Banner Archive for June 2017
 


Carlisle Barracks leadership, directors get first glimpse at new civ personnel system

Elton Manske, USAG director of human resources, leads a training session June 22 in the LVCC for Carlisle Barracks leadership and directors on the new DoD Performance Management and Appraisal Program.

Carlisle Barracks leadership and directors got their first glimpse into the new Department of Defense civilian personnel system, the DoD Performance Management and Appraisal Program, or DPMAP at a training session June 22 at the LVCC.

DPMAP is a standardized Defense-wide performance and appraisal system set to begin this year. It places a strong emphasis on supervisory responsibilities and employee engagement. The program is being phased in, with senior civilians, GS-13 entering July 1 with the rest of civilians entering Nov. 1.  

There are three formal documented face-to-face discussions required under the new program – An initial performance plan meeting, one progress review and a final performance appraisal discussion.

“Additional performance discussions are highly encouraged throughout the appraisal cycle with a focus on enhanced employee engagement,” according to Elton Manske, USAG director of human resources, who led the training.

DPMAP is a 3-tiered performance management program with the rating levels of “Level 5 – Outstanding”, “Level 3 - Fully Successful” and “Level 1 –Unacceptable”. Each performance element will be given a rating that corresponds to these levels. All elements are critical and will not be weighted. The overall rating will be calculated in the MyPerformance tool by adding together the individual ratings for each element and that sum will be divided by the total number of elements. This calculation will be used to determine the final overall rating – Outstanding, Fully Successful or Unacceptable.

For example, if you have four performance elements, and three of four are scored as a “5” and the other is a “3”, the calculation will look like: 5+5+5+3=18. The sum of all the elements are then divided by the total number of elements: 18÷4=4.5. This results in an overall rating of record of a “Level 5 – Outstanding”. If two of the four elements are scored as a “5” and the other two were “3”, the final calculation would be 4.0, resulting in an overall rating of record of a “Level 3 – Fully Successful”. If any rated performance element is scored as a “1” this results in an overall rating of record of “Level 1 – Unacceptable”. A forced distribution of ratings is not allowed under the new program.

Additional training opportunities will be made available for employees and supervisors later this year.

More information on DPMAP can be found at https://www.cpms.osd.mil/Subpage/NewBeginnings/DPMAP


Carlisle Barracks mosquito, tick test program underway

You may have noticed many different types of curious-looking traps popping up on the installation. No, we’re not trying to capture Bigfoot or Bugs Bunny, it’s all part of the annual program to test mosquito, ticks and insects for a number of viruses.

The Dunham Army Health Clinic Environmental Health team, led by Hilla Avusuglo, has placed traps on the installation to test mosquito samples for West Nile and Zika virus. While neither virus has been detected in Carlisle, the team here annually conducts these tests.

Each trap is set for 24 hours and then picked up and the samples are sent to the Public Health Command lab in Maryland for testing. In the event of a positive test for either virus steps are taken to both identify the breeding grounds for the mosquitos and then efforts are taken to remedy the situation.

 

Sentinel traps, which are designed to attract the aedes species of mosquito, which has been known to carry the Zika virus, have also been set up on post.

Avusuglo will conduct an environmental assessment to determine the location of breeding grounds for the positive samples. The Zika (aedes) mosquito travels about half a mile and the West Nile (Culex) mosquito travels about 1.5 mile so a positive test doesn’t necessarily mean that the breeding ground is on post. In either case the location of the positive sample is treated with a spray or a fog to diminish the mosquito population.

“At the end of the day rest assured the Dunham Health Clinic Environmental Health team is working hard to prevent the population on post from any mosquito borne diseases,” said Avusuglo. 

 

How you can help protect yourself and others

 

 

Gravis traps, which attract the culex species of mosquitos, which have been known to carry the West Vile Virus, are another of the traps set up on post.


 There are things every individual can do around the home and farm to help eliminate mosquito-breeding areas. Some of these tips include:
· Dispose of tin cans, plastic containers, ceramic pots or similar water-holding containers that have collected on your property.

· Pay attention to discarded tires. Stagnant water in tires are where most mosquitoes breed.

· Drill holes in the bottom of recycling containers left outdoors.

· Have clogged roof gutters cleaned every year, particularly if the leaves from surrounding trees have a tendency to plug up the drains. Roof gutters can produce millions of mosquitoes each season.

· Turn over plastic wading pools when not in use. Stagnant water in a wading pool becomes a place for mosquitoes to breed.

· Turn over wheelbarrows and don't let water stagnate in birdbaths. Both provide breeding habitats for domestic mosquitoes.

· Aerate ornamental pools or stock them with fish. Water gardens can become major mosquito producers if they are allowed to stagnate. Clean and chlorinate swimming pools not in use. A swimming pool left untended by a family on vacation for a month can produce enough mosquitoes to result in neighborhood-wide complaints. Mosquitoes may even breed in the water that collects on pool covers.

· Keep water in buckets and troughs fresh and clean.

 

A pool filled with stagnant water is a prime breeding area for mosquitos. Empty and turn over when not in use to help eliminate potential breeding areas.

· Use landscaping to eliminate standing water that collects on your property. Mosquitoes may breed in any puddle that lasts for more than four days.


Team Dunham praised by outgoing health clinic commander

CARLISLE, Pa. (June 21, 2017) -- Change of command for the Dunham U.S. Army Health Clinic was a salute to Army Medicine’s concept of the Patient-Centered Medical Home, a philosophy that a team-based model builds on a strong primary care foundation for the best possible patient care.  Outgoing and incoming commanders alike singled out the expertise and contributions of ‘Team Dunham.’

Lt. Col. Elizabeth H. Duque accepted the unit colors and associated responsibilities from outgoing commander, Lt. Col. Michael F. Belenky.  The parade field event for the Dunham workforce and Carlisle Barracks Community celebrated the leadership at Dunham Army Health Clinic, within the U.S. Army Medical Department Activity which was represented by Fort Meade MEDDAC commander Col. Daniel G. Bonnichsen.

Lt. Col. Elizabeth Duque, new commander, shares a humorous moment with the officiating party of the Dunham Army Health Clinic change of command, June 20.

Belenky shared his admiration for Dunham’s “ultimate team of teams.” They contribute to impressive statistics and remarkable patient feedback, and yet, Dunham team interactions with patients are the real game changer, he said, noting an ability to maintain standards or care while flexing for the unique nature of this clinic’s mission.

“Every year, we bid farewell to and welcome a new War College Resident Class and their families, when we centrally in-process them and provide school and sports physicals to make sure their children can become part of this community as quickly as possible,” said Belenky. “We teach [them] how to dynamically stretch before softball practice so that their 22-year-old minds can adapt to their 42-year-old bodies.

“We team up with the best garrison command in IMCOM to support a Retiree Appreciation Day that is unmatched in its dedication to our retired warriors.

“We hold classes on mindfulness training, tobacco cessation, and lifting to empower, while helping educate our community to make healthier food choices in our commissary. All of this is done while we see patients and receive compliments,” said Belenky, who referred to moving testimonials about “professionalism” and “obvious care.”

Sgt. 1st Class Jacob Romero, Lt. Col. Mike Belenky, and Col. Daniel Bonnichsen respond to Lt. Col. Duque’s remarks, following the formal passing of the unit colors during the Dunham Army Health Clinic change of command ceremony.

 “It’s been the honor of my career to be a member of your team and to be your commander for these two years,” said Belenky to Team Dunham. 

 “The people here are a steady, awesome crew, from what I hear,” said Duque, after the formal ceremony, and that makes her excited to be here at Dunham.

Duque comes from a larger patient base of about 63 thousand patients at Fort Bliss, where she ran the six outlying clinics.  “I was chief of primary care … and got to focus just on patient care, she said, drawing a contrast with the broader scope of responsibilities that will be hers at Dunham.

Team Dunham operates health clinics at Carlisle Barracks, Fort Indiantown Gap, New Cumberland Defense Distribution Center, and Letterkenny Army Depot & Munitions Center. It manages, as well, the Army Wellness Center at Carlisle Barracks which is introducing the new Senior Leader Resiliency program for the senior officers enrolled in Army War College and General Officer education here. SLS is being rolled out this week for the Distance Education student-leaders here at Carlisle for their mid-point resident phase.

“The interesting part of the job will be of a strategic nature,” she said, anticipating changes that will shape military medical care in the future.

The Annapolis native earned her Medical Doctorate from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, in 2003. She completed residency training in Family Medicine at Fort Hood, Texas, and a Geriatrics fellowship in 2010. She holds a master’s in Business Administration with a healthcare concentration from Indiana Wesleyan University.

Duque’s command team partner, Staff Sgt. Wayne J. Kaufman will pick up the baton from outgoing Senior Enlisted Advisor Sgt. 1st Class Jacob Romero, who will retire to northeast Pennsylvania.

Army Lt. Col. Belenky’s next port of call is the USAWC’s sister service college, the Naval War College.

Below, Army War College Commandant Maj. Gen. Bill Rapp thanks Sgt. 1st Class Jacob Romero for years of contributions to the Army and to the Carlisle Community. The ceremony marked the change of unit leadership from Belenky-Romero to the Duque-Kaufman command team.


IMCOM Commanding General visits Carlisle Barracks

Lt. Gen. Kenneth Dahl listens to James Johnson, Child and Youth Services Program Operations Specialist, about a new system that will allow McConnell Youth Center staff to have up to the second information on where youth and staff are located throughout the facility.

June 21, 2017 -- Lt. Gen. Kenneth Dahl, Installation Management Command Commanding General, spent more than a day with USAG Carlisle Barracks leadership, directors and employees earlier this week on his first official visit to the installation as the IMCOM CG.

His visit was focused in three areas -- infrastructure, security and people – and included a tour of Root Hall, the Fire Station, Visitors Center on Claremont Road and the McConnell Youth Center. During the tour of each facility Dahl heard success stories, challenges and best practices that can be shared across IMCOM.

“Each installation has unique challenges but in most cases we see opportunities to share solutions from other installations to help meet these challenges,” said Dahl. In Root Hall and the fire station he was able to see first-hand the challenges of operating and maintaining aging infrastructure.

