Banner Archive for June 2016
 

Distance Education Class of 2017 gathers at Carlisle for senior leader education

June 20, 2016 -- Maj. Gen. William E. Rapp, commandant of the Army War College, welcomed to Carlisle Barracks the members of the Distance Education Program's 1st of 2 resident phases, this one half-way through the two year curriculum.  

“Your goal over the next two weeks is to put what you have learned and studied over the last year into practice in terms of argumentation, testing your hypotheses and your assumptions, and really thinking -- and not just having opinions,” said Rapp to almost 400 students in Bliss Hall for the first formal event of the educational experience. .

Maj. Gen. William E. Rapp, greets members of the 1st resident phase of the Distance Education Class of 2017. Focusing on leaderhip at the strategic level, the commandant highlighted the nation's and DoD's expectations of senior leaders.  

“What can you do in your coming year?  Read, study, discuss," he urged. "In your seminars challenge what we think to be true. Can you make unemotional, rational arguments? Can you actually change your opinion as the information changes,” Rapp asked in challenge to their ability to broaden perspectives.

For the last year, the distance education students studied and participated in a multitude of online and virtual student-faculty forums to prepare themselves for future leadership positions in a demanding international security environment with unknown future conditions.

This week, the students will engage with large group, Bliss Hall presentations by leading experts on strategic leadership, American diplomacy, civil – military relations and ethical decision-making.  They'll participate in a strategic staff ride at the Antietam Battefield, exploring with faculty guidance the strategic leader decision-making during this historically significant battle which pushed Confederate forces from Maryland.

A second staff ride, to the National Capital Region, positions their reflections at the strategic level, as they will interact with federal and international organizations with influence on the national foreign and domestic policy agenda. The intent is to increase understanding about other agencies' interaction with the national security process.

Despite the use of online forums, this will be the first opportunity to engage fellow students in person and use personal relationships to better understand the joint, interagency and international environment.

The student body includes 346 Army officers who are predominately Reserve and National Guard officers; 3 Air Force; 10 Marine Corps; 4 Navy officers; 5 international officers from Canada, Mexico, Taiwan, England and Botswana; and 27 senior civilians in federal agencies that work with DoD.


By Jade Fulce, IMCOM Public Affairs
Under Secretary of the Army participates in worldwide IMCOM Town Hall

FORT SAM HOUSTON, TEXAS (June 28, 2016) – The U.S. Army Installation Management Command hosted a worldwide town hall with the Under Secretary of the Army Patrick Murphy via teleconference Jun. 28.

More than 70 garrisons connected to the town hall and employees were able to stream it live online.

In his opening remarks, Lt. Gen. Kenneth Dahl, the IMCOM commanding general, said he asked Murphy to speak directly to the 58,000 civilians in the IMCOM workforce about transformations in the Army during an office call about a month ago.

“It was great for me to hear it,” said Dahl.  “But you really need to hear it and you need to hear it from your senior civilian leadership,” he told the world-wide audience.

Wherever possible, IMCOM leaders invited soldiers and civilians to gather in theaters and conference rooms to participate. Where that wasn’t available a live stream was provided so employees could watch from their desks.

 “I want to talk to the Army team,” said Murphy.  “The Army team is 1.3 million strong with 1 million Soldiers and 300,000 civilians.  We are one team, one fight… My job is to fight for the Army.”

 

 

 

 

Murphy emphasized the Army’s number one priority is readiness, which meant being ready to fight tonight. 

 

“We have to be ready to go,” he said “That readiness is at an individual level, installation level and Army as an institution.  We are all part of that readiness.”

 

 Murphy also said the Army has to do more with less. The Army has $100 billion than it did five years ago, so every dollar counts.  He stressed everyone has to make sure we are not wasting that money.

 

Murphy also said that IMCOM is a true partner in what the Army is trying to do and appreciates what we do for the Army Team.

 

Employees had an opportunity to ask questions and learn what the Army leadership is planning for the Army’s future following his comments. The questions ranged from transformation, Soldier for Life, and public/private partnerships to telling the Army’s story.

 

He encouraged everyone to follow him on social media and to connect with the American public through it.

 

 “We have to do a better job of telling the Army story,” said Murphy.  “Every single one of us are a recruiting officer. We should be asking ourselves what we are doing to talk about the Army to our sons and daughters - our nieces and nephews.”

 

The town hall ended with Murphy thanking the workforce for everything that they do.

 

IMCOM employee Alfreda Arnold thought that it was “a wonderful thing” that Murphy was able to take time out of his schedule and bring some light to the issues that are going on with the Army.

 

Melissa Sturgeon, the IMCOM deputy director for operations, said it was great seeing and hearing Murphy on the teleconference because it demonstrated his passion for the Army.

 

“It is nice to see that level of enthusiasm and that energy applied to leading the Army,” said Sturgeon.  “That make us more excited to do our job and it was obvious that he values our command.”


USAWC distance students ask the experts: Guest speakers offer insider look at leadership, strategy, diplomacy, more

June 29, 2016 -- Strategic Leadership …  Grand Strategy, American Diplomacy, US-Africa Relations – these broad topics have been on the study agenda for USAWC distance ed students since starting the MSS program a year ago. After carving time from personal and professional schedules, the two-week Resident Course offers access to national experts and dedicated time to reflect and to discuss these topics in detail.

Hands in the air across the 500 seats of Bliss Hall signaled interest and satisfaction in the unique opportunity for direct engagement with top-tier speakers.

 J. Langan: Ethics

Students have been exposed to readings and discussions about just war, and its rational tests of intention, proportionality, last resort, and outcome.  Father J. Langan on June 29 in Bliss Hall introduced a new level of exposure, illuminating the concepts with many examples throughout history, to include examples from the students’ lifetimes, e.g., the Iraq War.  

The best way to get clarity of just war theory is to see that it is located in the middle of all sorts of contending points of view," said Langan, who then applied plain speaking to great complexities and historical patterns for thought, to include holy war, pacifism, and a variety of norms related to just war thinking.

Some of the questions we ask about war are the same as we would ask before surgery or any activity that place others at serious risk, he said. Is this the right person with appropriate skill and right intention?

Discussing rationality, he underscored the need to test ideas with others, to consider criticism, and to be faithful and respectful to others' opinions.  Later, he referred to this link between ethical decision-making and willingness to examine rationale with others, when he invited questions, such as one students' question about guerilla war, or another's about the dilemma of decisive conclusion and heavy civilian casualties in World War II versus the contemporary examples of enduring wars not quickly solved.

"Being here is for me quite a positive experience," said Langan, who colored his presence as a step in maintaining the dialogue between civilians and the military. "Difficult or imperfectly successful wars, or imperfectly just wars, are likely to be a continuing feature of our foreign policy. We have to live with the imperfect."

