonia, and Croatia.

“Each of you graduates has elected to take the road less traveled,” said graduation speaker Dr. William Perry, Stanford University professor and former U.S. Defense Secretary.  “Each of you graduates has been selected to be a leader in the future of our military services, and that has made all the difference in your life.

Col. Stephanie Wilcher, Dunham Health Clinic commander, smiles as she receives her diploma.

 

“In this world, all of your training and all of your leadership skills will be tested,” said Perry. “But, you have spent two years honing those leadership skills at  the best military college in the country, maybe the world. You are as well prepared as you can be for the challenges you face.

“I for one will sleep better knowing that the training of this group of Citizen-Soldiers, our future military leaders, are dedicated to preserving the peace and stability of the world.”

USAWC Commandant Maj. Gen. Gregg Martin saluted the graduates’ accomplishment.

“Today marks an amazing transformation,” said Martin. “You’ve completed the formal journey of personal and professional development within the Army War College program.

“You’ve shifted your thinking from the tactical and operational level to the strategic level, and you can face the new level of senior leader responsibilities with confidence,” he said.

As the graduates prepare for the next phase of their careers, they reflected on their Army War College experience.

“It’s truly been an amazing experience,” said Col. Andy Keirn, commander of the 301st Regional Support Group in Butler, Pa. “The course really help shift my way of thinking from the tactical and operational to the strategic. That’s the next level that many of us will now find ourselves operating at.”

“This course lets you take a step back and look at the big picture,” said Lt. Col. Dale Waltman, director of the Joint Emergency Operations Center at Fort Indiantown Gap, Pa. “It gives us time to think about what we’re reading or learning about during the discussions.”

Dr. William Perry, Former Secretary of Defense, spoke to the graduates about the challenges they would face as future strategic leaders.

 

USAWC distance education students face the additional challenge of balancing the responsibilities of both military and civilian careers.  Many deployed at some point during the two-year program.

“I deployed to Afghanistan during the second year,” said Lt. Col. Leslee Sanders, chief of the Medical Research Division at Ft. Bragg, N.C.  “The faculty and my seminar mates totally understood, and worked with us in whatever way they could to help us out. It was really amazing.”

Her classmate, Col. James Waskom, deputy commander of the 256th Infantry Brigade Combat Team of the Louisiana Army National Guard, had a similar experience while deployed.

“Many times there were operational issues that forced me to miss deadlines or group discussions,” said Waskom. “I received great support from my faculty instructors and encouragement from my seminar-mates.”

The camaraderie of the seminar enhances the students' experience. The course creates student links through online forums and two resident phases at Carlisle Barracks.

When Donna Welton arrives in Kabul, Afghanistan, in August to be the State Department’s public affairs officer, she’ll bring new insights into the military, she said. 

“I’ve spent the last two years learning with and from many great leaders in the military,” she said. “I know that any time I have a problem or want to bounce something off someone I have someone to call who I know will give me great advice.” 

“You each bring your own unique perspective to the discussions, which is where the real learning takes place,” said Keirn.  “The second year really helps strengthen the bond between us in the seminar.”

Graduates Col. Suzanne Vares-Lum and Lt. Col. David Lopina pose for a photo with their diplomas.

 

 

“I’m looking at folks that will be wearing stars some day,” said Lt. Col. Greg Jackson, who works for FEMA in Atlanta, Ga. “To me, these program shows that the system does work and we have the cream of the crop in this course. I’m humbled to be a part of it.” 

“I enjoyed the experience and the interaction with my classmates,” said Marine Lt. Col. Mark Jamison, a lawyer with the 1st Marine Logistics Group at Camp Pendleton, Ca. “Every time I go to an Army school I am better for it,” he said, mentioning attendance at the Army Judge Advocate General School.

Application of the Army War College education was immediate, noted Lt. Col. James McCormack, who commands the 154th Quartermaster Battalion in Philadelphia, Pa. and an administrator at Bloomsburg University.

“Sometimes I think we forget that the military doesn’t operate in a vacuum and that many times we are faced with similar issues in our civilian jobs as well,” he said. “A number of times I was able to apply some of the concepts we’d been discussing to projects at my civilian job.”


Photos by Staff Sgt. Corey Baltos and Tyler Davis

Employees, residents celebrate summer at installation picnic

Post employees and residents came together for a day of fun in the sun at the Carlisle Barracks Installation Picnic July 15. 

The afternoon of food and fun included games, horse rides for kids, a dunk tank manned by Col. Bobby Towery, deputy commandant and others, and open swimming at the post pool.

New student families will enjoy some food, and fun at eh Welcome Picnic and Boatyard Wars August 5, 5-9 p.m. at the LVCC Pavilion.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Prof. Charles Allen, DCLM
Post quilters create gifts for cancer center

 

Carlisle Barracks spouses and family members hold some of the quilts they have made for the Carlisle Regional Medical Center’s Stuart Cancer Center. The group meets at 1 p.m. on the first Thursday of the month at the post chapel to work specifically on these comfort quilts. Courtesy photo.

July 20, 2011 -- Anyone who has lived on a military post knows how tight knit its communities are.  Rather than a knitting circle, Carlisle Barracks has a small band of quilters who have been meeting for many years. The membership is fluid, as members join to share in their passion for creation and leave as life circumstances take them to other parts of the country and the world.  The group lately embraced a new undertaking; the members are making comfort quilts for chemotherapy patients at the Carlisle Regional Medical Center’s Stuart Cancer Center.

This endeavor started on a very personal basis when two members found themselves dealing with chemotherapy.  While going through the debilitating treatments and watching family members receive chemotherapy, they became aware that while sitting in a chemotherapy center, hooked up to IV’s, patients can become chilled.  At times, blankets are not readily available, and thus the idea of providing comfort quilts took shape within the Hearts and Hands Quilting Circle.  Now, the group is on a mission: to provide cheerful lap-size quilts to patients at the chemotherapy treatment center at the Carlisle Regional Medical Center.  The quilters have been joined by others in the Carlisle community who have generously donated materials—fabric and batting—and even partially made quilts to the cause.

This project has been spearheaded by Janice Smyth, who has, herself, dealt with issues of chemotherapy treatment on a very personal level.  Her 21-year-old daughter, Alison, lost her own battle against a rare form of ovarian cancer a year ago.  Soon after, Janice herself began chemotherapy for breast cancer.  Another member of the group, Jeanie Weddle, knows all too well the difficulties of chemotherapy, too.  They were the original recipients of the first comfort quilts made by the group. It occurred to its members that there were people outside of the group who needed the same support. 