“We see this across the Army and it truly is a challenge,” he said noting the cuts in funding and increased requirements in recent years. He also met with USAG directors and special staff to hear their concerns which included hiring lags for civilian employees. He also provided an update on the stand-up of the Installation Directorates which are co-located with major commands like TRADOC, and how his role as changed as a result of being the first IMCOM director without a dual-hat as the Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management.

“It’s allowed me to focus solely on our installations and work with the staff every day in San Antonio,” he said. “They can ask for guidance or support every day and it allows me more flexibility to visit our installations.” Dahl has visited more than 60 installations during his time as IMCOM’s CG. 

At each stop Dahl spoke with employees to ask their opinions on activities, how new IMCOM policies are affecting operations or if they had any advice on how to improve services.

 

Lt. Gen. Kenneth Dahl speaks with Lt. Col. Sally Hannan, Carlisle Barracks Garrison Commander, outside of the vehicle inspection area on Claremont Road. Dahl was able to tour the Visitors Center and speak with police and firefighters about their support to the installation and local community.

 

Dahl noted that as budgets got tighter, all installations have to look at what services they provide, which may require curtailment and what may need to be eliminated. He said that recent programs like the Service Culture Initiative are designed to help identify best practices in order to provide the best experience to customers, Soldiers and their Families. 

While here, Dahl recognized employees and volunteers who represented hard work and dedication. Recognized were Staff Sgt. Liane McCory, Tax Center NCO, and Dan Barney and Jay Tisserand, two volunteers, for their efforts in saving servicemembers, families and retirees hundreds of thousands in tax preparation fees and Al Marquez, Chief of the Plans and Operations Division, for his efforts in the planning and execution of the recent change of command and USAG support to the resident graduation.

At the McConnell Youth Center Dahl was able to see the state-of-the-art center as well as a new initiative developed by James Johnson, CYS Program Operations Specialist. Using existing equipment, Johnson was able to develop a new tracking system for children utilizing the center using a touch screen monitor and linked tablets.

“This allows us to see at any moment exactly where our kids are,” he said. The system refreshes every nine seconds and allows the children to update where they are going using a simple touch screen interface. The system replaced a system that relied on a magnetic chalkboard.

“This is really a creative solution,” said Dahl after viewing the system in action by a group of kids attending the summer camp. Johnson, Robert Suskie III, director of the Center and Mel Irwin, CYS director.

 

Lt. Gen. Kenneth Dahl speaks with Lt. Col. Sally Hannan, Command Sgt. Maj. Jamie Lethiecq and Tom Kelly about the post’s environmental programs.


USAWC honors legacy of LGBT men, women who serve our nation

You are invited to attend the Army War College and Carlisle Barracks' LGBT Pride Month Observance, in the Bliss Hall Foyer, Monday, 26 June, 11-11:30 a.m. This year's event will include USAWC proclamation signing and cake cutting to acknowledge LGBT Service Members, Family Members and Civilians, and the contributions they have made in the past, and continue to make every day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The event is open to everyone. Bring family and friends.

Event: LGBT Pride Month Observance

Date/Time: 26 June 2017 / 1100-1130

Location: Bliss Hall Foyer

 

BACKGROUND:

During the month of June, the DoD proudly celebrates our rich diversity and renew our commitment to equality by recognizing LGBT Pride. The dedicated services of our lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) service members, civilian employees and families members continues to strengthen our National Security as well as the Department of Defense. Their inclusion gives our Department greater promise and hope for the future.

June was selected as Pride month to remember the events that took place in Greenwich Village in New York, known as the Stonewall riots in 1969. The Stonewall riots were a series of violent demonstrations by members of the gay community against a police riot that lasted three days. From this tragic event, the Stonewall riots were then recognized as the catalyst for the Gay Liberation movement in the United States.

LGBT Pride or Gay Pride is the positive stance against discrimination and violence toward lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals to promote dignity, equality rights, increase visibility as a social group, build community, and celebrate sexual diversity and gender variances.


Real ID update for installation access

Visitors may continue to use driver's licenses from Pennsylvania and other states when accessing Carlisle Barracks.  Thanks to the extension of the REAL ID Act (www.dhs.gov/real-id) announced by the Department of Homeland Security through Oct. 10, Pennsylvania drivers will not need to present a second form of ID.

*** READ MORE BELOW, BUT FIRST: Enforcement of the REAL ID Act does not affect military or civilian personnel/dependents with the appropriate federal credentials. For all others, if you are uncertain whether you can get on Carlisle Barracks with your current identification, head over to http://carlislebarracks.carlisle.army.mil/VisitorCenter/realID.htm  before arriving to learn our entry requirements, acceptable forms of identification, and what you can do to avoid delays or denial of entry. ***

Visit www.dhs.gov/real-id to learn about this law, see your state's compliance status and upcoming enforcement dates, and find out what it all means for visits to Carlisle Barracks now or in the future. Those with driver's licenses from non-compliant states must have additional qualifying identification (e.g. U.S. passport, birth certificate, Social Security card) to get on post.

As of today, only state-issued identification from Minnesota* and Missouri are not valid for accessing federal installations due to non-compliance with the act. Oregon may be added to this list following expiration of an enforcement grace period on July 10. People who wish to access the post with IDs from those states must provide a secondary form of id that can be found at http://carlislebarracks.carlisle.army.mil/VisitorCenter/realID.htm’

*Regardless of their compliance status, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Vermont, and Washington all offer optional enhanced driver’s licenses that are considered superior to the act’s requirements and may be used for visitor access to Carlisle Barracks .


 
U.S. Army announces force structure decisions for fiscal year 2017
WASHINGTON -- The United States Army announced today how it will allocate thousands of additional troops that are part of an end strength directed by Congress in the National Defense Authorization Act.
 
Soldiers cross a water obstacle at the end of an early morning 10-kilometer ruck march during the 2017 Army Reserve Best Warrior Competition at Fort Bragg, N.C., June 13. The competition determines the top noncommissioned officer and junior enlisted soldier who will represent the Army Reserve in the Department of the Army Best Warrior Competition later in the year. Army photo by Sgt. David Turner
 
The increase allows the Army to maintain an end strength of 1.018 million Soldiers. This results in a regular Army force increase to 476,000 soldiers; the Army National Guard to 343,000 soldiers; and the Army Reserve to 199,000 soldiers. The increase reverses the Total Army end strength reduction originally programmed for 980,000 by the end of FY18.
 
Major force structure decisions include establishing readiness enhancement accounts in all Army components to raise manning and readiness levels in existing combat units to support combatant commanders’ operational demands and contingency operations as defined by the defense strategy; retention of units previously scheduled for inactivation; as well as the creation of new units and personnel increases in existing organizations in the United States and overseas.
 
“These Force structure gains facilitated by the FY17 end strength increase have begun, but some will take several years to achieve full operational capability. Implementation of these decisions, without sacrificing readiness or modernization, is dependent upon receiving future appropriations commensurate with the authorized end strength,” said Brig. Gen. Brian J. Mennes, director of the Force Management Division.
 
The increase will begin to address and reduce the capabilities gap against near-peer, high-end adversaries; reduce modernization gaps; and improve readiness in existing units. It also allows for the retention of the 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska; the 18th Military Police Brigade Headquarters in Europe; the 206th Military Intelligence Battalion at Fort Hood, Texas; the 61st Maintenance Company, and a combat aviation brigade in Korea. 
 
The Army will also build a small number of units such as the continuing activation of two security force assistance brigades (SFAB) along with the Military Advisor Training Academy and SFAB proponent at Fort Benning, Georgia, and an aviation training brigade in First Army at Fort Hood, Texas. The added end strength ensures the Army increases manning in its tactical units, enhancing overall readiness across all three components.
 
The Army is planning to station the following units overseas: a field artillery brigade headquarters with an organic brigade support battalion headquarters, a signal company and a Multiple Launch Rocket System battalion (MLRS); two MLRS battalions with two forward support companies; a short range air defense battalion, a theater movement control element; a petroleum support company; and an ammunition platoon.
 
The Army will further convert an infantry brigade combat team to an armor brigade combat team and increase personnel in the Training and Doctrine Command by 1,300 spaces to mitigate manpower shortfalls to increase training base and recruiting structure.
 
"The end strength increase will augment deploying units, and units on high readiness status, with additional soldiers to increase Army readiness and enable us to continue to protect the nation,” said Mennes.

Hannan, Lethiecq assume duties as Garrison leaders

Lt. Col. Sally Hannan, the new Carlisle Barracks Garrison Commander, accepts the colors from Vincent Grewatz, director of the Installation Directorate – Training, during the Change of Command ceremony June 14.

For more photos visit www.facebook.com/usawc

Against a backdrop that showcased the support mission of the garrison, Lt. Col. Sally Hannan and Command Sgt. Maj. Jamie Lethiecq, assumed their positions as the new command team of Carlisle Barracks June 14.

The Carlisle Barracks Golf Course was the setting for the change of command ceremony, which dates back to the earliest days of the Army.  Garrison commanders on Carlisle Barracks provide “city-manager” support to the mission activities of the Army War College, other organization and residents living on post as well. The site was selected in part to show the range of services the garrison provides, according to the outgoing garrison commander, Lt. Col. Greg Ank.

Briana Ank, daughter of Lt. Col. Ank, sung the National Anthem before the formal transfer of command ceremony.

The presiding officer for the ceremony, Vincent Grewatz, director of the Installation Directorate - Training, thanked Ank and Command Sgt. Maj. Nelson Maldonado for their hard work and dedication leading the post for the last two years.

“Nowhere is IMCOM’s mission of integrating and delivering base support to enable readiness for a globally responsive Army more evident than here,” he said. “It is reflected in the way you conduct yourselves, the way you treat each other and the way you serve. It’s evident that we’ve done things better here, because we’ve done them together. This great success begins with the fantastic leadership that our Garrison command team has provided for the past two years.” 

Grewatz named off just a few of the accomplishments of the Ank-Maldonado team, including numerous quality of life and safety and security initiatives.

 “This command team has worked tirelessly to achieve their goal of making Carlisle the best place to live, work and train for our Soldiers and families,” he said. “They’ve led by example and built a cohesive and effective team. The installation is now better postured to weather the complexity and challenges of the future and meet the needs of our national defense.