Father J. Langan, senior research scholar with Georgetown University’s Kennedy Institute of Ethics, is a Jesuit priest with graduate degrees in philosophy, classics, and theory. He has taught at Yale Divinity School, Drew University, and Loyola University Chicago. His research has included focus on applications of just war theory; he is chair of the American section of the Council on Christian Approaches to Defense and Disarmament.

 

M.V. Hayden: Information as an Instrument of Power

In an ever changing global environment where threats to national security can come from any combination of various nation states, non-state actors, or failing nation states, who better to lead the discussion on the growing need for information as an instrument of power than the only person to hold two of the top intelligence offices in the United States’ information gathering program. 

Retired Air Force Gen. Michael Hayden, the former director of the NSA and CIA, visited the Army War College Monday to share his insights into what he called tectonics with Distance Education Program students.

“I’m old enough to remember when only two countries took pictures from space, and only one of them did it well,” said Hayden. “If you want, after lecture go onto Google Earth, and you will pull up imagery of sufficient resolution to decide for yourself whether or not a country is stacking a missile for potential launch.”

As the world moves from the industrial era, to the postindustrial or information age aspects of the world political theater have become unstable and shift causing uncertainty for national security.

His four tectonics included, the power of states and the nature of power, things that seemed permanent are proving not to be, states that are brittle, ambitious, and nuclear, and the rise of China. Toward the end of his time, Hayden added a fifth tectonic, “What it is we think out role is, in this emerging world, is one for the most fundamental tectonics we have to deal with,” he said.

Following his remarks Hayden welcomed questions form the assembled student body before signing copies of his book, “Playing to the Edge,” and adjourning to a seminar room for a continued discussion with one of the seminars.

C. R. Neu: Economic Power

They asked the economic expert about effective use of economic sanctions, economic impact of the historic downgrading of US credit rating, potential for immigration reform that would be to our economic benefit, and more. It’s one thing to understand that the diplomatic-informational-military-economic (DIME) elements of national power work best as a synchronized strategy. It’s another thing altogether to test ideas with an expert.

Dr. C. Richard Neu is a thought leader on economics and national security, and spoke to the Distance Education class Monday, June 27. The author of ‘Fiscal Performance and U.S. International Influence’, Neu is a professor at the Pardee RAND Graduate School, the founding director of the RAND-Qatar Policy Institute, and from 1993 to 1995 the principal advisor on economic matters to the Director of Central Intelligence, among notable positions.

“The world seems to conspire to make this topic more relevant than it has been in recent times,” he said in his opening comments before embarking on a deeper discussion of the costs of global economic leadership. He addressed the question, “Do we really have the confidence and cohesion to be a world leader, with its costs?”

Monde Muyangwa: African Affairs

 Dr. Monde Muyangwa, the Director of the Africa Program at the Woodrow Wilson Center in the District of Columbia, offered her insights on U.S.-African relations, strategies and future plans during an address to distance education students Wednesday.

Her ability to respond to a broad range of student questions reflected her personal experience in Africa, and her accomplished academic career that includes a Ph. D. in International Relations and a BA in Politics, Philosophy and Economics from the University of Oxford, and a BA in Public Administration and Economics from the University of Zambia.

Grounding her analysis with the end of colonialism in Africa in the 1960s, she discussed the four pillars for consideration: democratic initiatives, growth of trade and investments, peace and security, and opportunity and development.

“We tend to paint [Africa] with a very broad  brush, and … there are so many underlying issues that never get addressed when you paint with a big brush,” said Col. Andy Petretti, a Blairstown, N.J. native, who comes to the Distance Education Program from Fort Belvoir, Va. “Africa itself is a very abstract concept, until you dig into it, and it was very enjoyable for me to hear her talk about that, and very enlightening.

 “These lectures add tremendous value to everything we’re doing. They broaden your view, they open your mind, and they make you a better well rounded person at the end of the day, not even as an officer, but as a person. It’s an invaluable part of this,” he said.

Following the Bliss Hall remarks Muyangwa hosted a sit-down discussion with Seminar 4 to further speak to issues facing Africa, but in a smaller 20-person setting.

“A piece of the program that they’ve done very, very well is  -- after the speech, after the speaker gives their lecture, having the ability to have that lecturer come up to your seminar and continue the discussion, that was unbelievable. Having that one on one time with somebody like that, you couldn’t even put a value on it,” Petretti said.

       “I wish my daughters were there to see her. She is everything I want my kids to be, very passionate, very outspoken and extremely intelligent,” said Army student Col. Andy Petretti about Dr. Muyanga's analysis and insights of Africa today.       

 

D. C. Kurtzer: Diplomacy

Ambassador D. C. Kurtzer offered wisdom and multiple detailed anecdotes from a 29-year career in the U.S. Foreign Service, through 2005. Kurtzer remains active in Track II diplomacy related to the Middle East, as a professor of Middle East Studies at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. From 2001 to 2005, he had served as the US Ambassador to Israel, and from 1997-2001 as the US Ambassador to Egypt.  Kurtzer, on June 21, contributed specific examples and explanations to clarify and color the students’ broad-stroke understanding of diplomacy. From Israeli-Palestinian peace talks, and US-Syria-regional developments, to the role of coercive diplomacy and incentive diplomacy: this was Diplomacy 501 from a master, in 90 minutes.

Diplomacy requires wits and wallet, wisdom and willpower, said Kurtzer. There is a distinction between signaling importance, for the Israel-Palestine peace process, for example, and the willpower to back that signal. Without that will power, military people and diplomats alike know that’s a disadvantage in the field.

See full video presentation of Amb. Kurtzer’s remarks at www.youtube.com/usarmywarcollege.

Seminar dialogue follows each Bliss Hall presentation.  Students make it an opportunity to test assumptions, and understanding with colleagues and, even, to address nuanced contrasts between speakers’ ideas, e.g., relinquishing responsibility in the world by burden-shifting, or understanding the limits of power and that we need not be the sole player and thinker in resolving power.

Richard Betts:  Grand Strategy

Dr. Richard Betts led the June 21 morning agenda, addressing Grand Strategy as an aspirational long-term bridge between two points:  objectives and operations. He discussed at length the multiple obstacles.

“The United States Government is not good at Grand Strategy because political structure prevens long-term leadership,” he said. “The U.S. Constitution is anti-Grand Strategy. The founders overwhelmingly focused on constraining government power among eh branches … reducing the coherence of Grand Strategy.”

Betts is a long-standing academic at Columbia University and a senior fellow with the Council on Foreign Relations. He is a former member of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, and the National Security Council.

See video of Dr. Betts’ remarks at www.youtube.com/usarmywarcollege.

“Is it hopeless to think we can have long-term control over plans and strategy?” he asked, and answered: No, but external events – think Korean War and fall of the wall – and internal events, like the transfer of political power – work against Grand Strategy.