 Soon after beginning this project, the group became aware of other people within our own military community battling various cancers, which made the mission even more relevant.  Numerous quilts have already been donated to these cancer patients in our community.  The need continues—so the Hearts and Hands Quilting Circle is building an on-going inventory with the goal to donate the first 12 quilts directly to the chemotherapy treatment center this Summer. 

The group meets at 1 p.m. on the first Thursday of the month at the post chapel to work specifically on these comfort quilts.  If there are any quilters in the military community that would like to join in on this effort, you are welcome to attend.


Thomas Zimmerman, Public Affairs Office
Seminar brings together civilian leaders, USAWC students for talks on strategic issues

Retired Gen. Barry McCaffrey, former Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy spoke to Strategy Implementation Seminar guests and members of the Distance Education Class of 2011 in Bliss Hall July 19.  The seminar serves as the capstone for the distance education program and brings together leaders from business, academia and other fields into USAWC seminars to discuss strategic issues with students.

SIS guests--check out your group photos on the USAWC Facebook page

 

July 19, 2011 -- The annual Strategy Implementation Seminar kicked Tuesday July 19 with a keynote address by retired Gen. Barry McCaffrey, former Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy. He discussed leadership in complex organizations.

The seminar, which serves as the capstone event of the Army War College Distance Education Program, consists of a series of guest speakers and panel presentations by nationally recognized subject matter experts on topics involving national security strategy and policy that 60 civilian guests took part in alongside USAWC students. 

“This has been an outstanding seminar,” said Art Lofton, Corporate Vice President and Chief Information Officer from Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems.  “The chance to speak with these military leaders, listen to the guest speakers and see all of what is offered here is amazing.”   

The civilian guests are nominated by a variety of sources including previous attendees, students, staff and faculty of the USAWC. The invited guests are a select group of representatives from academia, the media, government, business, and other prominent organizations and represent a cross section of experience, contemporary interests, and views.

“I was honored to be invited to this event,” said Michael Gfoeller, Senior Advisor Middle East and North Africa for EXXON/MOBIL.  “We don’t often focus on strategic planning as much in the civilian world, but being here and talking with some of the students and faculty reminds me of how important it is.”

Two or three guests are assigned to each of the student seminar groups. The guests are invited to become active participants in the discussions and are encouraged to probe and examine the seminar group's ideas vigorously and critically so as to give the students the benefits of their experience and perspectives.

Besides the guest speakers and the seminar discussions, guests also take attend presentations during optional lunch time lectures on various national security related topics. More informal discussions take place at several social events. In addition, guests are provided the opportunity to take a "staff ride" to the Gettysburg Battlefield with some of the USAWC’s experienced historians.


Staff Sgt. Corey Baltos
Distance education class starts countdown to parade-field graduation Friday, 9 a.m.

As part of their second resident course at Carlis, members of the Distance Education Class of 2011 traveled to the Gettysburg battlefields to view strategic challenges in a historical context.  Photo by Scott Finger.

Want more photos? Check out the USAWC Facebook page

 

July 18, 2011 -- For the past two years, 365 senior military officers and government employees have been conducting an elaborate juggling act.  Many have juggled a civilian job, family, responsibilities in the National Guard or Reserve, as well as studies with the Army War College.  In four days they will put down one of the balls when they graduate from the Army War College’s distance education program.

Most of their work has been done at a computer,  doing research and corresponding with their classmates and instructors via email and on-line chats.  However, the class comes together for two weeks a year to interact and focus exclusively on their course work. 

The first resident course takes place in June after their first half of their course work.  The course provides a capstone for the first year of studies said Col. Darrell Fountain, First Resident Course director.  

“Guest speakers provide a wrap-up on each of the four courses, as well as talk about each element of national power, diplomatic, information, military and economic.”

The second resident course takes place at the end of their second academic year and culminates with their graduation.  During this last phase, which the Class of 2011 is in now, the students attend the Strategy Implementation Seminar and a Gettysburg staff ride in order to better understand what happened, why it happened, and what could be learned and applied to future strategic issues. 

Maj. Gen. Gregg Martin, the Commandant of the Army War College, welcomed the distance education class of 2011 as they begin their final two-week resident phase. The 365 members of the class will graduate on Friday, July 22.

 

Lt. Col. William Britt said he looked forward to going to Gettysburg because he had had a great experience with the Antietam staff ride of the first resident course due to the knowledge of the War College staff.

While the majority of the Distance Education Class of 2011 is Army, it includes 21 officers from other services.  Marine Col. Mark Jamison found attending an Army school to be rewarding.

“I enjoyed the experience and the interaction with my classmates.  Every time I go to an Army school I am better for it.”  Jamison, a Marine lawyer, first experienced Army schools when he attended the Army Judge Advocate General School in 2001.

The resident phases are a break from the internet-based interaction of most courses.

 “The ability to have face-to-face discussions was lost.  Everything from an answer to a question to a response to a fellow student had to be written out,” said George Polich, DE class of 2011.  “However, I was bowled over by the resources the college had for us to interact through the computer.  It didn’t matter if you were west coast, east coast or in Afghanistan, you could still participate.

“ I cannot imagine another college who does that as well,” said Polich.

The Distance Education Class of 2011 graduation ceremony is scheduled for 9 a.m. July 22 at the Wheelock Bandstand.  The guest speaker will be former Secretary of Defense Dr. William J. Perry, who is now the Michael and Barbara Berberian Professor at Stanford University. 


 

Maj. Gen. Gregg Martin, Commandant U.S. Army War College

Commanding General:  1,200 Students Create Dynamic Carlisle Summer

Twelve hundred leaders studying at the Army War College tell the story of a dynamic Carlisle Summer centered on our mission to develop, inspire, and serve strategic leaders.

A single six-week period demonstrates the demand for USAWC professional development in strategic leadership and thought.

·         355 distance students were in residence for two weeks, marking the half-way point of the distance class of 2012’s two-year program.

·         367 distance students of the class of 2011 will complete their studies during a two-week resident phase that leads to graduation on 22 July. 

·         364 resident students arrive this month to begin classes in August.

The Army entrusts the Army War College to lead its national security education at the strategic level. The well-known USAWC course for colonels and lieutenant colonels is part of the continuum of strategic-level education programs.  For general officers, the Combined/Joint Force Land Component Command (C/JFLCC) Course focuses on the complex issues that belie simple solutions in theater-level operations conducted in the joint, interagency, intergovernmental, and multinational (JIIM) environment.  For younger emerging strategists, we offer the Basic Strategic Art Program (BSAP) three times a year, as well as the Defense Strategy Course and the Reserve Component National Security Issues Course

Demand and expectations are on the rise in terms of our student numbers and strategic reach.