Grewatz was among the first to thank the members of the Garrison team.

“To the members of the Garrison team, I want you to know that your efforts and contributions have been recognized and hugely appreciated,” he said to those in attendance. “You work tirelessly day in and day out to provide first class service to the community, I am so proud of you. We’ve asked a lot of you and you’ve delivered.” 

He then challenged Hannan and Lethiecq to build on their success.

“Fortunately for IMCOM, the Army and the Carlisle Barracks community, we don’t have to look far to find another superb command team to take the helm at the Garrison,” he said. “We’re placing this command in the hands of two very capable leaders, Lt. Col. Sally Hannan and CSM Jamie Lethiecq. They bring to IMCOM a track record of excellence and a clear passion for mission, people and families.

Lt. Col. Greg Ank, outgoing Garrison Commander, speaks during the ceremony.

I can’t think of a better command team to lead the Garrison.”

Both Ank and Command Sgt. Maj. Nelson Maldonado, reflected on their two years of command at Carlisle Barracks after passing the Garrison colors to Hannan and Lethiecq.

Ank thanked the employees, including Brutus the post K-9, for their support, hard work and installation integration experience during his time as Garrison Commander.

He shared the story of his first week of command that included a post-wide power outage, a micro-burst storm that downed more than 20, 60-year-old trees, a higher headquarters inspection of the child care centers and a task to plan and develop a future academic facility.

“This was our introduction to Garrison Command – this was Sergeant Major’s and my adventure,” he said.
But ask every one of the garrison professionals that sit before you today – this adventure and the challenges that occur each day are a normal part of leading and managing a small city like Carlisle Barracks.”

He then reminded the new team that they won’t do any of this alone.

“The team made up of human resource, morale and recreation, plans, training and security, emergency services, public works, legal, public affairs, religious support, equal employment opportunity, safety, environmental, budget and resource management professionals will be there every day to help you solve immediate and unforcasted challenges, and more importantly, to prevent even larger ones.”

Ank also thanked Maldonado for his support during their time in command.

“Your guidance, advice and counsel have saved me on multiple occasions, more than I count or remember, but without you, I know I would not be here today. There is no one the Army could have chosen to make sure I didn’t screw all this up better than Nelson Maldonado, I was a lucky Soldier.

Battle buddy, I’d go to war with you any day, anywhere.”

Command Sgt. Maj. Nelson Maldonado, outgoing CSM, speaks to the Soldiers, employees and families.

He closed by thanking his family, including his wife, Holly, and their three children. Ank will retire to the Pittsburgh area after a formal retirement ceremony later this month at the Military District of Washington.

Maldonado also took time to thank the garrison staff for their support and expertise, including the police and fire fighters who keep the post and Carlisle community safe, not to mention issuing him a parking ticket his first day on the installation.

“Our fire department not only assures the safety of this historic post, but the greater Carlisle community,” he said. The fire department here has standing mutual aid agreements with the Carlisle Borough, North Middleton Township, Middlesex Township and the Mt. Holly Borough. In the last two years they have responded to more than 600 calls on and off the installation.

He also recognized the security guards who screen more than 2,500 visitors on a monthly basis and ensure that the security program is constantly evolving to meet new threats.

Maldonado closed with a piece of advice for the new command team.

“We are proud of your selection for this assignment and even more proud of the team we are leaving in your capable hands,” he said. “Please remember that we are in the business of taking care of people because people are our business.

Maldonado will retire to the Chambersburg, Pa area later this month.

Both Hannan and Lethiecq thanked their families for attending and expressed excitement for the challenges of command.

“It is truly a blessing to be trusted to care for this amazing installation,” said Hannan. “The expertise of the Garrison team is evident in every foot that you have walked out here today – from flawless grounds, expert catering and setup to seamless security – are just a few of our services. It is obvious that I have been given a team of committed professionals. I look forward to the opportunity of serving with you.”

Hannan comes to Carlisle from Fort Leonard Wood, MO, where she served as the Deputy Commanding Officer for the 1st Engineer Brigade. She previously served as the Engineer Doctrine Chief, Maneuver Support Center of Excellence, Deputy District Engineer for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Honolulu District, Hawaii and Project Manager for a Formerly Used Defense Site (FUDS). Hannan commanded the Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd Signal Brigade in Mannheim, Germany, followed by command of the 18th Engineer Brigade Rear Detachment during their deployment in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.  Following command, Hannan served as the U.S. Army Engineer School, Operations Officer followed by service as the Battalion Executive Officer of the 35th Engineer Battalion at Fort Leonard Wood, MO.

Hannan holds a B.S. in Environmental Engineering from the United States Military Academy, West Point , an M.S. in Environmental Engineering from Missouri University of Science and Technology, and graduated from the Engineer basic and advanced courses and the Command and General Staff College.

Command Sgt. Maj. Jamie Lethiecq speaks.

 

Lethiecq’s duty assignments include 3rd Military Intelligence (Aerial Exploitation) Battalion, 501st Military Intelligence Brigade, Camp Humphreys, Republic of Korea; the 344th Military Intelligence Battalion, Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas; the Regimental Special Troops Battalion (RSTB), 75th Ranger Regiment, Fort Benning, Georgia; and the 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne), Fort Carson, Colorado.

Lethiecq’s civilian education includes a Master’s degree in Public Administration from the University of Texas El Paso, a Master’s in Management with a concentration in Organizational Leadership from American Public University, a Bachelor’s of Arts in Political Science from Angelo State University, and five Associate’s degrees. Sergeant Major Lethiecq is also a Project Management Professional (PMP) through the Project Management Institute as well as a Certified Manager (CM) through the Institute of Certified Professional Managers.


242nd Army Birthday

Remarks by retired Gen. Gordon Sullivan

The U.S. Army War College and the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center commemorates the U.S. Army's 242nd Birthdayand the Military History Institute's 50th Anniversary on Wednesday, June 14, 2017, beginning at 1:30 p.m. inside the USAHEC.

The highlight of this year's celebration is a presentation by General (Retired) Gordon Sullivan, who served as the 32nd Chief of Staff of the Army, a culmination of more than 36 years of service on active duty. General Sullivan's remarks will honor both the long history of the Army and the history and significance of the Military History Institute.

Other event features include a reading of the Congressional Resolution, passed on June 14, 1775, establishing the Army, a cake cutting, and singing of the Army Song.

Commemorating the Army's birthdayprovides an opportunity to celebrate its rich history with fellow Soldiers and look toward the future of the nation. Selfless service by Soldiers, Civilians, and Families keeps the nation ready today and prepared for tomorrow.

This event is free to attend and is open to all military and civilian employees of Carlisle Barracks and the public. For questions or more information, please call: 717-245-3972.


The heat is here, how to keep cool, safe

For the first time this year, temperatures are expected to exceed 90 degrees Fahrenheit at Carlisle Barracks.  While many are ready to welcome the summer months, the elevated temperatures can pose a significant risk for heat-related injuries.  The Army reports an average of two to three heat-related fatalities and more than 1,000 non-fatal heat-related conditions requiring hospitalization each year. This sobering fact underscores the need for Army Leaders to understand risk factors, prevention tactics, signs and symptoms, and treatment protocols for heat stress.  In an effort to prevent the onset of heat injury/illness, personnel should:

-         Ensure adequate hydration to replace fluids and electrolytes lost through sweating.  Monitor the amount of fluid intake during work shifts.   Hourly fluid intake should not exceed 1½ quarts and daily fluid intake should not exceed 12 quarts.

-         Monitor urine.  Dehydration typically results in a darkening of the urine color.  Frequent urination, especially at night, may be a sign of overdrinking during the day. 

-         Eat well-balanced and regular meals.  Ensure proper nutrition and rations for the conditions and activities are consumed.  Avoid using salt tablets unless directed by a doctor.

-         Implement work/rest cycles.  These cycles vary based upon the type of work/activity being conducted and the current heat category.  Heat categories are based upon the wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT) index.

-         Wear loose, lightweight clothing (if possible) to encourage heat release.  Light-colored, moisture-wicking garments are preferred to reflect light and heat.  For Soldiers and first responders, please note that wearing body armor adds 5°F to WBGT index and wearing MOPP over garment adds 10°F to WBGT Index.

Heat illness is remains a life-threatening conditions during off-duty hours.  In the U.S. civilian population, heat illness and related fatalities are highest among infants and young children, athletes, outdoor laborers, the elderly, and those who are obese or with certain health conditions and medications.  Tips for preventing heat injury at home include:

-         Recognizing at-risk populations.  Infants, young children, and the elderly are not able to regulate heat as well as healthy adults.  Minimize their exposure to high temperatures and direct sun.

-         Avoiding alcohol consumption.  Drinking alcohol while playing sports or other outdoor recreational activity can increase dehydration and lower awareness.

-         Monitoring athletic activities.  Sports requiring long distance running, racing, or cumbersome uniforms are high-risk activities for heat illness.  Participants must be closely watched for early symptoms of heat stress.

-         Taking care of pets.  Dogs die each year from heat stroke from being left in a hot car or running in the hot sun.  They can only pant to cool themselves, so they are less able to accommodate heat stress.

For more information and training tools, see the U.S. Army Public Health Center Army Injury Prevention webpage at http://phc.amedd.army.mil/topics/discond/hipss/Pages/HeatInjuryPrevention.aspx or the OSHA Heat Stress QuickCard at https://www.osha.gov/Publications/osha3154.pdf.


New command team to take lead of Garrison at Carlisle Barracks

    Lt. Col. Sally C. Hannan and Command Sgt. Maj. Jamie Lethiecq will assume their duties as the new command team of the United States Army Garrison at Carlisle Barracks during a change of command and responsibility ceremony on the Carlisle Barracks Golf Course, Wednesday, June 14, at 10 a.m. 

  Lt. Col. Sally C. Hannan

  Hannan comes to Carlisle from Fort Leonard Wood, MO, where she served as the Deputy Commanding Officer for the 1st Engineer Brigade. She previously served as the Engineer Doctrine Chief, Maneuver Support Center of Excellence, Deputy District Engineer for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Honolulu District, Hawaii and Project Manager for a Formerly Used Defense Site (FUDS). Hannan commanded the Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Signal Brigade in Mannheim, Germany, followed by command of the 18th Engineer Brigade Rear Detachment during their deployment in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.  Following command, Hannan served as the U.S. Army Engineer School, Operations Officer followed by service as the Battalion Executive Officer of the 35th Engineer Battalion at Fort Leonard Wood, MO.