Student questions were as wide-ranging as the scope of his comments: about China, Japan, re-approaching a balance of power strategy, core national interests in Asia, partisanship in foreign policy, and opinions about a nation whose grand strategy stands as role model.

Carter Ham: Strategic Leadership

Retired Gen. Carter Ham brought his experience to the DE class of 2017. Speaking to the subject of strategic leadership, remarking that leadership is unpredictable and will take you in directions that you would never see coming in your future. He gave as examples his unexpected leadership positions:  lead investigator of non-criminal events of the Fort Hood shootings, co-chair for the comprehensive review of issues associated with the repeal of the "Don't ask, don't tell" policy, and, even in retirement, appointment as chair of the National Commission on the Future of the Army.

See full video presentation of Gen. Ham's remarks at www.youtube.com/usarmywarcollege.

“We hear all the time that the global security environment is increasingly unstable and unpredictable, the threats more diverse and numerous,” Ham said. “To me the real challenge is not so much in how you address each one of those specific threats....  It’s more about, in my view, how do we develop leaders who are increasingly capable of handling the diversity of the global environment?  How do you lead, how do you operate, and how do you influence in that environment? To me that is why you are here,” he said.

During the question-and-answer period, students asked about the Commission on the Future of the Army's look at force structure; asked about how the Army can preserve its ethos when so few in government have service experience; and addressed Ham's thoughts on  redrawing combatant command boundaries, among others. [SEE:  the independent USAWC research study on the future Total Army at http://warontherocks.com/2016/05/announcing-the-elihu-root-study-on-the-total-army/]

Retired Gen. Ham's 39 year career included command of the United States Africa Command, as well as United States Army Europe and 7th Army. Prior to that, he served as Director for Operations (J-3) at the Joint Staff and was the Commanding General, U.S. 1st Infantry Division command of Multinational Brigade (Task Force Olympia) – North in Mosul.  He has a B.A. in Political Science from the John Carroll University, and an M.A. in National Security and Strategic Studies from the Naval War College.


New entry point for all visitors officially opens for business

Lee McLure, Visitors Center director, Elaine Leist, Deputy Garrison Commander, Lt. Col. Greg Ank, Garrison Commander, Col. Robert Balcavage, Army War College Deputy Commandant, Pic Pritchett, Public Works Engineer, and Bob Suskie, Emergency Services Director, cut the ribbon officially opening the Visitors Center at 870 Jim Thorpe Road. The center will now serve as the entry-point for all non-DoD ID card holders visiting the post.

 

 

Carlisle Barracks hosted a group of key community leaders and officially opened the Carlisle Barracks Visitor Center during a short ceremony June 24.

The Visitors Center, located at 870 Jim Thorpe Road, will now serve as the entry-point for all non-DoD ID card holders visiting the post. Visitors will need to present photographic identification and fill out a form required to submit to a background check.  This new policy will affect all U.S. military installations across the United States. The visitors center will be open Monday-Friday, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. After hours and weekend visitors will process through the far right guard booth as you come around Jim Thorpe Road. Processing times may be delayed on weekends and after hours due to truck processing.  

"For the Soldier, Family member or civilian who already have a common access card or military ID, it isn't going to affect them," said Bob Suskie, Director of Emergency Services here. "They're still going to come through the gate showing that same card."

During the short ceremony, Lt. Col. Greg Ank, Garrison Commander, recognized the hard work of Mark Shatte, physical security officer, Lee McLure, Visitors Center supervisor, and Bob Suskie, Director of Emergency Services.  

“Thank you for developing the policy and procedures that will make this work to ensure we are abiding DoD’s and Army Directives to ensure security and access compliance at Carlisle Barracks,” he said. “This was not an easy road.” 

After the ceremony, Carlisle Barracks leadership provided a behind-the-scenes tour of the center and an installation tour for a number of key community leaders.

Visitors to the installation who are accompanied by a CAC, or military ID holder will be allowed to enter without a background check.

A new website, located at http://carlislebarracks.carlisle.army.mil/visitorcenter/has been developed that provides information, FAQs and forms necessary to gain access to the installation that can be completed prior to arrival. A Carlisle Barracks Form 228 has been developed that will allow visitors to apply for access up to 30 days in advance.

Background checks will be conducted using the National Crime Information Center Interstate Identification Index, a Federal Bureau of Investigation database that will provide criminal histories from all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Each visitor pass will depend on the nature of the visit. For example, a family member visiting over the holidays may be able to obtain a pass that will be valid for a week or more. Those who have a legitimate reason to access the post on a regular basis -- e.g. a spouse or family member who picks a child up from daycare -- will be able to apply for pass that will last one year.

A visitor can be denied access based on 11 different factors and all visitors will need a valid reason for coming onto the installation or will need a government sponsor.

Suskie said background checks are expected to take about 10 minutes each, but that other factors including the numbers of visitors requiring access, and the complexity of a background checks may cause the process to take longer.   
While these are significant changes, Suskie said Carlisle Barracks will continue to try and accommodate as many visitors as possible.

"There are different events that will allow us to do different things, so if the public is invited to come out for something, we still want them to come out," he said. "These are areas where we may be able to do some mitigation to allow people to come out without a background check. Events like the post yard sale, weddings and other special events may allow for flexibility with the new policy. 

Disqualifying factors for access to Carlisle Barracks

Derogatory information that would bar installation access includes, but is not limited to, the following:

1. The National Crime Information Center Interstate Identification Index contains criminal arrest information about the individual that causes the installation commander to determine the individual presents a potential threat to good order, discipline, or health and safety of the installation.

2. The installation is unable to verify the individual's claimed identity based on the reasonable belief that the individual submitted fraudulent information concerning his or her identity in the attempt to gain access.

3. The individual has a current arrest warrant in NCIC, regardless of the offense or violation.

4. The individual is currently barred from entry to a federal installation or facility.

5. The individual has been convicted of crimes encompassing sexual assault, armed robbery, rape, child molestation, production or possession of child pornography, trafficking in humans, drug possession with intent to sell or drug distribution.

6. The individual has a U.S. conviction for espionage, sabotage or treason.

7. The individual is a registered sex offender.

8. The individual has a felony conviction within the past 10 years, regardless of the offense or violation.

9. The individual has been convicted of a felony firearms or explosives violation.

10. The individual has engaged in acts or activities designed to overthrow the U.S. government by force.

11. The individual is identified in the Terrorist Screening database as a known to be or suspected of being a terrorist or belonging to an organization with known links to terrorism or support of terrorist activity.


Local events planned to celebrate Independence Day

There are numerous events this year for you and your family to celebrate the 4th of July holiday, and a few local are listed below.