This is a record-breaking year for International Officers at the Army War College.  We think this is a significant development that benefits both our US students and our broader national security objectives.  The International Fellows (IFs) play a vital role in building regional knowledge, understanding of other nations’ priorities and perspectives, and relationships that will prove essential in the future.  Both the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Chief of Staff of the Army reflected their respect for the IF program when they directed us to double the number of Fellows in our program from 40 to 80.  Last year we had 50 IFs and this year we have 67, which is 3 fewer than the planned 70, since the significant language-testing hurdle sidetracked three prospective Fellows.  The distance education program includes growing numbers of International Fellows each year, and half of this summer’s C/JFLCC course participants will be from sister nations. 

The collaboration that is a hallmark of the Army War College’s Carlisle Experience is heightened by representatives of sister Military Services and Federal Agencies.  Our current BSAP class includes the program’s first civilian student.

Another highly valued, but less visible program is our Army Senior Service College Fellowship Program, managed by the Army War College. This month, 85 Fellows will be in residence at Carlisle Barracks for a week of classes and preparation. They then depart for universities and institutions across the nation and world, from Harvard to Stanford and beyond, for singular experiences of learning and collaboration. This program, too, is experiencing a growth spurt – recognizing the value of diversity in our strategic leader education and development.

This high-water mark in student numbers comes on the 60th anniversary of the college’s move to Carlisle in 1951. It’s no coincidence that our signature identity, the Carlisle Experience, is characterized in part by the close-knit neighborhood that surrounds and supports us.  It’s no secret that the IF Program depends on the Carlisle community which creates the lasting positive impressions of the United States for our International Fellows and their families. It’s no surprise that Foreign Military Attaches from 24 nations – from China to Tunisia – have requested to visit us this month and learn how the Army Physical Fitness Research Institute (APFRI), the Army Heritage and Education Center (AHEC), and the Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute (PKSOI) focus their expertise to develop senior leaders.

Let’s celebrate not only the 60 years in Carlisle but the 110 years of contributions since the college was established.  The college’s long-lasting success rests on three critical elements: vision, values, and adaptive strategies. The vision of the college’s founder, Secretary of War Elihu Root, remains valid: “not to promote war, but to preserve peace.”  The vision has proved elusive but compelling, and demands continuous assessment of ourselves, our environment, and our strategy to achieve the vision. Changes to organization, teaching styles, locations, student body, and curriculum are guided by what we value: character, service, responsibility, intellectual growth, and practical application of knowledge.

May we continue to create a better future through those wise and strong strategic leaders we strive to develop, inspire, and serve.


Staff Sgt. Corey Baltos, USAWC Public Affairs
Soldiers compete in 2011 CSM Cup

The Carlisle Barracks Garrison team poses with their trophy after winning the CSM Cup.

For three sweltering July days four teams competed for the glory of the Command Sergeant Major’s Cup, an annual event that pits the Soldiers and Sailors of the Carlisle area against each other in competition.  By the end of the competition the Carlisle Barracks Garrison team stood victorious.

 The competion, which took place July 13 to 15, was between four teams, the Carlisle Barracks Headquarters and Headquarters Company, the Dunham U.S. Army Health and Dental Clinic, both from Carlisle Barracks, the New Cumberland based Soldiers who work at the Defense Distribution Susquehanna Pennsylvania, and the New Cumberland Navy Depot.

The tournament consisted of 13 events which tested the physical fitness and team work of the Soldiers and Sailors competing.  The Garrison dominated the running events and Frisbee football, while Dunham, lead by Sgt. First Class Preston Grant, crushed everyone in bowling. 

Soldiers from Carlisle Barracks Garrison and Dunham Health Clinic compete in a Frisbee football match during the CSM Cup competition.

The CSM cup, which was started in 1999, has historically only been open to active duty enlisted Soldiers, warrant officers and company grade officers stationed at Carlisle Barracks.  However in recent years the post has reached out to military personnel stationed in the greater Carlisle area. 

Cpt. Michael Tomkins, the company commander for Carlisle Barracks Headquarters and Headquarters Company, credited his team’s win to the committed effort and full participation of his Soldiers.

“We have a lot of work to do to defend the cup next year,” he said.


Severe weather siren test July 20 at noon 

July 19, 2011 -- The Installation Operations Center will test the Severe Weather/Emergency Siren tomorrow, July 20 at noon. The siren that will be played is the same that will be used in the event of an emergency, but this will only be a test.  


Well-being events at Carlisle Barracks

 

Seventeen events that have significant well-being potential are currently scheduled between now and 31 August 2011:

 

20 July 2011. Restorative Sleep. 1145-1245. Bradley Auditorium. APFRI. Targeted Group: All Carlisle Barracks Community. Linkage to CSF: Physical Fitness Domain. Contact APFRI at 245-4511.
 

23 July 2011. DDE Graduation Brunch. 1100 – 1400. Letort View Community Center. Targeted Group: Entire Carlisle Barracks Community. Linkage to CSF: Family Fitness Domain. Contact LVCC at 245-3991.
 

25-29 July 2011. Vacation Bible School. 0930-1100 daily. Chapel Targeted Group: Youth through 6th grade. Linkage to CSF: Spiritual Fitness Domain. Contact Angela Walter, 245-3318, email: angela.d.walter@us.army.mil
 

26 July 2011. High School Welcome Jam. 1800-2130. Pool Pavilion. CYSS Targeted group: Grades 9-12 High School. Linkage to CSF: Social Fitness Domain. Contact Jacqueline Schultz at jacqueline.schultz@us.army.mil
 

27 July 2011. Middle School Welcome Jam. 1800-2130. Pool Pavilion. CYSS Targeted group: Grades 6-8 Middle School. Linkage to CSF: Social Fitness Domain. Contact Jacqueline Schultz at jacqueline.schultz@us.army.mil
 

 2 August 2011. Elementary School Welcome Jam. 1730-1930. Pool Pavilion. CYSS. Targeted group: Grades Elementary School. Linkage to CSF: Social Fitness Domain. Contact Jacqueline Schultz at jacqueline.schultz@us.army.mil
 

3 August 2011. County Fair. 0900-1400. Thorp Hall / LVCC. Targeted Group: Entire Carlisle Barracks Community. Linkage to CSF: Social Fitness Domain. Contact Kevin Small at 245-4069.
 

4 August 2011. APFRI Health Day. 0800-1200. Bliss Hall. APFRI. Targeted Group: US Army War College Students. Linkage to CSF: Physical Fitness Domain. Contact APFRI at 245-4511.
 