    Hannan holds a B.S. in Environmental Engineering from the United States Military Academy, West Point , an M.S. in Environmental Engineering from Missouri University of Science and Technology, and .  She graduated from the Engineer basic and advanced courses and the Command and General Staff College. 

     Lethiecq’s duty assignments include 3d Military Intelligence (Aerial Exploitation) Battalion, 501st Military Intelligence Brigade, Camp Humphreys, Republic of Korea; the 344th Military Intelligence Battalion, Goodfellow Air Force Base, Texas; the Regimental Special Troops Battalion (RSTB), 75th Ranger Regiment, Fort Benning, Georgia; and the 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne), Fort Carson, Colorado.

    Lethiecq’s civilian education includes a Master’s degree in Public Administration from the University of Texas El Paso, a Master’s in Management with a concentration in Organizational Leadership from American Public University, a Bachelor’s of Arts in Political Science from Angelo State University, and five Associate’s degrees. Sergeant Major Lethiecq is also a Project Management Professional (PMP) through the Project Management Institute as well as a Certified Manager (CM) through the Institute of Certified Professional Managers.

    Garrison commanders on Carlisle Barracks provide “city-manager” support to the mission activities of the Army War College and other organizations, as well as to residents living on post. Command Sgt. Majors are the senior enlisted Soldiers and oversee the Headquarters Detachment and advise the commander. 

 

   The outgoing commander, Lt. Col. Greg Ank, and the outgoing Command Sgt. Maj. Nelson Maldonado, led from the front, at all times keeping Soldiers, civilian, and family wellbeing at the forefront of actions related to safety, security, personal, professional, and spiritual development. After the change of command, Ank and Maldonado will retire from the Army.

Command Sgt. Maj. Jamie Lethiecq  

The change of command ceremony is a formal tradition to demonstrate continuity of command. The military and civilian members of the Garrison at Carlisle Barracks will assemble for the event, highlighted by the passing of the unit guidon from outgoing commander to presiding officer to new commander. Vincent Grewatz, director of the Installation Directorate - Training, will preside. 

    The ceremony will move to Bliss Hall in case of inclement weather.  A shuttle bus will also be available from the Exchange parking lot to transport attendees to and from the Golf Course. The shuttle will depart the lot at 9:30 a.m. and 9:45 a.m. and will return guests at 11:30 a.m. and 1 p.m.


 

 

 

 

 

 

Army War College faculty team Dr. Craig Bullis, Col. Joseph Secino and Navy Capt. Wade Turvold congratulate seminar 5 graduates Col. Yacouba Sanogo of Mali, and Army Lt. Col. Andrew Saslav, June 9.

 

 

 

 

 

 

VCSA: Leaders are the US asymmetric advantage

Strategic education and 15+ years in crucible of combat prepared Army War College graduates for challenge ahead
 
Over 2,000 graduation photos uploaded @ https://www.flickr.com/photos/usawc
 
Story by Curt Keester
CARLISLE, Pa. (June 9, 2017) – The flags of U.S. states and territories and 70 countries fluttered in a cool morning breeze as the Army War College resident class of 2017 arrived on a perfectly sunny day, soon to assume a proud place among strategic leaders. A crescendo moment after 10 months of graduate-level study, the Army War College Graduation unfolded with historic Carlisle Barracks’ parade field as back drop for families, friends and professional colleagues.
 
This class will always hold a special place in my heart, said Commandant Maj. Gen. Bill Rapp, noting this would be his last resident class graduation before retirement. His remarks celebrated the students’ significant achievements in a tough but vitally important curriculum, and highlighted the faculty’s professionalism and skill as teachers and mentors.
 
Almost 400 military officers of the U.S. Army, Marines, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard; 70 armed forces of allied/partner countries, and multiple U.S. federal agencies walked the stage to receive a USAWC diploma and, for most, a Master’s degree in Strategic Studies. Several handfuls of students accepted additional honors for their writing, public speaking or leadership achievements during the academic year.
 
Army War College graduates give “thumbs-up” as they complete 10 months ofgraduate-level study. During the June 9 graduation ceremony, nearly 400 students received USAWC diplomas.
 
“These are our credentials,” said Rapp, about the graduates who are about to depart for leadership across the globe. He echoed the words of Brig. Gen. Charles Canham, who pointed to his Soldiers during the surrender of the German forces at Brest, France, July 1944.
 
Rapp introduced graduation speaker Gen. Daniel B. Allyn, Vice Chief of Staff of the Army, with a description borrowed from William Tecumseh Sherman: “It is enough for the world to know he is a Soldier.” Rapp recounted Allyn’s leadership of combat formations from platoon to corps, in Iraq and Afghanistan, and his leadership of U.S. Forces Command. “His steady leadership of Soldiers at all levels has been remarkable in these turbulent times.”
 
Allyn weaved personal and aspirational themes in his comments to the students. He looked back at his own post-war college years as a strategic leader, and anticipated the graduates' service at the strategic level.
 
Gen. Dan Allyn, Vice Chief of Staff of the Army, congratulates Army Col. Collin Hunton as he accepts his diploma during the Army War College Graduation, June 9.
 
‘Warfighters are why we exist’
 
“My war college class [of 2001] fulfilled our role as military leaders, learning to be comfortable in uncertainty and changing environments during an extraordinarily challenging period in our nation’s history,” said Allyn.
 
“We must transition leaders for our future responsibilities to your capable hands.
 
“The leaders seated among us this morning will soon be responsible for leading change with an uncertain mix of forces, an even more uncertain budget, and in an arguably more dangerous and more complex world than the one we faced at the turn of the millennium.
 
Allyn urged them to take his lessons and apply to their future, whether at Joint duty at a combatant command or service, as a division chief in the Pentagon, or in any number of awaiting duties. 
 
Col. Romeo S. Brawner of the Philippines accepts his Army War College diploma and congratulations from Gen. Dan Allyn, Vice Chief of Staff of the Army, June 9.
 
“What you do as strategic leaders determines where Soldiers fight, how they fight, and with what equipment they fight,” he said. “The warfighters around the globe today are why we exist …. In our profession, we spell TRUST in all-caps. It is foundational to what we do and unconditional. As strategic leaders, we maintain trust with the All-Volunteer Force by doing everything we can every day to fight for their best interests.
 
“Strategic leadership matters,” said Allyn. “It determines whether our joint force wins or loses; personalize your commitment, be a passionate advocate, and maintain the trust of those we lead by doing all you can to fight for their best interests.”
“You have many difficult tasks ahead of you, but we know this terrain and you and your teammates are more than ready,” he said.  “Network daily and remember to stay connected to your war college classmates. Leverage this elite team to achieve exponential results no matter where you find yourself in need -- or able to help others.”
 
“I sleep well because the leaders we are blessed with in our joint force, molded by 15 plus years in the crucible of combat, and now, broadened with a strategic education, remain our asymmetric advantage,” said Gen. Allyn.
 
Gen. Dan Allyn, Vice Chief of Staff of the Army, addresses students, families, faculty and friends gathered for a graduation ceremony in Carlisle, Pa., June 9. These leaders, molded by 15+ years in the crucible of combat and broadened with strategic education are the nation’s asymmetric advantage.
 
Following Allyn’s remarks, family and friends cheered as each graduate received congratulations from Dean Richard Lacquement, Provost Lance Betros, Commandant Bill Rapp, and Vice Chief of Staff Allyn.
 
They walked onto the stage as students of strategic thought; they walked off as graduates of the Army War College, ready to fill the role of strategic leader.
 
In the graduates’ words
 
“I got to interact with my Army counterparts and also the International Fellows,” Navy Cmdr. Shannon Corey said. 
 
Ruth Collins, Chief Executive Officer of the Army War College Foundation, presents Col. Stephanie Ahern with an award for academic excellence during a ceremony June 9. 
 
“Relationships and friendships forged here are something you walk away with and you have for the rest of your life.” He talked about better understanding of the strategic environment, instruments of national power, and how the Defense Department works,” but emphasized the broadening experience of the war college year.
 
“I came in as an officer trained and functional at the operational level, and now I’m going back as an officer trained to be functional at the strategic level,” said Nigerian Col. Kapeh Kabaju Alwali Kazir.
 
“The American environment and the American people have been very, very friendly,” he added. “I sincerely appreciate everything that has gone on here.
 
“I have tremendous respect for this college and the United States.”
 
“We’ve heard over and over throughout the year that it’s not what you know, but who you know: the people that I’ve met here and the relationships built over the year, both in seminar and then in electives and all the different social functions,” said Army Lt. Col. Anne Hessinger. The future ability to pick up a phone with a fellow graduate, and start with a shared experience, is the best part of the resident education, she said.
 
“The support of the community here, the access to the park, the library, the YMCA: that total support of the community made it a great family experience, and central Pennsylvania is a beautiful area,” she added.

Graduates singled out with writing, speaking, leadership awards

For more about the Resident Class of 2017 Graduation: story, photos, video

June 8, 2017 -- Army War College graduates honored for writing were announced by Provost Lance Betros, singling out top performers for graduation kudos and enduring impact within the national security community.

Army War College students and USAWC Fellows, who have studied at some of the nation’s top educational institutions, won four of the nine awards in the Secretary of Defense and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff essay competitions hosted by NDU Press.  Additional awards selected 26 members of the Class of 2017 for acknowledgement of writing, speaking and leading prowess that advanced understanding of significant issues in strategic thought. 

USAWC Faculty lend mentorship to research projects. These faculty advised the award-winning students and fellows:  Dr. David Lai, Dr. Stephen J. Gerras, Dr. Richard C. Bullis, Dr. C. Anthony Pfaff, Dr. Jeffrey L. Groh, Dr. Glenn K. Cunningham, Dr. Andrew A. Hill, Dr. Don Snider, Col. Douglas W. Winton, Col. Douglas G. Douds, Prof. John F. Troxell, Dr. Christopher J. Bolan, Dr. Paul C. Jussel, Col. Stephen K. Van Riper, Prof. Douglas C. Lovelace, Prof. Venaya Eftimova Bellinger, Dr. Antulio J. Echevarria, Prof. Philip M. Evans, Prof. Brett D. Weigle, Col. David W. DeTata, Dr. Marybeth Ulrich, and Col. Edward A. Kaplan.