NOTE: For your security and everyone's - When in large gatherings over this weekend, be aware of your surroundings. Don't hesitate to call law enforcement or report your suspicion via iWatch: http://carlislebarracks.carlisle.army.mil/iWatch/index.cfm

June 25- July 4 - For 39 years, Carlisle Summerfair has been providing family friendly events at no cost to the public around the 4th of July holiday including open pool nights, concerts, musicals, kid’s activities and an ice-cream social. Check out the full schedule of events at http://carlislesummerfair.org/schedule/

June 30- Head out to the United States Army Heritage and Education Center (USAHEC) trail June 30 for the Carlisle Summerfair 2016 Scavenger Hunt, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
The educational scavenger hunt is open to of all ages and are broken into three age groups elementary school, middle school and high school. There will be an event tent on the sidewalk at the beginning of the Trail where participants can pick up scavenger hunts. There will be gift card prizes for the Center's Gift Shop for 1st and 2nd place in each category.

July 3- The U.S. Army Band, "Pershing’s Own" will take part in the annual Cannon Brigade and Fireworks at Long’s Park Amphitheater, 1441 Harrisburg Pike @ U.S. Route 30, Lancaster, PA Sun. July 3, 7:30-11 p.m. Bring your blankets and lawn chairs and picnic in the park and enjoy this free concert. When in large gatherings over this weekend, be aware of your surroundings, don't hesitate to call law enforcement or watch an iWatch report.

July 4– Fireworks at the Carlisle Fairgrounds, 9:30 p.m.


Summer Sense Campaign - Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over

Americans love to celebrate the Fourth of July with family, friends, food and fireworks, but all too often the festivities turn tragic on the nation's roads. The fact is, this iconic American holiday is also one of the deadliest holidays of the year due to drunk-driving crashes.

There are two basic principles for this drunk driving prevention initiative: they are
- Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over (enforcement) and
- Buzzed Driving Is Drunk Driving (social norming)

Fourth of JULY 2016 fact sheet

 

  • Parties, picnics and fireworks are just some of the festivities that lead droves of Americans onto our nation’s highways every Fourth of July. Unfortunately, the celebrations too often turn deadly when drinking alcohol leads to drunk driving.


  • This year, Americans will celebrate the Fourth on a Monday, which means the holiday weekend starts at 6 p.m. Friday, July 1st and ends on Tuesday, July 5th at 5:59 a.m.

 

  • In 2014, over the Fourth of July holiday (6 p.m. July 3rd to 5:59 a.m. July 7th), 164 people were killed in crashes involving at least one driver or motorcycle operator with a blood alcohol concentration of .08 grams per deciliter or higher. Those preventable deaths make up 41 percent of the 397 people killed in motor vehicle traffic crashes over the Fourth of July period.


  • It is illegal to drive with a BAC of .08 g/dL or higher in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Yet, of the 164 people killed in drunk driving crashes during the 2014 July Fourth period, 113 people died in crashes involving at least one driver or motorcycle operator with a BAC of .15 or higher—almost twice the set limit.


  • In fatal crashes during the 2014 July Fourth period, more than one-fourth (29%) of involved drivers or motorcycle operators had BACs of .15 or higher.

 

  • Over half (58%) of the young drivers (18 to 34 years old) killed in motor vehicle traffic crashes were alcohol-impaired (BAC of .08 g/dL or higher) during the 2014 Fourth of July period.

 

  • The rate of alcohol impairment among drivers involved in fatal crashes during the 2014 July Fourth period was over three times higher at night than it was during the day.

 

  • This year, law enforcement is taking part in the “Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over” campaign on the Fourth of July to end drunk driving. This means increasing enforcement with zero tolerance for those who drive impaired.

 

  1. Police will be out in force throughout the region, arresting drunk drivers. Expect to see increased sobriety checkpoints, roving and saturation patrols, and other enforcement efforts.


  2. These enforcement campaigns are necessary. As statistics show, drunk driving is an epidemic in our nation. In 2014, 9,967 people were killed in drunk-driving crashes—almost a third of all traffic fatalities nationwide.

 

  • Of the 9,967 people who died in alcohol-impaired-driving crashes in 2014, 6,391 (64%) were drivers with BACs of .08 or higher. The remaining fatalities consisted of 2,752 motor vehicle occupants (28%) and 824 non occupants (8%).


  • The number of drunk-driving fatalities (164) during the 2014 July Fourth period is no exception to this trend. From 2010 to 2014, there were 752 people killed in drunk-driving crashes over the Fourth of July holiday periods.

 

  1. From 2013 to 2014, the number of overall drunk-driving-crash fatalities decreased by 1.4 percent in the United States—from 10,110 people killed in 2013 to 9,967 in 2014.


  2. There’s No Excuse--Plan Ahead to Get Home Safely This Fourth of July. Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over.

 

Cost of a DUI – The $10,000.00 Ride Home.

The costs associated with an impaired driving arrest can vary greatly depending on several factors, including blood-alcohol content, location of arrest, and number of offenses. The effect on a driver’s wallet starts the moment they are stopped by police.


Apart from the financial aspects of a DUI arrest, there may also be social ramifications. Court appearances, community service requirements or jail time lead to lost time and lost wages – possibly job loss. A DUI conviction can also impede attempts to get a job, and cause embarrassment to your family. For more information, check out Pennsylvania’s DUI Law.
 

 

 

 

 

Avoid Drunk Driving Altogether—Use Safe Alternatives to Getting Home

 

  • Plan a safe way home before the fun begins.
  • Designate a sober (non-drinking) driver or use public transportation to get home safely.
  • Download NHTSA’s Safer Ride mobile app at www.nhtsa.gov/link/saferride/.
  • Use your community’s sober ride program.
  • If you see a drunk driver on the road, don’t hesitate to contact Local Law Enforcement.

 

This Fourth of July, remember to Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over. If you know someone who is about to drive or ride after drinking, be strong—take the keys and make arrangements to help them get safely to their destination.

 

Remember, with all of today’s alternatives to getting home safely, there’s no excuse for getting behind the wheel after drinking alcohol. Driving impaired is never worth the risk, not to yourself or anyone else. If law enforcement pulls you over for drunk driving this Fourth of July, you can count on being arrested.

 

Designate a Sober (non-drinking) Driver This July Fourth

Because Buzzed Driving is Drunk Driving

 

Summer Holiday celebrations often include barbeques, picnics, water sports, vacationing with family and friends, and fireworks. However, many holiday weekends can be filled with tragedy instead of celebration. The Fourth of July is a favorite American holiday filled with fun, food, fireworks, friends and family. But celebrating can quickly turn to tragedy when people choose to drive after drinking. The Army Substance Abuse Prevention office is urging everyone to plan ahead this Independence Day. Designate a sober (non-drinking) driver ahead of time.

 

“The Fourth of July festivities can be so much fun. “People make plans for the partying, but too many drivers don’t plan ahead to get home safely.”

 

“We’ve seen that too many drivers around think that it’s OK to drive ‘buzzed.’ The truth is you don’t have to be completely wasted to get arrested for drunk driving. Remember: Buzzed Driving is Drunk Driving.”