5 August 2011. Boatyard Wars and Welcome Picnic. 1700-2100. Picnic Pavilion. MWR / LVCC. Targeted Group: US Army War College Students and Families. Linkage to CSF: Social Fitness Domain. Contact APFRI at 245-4511.
 

12 August 2011. Kid’s Day. 1330-1530. Youth Center. CYSS. Targeted group: Carlisle Barracks Youth. Linkage to CSF: Social Fitness Domain. Contact CYSS at 245-3801.
 

13 August 2011. Hershey Park Trip. 0900-1500. Hershey Park. CYSS. Targeted group: Carlisle Barracks Youth – Middle School and Teens. Linkage to CSF: Social Fitness Domain. Contact CYSS at 245-3801.
 

14 August 2011. Ice Cream Social. 1800-2000. Chapel. Targeted group: Carlisle Barracks Community. Linkage to CSF: Social Fitness Domain. Contact Angela Walter, 245-3318 or email: angela.d.walter@us.army.mil
 

20 August 2011. Old Bedford Village and Lincoln Caverns. 0630-2100. Bedford PA. LTS. Targeted Group: All Carlisle Barracks and surrounding communities. Linkage to CSF: Family Fitness Domain. Contact LTS 245-4048 or 245-3309.
Page 5 of 5
 

27 August 2011. Survivor Outreach Day. TDB. Hershey Park. ACS. Targeted Group: Surviving Family Members of fallen Service Members. ACS - Survivor Outreach Services, with PA National Guard, Army Reserve and Tobyhanna Army Depot, will host a Survivor Outreach Day at Hershey Park on 27 Aug 11. Hershey Park has donated 75 tickets for survivors of our Soldiers, who gave the ultimate sacrifice, from the state of Pennsylvania. There will be an occasion for survivors to meet and find support and assistance from various organizations in attendance. Linkage to CSF: Social Fitness Domain. Contact Linda Slaughter, ACS 245-3868.
 

27 August 2011. Paintball. 1000-1400. Location TBD. CYSS. Targeted Group: Middle School and Teens. Linkage to CSF: Social Fitness Domain. Contact CYSS 245-3801.
 

27 August 2011. Middle and High School Social. 1900-2200. Pool Pavilion. CYSS. Targeted group: Middle and High School student. Linkage to CSF: Social Fitness Domain. Contact Jacqueline Schultz at jacqueline.schultz@us.army.mil
 

28 August 2011. Faithfest. 1000-1300. Chapel Targeted Group: All Carlisle Barracks Community. Linkage to CSF: Spiritual Fitness Domain. Contact Angela Walter at 245-3318 or angela.d.walter@us.army.mil


Carlisle Barracks and Army War College work together to scheduled activities across the Well-Being spectrum

Newcomer activities for all ages highlight the August events

23 July 2011.  White Water Rafting in the Poconos. 0700-1800. Lehigh River Gorge. ODR. Targeted Group: Entire Carlisle Barracks Community.  Linkage to CSF: Physical Fitness Domain.  Contact ODR 245-3657.

25-29 July 2011.  Vacation Bible School.  0930-1100 daily. Chapel  Targeted Group:  Youth through 6th grade.  Linkage to CSF:  Spiritual Fitness Domain.  Contact Angela Walter,  245-3318, email:  angela.d.walter@us.army.mil

26 July 2011.  High School Welcome Jam. 1800-2130. Pool Pavilion. CYSS Targeted group: Grades 9-12 High School. Linkage to CSF:  Social Fitness Domain.  Contact Jacqueline Schultz at  jacqueline.schultz@us.army.mil

27 July 2011.  Middle School Welcome Jam. 1800-2130. Pool Pavilion. CYSS Targeted group: Grades 6-8 Middle School. Linkage to CSF:  Social Fitness Domain.  Contact Jacqueline Schultz at  jacqueline.schultz@us.army.mil

2 August 2011. Elementary School Welcome Jam. 1730-1930. Pool Pavilion. CYSS.Targeted group: Grades Elementary School. Linkage to CSF:  Social Fitness Domain.  Contact Jacqueline Schultz at jacqueline.schultz@us.army.mil

3 August 2011. County Fair. 0900-1400.  Thorp Hall / LVCC.Targeted Group:  Entire Carlisle Barracks Community.  Linkage to CSF: Social Fitness Domain.  Contact Kevin Small at 245-4069.

4 August 2011. APFRI Health Day. 0800-1200. Bliss Hall. APFRI. Targeted Group: US Army War College Students. Linkage to CSF: Physical Fitness Domain.  Contact APFRI  at 245-4511.

5 August 2011. Boatyard Wars and Welcome Picnic following the Opening Ceremony. 1700-2100. Picnic Pavilion. MWR / LVCC. Targeted Group: US Army War College Students and Families. Linkage to CSF: Social Fitness Domain.  Contact MWR/LVCC at 245-3991.

9 August 2011. Waiting Families Meeting. 1000-1100. Anne Ely Hall. ACS. Targeted Group: Waiting Families of deployed Service Members. Linkage to CSF: Family. Contact Linda Slaughter, ACS 245-3868.

9 August 2011. Stress Management. 1200-1300. Anne Ely Hall. ACS. Targeted Group: Entire Carlisle Barracks Community. Linkage to CSF: Emotional. Contact 245-3775 to register.

11 August 2011.  Senator’s Baseball Game 1745-2300. Harrisburg. ODR.Targeted Group: Entire Carlisle Barracks Community.  Linkage to CSF: Social Fitness Domain.  Contact ODR 245-3657.

12 August 2011. Kid’s Day. 1330-1530. Youth Center. CYSS.Targeted group: Carlisle Barracks Youth. Linkage to CSF:  Social Fitness Domain.  Contact CYSS at 245-3801.

13 August 2011. Hershey Park Trip. 0900-1500. Hershey Park. CYSS. Targeted group: Carlisle Barracks Youth – Middle School and Teens. Linkage to CSF:  Social Fitness Domain. Contact CYSS at 245-3801.

14 August 2011.  White Water Rafting in the Ohiopyle. 0700-2000. Laurel Highlands. ODR. Targeted Group: Entire Carlisle Barracks Community.  Linkage to CSF: Physical Fitness Domain.  Contact ODR 245-3657.

14 August 2011. Ice Cream Social. 1800-2000. Chapel. Targeted group: Carlisle Barracks Community. Linkage to CSF: Social Fitness Domain. Contact Angela Walter,  245-3318 or email:  angela.d.walter@us.army.mil

20 August 2011.  Old Bedford Village and Lincoln Caverns. 0630-2100. Bedford PA. LTS.Targeted Group: All Carlisle Barracks and surrounding communities.  Linkage to CSF: Family Fitness Domain.  Contact LTS 245-4048 or 245-3309.