The 2017 SECDEF National Security Essay Competition awarded third-place honors to Col. Paul Wayne Turnbull for “Asian Alliances in the Era of America First.”  Turnbull was a USAWC Fellow this year at the Daniel K. Inouye Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies. His project advisor was USAWC research professor Dr. David Lai.

 USAWC students received first and third place awards in the CJCS Strategic Essay Competition for Strategic Research Papers of 5000 words.  Lt. Col. Benjamin R. Ogden, earned 1stplace for “Butter Bar to Four Star: Deficiencies in Leader Development;” and Lt. Col. Owen G. Ray was awarded 3rdplace, for “The Second Wave: Resurgence of Violent Islamic Extremism in Southeast Asia,” respectively. In the Strategic Article (1.5 thousand words) category of the CJSC competition, Col. James M. Efaw received the 2ndplace award, for “Countering Violent Extremists’ Online Recruiting and Radicalization.”

The Commandant’s Award for Distinction in Research was awarded to these:

  • Air Force Lt. Col. Charles B. Cain, for ‘Go and Artificial Intelligence: Potential for Strategic Decision-Making”
  • Mr. Mark. M. Hamilton, Defense Civilian, for “The Third Offset, Remotely Piloted Systems, and Moral Hazards”
  • Col. Harold L. LaRock II, for “Improving Strategic Risk Assessment and Communication,” developed as an Army War College Fellow at Carnegie Mellon University
  • Col. Mark B. Sherkey, for “Emerging Currents and Guiding Lights in a Sea of Goodwill”
  • Lt. Col. Patrick J. Sullivan, for “Strategic Robotpower: Artificial Intelligence and National Security”
  • Dr. James T. Treharne, for “Building Soldier-Civilian Trust in Mixed Army Organizations”

The Foreign Area Officer Association Research Award:

  • Col. Stephanie R. Ahern, for “The Russian Way of War: Implications for the U.S. Army”

The Excellence in Logistics Research Award and Retired Lt. Gen. Eugene J. D’Ambrosio Logistics Writing Award:

  • Mr. Joseph a. Brooks, for “Time: Exploring the 4thDimension of Strategy”

The General Matthew  B. Ridgway Writing Award:

  • Col. Shawn P. Creamer, for “Answering the Korea Question: U.S. Government Policy toward the Unified command and the Korean Armistice Agreement.” Creamer was a USAWC Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Army War College Foundation Awards for Outstanding Research Paper:

  • Col. Michael J. Birmingham, for “Organizing Eric Hoffer’s Theory of Mass Movements”
  • Ms. Wendy Marshall, for “Mitigating Divergence from Strategic Intent”
  • Mr. Patrick Quinn, for “Deception as a Supplement to the Instruments of National Security”
  • Marine Lt. Col. Mark R. Reid, for “Warrior Entrepreneurs: Fostering U.S. Marine Corps Maneuver Warfare Philosophy”

Army War College Foundation Daniel M. Lewin Cyber-Terrorism Technology Writing Award

  • Lt. Col. Kenneth J. Biskner, for “The Russian Exploitation of the Cyber Gap in International Law”

Army War College Foundation Col. Don and Mrs. Anne Bussey Military Intelligence Writing Award

  • Lt. Col. Andrew  W. Jones, for “Re-examining the Enlightenment: Origins of Mission Command and Ethical Reasoning”

The Col. and Mrs. T. Bristol Military History Writing Award

  • Col. Patrick E. Proctor, for “The United States Army’s Experience in the Balkans and Transformation”

Army War College Foundation Col. Jerry D. Cashion Memorial Writing Award

  • Col. Scott W. Mueller, for “The Great Enabler: The AVF and the Use of Force”

Army War College Foundation Dr. Sara L. Morgan Civilian Development/ Management Writing Award

  • Col. Jonathan C. Taylor, for “Are We Really Ready or Do We Need a New Accessions Paradigm?” Taylor completed his Army War College Fellowship at the Department of Health and Human Services

Association of the U.S. Army (AUSA) Writing Award

  • Lt. Col. Richard R. Balestri, for “Recasting the Carter Doctrine: Pursuing Proportionality in Arabian Gulf Petro-Security:

Marine Corps Association and Foundation Gen. Thomas Holcomb Writing Award

  • Marine Lt. Col. Neil J. Owens, for “Japan’s Strategic Renassaisance: Implications for U.S. Policy in the Asia-Pacific”

Military Officers Association of America (MOAA) Writing Award

  • Col. Erik L. Christiansen, for “Curbing the Trend of Retired General/ Flagg Officer Political Endorsements”
  • Lt. Col. Scott Myers, for “The U.S. Military … America’s Easy Button”

 Military Order of the World Wars Writing Award

  • Col. William D. Voorhies, for “Rejecting the ISIL Tumor”

Red River Valley Fighter Pilots Association Writing Award

  • Air Force Lt. Col. Mark C. Dmytryszyn, for “The Field of Human Conflict: Developing HAPDB and Cyber Doctrine”

U.S. Military Academy’s Simon Center for the Professional Ethic Writing Award

  • Col. Derek K. Thomson, for “Reclaiming the Essence of Leadership”

Reserve Officers Association (ROA) Lt. Gen. Thomas J. Plewes Writing Award

  • Chap. (Col.) James L. Boggess, for “More than a Game:  Decision Support Systems and Moral Injury”

Carlisle Barracks and Cumberland Valley Chapter of the Association of the U.S. Army (AUSA) Award for Excellence in Public Speaking

  • Mr. Jesse D. Munoz, for “Security America”

The Army War College Foundation Lifetime Alumni Membership Award

  • Col. Arvesta P. Roberson II.

 

 

 

 


Graduates singled out with writing, speaking, leadership awards

 

June 8, 2017 -- Army War College graduates honored for writing were announced by Provost Lance Betros, singling out top performers for graduation kudos and enduring impact within the national security community.

Army War College students and USAWC Fellows, who have studied at some of the nation’s top educational institutions, won four of the nine awards in the Secretary of Defense and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff essay competitions hosted by NDU Press.  Additional awards selected 26 members of the Class of 2017 for acknowledgement of writing, speaking and leading prowess that advanced understanding of significant issues in strategic thought. 

USAWC Faculty lend mentorship to research projects. These faculty advised the award-winning students and fellows:  Dr. David Lai, Dr. Stephen J. Gerras, Dr. Richard C. Bullis, Dr. C. Anthony Pfaff, Dr. Jeffrey L. Groh, Dr. Glenn K. Cunningham, Dr. Andrew A. Hill, Dr. Don Snider, Col. Douglas W. Winton, Col. Douglas G. Douds, Prof. John F. Troxell, Dr. Christopher J. Bolan, Dr. Paul C. Jussel, Col. Stephen K. Van Riper, Prof. Douglas C. Lovelace, Prof. Venaya Eftimova Bellinger, Dr. Antulio J. Echevarria, Prof. Philip M. Evans, Prof. Brett D. Weigle, Col. David W. DeTata, Dr. Marybeth Ulrich, and Col. Edward A. Kaplan.

The 2017 SECDEF National Security Essay Competition awarded third-place honors to Col. Paul Wayne Turnbull for “Asian Alliances in the Era of America First.”  Turnbull was a USAWC Fellow this year at the Daniel K. Inouye Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies. His project advisor was USAWC research professor Dr. David Lai.

 USAWC students received first and third place awards in the CJCS Strategic Essay Competition for Strategic Research Papers of 5000 words.  Lt. Col. Benjamin R. Ogden, earned 1stplace for “Butter Bar to Four Star: Deficiencies in Leader Development;” and Lt. Col. Owen G. Ray was awarded 3rdplace, for “The Second Wave: Resurgence of Violent Islamic Extremism in Southeast Asia,” respectively. In the Strategic Article (1.5 thousand words) category of the CJSC competition, Col. James M. Efaw received the 2ndplace award, for “Countering Violent Extremists’ Online Recruiting and Radicalization.”

The Commandant’s Award for Distinction in Research was awarded to these:

  • Air Force Lt. Col. Charles B. Cain, for ‘Go and Artificial Intelligence: Potential for Strategic Decision-Making”
  • Mr. Mark. M. Hamilton, Defense Civilian, for “The Third Offset, Remotely Piloted Systems, and Moral Hazards”
  • Col. Harold L. LaRock II, for “Improving Strategic Risk Assessment and Communication,” developed as an Army War College Fellow at Carnegie Mellon University
  • Col. Mark B. Sherkey, for “Emerging Currents and Guiding Lights in a Sea of Goodwill”
  • Lt. Col. Patrick J. Sullivan, for “Strategic Robotpower: Artificial Intelligence and National Security”
  • Dr. James T. Treharne, for “Building Soldier-Civilian Trust in Mixed Army Organizations”

The Foreign Area Officer Association Research Award:

  • Col. Stephanie R. Ahern, for “The Russian Way of War: Implications for the U.S. Army”

The Excellence in Logistics Research Award and Retired Lt. Gen. Eugene J. D’Ambrosio Logistics Writing Award:

  • Mr. Joseph a. Brooks,for “Time: Exploring the 4thDimension of Strategy”

The General Matthew  B. Ridgway Writing Award:

  • Col. Shawn P. Creamer, for “Answering the Korea Question: U.S. Government Policy toward the Unified command and the Korean Armistice Agreement.” Creamer was a USAWC Fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Army War College Foundation Awards for Outstanding Research Paper:

  • Col. Michael J. Birmingham, for “Organizing Eric Hoffer’s Theory of Mass Movements”
  • Ms. Wendy Marshall, for “Mitigating Divergence from Strategic Intent”
  • Mr. Patrick Quinn, for “Deception as a Supplement to the Instruments of National Security”
  • Marine Lt. Col. Mark R. Reid, for “Warrior Entrepreneurs: Fostering U.S. Marine Corps Maneuver Warfare Philosophy”