 

“Here’s what we want people to understand.  “Alcohol not only impairs your ability to drive, it impairs your judgment about whether you can or should drive.  Sure, you may thinkyou’re ‘fine’, but you’re not.  The best thing to keep in mind is simply:  Buzzed Driving is Drunk Driving.” Prevent drunk driving by only driving completely sober.

 

 

Did You Know?

  • Drunk driving is often a symptom of a larger problem: alcohol misuse and abuse.
  • Alcohol-impaired motor vehicle crashes cost more than an estimated $37 billion annually.
  • Remember, whether you’ve had way too many or just one too many, it’s never worth the risk to drive impaired. Buzzed Driving is Drunk Driving.
  • Planning ahead can mean the difference between life and death.

For additional information contact the Army Substance Abuse Office at 245 – 4576.

More information on avoiding impaired driving can be found at www.trafficsafetymarketing.gov

 


Help fight hunger, donate non-perishable items as part of ‘Feds Feed Families’

USDA once again will lead the 2016 Feds Feed Families (FFF) campaign with the support of the Chief Human Capital Officers Council and other agency partners. The campaign will officially begin on June 1, 2016 and run through August 30, 2016.

Launched in 2009 as part of President Obama's United We Serve campaign, Feds Feed Families was designed to help food banks and pantries stay stocked during summer months when they traditionally see a decrease in donations and an increase in need. Through the amazing generosity of federal employees, since 2009 the food drive has collected nearly 57.2 million pounds of food for those in need. Last year alone, more than 17.9 million pounds were donated and provided to food banks and pantries. Even as the economy grows stronger, there are still too many people struggling to put food on the table.

Items collected at Carlisle Barracks are donated to Project SHARE, a local community food bank.

Employees are asked to bring non-perishable food items and place them into a designated collection box. The boxes are located at:

  • Sgt. Andrew McConnell Youth Center
  • Army Community Services, 632 Wright Ave
  • Thorpe Gym
  • Upton Hall
  • Exchange
  • Anne Ely Hall
  • Moore Child Development Center
  • Army Wellness Center, 314 Lovell Ave
  • Resource Management, 315 Lovell Ave.
  • Fire Station
  • Dunham Clinic

Civilian employee retirement benefits briefings set for July 13, 14

Always wanted to know about your retirement options under CRS or FERS but were afraid to ask? Or you didn't know how to ask? Carlisle Barracks will host two information sessions with an expert from the Army Benefits Center July 13, 14 at the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center, located at 950 Soldiers Drive, Carlisle, Pa.

Teresa Weishaar, a human resource expert with the Army Benefits Center, will present helpful tools and tips for civilian employees planning for retirement and looking at retirement options.  Each session will run from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. with an hour for lunch.

Seating is limited, so early enrollment is encouraged in order to guarantee a seat. Registration is free and can be done using the form at  http://www.cpfea.us/retirement-seminar/

Registrants may also pre-pay for a box lunch, if desired using the same link. Lunch options include grilled chicken caesar salad, turkey & provolone sandwich, ham & swiss sandwich, or hamburger. Each lunch includes water, chips, fruit, and condiments.  Be sure to specify what date you are attending during registration. The lunches will be ready by noon each day.

The first day of the session, July 13, is focused on employees who will retire under the Civil Service Retirement System. Day two, July 14, is aimed at employees who fall under the Federal Employee Retirement System. Employees should only attend the eight-hour session that applies to them.

Each day of the session will provide an overview of the retirement system, how an employee applies for retirement, all applicable timelines and requirements and a question and answer period. A copy of the slides for CSRS can be found here and for FERS here. Participants are encouraged to print a copy of the slides as no copies will be available at the event.

For those that cannot attend, the presentations will be posted to the Army War College YouTube page within a week of the event at https://www.youtube.com/user/USArmyWarCollege

For questions you can contact the POCs below:

     Sarah Simons (Dunham Clinic)   sarah.a.simons2.civ@mail.mil

     Kathy Benton (USAWC)     Kathy.r.benton.civ@mail.mil

     Tony Robinson (USAG CBks)     Anthony.c.robinson20.civ@mail.mil


Army’s musical ambassadors to host free summer concert

 Selinsgrove to welcome U.S. Army Field Band

June 20, 2016 –The Carlisle Barracks and Army War College communities are cordially invited to join the United States Army Field Band, for a free concert June 25, at 3 p.m. at Susquehanna University’s Weber Chapel Auditorium in Selinsgrove, Pa.

The Army Field Band’s Concert Band and Soldiers’ Chorus are the musical ambassadors of the Army, and both will be performing at Susquehanna University, part of their Summer Tour 2016. 

The Band’s Summer Tour program is a great opportunity to experience a world-class musical performance by one of the nation’s top military bands. The tour extends a friendly hand through musical performances to thousands of citizens who might not otherwise have contact with the Army or its Soldiers. 

The Band’s performances are free and open to the public. Tickets are required however, and can be acquired by calling (570) 372-4281, or by visiting the band’s Webpage at www.armyfieldband.com


Academic preparatory course puts International Fellows a step ahead

June 17, 2016 -- The USAWC journey begins next week for 75 officers of allied and partner nations who will first complete a 6-week orientation for all International Fellows, and then join their US counterparts in early August in the U.S. Army War College Resident Program Class of 2017.  

Today is a milestone for 32 of those international officers for whom English is not their native language. They have completed the nine-week Academic Preparatory Course to hone their language skills for reading, seminar discussions, research, and academic writing at the graduate level.

 “The course is designed for officers who may not be as proficient in English or have had as much academic experience as the average incoming international officer,” said Jeremy Beussink, who has been the IF Writing and Research Instructor 7 years.

The international officers address the workshop topics in seven-man teams, each with its own instructor.

We understand that these officers are the best and brightest, representing their countries, said Kerri Bechert, academic prep course teacher. “They are incredibly bright and intuitive. They have the skills to be leaders in their Army.

Kerri Beckert and her 6 students from Nepal; Tanzania; Peru; Ethoiopia; Burkina Faso and Kosovo gather for an after graduation photo in Will Washcoe, June 17

“We are teaching them is how to communicate efficiently and effectively at this level and a type of writing that is expected at the Army War College so they can perform at their potential,” she said.

“The curriculum is designed not only to review English skills but also to model reading, presentation, and writing assignments that students will encounter in the resident course, as well as familiarizing students to the seminar class dynamic and adult education format.”  Beussink was referring the USAWC seminar group to be joined when classes start in August. Each seminar will include a cross-section of US Army, Sea Service, Air Force officers, federal civilian students, and four International Fellows for the seminar dialogue, case studies and experiential learning of the six-months of core course.