23 August 2011. Anger Management. 1200-1300. Anne Ely Hall. ACS. Targeted Group: All Carlisle Barracks Community. Linkage to CSF: Emotional. Contact ACS 245-3775.

25 August 2011. Carlisle Barracks Annual Job Fair. 1000-1400. Letort View Community Center. Hosted by ACS Employment Readiness Program. Linkage to CSF: Social. Contact ACS Jeffrey.hanks@us.army.mil

26-29 August 2011.Corvettes at Carlisle. Carlisle Fairgounds. PAO. Targeted Group:  Carlisle Community.  Linkage to CSF:  Family Fitness Domain.  See Website for details: www.CarlisleEvents.com

27 August 2011.  Survivor Outreach Day. TDB.  Hershey Park.  ACS. Targeted Group: Surviving Family Members of fallen Service Members. ACS - Survivor Outreach Services, with PA National Guard, Army Reserve and Tobyhanna Army Depot, will host a Survivor Outreach Day at Hershey Park on 27 Aug 11.  Hershey Park has donated 75 tickets for survivors of our Soldiers, who gave the ultimate sacrifice, from the state of Pennsylvania.  There will be an occasion for survivors to meet and find support and assistance from various organizations in attendance.   Linkage to CSF: Social Fitness Domain. Contact Linda Slaughter, ACS 245-3868.

27 August 2011.  Paintball. 1000-1400.  Location TBD.  CYSS. Targeted Group: Middle School and Teens.  Linkage to CSF: Social Fitness Domain. Contact CYSS 245-3801.

27 August 2011. Middle and High School Social. 1900-2200. Pool Pavilion. CYSS.Targeted group: Middle and High School student. Linkage to CSF:  Social Fitness Domain.  Contact Jacqueline Schultz  at jacqueline.schultz@us.army.mil

28 August 2011.  Little League World Series. 0700-2000. Williamsport, PA. ODR. Targeted Group: Entire Carlisle Barracks Community.  Linkage to CSF: Social Fitness Domain.  Contact ODR 245-3657.

 28 August 2011.  Faithfest.  1000-1300. Chapel  Targeted Group:  All Carlisle Barracks Community.  Linkage to CSF:  Spiritual Fitness Domain.  Contact Angela Walter at 245-3318 or angela.d.walter@us.army.mil

 6 September 2011. Stress Management. 1200-1300. Anne Ely Hall. ACS. Targeted Group: Entire Carlisle Barracks Community. Linkage to CSF: Emotional. Contact 245-3775 to register.

 7 September 2011. Meyer’s Briggs Type Indicator for AWC Families. 1800-2200. Bliss Hall. MFP. Targeted Group: Families of AWC Students. Linkage to CSF: Family. Contact MFP christine.yuengert@us.army.mil

 10 September 2011.  Fall Yard Sale.  0700-1400. Carlisle Barracks. MWR Targeted Group:  All Carlisle Barracks Community.  Linkage to CSF:  Family Fitness Domain.  Contact Chuck Gentile at 245-4343.

 10 September 2011.  Annapolis Day Trip. 0730-2130. Annapolis, MD. LTS. Targeted Group: Entire Carlisle Barracks Community.  Linkage to CSF: Family Fitness Domain.  Contact LTS 245-4048.

 13 September 2011. Waiting Families Meeting. 1000-1100. Anne Ely Hall. ACS. Targeted Group: Waiting Families of deployed Service Members. Linkage to CSF: Family. Contact Linda Slaughter, ACS 245-3868.

 16 September 2011. Air Shipwreck Ball. 1630-2200. Indian Field / LVCC. Linkage to CSF: Family. Further details TBD.

 18 September 2011.  LTS Smithsonian Zoo. 0730-2130. Washington, DC. LTS. Targeted Group: Entire Carlisle Barracks Community.  Linkage to CSF: Family Fitness Domain.  Contact LTS 245-4048.

 24 September 2011.  LTS New York City Day Trip. 0730-2330. New York City. LTS. Targeted Group: Entire Carlisle Barracks Community.  Linkage to CSF: Family Fitness Domain.  Contact LTS 245-4048.

 24 September 2011. Welcome Jam; Carlisle’s Harvest of the Arts. 1000-1700. High-South Streets, Carlisle PA.Targeted Group: Entire Carlisle Barracks Community.  Linkage to CSF: Family Fitness Domain.  Contact PAO.

 27 September 2011. Anger Management. 1200-1300. Anne Ely Hall. ACS. Targeted Group: All Carlisle Barracks Community. Linkage to CSF: Emotional. Contact ACS 245-3775.


Distance Education Class of 2011—How, when to find your graduation photos, videos

 

Friday, July 22

Photos of every graduate, award winners and the guest speaker will be posted after the graduation ceremony at http://www.carlisle.army.mil/banner/PhotoAlbum/DDEGraduation2011/default.cfm

 

 

A highlight video of the graduation that will include the award winners, guest speakers and a selection of graduates at http://www.youtube.com/usarmywarcollege

 

Tuesday July 26

Videos of each every student receiving their diplomas, separated by seminar at http://www.youtube.com/usarmywarcollege

 

 

Check our Facebook page for photos

 

During your two week resident course we will also be loading photos to keep you and your families aware of what you and your fellow students are participating in on our Facebook page, www.facebook.com/usawc

We also encourage you to post photos you take during this time to share with the Army War College community.

 

 

After graduation, other ways to stay connected are available to you

 

Army War College homepage

The first and greatest place to keep up on Army War College news and events is the USAWC homepage, located at www.carlisle.army.mil Updated regularly; the site showcases the latest USAWC news, conference, studies and other important events.

 

Facebook

One of the easiest ways to stay connected is to become a follower on Facebook. Simply go to www.facebook.com/usawc and you’ll see the latest news and events. The best part is you don’t even need an account to see the newest postings.

 

However if you’d like to have them delivered straight to you, log into your exiting Facebook account and click “Like” on the top right corner of the USAWC page. After that, all of the latest postings from our page will appear directly on your News Feed.

 

YouTube

Another valuable resource are the lectures from guest speakers and conferences available at the USAWC YouTube page, www.youtube.com/usarmywarcollegeThe best part is that you don’t even have to register for an account to see the latest videos, just visit the page to see the newest videos, all sorted by event.


Army War College honors Distance Education 2011 students for award-winning writing projects

July 18, 2011 -- The Commandant of the U.S. Army War College is pleased to announce the names of students who will be receiving awards at the Distance Class of 2011 graduation Friday, July 22 at 9 a.m.