Army War College Foundation Daniel M. Lewin Cyber-Terrorism Technology Writing Award

  • Lt. Col. Kenneth J. Biskner, for “The Russian Exploitation of the Cyber Gap in International Law”

Army War College Foundation Col. Don and Mrs. Anne Bussey Military Intelligence Writing Award

  • Lt. Col. Andrew  W. Jones, for “Re-examining the Enlightenment: Origins of Mission Command and Ethical Reasoning”

The Col. and Mrs. T. Bristol Military History Writing Award

  • Col. Patrick E. Proctor, for “The United States Army’s Experience in the Balkans and Transformation”

Army War College Foundation Col. Jerry D. Cashion Memorial Writing Award

  • Col. Scott W. Mueller, for “The Great Enabler: The AVF and the Use of Force”

Army War College Foundation Dr. Sara L. Morgan Civilian Development/ Management Writing Award

  • Col. Jonathan C. Taylor, for “Are We Really Ready or Do We Need a New Accessions Paradigm?” Taylor completed his Army War College Fellowship at the Department of Health and Human Services

Association of the U.S. Army (AUSA) Writing Award

  • Lt. Col. Richard R. Balestri, for “Recasting the Carter Doctrine: Pursuing Proportionality in Arabian Gulf Petro-Security:

Marine Corps Association and Foundation Gen. Thomas Holcomb Writing Award

  • Marine Lt. Col. Neil J. Owens, for “Japan’s Strategic Renassaisance: Implications for U.S. Policy in the Asia-Pacific”

Military Officers Association of America (MOAA) Writing Award

  • Col. Erik L. Christiansen, for “Curbing the Trend of Retired General/ Flagg Officer Political Endorsements”
  • Lt. Col. Scott Myers, for “The U.S. Military … America’s Easy Button”

 Military Order of the World Wars Writing Award

  • Col. William D. Voorhies, for “Rejecting the ISIL Tumor”

Red River Valley Fighter Pilots Association Writing Award

  • Air Force Lt. Col. Mark C. Dmytryszyn, for “The Field of Human Conflict: Developing HAPDB and Cyber Doctrine”

U.S. Military Academy’s Simon Center for the Professional Ethic Writing Award

  • Col. Derek K. Thomson, for “Reclaiming the Essence of Leadership”

Reserve Officers Association (ROA) Lt. Gen. Thomas J. Plewes Writing Award

  • Chap. (Col.) James L. Boggess, for “More than a Game:  Decision Support Systems and Moral Injury”

Carlisle Barracks and Cumberland Valley Chapter of the Association of the U.S. Army (AUSA) Award for Excellence in Public Speaking

  • Mr. Jesse D. Munoz, for “Security America”

The Army War College Foundation Lifetime Alumni Membership Award

  • Col. Arvesta P. Roberson II.

 

 


USAG staff, families say goodbye to Ank, Maldonado

Command Sgt. Maj. Nelson Maldonado, (right)Garrison CSM, thanks Carlisle Barracks staff and families for their support as he and Lt. Col. Greg Ank, (left), Garrison Commander, led the installtion for the last two years. Ank and Maldonando will turn over command to Lt. Col. Sally Hannan and Command Sgt. Maj. Jamie Lethiecq on June 14, at 10 a.m. on the Carlisle Barracks Golf Couse. The entire community is invited to attend.

For more photos visit www.facebook.com/usawc

 

Garrison staff and families hosted a farewell luncheon for Lt. Col. Greg Ank, Garrison Commander and Command Sgt. Maj. Nelson Maldonado, installation CSM, who will relinquish command of Carlisle Barracks next Wednesday, June 14, during a change of command ceremony at the Golf Course at 10 a.m. Ank and Maldonado were presented their PCS awards by Maj. Gen. Bill Rapp, Army War College Commandant, who thanked the team for superior service at the “best hometown in the Army.” Rapp acknowledged the challenges that face the garrison command team here and praised the duo for their hard work and dedication during their two years of command.

Julie Maldonado, wife of CSM Maldonado, was also presented an award for her service to the nation, Soldiers and families. Holly Ank, wife of LTC Ank, was unable to attend the ceremony.  

Garrison staff also presented Ank and Maldonado with farewell gifts including an MWR-emblazed Steelers “Terrible Towel,” flags flown over the Nations and Pennsylvania capitol and framed photos of Upton Hall, the headquarters building for Garrison.

Ank and Maldonado thanked the staff and families in attendance for their support and expertise as they marked the end of their Army careers next week.

The entire community is invited to attend the change of command ceremony on June 14, 10 am. at the golf course where Lt. Col. Sally Hannan and Command Sgt. Maj. Jamie Lethiecq will assume command of the garrison.


CARLISLE, Pa. (April 28, 2017) –The graduation ceremony of the U.S. Army War College Resident Class of 2017 is scheduled on Friday, June 9 at 9 a.m. at the Wheelock Bandstand on the historic parade ground Carlisle Barracks.  This year’s graduating class consists of 227 Army officers, 9 Navy, 26 Air Force, 16 Marines, 1 Coast Guard, 28 Civilians, and 74 International Fellows from 70 countries.
 
All family members and friends are welcome to attend and watch our graduation ceremony. For those unable to attend, the whole ceremony can be viewed live, 9 – 10:30 a.m. at http://armywarcollege.edu/live.
 
For family members and friends who are able to join us, these details will help you plan your visit.. For additional and updated information please continue to check our webpage at http://armywarcollege.edu, or please follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/usawc.
 
·   Students must be in seats by 8:30, so you’ll want to plan to arrive with them or at about that time. Before the ceremony begins, you can listen to a pre-event performance by the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Band, and watch our faculty member procession.
 
·   A shuttle will be running between 7:30 to 8:45 a.m., (and following the ceremony) between the parking areas and the parade ground. Students who live on base are encouraged to park at home and use the shuttle bus.
 
·   If you are driving yourself, enter Carlisle Barracks at the visitor’s entrance, Claremont Gate. For navigation, please enter the 870 Jim Thorpe Rd., Carlisle, PA 17013, and follow the signs to the vehicle access point, and then follow Special Event signs. Security police and parking attendants will assist.
 
·   Those with disabilities or unable to walk distances will find seating at “Quarters Two.” Parking attendants will direct the driver to the handicapped lot.
 
·   Shortly after the ceremony starts at 9 a.m., Pa. Army National Guard 108th Field Artillery will fire cannon on Indian Field in an honorary salute.
 
·   Bags are subject to security checks at entry to the parade field.
 
·   After the speakers, every student will cross the stage – and professional photos of every students will be available at www.flickr.com/photos/usawc by the end of the day, June 9. Guests are welcome to take photos throughout the ceremony, as well, and a photo area near the stage is available for family/friends’ photo-taking.  A highlight video of the ceremony will be available at:  www.youtube.com/usarmywarcollege shortly after graduation.
 
·   If your graduate will be promoted following graduation all promotion ceremonies will begin at 1 p.m.
 
·   Restrooms for spectators will be located in the Thorpe Gym, and porta johns will be situated at the rear of the ceremony site.
 
·   Please remember, there’s no smoking, no selfie sticks, backpacks nor coolers at the ceremony. Water is provided on site.
 
·   We recommend hats and sun screen.
 
·   Dunham Clinic will be open on Thursday, June 8 from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. for patient care and closed June 9 from 7:30 am to 1 p.m. (including the pharmacy), reopening at 1 p.m. and closing at 4:30 p.m.
 
·   The uniform for those graduating will be service dress uniform or equivalent with no head gear for military and business attire for civilians. Faculty will wear academic regalia, service dress uniform or business attire. A final weather and jacket call will be made at 7 a.m. on June 9.
 
·   The inclement Weather Location will be inside Bliss Hall Auditorium for students only. Closed circuit viewing will be provided for guests in the seminar rooms and other venues throughout the Army War College.
 
·   During the ceremony Lovell Avenue, Guardhouse Lane, and Garrison Lane will be closed to traffic with the exception of emergency vehicles.
 
·   All residents are asked to leave their vehicles and their guest's vehicles at their quarters and ride the shuttle bus, unless they require handicap parking.
 
·   Faculty and Staff who normally park in the 314/315 lot, along Lovell Ave. and along Forbes Ave. in front of Building 122 can park along Letort Lane below the 314/315 lot, along Letort Lane between Barry Drive and Butler Rd (temporary parking will be identified along the drive) or in the Collins Hall lots.
 
·   Graduates will pick up their diplomas at the Letort View Community Center immediately following the ceremony. Graduates and their families can also pre-register before June 2, for a brunch to be held in the Letort View Community Center.
 
·   Liberal leave is encouraged for personnel of the Army War College in order to maximize parking, pending supervisor approval.
 
·   VIPs will move to the intersection of Ashburn and Lovell to be directed into one of the VIP lots. All other drivers will need to move as directed by the Police or Parking attendants to designated parking lots and walk or ride the shuttle.
 
·   Residents on Garrison Lane are asked to park their cars in garages, if possible.
 
 
·   Faculty and Staff who work in Anne Ely, or normally park in the Anne Ely parking lot, are asked to park in DES or Chapel lots.

Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower encouraged Allied soldiers taking part in the D-day invasion of June 6, 1944, reminding them, "The eyes of the world are upon you," before they embarked on " a great crusade."

On June 6, 1944, more than 160,000 Allied troops landed along a 50-mile stretch of heavily-fortified French coastline, to fight Nazi Germany on the beaches of Normandy, France. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower called the operation a crusade in which, “we will accept nothing less than full victory.” More than 5,000 Ships and 13,000 aircraft supported the D-Day invasion, and by day’s end, the Allies gained a foot-hold in Continental Europe. The cost in lives on D-Day was high. More than 9,000 Allied Soldiers were killed or wounded, but their sacrifice allowed more than 100,000 Soldiers to begin the slow, hard slog across Europe, to defeat Adolf Hitler’s crack troops.

Learn more at the special Army D- Day page


From the Garrison Commander, Command Sergeant Major: Thank you

Summer is here and our post has never looked better.  We are grateful to our talented and diligent Public Works, Balfour Beatty, Recreation, and International Hotel Group grounds crews for continuing to maintain the beauty of Carlisle Barracks for residents, employee professionals, students and visitors.  With the fast approaching change in seasons, there are additional changes on the horizon.