“The ACP course is interesting in the since that it gives us a little bit of warning of what will be happening once we cross the street,” said Lt. Col. Mohamadou Sylla from Senegal. The course gives them practice and confidence in processing a complex thought into English, he added.   

Lt. Col. Mohamadou Abdoulaye Sylla from Senegal receives his certificate of completion from Amb. Daniel Shields during the APC graduation in Will Washcoe, June 17

“Sometimes we’re thinking very hard to have the right word. Sometimes it is also very hard to make the transition the way you want to make it, because communications is not only about the words you speak,” said Sylla. “It is about a combination of words with some movement to make it lively when you want to support an idea.”

“Before coming here I received the pre-course schedule and after reading through it I knew what we would cover in terms of grammar, reading and analytical writing in my view this the crux of the course,” said Lt. Col. Tony Aseavu from Papua New Guinea. “I would recommend that international students attend the ACP, because I can see that we are a step ahead for the resident course,” he said. 

It’s been a nice experience with our classmates from different countries, different continents, different races, said Ukrainian Col. Oleksandr Taresnko. “I was actually surprised and pleased to see that all my peers were familiar with the situation in Ukraine. During presentations and briefings, I am asked many questions.”

The course serves as well to help prepare for the Test of English as a Foreign Language.  International students must pass this test 83 percent to be eligible for the master’s degree in Strategic Studies.

The 75 International Fellows in the resident Class of 2017 represent 71 countries. This year, for the first time, the body of IF will include an officer from Jamaica.  The USAWC Distance Education Program has currently enrolled 3 international officers in the DEP Class of 2016, graduating in July; 5 in the Class of 2017; and 10 in the Class of 2018.  The distance program officers a curriculum equivalent to the resident program over a two year period, predominately online with two 2-week resident phases.  International Fellows have been invited by the Chief of Staff of the Army to attend the Army War College in a State Department program executed by the Defense Department. 

The following are students attending the Academic Preparatory Course, in no specific order:

Armenia Lt. Col. Artem Avdalyan; Brazil Col. Joao Alberto Nunes de Paula and Col. Anysio Luis Crespo Alves Negrao; Bulgaria Col. Todor Dimitrov Todorov; Burkina Faso Col.  Ernest Kisbedo; Cambodia Brig. Gen. Leangsong Buth; Chad Col. Mamadou Adam Mahamat; Colombia Col. Franklyn Gomez Gomez; Congo DRC Lt. Col. Patrick Sasa Nzita Lusala; Djibouti Lt. Col. Ahmed Daher Djama; El Salvador Col. Bosbeli Alejandro Recinos Magana; Ethiopia Lt. Col.  Shiferaw Biru Gemeda; Georgia Col. Roman Jokhadze; Ghana Col. Johnson Kofi Akou-Adjei; Greece Lt. Col. Nestoras Vargemezis; Indonesia Col. Ahmad Faizal and Col. Hilman Hadi; Kosovo Lt. Col. Jeton Dreshaj; Mali Col. Yacouba Sanogo; Nepal Col. Santosh Dhakal; Papua New Guinea Lt. Col. Tony Kavawanny Aseavu; Peru Col. Omar Gonzalo Noriega Ramirez; Romania Col. Remus Hadrian Bondor; Rwanda Col. Rwakabi Kakira; Saudi Arabia Col. Saeed Moshabab S. Alshahrani and Col. Mohammed Abdullah M Binshanar; Senegal Lt. Col. Mohamadou Abdoulaye Sylla; Tanzania Lt. Col.  Lulacha Hayeshi; Tunisia Lt. Col.  Hichem Khalifa; Turkey Lt. Col. Yucel Yavuz; Ukraine Col. Oleksandr Tarasenko; Vietnam Lt. Col. Vuong Van Nguyen


Quick actions by Wellness Center expert help save a life 

Shana Blaney, a health promotion technician with the Carlisle Barracks Army Wellness Center, receives a Commanders Coin for Excellence from Maj. Gen. Bill Rapp, Army War College Commandant, during a recent update brief. Blaney is credited with helping to save the life of an Army War College student who suffered a medical emergency while working out at a local gym.

Quick thinking and training all paid off as a member of the Carlisle Barracks Army Wellness Center helped save the life of an Army War College student recently.

On April 3, Shana Blaney, a health promotion technician with the center here, was working out at a local gym when a student had a medical emergency that caused him to be unresponsive and with seizure-like activities. Blaney immediately went into action and started administering cardiopulmonary resuscitative measures.  After directing someone to call 911 and retrieving the automated external defibrillator, Blaney gave two rescue breathes and recognizing there was no pulse, began chest compressions.  Once the AED analyzed the patient's status, a shock was advised and delivered by the automated external defibrillator machine. She commenced chest compressions and was shortly relieved by the paramedics on scene.

The student was admitted for open heart surgery with a 100% blockage.  The physicians along the way credited her quick action and capabilities in saving the student's life.

This was the first time she had ever encountered a situation like this and credited her time working with the military for giving her the confidence to step in and render aid.

“I have to credit my quick action to the training we receive through the clinic and the drills we do throughout the year,” she said. “I also believe working for the military has helped me be more aware of what is going on around me on and off post, confident and ready to act if I'm needed.

Blaney has been certified in CPR since she was 16.

"Through high school I volunteered as a leader where I assisted the instructor in teaching CPR to students in our school," she said. "I have always considered it a very important skill to have and be ready to use.”

Blaney has more than ten years of experience working in a physical fitness setting. Her experience ranges from working as a personal trainer’s assistant designing and implementing programs to helping manage facility operations. She graduated with her Bachelors in Health and Physical Education from Marywood University in 2013 and is currently pursuing her Master’s Degree for Counseling.

“Shay has always displayed a caring and compassionate attitude with everyone who comes into the Wellness Center,” said Matt Zlogar, wellness center director. “She is our safety officer so she is always prepared and ready to take necessary action. I'm actually not surprised that Shay was able to react the way she did. She is an asset to the team, Carlisle Barracks and the community.”


Strategy Education at War College supports CSM, SGM in executive leader assignments

June 20, 2016 -- The Army War College's strategic education course for 29 sergeants major and command sergeants major is in the 2nd of its two-week duration, at Carlisle Barracks.  The Executive Leader Course prepares participants for their duties as senior enlisted advisors and staff section sergeants major in 1- and 2-star command (executive) nominative-level positions. Originally called the CSM/SGM Executive Education Course, the course was renamed the Executive Leader Course by the Sergeant Major of the Army (SMA).

Leaders in the USAWC Executive Leaders Course take part in a staff ride to the Nation's Capital for first-person exposure to the strategic level of national security processes.


 NCOs: Join TRADOC SGM Davenport for Town Hall on leader development

Command Sgt. Maj. David Davenport Sr., U.S. Army Training and Doctrine command sergeant major, will host the second in a series of live Army-wide State of NCO Development Town Halls June 23.