The AWC Foundation Award for Outstanding Program Research Paper

Lt. Col. Donald Gillich

Atoms for Peace Initiative for the 21st Century

The AWC Foundation Personal Experience Monograph Writing Award

Lt. Col. North Charles

Nangarhar Agri- Business Development Team IV: Integrating Interagency Capabilities to Build Partner Capacity

The AWC Foundation Daniel M. Lewin Cyber-terrorism Technology Writing Award

Lt. Col. Douglas Smith

Securing Cyberspace: Approaches to Developing an Effective Cyber-Security Strategy

The Military Officers Association of America (MOAA) Writing Awards

Marine Corps Col. Phillip Ridderhof

Organizing to Control the Global Maritime Commons

Col. Conrad Holbert

Evaluating the Impact of Offshoring on U.S. National Security

The Commandant’s Award for Distinction in Research

Col. Suzanne Vares-Lum

Security in the Philippines and Indonesia: The US Military Role in Southeast Asia

The AWC Alumni Association Lifetime Membership Award

Col. Ronald Czmowski


Class of 2010 Plaque unveiling ceremony postponed

July 18, 2011 -- The Class of 2010 Plaque unveiling ceremony scheduled for Thursday, July 21 has been postponed until a later date.


Suzanne Reynolds, Public Affairs Office

International Fellows of 2012 launch year in Carlisle

International Fellows of 2012 participate in briefings, as part of their orientation, presented by Carlisle Barracks organizations, June 22, Letort View Community Center.

Photo by Suzanne Reynolds

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 2012 International Fellows, their families, and their USAWC and Community sponsors enjoy food, fun, and games at the annual International Fellows' Family Welcome Picnic, July 9, at the picnic area behind the LVCC.

Photo by Suzanne Reynolds

  Senior officers from Montenegro and Suriname have joined the Army War College student body for the first time in history.

  Sixty-seven senior military officers from around the world have arrived at Carlisle Barracks for their integration into the Army War College Class of 2012 as International Fellows.  International officers participating as Fellows are a critical element of the Carlisle experience that encourages collaboration in learning and critical thinking from multiple points of view. 

  The International Fellows of 2012 represent the following countries:  Afghanistan, Algeria, Australia, Bangladesh, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burundi, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Egypt, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Germany, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Israel, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Kenya, Korea, Kuwait, Lebanon, Lithuania, Macedonia, Malawi, Malaysia, Mali, Mexico, Mongolia, Montenegro, Morocco, Nepal, the Netherlands, Nigeria, Norway, the Philippines, Poland, Romania, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Suriname, Sweden, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, the United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, Yemen and Zambia.

  The Polish Fellow Col. Andrzej Solarz and his wife, Barbara, said they are happy to be here and look forward to surprising a family member.  Their son has been living in New Jersey for 16 years and has no idea that his father was selected to attend the Army War College in Carlisle.  “He doesn’t know that we are here,” said Barbara Solarz.  “We will have a big surprise for him.” 

  Col. Ricardo Costa Neves, his wife, Daniela and son Guilherme are from Brazil. “I have very high expectations,” said Daniela.  “I want to experience the American way of life and speak better English.”  Guilherme is no stranger to the United States--in 2008 he was an exchange student in Coldwater, Mich.  Although he will return to Brazil in August for college, he will be back in Carlisle in December. 

  Nigeria’s Col. Charles Ofoche is looking forward to the Army War College classes.  “What I can see from the syllabus, I believe the education we will receive will improve us greatly in our future endeavors,” said Ofoche.

  Much of the success of the International Fellows program is linked to extensive support from Carlisle-area community sponsors who give year-long support with "American" advice and friendship. Community sponsors work side-by-side with Carlisle Barracks sponsors who assist with the wide range of administrative and logistical arrangements, and Seminar sponsors who assist International Fellows with the requirements and schedules of the USAWC academic environment.

  “We have good sponsors,” said Barbara Solarz.  “I just call them and they are at my residence within 15 minutes willing to assist.”

  “The community sponsors are fantastic.  Even before I arrived in America they were e-mailing me with information,” said Col. Ofoche.

  Ofoche’s sponsors, Gary and Emma Neights, have been community sponsors since 1999. 

  “We told them that we are their American parents and grandparents, said Emma.”

  “We get more out of it than we put into it,” said Gary, a retired Marine.  “We make a lot of great friends, and we get to broaden our horizons about different cultures of the world.” 

  “About five years ago, we visited three families we had sponsored--one in Moldova and two in the Ukraine,” said Emma, a native of Moldova who moved to the United States with her family at sixteen.  “We stayed in their homes and they made us feel very welcomed.”

  The International Fellows Program dates to 1978.  The program has expanded this decade from 40 Fellows per class to 80 Fellows projected for the Class of 2013.


Marine Corps' 'preparation for victory' began at the Army War College

Chesty Puller, Dan Daly, Smedley Butler, John Basilone --  these men and their accomplishments are known and revered by generations of Marines.  However, if you say the name Thomas Holcomb you will most likely get a blank stare.   It was this man, more than any other, that made the modern Marine Corps and prepared them for victory during World War II.

“Holcomb is one of those figures that have not gotten a lot of attention in history,” said Dr. David Ulbrich, a historian at the U.S. Army Engineer School.  “He didn’t have a cool nickname like Gen. Holland “Howlin’ Mad” Smith, he didn’t have the personality that Nimitz or Marshall did.  However, by inspiration and hard training Holcomb transformed the Marines from a police force aboard naval ships and in banana republic interventions, into division-sized units of elite assault troops that helped lead the United States to victory in the Pacific.”

 Ulrbrich’s lecture, “Preparing for Victory: Thomas Holcomb and the Making of the Modern Marine Corps, 1936-1943” was the topic of this month’s Perspectives in Military History lectures at the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center.

Thomas Holcolmb became the 17thCommandant of the Marine Corps in 1936 and led the Marines through their largest expansion and reorganization ever.  He also succeeded in shaping it into the amphibious offensive force that brought Japan to its knees.

Holcomb’s vision for this monumental transformation took shape while he was a student at the Army War College.

“While Holcomb was a student at the Army War College he wrote a paper entitled, “Marine Corps Mission: National Defense and its organization for a National Emergency,” said Ulbrich.  “That paper outlined the training that would allow Marines to take and defend islands in the Pacific, and also outlined how the force structure could be realigned to accommodate a larger force.”

When Holcomb assumed the office of the Commandant of the Marine Corps he inherited a small force, beset with fiscal restraints, manpower shortages, promotion bottlenecks and isolationist sentiments. 