On June 14th, CSM Maldonado and I will transition through a combined change of command and change of responsibility ceremony with LTC Sally Hannan and CSM Jamie Lethiecq.  The ceremony is at 10 a.m. at the Carlisle Barracks Golf Course, and all are invited.

It has been our honor and privilege to be the temporary custodians of the garrison over the last two years.  With our small, but dedicated and talented team of Installation Management professionals, we have accomplished so much.  We have increased the readiness of our installation through significant infrastructure improvements that include renovated water towers, upgraded electrical infrastructure that support future growth and redundancy, reduced energy output through efficient interior and exterior lighting solutions, replaced miles of old carpeting and revitalized older buildings that are still vital to supporting the mission of the Army War College.  We also managed to set forth favorable future plans for modernizing academic facilities, building a new golf clubhouse, and revising plans for a more efficient fire station, all critical to ensuring Carlisle Barracks maintains the capacity and fulfills the requirements for the U.S. Army War College. 

Over the last couple years, we have endured some significant budget reductions that have impacted personnel and services.  While these reductions have forced us to relook at how we deliver quality services to all of our customers, I am proud to admit that this team has always prioritized critical services at the top and continued to adapt and adjust to ensure we still support everyone fairly, while delivering exceptional customer service.  Just as resources become more scarce, it is even more important to ensure that we are safety-minded and maintain the highest levels of vigilance and security.  Our emergency services and are second to none, and we will continue to invest in improvements that assure the safety and security of Carlisle Barracks. 

I want to thank everyone who continues to use and support our Morale, Welfare and Recreation programs and activities, our Exchange and Commissary, our Balfour Beatty and International Hotel Group partners, and the myriad of valuable activities and opportunities provided by Carlisle Barracks businesses, partners and military tenants every day.  Your support of these programs directly strengthens our installation and helps promote the readiness of everyone in the Army.

As we say farewell, the Maldonado and Ank families want to thank you for your outstanding support, professionalism and dedication.  Carlisle Barracks is a special place – a magical place to work, live and visit.  CSM and I are better leaders, managers and citizens for this assignment, and we wish you all the best for the future. 

Support and Defend, Strength and Wisdom, Army Strong!


Center for Strategic Leadership celebrates 25 years experiential education
 
Current and former staff of the Center for Strategic Leadership turned an anniversary into a reunion, June 1 in Collins Hall.  Recognizing 25 years of service, CSL director Col. Chris Beckert dedicated a 25-year plaque in a plain 2nd floor room that belies the high-tech support and specialized expertise that regularly turns Collins Hall rooms into strategic learning platforms 
 
CSL director Col. Chris Beckert dedicates a 25-year plaque with the assistance of Gen. J. Lawton Collins’ daughter, Nancy Collins Rubino. Rubino represented her father and was accompanied by husband, Michael, and daughter, Margaret. CSL hosted the anniversary ceremony in Collins Hall, June 1.
 
The Army War College’s Center for Strategic Leadership was formally established June 19, 1992, in response to the Chief of Staff of the Army’s decision to expand the use of simulation and wargaming at the strategic and operational levels of the U.S. Army.  It’s a mission that has been executed, and enhanced, thanks to planning forethought about a facility and staff that could flex to meet the fundamental mission while evolving how to do so.
 
CSL filled a critical strategic gap identified by three successive Army Chiefs of Staff, generals Carl E. Vuono, Gordon Sullivan, and Dennis J. Reimer. The gap was the Army’s inability to codify an education experience for senior leaders that melded experiential learning with theory and doctrine. They further directed that wargaming and simulation would be the medium to galvanize strategic thought and debate, establishing CSL as the Army’s Strategic Wargaming Center.
Vuono sent his regards to the CSL alumni and professional colleagues.
 
“Through your imaginative and innovative programs, you have helped forge a new generation of strategists who are uniquely capable of absorbing the experience-based lessons you have presented and forging them into new paradigms of thought in an age of great challenge and change.
 
“You have exceeded all the expectations that we had for the center at its conception during my tenure as Army Chief of Staff,” he wrote in a 25th anniversary greeting.
 
In his message, Reimer called CSL an important and strategic addition to the Army learning system.
“We had a window of opportunity and made the right decision…. You all have done a wonderful job of helping the Army to understand the role of strategic leadership and I, and many others, deeply appreciate all you have done,” said Reimer.
Today, CSL integrates its missions with the USAWC School of Strategic Landpower and other war college institutes to continue to be the resource of choice for developing, testing, and reporting on emerging strategic issues, and educating the Army’s senior leaders, from Colonels through Lieutenant Generals.
 
CSL opened its doors to employees from across the post, explaining how a game becomes a learning tool for strategic decision-making.
 
“We get leaders in a position to make decisions and experience the consequences of those decisions,” said Col. Ken Gilliam, who has guided a series of “games” about mobilizing the Total Army in an example of CSL’s ability to test assumptions against likely, future scenarios.” Leaders can react to an evolving scenario that the U.S. may encounter, and consider the potential political, military and economic effects. When current Army Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Milley gave to the Army War College authority and responsibility for the Army’s general officer education program, the decision recognized the value of strategic education skills inherent in CSL.  CSL executes the four core general officer courses, ASEP-Basic, Advanced, Senior and Transitional and as well as the Combined/Joint Force Land Component Commander Course as a partner with the USAWC Army Strategic Education Program.
 
Discussions about CSL intertwine with comments about its building, Collins Hall, dedicated in July 1994. Named in honor of Gen. J. Lawton ‘Lightning Joe’ Collins, this multi-faceted 155,000-square foot facility provides both CSL and the US Army War College with a learning center, a laboratory, a wargaming center, and a conferencing facility. 
 
Collins’ daughter, Nancy Collins Rubino represented her father, accompanied by husband, Michael, and daughter Margaret.
“The ceremony was brief, but meaningful,” noted Bob Wade, a relative newcomer to the Collins Hall staff. Present for the ceremony were several staff members who have been with CSL since its beginnings. While ‘plank holders’ is a term normally used to designate individuals who are members of the first crew to take a ship to sea, Beckert borrowed the term to describe current staff members Robert Chicchi, Eddie Cook, Ritchie Dion, James Kievit, Wendy LeBlank, Mark McKamey, Barbara Mountz, Darlene Pittenger, Barbara Swope and Vincent Walters.

New commander slated for Dunham Army Health Clinic

Carlisle Barracks, Pa. – Lt. Col. Elizabeth Duque will take command of the Dunham U.S. Army Health Clinic at a change of command ceremony here Tuesday, June 20  at 10 a.m. at Wheelock Bandstand on Carlisle Barracks. Col. Daniel Bonnichsen,the MEDDAC Commander at Fort George G. Meade, Md., will officiate. 

   Duque most recently served as the Chief of the new Department of Primary Care, William Beaumont Army Medical Center, Fort Bliss, Texas, responsible for more than 62,000 Soldiers and family members.

   Duque’s first assignment upon completion of her residency was as Medical Director of the Hohenfels, Germany Clinic where she served for three years. From Hohenfels, she deployed to Romania and Bulgaria as the 1-94th FA BN Battalion Surgeon with JTF-N. In 2008, she deployed with the 10th CSH to Mosul, Iraq in support of OIF. Upon redeployment, LTC Duque completed her fellowship in Geriatrics at Fort Lewis, WA before moving with her family to Fort Hood, TX, where she served as a residency staff physician, OIC of the Family Medicine Residency Center, and OIC of the Bennett Health Clinic. After completing a year in residence at CGSC in Fort Leavenworth, KS in 2014, LTC Duque was assigned to Fort Bliss, TX as the Deputy Commander for Clinical Services for the Primary Care and Soldier Readiness (PCSR) Command. In Oct 2015, she served as a senior medical officer for a MEDRETE mission to Uganda, working with Ugandan Army physicians in joint training.

    She graduated from Lehigh University with a Bachelor of Science degree in Microbiology in 1999, and was awarded her Medical Doctorate from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in 2003. Dr. Duque subsequently completed residency training in Family Medicine at Fort Hood, TX in 2006 and a Geriatrics fellowship in 2010. In 2011, she received a Master of Business Administration with Healthcare Concentration from Indiana Wesleyan University.

    The outgoing commander, Lt. Col. Michael Belenky will become a student at the National War College in Washington, D.C. 


Faculty Awards Ceremony recognizes excellence in teaching, scholarship, service

CARLISLE, Pa. (June 1, 2017) – An annual awards ceremony recognized an exceptional group of Army War College faculty whose work throughout the last academic year warranted formal recognition. Fellow faculty, staff and students gathered in Bliss Hall Thursday to honor this group’s excellence in teaching, scholarship and service to the Army, joint commands, and federal agencies. 

“It’s a good time to pause to recognize excellence of the faculty,” said Dr. Lance Betros, Provost of the Army War College. “We’re very proud of those who merit these awards, and I’m honored to join the commandant in presenting them this morning.”

Betros, who will retire from the provost position in July, offered a personal reflection on the significance of this year’s award ceremony. During his five year tenure as provost, Betros ushered in the first USAWC faculty council and, with the council, guided development of the college’s three domains of faculty excellence: teaching, scholarship and service.

“As the provost, and the senior faculty member of the college, I want to say publicly how proud I am to be a member of this faculty,” said Betros. “I’m truly blessed to be associated with such an outstanding group of professionals. It’s been the highlight of my long career, 44 years either in or working for the Army.

“To my faculty colleagues, thank you for your hard work and commitment every day. It’s an honor to serve with you.”

The Army War College presented Excellence in Scholarship awards, named for Gen. John J. Madigan, to Dr. Antulio Echevarria, Dr. Frank Jones, Dr. Paul Kan, Dr. John Deni, and Mr. Clarence Bouchat. The Madigan Awards date to 1999, when the annual writing awards were named for the former publisher of Parameters Magazine.

Excellence in Teaching Awards were presented to Navy Capt. Wade Turvold, Col. Douglas Douds and Col. Eric Crider for excellence in the USAWC core curriculum.