The event will once again provide Soldiers a chance to get their concerns and questions addressed directly by the leaders charged with revolutionizing NCO development for the force.

"The last town hall was a huge success," Davenport said. "I received a lot of great feedback, but as I stated in an earlier blog, I felt that the first town hall was too wide in focus.

"So for this town hall, I would like to limit the discussion to the first line of effort of the NCO 2020 Strategy, which is Leader Development."

To address this line of effort, Davenport has gathered senior leaders from the U.S. Army Combined Arms Center, U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy, Institute for NCO Professional Development and the Training Operations Management Activity to field questions.

"This time, we are going to try some new things, including opening up the chat board at 4 p.m. EDT -- one hour before we start answering questions on the panel," he said. "This way, we can have more questions for our discussion."

The live panel discussion will run from 5 to 6:30 p.m. EDT however, the chat room will remain open until 7 p.m. to ensure participants have every opportunity to have their voices heard.

"Now, more than ever -- and certainly more than when I was a private -- Soldiers have the ability to share their perspectives and have their voices heard," said Master Sgt. Elsi A. Inoa-Santos, INCOPD senior military analyst, in her recent blog post, "A Soldier's perspective on the NCO Town Hall."

Inoa-Santos was among the many people working behind the scenes answering questions during TRADOC's last State of NCO Development Town Hall March 3.

As a senior analyst in TRADOC's INCOPD, the organization dedicated to the advancement of professional military education for NCOs, she also has a firsthand perspective on how TRADOC is improving NCO education.

"I really believe that TRADOC is on the cusp of the greatest era of change the Army has ever experienced," she said. "For example, TRADOC is influencing current and future development to our professional military education with efforts like the Master Leader Course and the Executive Leader Course."

Senior leaders on hand to answer questions on NCO leader development include: Command Sgt. Maj. David Turnbull, USACAC command sergeant major; Command Sgt. Maj. Dennis Defreese, USASMA commandant; Command Sgt. Maj. Jeffrey Huggins, USASMA deputy commandant; Charles Guyette, USASMA director of training; Dr. Aubrey Butts, INCOPD director; Troy Nattress, TRADOC G-3/5/7 deputy chief of staff and TOMA plans officer; and Jeff Wells, TRADOC, G-3/5/7 chief of plans and TOMA plans officer.

Representatives from USASMA will field questions and lead a discussion on the purpose, objectives and methodology of the Master Leader Course, the concept and learning objectives of the Advanced Leader Course and the Senior Leader Course's Common Core curriculum. The USASMA team will also provide insight on the redesign and learning objectives of all Structured Self Development and the Basic Leaders Course.

Turnbull will field questions and lead a discussion on the purpose of Army University, as it increases the academic rigor of Army education programs through broader accreditation, while also establishing a collaboration with the nation's premier universities and colleges.

"Be a part of this -- your voice and experiences are important to us, and will help shape our efforts. I cannot think of a better way to be heard and share your ideas or concerns. We are listening," Davenport said.

*The State of NCO Development Town Hall 2 is June 23. The chat room is open from 4 to 7 p.m. EDT. The senior leader panel discussion is scheduled from 5 to 6:30 p.m. Watch and participate live in the chat room at www.emc.army.mil/broadcast, or ask questions via social media. Upload your video or typed questions to TRADOC's Facebook page or post them to Twitter using #TRADOCtownhall.


New website launched for military child care services 

A new website for Carlisle Barracks parents touts fewer waiting lines, less paperwork and greater awareness of available programs.

Endorsed by the Department of Defense, MilitaryChildCare.com is a single gateway that makes it easier for parents to research options and get on waiting lists for military-operated and military-subsidized child care, whether it’s at their current installation or before they move to a new duty station.

“Having this site, will allow Carlisle Barracks Child, Youth and School Services to have one program to manage the waitlist,” said Jacqueline Schultz, CYSS Outreach Services director. “Our staff will be able to see real-time statistics and better inform our parents about availability and waiting times for child care slots.”

The site allows users who create an account to maintain a family profile, which can be accessed any time from any location. By automating the process, CYSS facilities can drastically reduce enrollment forms and registration paperwork requirements.

“It’s one more step in easing the transition process for military families,” Schultz said. “Additionally, having that information ready to go means families can immediately place their child on a waiting list as soon as they need care.

Through the site, families can search for and get on the waitlist for full-day and part-day care programs.  

Families may remain on a preferred program’s wait list even after being offered care or enrolling in another program. Those at Carlisle Barracks who are currently on wait lists will be automatically transitioned to the new web-based system. These families will retain the original date of their request or requests for care, and all program enrollment processes will remain the same.

Those who would like to learn more about MilitaryChildCare.comare encouraged to read its frequently asked questions document, accessible via the link at the top of the website’s opening page. If you encounter problems with sign-up, contact the sites help desk at 855-696-2934 or send an email to FamilySupport@MilitaryChildCare.com.


June 20, 2016 - ARCIC's Lt. Gen. McMaster included on his current Professional Reading recommendation:  The Lure of Strike, by Dr. Conrad Crane, historian and research professor with the USAWC's Army Heritage & Education Center (published by the USAWC Press, in Parameters:

http://strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/pubs/parameters/Issues/Summer_2013/1_Crane_SpecialCommentary.pdf

Why read this?

An increasingly important part of the new American Way of War has been a reliance on standoff technology to project power. The "lure" is minimal friendly casualties and short, inexpensive wars with only limited landpower commitments. Unfortunately, inflated expectations for such an outcome have often led to strategic over-reach and a dangerously unbalanced force structure, ultimately cost-ing the nation more blood and treasure. As the United States tries to refocus its strategy and reduce defense expenditures, it must be careful to retain a balanced force with a full range of capabilities.


 

New AER website built around online assistance

WASHINGTON (Army News Service, June 7, 2016) -- A new Army Emergency Relief website is now up and running with an online assistance tool that is easy to navigate on mobile devices.

"It now works well from a smart phone, tablet, desktop, laptop, whatever device," said retired Col. Guy Shields of AER.

AER conducted a "soft launch" of the website last month to insure that it was working smoothly prior to making an announcement. It was important to work through any issues to insure that the back-end processing of online assistance applications was functional, Shields said. But he added that the new site is now up and running like a champ.

The website offers new features to Soldiers and families that they can easily negotiate, said retired Command Sgt. Maj. Charles Durr, AER assistance officer.

It provides a loan calculator, AER news and videos, and portals to apply for scholarships or loans.

"The thing that I'm really excited about is the online assistance feature -- which really is all about providing a more streamlined assistance process for our Soldiers and their families," Durr said. "It will enable them to execute that with ease, anytime, anywhere, by use of any electronic device, and it can be executed securely in a matter of minutes."

ASSISTANCE PORTAL

The tool takes applicants down separate paths, he said, depending on whether the user is a Soldier, family member, retiree or survivor.