“When Holcomb assumed the office of Commandant, the Marine Corps had fewer men than the New York City Police Department,” said Ulbrich.  “Marines were primarily used in counter-insurgency and guerrilla operations in Latin America, the Philippines, China and Latin America.”  There were many in Washington who doubted whether the United States needed a Marine Corps.

Realizing that war with Japan was inevitable,  and that the Marines would play a significant role in the coming war, Holcomb moved to streamline the Corps and reorganized it more efficiently to facilitate the flow of information.

“Holcomb strengthened the position of assistant commandant,” said Ulbrich.  Prior to this each department operated as its own little fiefdom, so consequently little got done.  Under the new system the departments were answerable to the assistant commandant.”

He also realized that for the Marine Corps to exist, it had to be justified in the eyes of the American public so one of the new departments at Headquarters Marine Corps were a public relations division to make sure the Marines got good press.

However the most important change that Holcomb undertook as Commandant benefited not only the Marine Corps but the way America fights its wars.

In 1942, when the Marines were fighting at Guadalcanal, ground operations were being directed by Admiral Richmond Turner, commander of the Amphibious Force, South Pacific Force, instead of by the commander Marine commander on the ground, Gen. Alexander Vandergrift.

Realizing that it was more efficient to have the ground commander direct operations, Holcomb established the autonomy of the ground commander.  “The Marine leader on the ground should direct operations on the ground, not an Admiral on the ship,” said Holcomb. 

During Holcomb’s tenure as Commandant the Marine Corps also saw for the first time, female Marines.  However, while he was forward thinking on the subject of allowing women to serve, he was not in favor integrating the Marine Corps. 

In April 1941, Holcomb explained that he did not want African Americans to serve in the Marine Corps because it would undermine efficiency.  Like many of his generation, he believed that African Americans were not able to follow orders and that they would run away in battle.  “If it were a question of having a Marine Corps of 5,000 whites or 250,000 Negroes, I would rather have the whites,” said Holcomb.

“Because of his skill and calm intellect, Holcomb deserves not only to be placed among the great commandants of the Marine Corps, but to be placed with Marshall, Nimitz and Eisenhower,” said Ulbrich.  “He prepared the Marine Corps for victory, and he made the modern Marine Corps.”

 The next Perspectives in Military History lecture will take place on Aug. 17.  Maj. Gen. Gregg Martin, the Commandant U.S. Army War College, will present a lecture on, " Transforming the Army and its Strategic Leaders: A wicked Problem."


Dunham Health Clinic will be conducting sports and school physicals on Monday and Wedneday afternoons begining July 18. 

To make an appointment call: 245-3400 or use Tricare online.

What do you need to bring?

- the child

- military ID card

- Child's shot records

- glassess or contacts if needed

- Filled out physical forms (available on the Dunham home page)

- If you are bringing multiple children, you MUST HAVE additional adult to watch over your chilldren in the waiting room


Staff Sgt. Corey Baltos, USAWC Public Affairs

Carlisle Barracks welcomes new 'mayor'

Lt. Col. Janet Holliday passed command responsiblity for the U.S. Army Garrison at Carlisle Barracks to new commander Lt. Col. William McDonough during a change of command ceremony near Wheelock Bandstand on July 8.

U.S. Army Garrison Soldiers stand on the parade field during the garrison change of command ceremony on July 8.  Photo by Charity Murtoff.

“Carlisle Barrack is a unique garrison,” said Russell Hall the director of the Northeast Region, Installation Management Command.  “This garrison staff can compete with Fort Drum or Fort Hood. You are at the top of your game.”

Hall praised Holliday’s leadership over the past two years as being a large part of why he considers the Carlisle Barracks garrison to be one of the best in the Installation Management Command. 

“Jan’s team has developed conservational upgrades to the installation and found innovative ways to renovate despite a smaller budget,” said Hall.

Holliday’s next assignment will be as an Army War College Fellow with duty at the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies in Washington D.C.

The new garrison commander made two promises to the community at Carlisle Barracks.

“I will try not to screw this up too badly and undo all your hard work," said McDonough.  "I will always give 100 percent of my focus and effort on ensuring that the military personnel, families, and civilian workforce continue to receive an outstanding quality of life here at beautiful Carlisle Barracks."

Russ Hall, the director of the Northeast Region, Installation Management Command, passes the Garrison Guidon to Lt. Col. William McDonough, the incomming garrison commnader, during a change of command ceremony on July 8.  Photo by Charity Murtoff.

McDonough comes to Carlisle Barracks from Fort Shafter, Hawaii, where he served as the chief of Plans and Exercises for the USARPAC G2 directorate.

Hall praised McDonough’s experience as a leader.

“He understands how to fight. He understands what the issues are. And, he asks the right questions to get things done.”


Incident at Carlisle Barracks

July 7, 2011 -- This afternoon there was a domestic incident on Carlisle Barracks involving a family residing on post. A male was injured and is receiving treatment at Carlisle Hospital. The injuries are not life-threatening. A female has been taken into custody by the Carlisle Barracks Police, the local Army Criminal Investigation Division is investigating the matter.


Col. David Hembree, the commander of the Fort Meade Dental Activity, passes the guidon to Col. Michael E. Garvin, the incoming commander of the Carlisle Barracks U.S. Army Dental Clinic during a June 7, change of command ceremony held at the Letort View Community Center.

Photo by Tyler Davis, USAWC Public Affairs

Col. Stephen Tanner, the out-going commander, departs for a second command, as commander of the   Fort Eustis Dental Command.


Veteran Tandem Airborne Jump scheduled for Aug. 13

A veteran combat parachutist of D-Day, Operation Market Garden, and the Battle of the Bulge will celebrate his 90thbirthday with a tandem parachute jump, Aug. 13.

 

World War II veteran Richard “Red” Falvey, in tandem with Sergeant First Class Mike Elliott plan to do an airborne tandem jump into a landing zone on the Army Heritage Trail in Carlisle, Pa., now scheduled for 12:30 p.m.


The Army Heritage & Education Center will celebrate Falvey’s service with an educational presentation on the D-Day invasion, and an introduction to the AHEC collection and materials from D-Day and Operation Overlord.


 Tyler Davis, Public Affairs Office

Carlisle Barracks partners with local food bank

 

June 29, 2011 – Balfour Beatty housing communities, in coordination with Project SHARE, a local non-profit charity organization, is still conducting a food drive on post for families in the Carlisle community.

 

The food drive kicked off June 5, accepting donations of non-perishable food items from those residing within the barracks housing.  The food drive was designed to correspond with extensive moves that occur this time of year on the barracks.

 

“Most of the outgoing residents threw away the food that couldn’t be packed,” said Helen Widdowson, Lifeworks Coordinator for Balfour Beatty. “We decided to collect and donate the food so it would do some good in the community rather than go to waste, “ Widdowson said. The food drive is slated to end on July 10.