Excellence in Service Awards were announced for Prof. Bert Tussing, Prof. Charles Allen, Dr. R. Evan Ellis, Dr. Frank Jones, Prof. Albert Lord, Dr. Craig Nation, and Prof. James Shufelt. Service awards acknowledge contributions through lectures, conference presentations, consultation, and written scholarship.

The college recognized Assistant Professors Col. Ian Lyles, Col. Robert Hamilton, Dr. Gregory Cantwell, Sam White, and Louis Yuengert.

New this year is the USAWC Chair of Strategic Leadership, awarded to Dr. Andrew Hill. These faculty members were acknowledged, as well, as academic chairs Dr. Christian Keller, General Dwight D. Eisenhower Chair of National Security, Dr. Frank Jones, General George C. Marshall Chair of Military Studies, Prof. Douglas Waters, General Brehon Burke Somervell Chair of Management, Dr. William Pierce, General Matthew B. Ridgway Chair of Leadership, Col. Edward Kaplan, General Hoyt S. Vandenberg Chair of Aerospace Studies, Col. John Mowchan, General Colin Powell Chair of Military and Strategic Studies, Col. Tarn Warren, General John M. Shalikashvili Chair of Joint Military Studies, Dr. Holly Mayer, Harold K. Johnson Chair of Military History, Dr. Genevieve Lester, Francis W. DeSerio Chair of Strategic and Theater Intelligence, Prof. Howard Taylor, National Security Agency Chair for Cyber Studies, and Col. Barrett Parker, John Parker Chair of Reserve Component Studies.

The college personnel honored retired Col. Donald Shaw with the most prestigious award given to former faculty members: Distinguished Fellow of the Army War College.  His wife, Joan, with son Peter, accepted the award for Shaw, who died in 2002 and whose exceptional service to the college extended across 12 years.

Dr. James Gordon and Dr. W. Andrew Terrill were honored with Emeritus Professorships.

“It truly takes a dedicated and highly skilled team to educate and develop tomorrow’s strategic leaders,” said Maj. Gen. William Rapp, Commandant. “A world-class educational program like the Army War College requires both a world-class curriculum and a world-class faculty to deliver that curriculum. I know we have both here at the Carlisle Barracks, and I’m exceedingly proud to be counted among your ranks for these past three years.”

“You have to be the kind of educational leader who inspires our students to be among those who dedicate themselves to learn for a lifetime,” said Rapp, to the faculty.

“You’ve already led by example in research, scholarship and publishing -- and you’ve shown that you can have a positive impact on our profession, and to the vital mission of developing these leaders and ideas.”

“... Creative and innovative thought and the skills to translate them into organizational action are vital to create the optimum environment for the development of leaders ready for the rigors of the coming decades.

“I sincerely thank the faculty, not just the ones that we recognize today, but all of them,” he said, as he asked the Class of 2017 to join a round of applause for the faculty.


Robert D. Martin, USAWC Public Affairs Specialist
Day of Remembrance honors those who wear ‘Blue Helmet’      

May 31, 2017 -- Since 1948, more than 3,500 United Nations peacekeepers have lost their lives in pursuit of peace. “Investing in peace around the world,” the theme of this year’s 2017 International Day of UN Peacekeepers, has come at a cost. Last year alone, 117 service member from participating countries paid the ultimate price during peacekeeping operations.

The Army War College honored all those who have participated as peacekeepers – including the 17 International Fellows who have served in peacekeeping operations -- at a ceremony at Root Hall, Carlisle Barracks. 

“Standing before you are members of the resident class of 2017 and faculty of the Army War College who have served in U.N. peacekeeping operations around the world.” said Maj. Gen. Bill Rapp, Commandant of the Army War College. “Class of 2017, you have spent this year thinking about your upcoming roles at the strategic level of your militaries.

“Increasingly, peace support operations will play an important role in the relations between and within countries,” said Rapp.

Bangladeshi Brig. Gen. Sayeed Siddiki, an Army War College Fellow, spoke on behalf of his peacekeeper colleagues at the ceremony. He deployed for peacekeeping duties to Rwanda in the time of genocide; to Bosnia and Herzegovina; and to the Ivory Coast. 

“I have seen very closely the unbound suffering of human nature, especially the suffering of children and women,” said Siddiki. “The suffering is beyond any description that one can think of, and I know most of my peers present here have had similar experiences.”

“The learning here at the Army War College definitely has made us better prepared to take on future challenges,” he said. “With this experience and knowledge, we look forward to working together for better stability and improving peace for the world.”

The U.N. deploys currently more than 113,000 military, police and civilian personnel in 16 peacekeeping operations on four continents.  Peacekeeping has grown from simply monitoring ceasefires, to protecting civilians, disarming ex-combatants, protecting human rights, promoting the rule of law, supporting free and fair elections, minimizing the risk of land-mines and so much more.

The General Assembly, in Resolution 57/129, designated 29 May as the International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers. This is the date when in 1948 the first UN peacekeeping mission, named the "United Nations Truce Supervision Organization," began operations in Palestine.


Three most important financial tips for graduating seniors 

1. Accessibility is not affordability.  In the next couple of years, graduating seniors will have access to more credit than they can afford to repay. They desperately need to understand that "because we have access to buy something, does not mean we can afford to buy it!"

High credit scores do not, in themselves, reveal whether people can actually afford to buy what they are looking to buy. The credit scores primarily show that the person pays his bills on time. Unfortunately, this is frequently done by using credit to pay on credit.

Graduates need to determine what they can afford to buy before they go shopping, not leave it up to the salesman to tell them.

2. Wants are not needs.  The truth of the matter is that once we have access to actually have the thing we want, we tend to see it as a need and no longer as a want.  The best defense I know against seeing want as needs is a keen appreciation for the things I presently have. Being grateful for what I have keeps me from wanting what I don't have. It also keeps me from cultivating an entitlement attitude that thinks I deserve to have more.

There is no way to express how important an attitude of gratitude is. It affects every area of our lives every day, including finances.

3. Credit cards are not money. Credit cards are as convenient as using cash, so it seems like we are spending money when we use them. In reality, we are borrowing money.  A credit card transaction is very similar to that of taking out a loan at a bank, and like a loan, the money we "borrow" must be repaid.

This fact would be much easier for us to realize if we actually went to the bank, filled out a loan application, and used the money to purchase our items. Credit cards eliminate those steps, but nonetheless, leave us owing money and creating debt just like a bank loan would. Realize it is borrowing money instead of spending money.

There are other things I wish I could impart into the minds of these young people who are graduating because I know that the perspectives they have will determine the practices they follow.

If they can grasp any one of these three simple truths: (1) access does not determine affordability, (2) wants are not needs, and (3) credit cards borrow money, not spend money.


IMCOM leaders pledge to enable employees, build a culture of service

 

FORT SAM HOUSTON, Texas (May 31, 2017) -- An Army-wide campaign was publically launched this week at a headquarters town hall hosted by Lt. Gen. Kenneth R. Dahl, commander of the U.S. Army Installation Management Command.

Officially known as the IMCOM Service Culture Initiative, the campaign represents the Command's long-term commitment to providing the best possible customer service to Soldiers, Families, and communities. The campaign is based on the premise that excellence in customer service is a result of how an organization treats its employees. If employees have engaged and caring leaders, feel valued and respected for the work they do, are properly trained, and live the Army values, they will in turn pass forward this positive attitude to their customers and to their co-workers.

"This will take the combined effort and commitment of every IMCOM professional to be successful," Dahl said.

Underscoring the importance of the campaign and acknowledging that IMCOM touches each and every Soldier and Family every day, Dahl waited until he could personally address the workforce and emphasize his commitment to the campaign by unveiling it personally, and publically.

At the town hall, Dahl, along with other senior IMCOM leaders, signed the first "Leadership Pledge" surrounded by his headquarters workforce.

The Pledge serves as a visible symbol and a reminder to leaders that all employees deserve respect and the basic tools needed to be successful, including proper on-boarding, performance standards, training opportunities, recognition programs, empowerment, and a commitment to hold one another accountable.

"The Pledge and the principles defined signify a return to the basics -- Leadership 101. The Pledge serves as a reminder of the importance of these ideals and a reaffirmation that we, as leaders, have a responsibility to ensure you are successful," Dahl said.

The campaign relies on actions related to four basic focus areas to reach that goal: team member sense of belonging to their organization, leader engagement, on-boarding, and team member recognition.

"We want to establish a culture where members of the IMCOM team take pride in the organization, fully understand and live by our organizational values, feel valued and respected, and are led by engaged and caring leaders," said Mr. Matt Margotta, Program Manager for the Service Culture Initiative.

"While most of the command is already doing this in some fashion, codifying and standardizing the principles, the process, and providing the tools and training to assist leaders and employees at all levels helps ensure we establish a culture of service excellence across the 70 plus installations around the world," Margotta explained.

In informal communications to the staff as the campaign was being developed, both Margotta and Dahl were quick to point to examples of great employee and customer service throughout the command.

"This is going to help us define who we are as an organization," Dahl said. "When it comes to taking care of our customers--our Soldiers and their Families--we've done a marvelous job and really have become experts at customer service."

"But when you think about it," he continued, "those of you working in human resources, operations, range support, emergency services, public works, MWR… you all provide service to customers. Even if the person you're helping is a fellow IMCOM professional, they're still a customer."

"So we've got to do this together," he concluded. "We're one team. If we take better care of ourselves, we're going to take better care of our customers."

Over the coming year, starting with a self-assessment at the garrison level, leaders will implement changes in the four focus areas, sign employee and customer pledges, demonstrate a commitment to employees and each other, and create, reinforce, or enhance employee recognition and on-boarding programs.

"Leaders will be provided the maximum flexibility in the implementation of the campaign" Margotta said. "Some garrisons already possess robust onboarding and recognition programs, like Fort Riley's ESPRIT (Employee, Satisfaction, Performance, Recognition and Improvement) Team. Our goal is to reinforce what we are doing well and enhance areas we've identified for improvement."

Dahl told his senior leadership while the campaign was being developed to "drive on with the things you are already doing that are working."

"We're not trying to tell you to do anything new," Dahl explained. "Follow the most basic leadership principals, and we'll reach our desired end state: an organization filled with enabled and enthusiastic employees supported by involved leaders, providing the best possible service to our Army and our nation."