 

Project SHARE takes donations of all non-perishable food items but is currently in need of spaghetti sauce, tuna fish, baby food/formula, canned chicken and peas. The collected food is distributed monthly to more than 1,000 low income families across the greater Carlisle area. Those interested may donate their non-perishable canned or dried foods to the Balfour Beatty housing office at Delaney Field House.

 

Project SHARE also raises funds through a cardboard drive that will begin on July 20 and run through Aug. 4. Cardboard collected is bundled and sold, with proceeds contributing to food and clothing distribution. Donated cardboard is to be flattened and placed outside before 10 am, on Wednesdays and Thursdays between July 20 and August 4, when volunteers will be picking up donations.



Farewell Message from Secretary Gates

To the Men and Women of the United States Armed Forces: Tomorrow, 30 June 2011, I will retire as Secretary of Defense.  It has been the greatest honor of my life to serve and to lead you for the past four and a half years. All of that time we have been engaged in two wars and countless other operations. 

It has been a difficult time for you and for your families, from long and repeated deployments for those in all four services -- and the associated long separations from loved ones -- to the anguish of those of you who have lost friends and family in combat or those of you who have suffered visible and invisible wounds of war yourselves.  But your dedication, courage and skill have kept America safe even while bringing the war in Iraq to a successful conclusion and, I believe, at last turning the tide in Afghanistan.  Your countrymen owe you their freedom and their security.  They sleep safely at night and pursue their dreams during the day because you stand the watch and protect them.

For four and a half years, I have signed the orders deploying you, all too often into harm's way.  This has weighed on me every day.  I have known about and felt your hardship, your difficulties, your sacrifice more than you can possibly imagine.  I have felt personally responsible for each of you, and so I have tried to do all I could to provide whatever was needed so you could complete your missions successfully and come home safely -- and, if hurt, get the fastest and best care in the world.

You are the best that America has to offer.  My admiration and affection for you is without limit, and I will think about you and your families and pray for you every day for the rest of my life. God bless you.


Tyler Davis, Public Affairs Office

Patriot Guard Riders to help welcome home USAWC 2010 grad from individual deployment to Iraq

July 1, 2011 – A lone soldier will return home from a year long Iraqi deployment to the greetings of family, friends, and the Patriot Guard Riders this holiday weekend.

Colonel David L. Ward, US Army, has spent the last year on an individual deployment to Baghdad Iraq and will arrive at Harrisburg International Airport at 5:25 pm, Sunday, July 3.

Ward’s wife, Mary Ward, has enlisted the support of the Patriot Guard Riders to greet her husband at the airport and escort him home to Carlisle Barracks. The Patriot Guard Riders is a group of men and women from around the country that support our troops when they return home. The organization’s main goals are to greet and congratulate our heroes, respect and mourn them and shield the family and friends from protestors.

The yearlong deployment has been hard on the Ward family. Like many other soldiers, Col. Ward’s primary means of contact was email or a rare Skype call. Since learning of his return date, Ward has spread the word to gather a greeting force for her husband.

The response she received was unexpected. “I was overwhelmed to learn that people will be coming from Maryland and Delaware. They put out a call through their [The Patriot Guard Riders] organization. They don’t know my husband, but they are responding to a call to welcome an honored soldier,” Ward said.

Col. Ward’s flight will land at 525 at Harrisburg International Airport, and all are welcome to support his return. He will be escorted by the Patriot Guard Riders back to his home on the Carlisle Barracks.

 “We forget sometimes that people are grateful and happy to have the opportunity to thank a soldier for what he did in Iraq,” said Ward, “That’s what touched me – that people are willing to change their holiday weekend to welcome my soldier.”


Staff Sgt. Corey Baltos, USAWC Public Affairs

Distance Education students descend on Washington DC for a day of intergovernmental interaction

June 24, 2011 - One of the lessons of the Army War College program is that the military does not, and cannot operate as a self contained entity.  In many cases, coordinating with other nations, government agencies and international forces is required. 

Michael Keays, a State Department employee with the Bureau of South and Central Asian Affairs, briefs Army War College students on the U.S. policy towards Afghanistan.  The students visited the State Department and other government and non-government agencies during a trip to Washington D.C. on June 22.  Photo by Staff Sgt. Corey Baltos.

To see this process in action, on June 22 nearly 350 distance education class of 2012 students descended on Washington D.C. to gain a broader perspective of international and domestic organizations that effect and influence national security policy.

The trip allows the students the opportunity to visit with, and speak with members of these government agencies.

 “This trip is an integral part of the summer educational experience exposing our students to large and complex public and private organizations with a particular emphasis on interagency organizations,” said Col. Darrell Fountain, First Residence Course Director.

 Prior to the trip the students were given a list of 22 different organizations they could visit.  Once they made their choices they were broken into small groups to visit the organization or institution of their choice.  The organizations that were visited included the Russian, Brazilian and Indian Embassies, the State Department, a tour of the Army Congressional Appropriations, and the Heritage Foundation.  Students also had the opportunity to visit media outlets such as Reuters and CBS News.

“This visit has brought everything full circle,” said Lt. Col. Kat Walker, the executive officer for Headquarters Department of the Army, G-8 .  “It is interesting to see how different agencies interact from a strategic prospective, and see some of the challenges we have strategically to implement our national interests.” 

Members of the distance education class of 2012 listen as Jason Greer, the director of the Office of Congressional & Public Affairs for the Bureau of Political-Military Affairs, gives them an overview of the State Department during their small group visit to Washington D.C.  Photo by Staff Sgt. Corey Baltos.

While visiting the State Department the students listened to remarks on the situation in Libya and U.S. policy toward Afghanistan.    Walker said she found the remarks interesting because it gave her a better perspective on how the Department of State works with the Defense Department to implement national policy. 

“In seminar we talked about strategic leadership, and DIME, or Diplomacy, information, Military and Economic, power,” said Marine Corps Lt. Col. Wes Hayes, the strategic communications officer for US Joint Forces Command.  “It is eye opening to see the diplomatic concern and everything they are involved in.”

Other students “followed the money”, and learned how the Army gets its money.  The students met with Maj. Gen. Phillip McGhee, the director of the Army Budget then went to Capitol Hill to meet with staffers from both the House and Senate Appropriations Committees.

“This trip was helpful,” said Col. Martin Wilson, Seminar 22 distance education faculty instructor.  “The students are able to see the strategic level of money.”

“I couldn’t ask for a better trip,” said Hayes.  “This was definitely the highlight of our two week resident program.”