"There's only six simple steps that are involved in the process, or six clicks and the application is submitted to the nearest AER section," Durr said.

"The flash-to-bang time" from when a Soldier begins the application to when he or she walks out the door with a check has been greatly reduced, he said.

"I would say a minimum of two hours can be knocked off a routine application," he said.

The online assistance tool has been tested for the last three months on the former website.
AER initiated a "soft launch" of the assistance portal on Feb. 22. The new website just went live this week.

"We've been testing this since February to work out the bugs in it," Shields said about the assistance portal.

The majority of feedback has been very positive, Durr said. The assistance portal has dramatically decreased application time for assistance, he added.

"It's all individually dependent on how fast the Soldier will move," Durr said. "Probably the fastest we've seen: a Soldier started an application at 9, and by 11 they had funds in their hands."

The process included sending in the form, getting the commander's signature and coming into the AER office to get a check.

Soldiers in the Army for more than a year no longer need their commander's signature, if they've completed Advanced Individual Training and are not exhibiting risky behaviors, Durr said.

"One of the things we emphasize to commanders is that this new online assistance process is about expediency, not about masking any problems," Durr said. "Those Soldiers that a commander deems it appropriate to review still need to go through their commander's review. It's not meant to circumvent the chain of command in any way."

Instead, Durr said, the new process is about making it easier for Soldiers to get assistance.

Forms used to be filled out in the AER office. Now when the form is sent online, staffers can begin to process it before the Soldier arrives.

STREAMLINED AND FAST

"One of the things that we have to do is make sure we're paying attention to what our competitors are doing out there," Durr said. "Many of them have a very streamlined and simple process."

Achieving that streamlined approach, Durr said, was the impetus for creation of the new website.

"We hope this will be attractive to Soldiers and get more of them in the door, in lieu of pushing them out to predatory lending institutions," Durr said.

Title loan companies, pawn shops, payday lenders, and other non-traditional lenders in the U.S. sometimes charge up to 36 percent interest, Shields said.

"The worst of the worst are the online, off-shore lenders," he said, who sometimes charge a 2,000-3,000 percentage rate... "They're totally unregulated."

AER, on the other hand, charges no interest and no fees on their loans. In fact, depending on the need, sometimes AER provides a grant that doesn't even need to be paid back.

UPGRADED SYSTEMS

AER has also been working on upgrading its information systems. It recently completed the Defense Information Assurance Certification and Accreditation Process, allowing its systems to interface with DOD sites such as the Defense Finance and Accounting Office.

LeRoy Lundgren, deputy director of Cybersecurity for Army G-6, was instrumental in helping AER get through the process, according to retired Lt. Gen. Robert Foley, AER director.

"His efforts ensured that AER had continued access to various DOD and Army systems which are required to efficiently take care of Soldiers and their families," Foley said of Lundgren.

Foley presented Lundgren the AER 2015 Jack Ritchie Distinguished Service Award for his "many significant contributions to AER information systems, improving the ability to protect Soldier and Family personally identifiable information and personal health information," according to a released statement.


New security process to affect all visitors to Carlisle Barracks

Visitor Center to open July 1 for all non-ID card holders

Visitors without a valid ID or CAC card will need to enter through the Visitors Center, located at 870 Jim Thorpe Road, where they will need to present photographic identification and fill out a form required to submit to a background check. The visitors center will be open Monday-Friday, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. After hours and weekend visitors will process through the far right guard booth as they come around Jim Thorpe Road.

The tests have been run, the kinks are being worked out and all signs point to a “go” for the Carlisle Barracks Visitors Center to officially open for visitor processing on July 1.

Lee McLure, visitor center manager, and Lorie Heinlein, security assistant, have been processing visitors for the last two weeks as part of a "soft opening" as they get prepared for the official opening at 7 a.m., Friday July 1.

As part of the Homeland Security Presidential Directive, all visitors to Carlisle Barracks will be required to present a valid government-issued identification card (ID or CAC card) or be accompanied by an ID card holder in order to enter the installation. This affects all occupants of a vehicle, not just the driver.

Those without a valid ID or CAC card will need to enter through the Visitors Center, located at 870 Jim Thorpe Road, where they will need to present photographic identification and fill out a form required to submit to a background check.  This new policy will affect all U.S. military installations across the United States. The visitors center will be open Monday-Friday, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. After hours and weekend visitors will process through the far right guard booth as you come around Jim Thorpe Road. Processing times may be delayed on weekends and after hours due to truck processing.  


"For the Soldier, Family member or civilians who already have a common access card or military ID, it isn't going to affect them," said Bob Suskie, Director of Emergency Services here. "They're still going to come through the gate showing that same card."

However, any CAC or military ID holder who does not have their identification with them will be treated as a visitor, and starting July 1, will need to enter the Visitors Center, located at 870 Jim Thorpe Road. This is also true for those who walk off the installation.

"Beginning July 1, if you show a driver's license at the gate and we ask you for a federal government-issued ID card and you don't produce it, you will be considered a visitor," said Suskie. "You'll be asked to go to the Visitors Center where you’ll undergo the background check and be issued a temporary pass to get on the installation."

Visitors to the installation who are accompanied by a CAC, or military ID holder will be allowed to enter without a background check.

A new website, located at http://carlislebarracks.carlisle.army.mil/visitorcenter/has been developed that provides information, FAQs and forms necessary to gain access to the installation that can be completed prior to arrival. A Carlisle Barracks Form 228 has been developed that will allow visitors to apply for access up to 30 days in advance.

Background checks will be conducted using the National Crime Information Center Interstate Identification Index, a Federal Bureau of Investigation database that will provide criminal histories from all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Each visitor pass will depend on the nature of the visit. For example, a family member visiting over the holidays may be able to obtain a pass that will be valid for a week or more. Those who have a legitimate reason to access the post on a regular basis -- e.g. a spouse or family member who picks a child up from daycare -- will be able to apply for pass that will last one year.

A visitor can be denied access based on 11 different factors and all visitors will need a valid reason for coming onto the installation or will need a government sponsor.

Suskie said background checks are expected to take about 10 minutes each, but that other factors including the numbers of visitors requiring access, and the complexity of a background checks may cause the process to take longer.   
While these are significant changes, Suskie said Carlisle Barracks will continue to try and accommodate as many visitors as possible.

"There are different events that will allow us to do different things, so if the public is invited to come out for something, we still want them to come out," he said. "These are areas where we may be able to do some mitigation to allow people to come out without a background check. Events like the post yard sale, weddings and other special events may allow for flexibility with the new policy. 

Disqualifying factors for access to Carlisle Barracks

Derogatory information that would bar installation access includes, but is not limited to, the following:

1. The National Crime Information Center Interstate Identification Index contains criminal arrest information about the individual that causes the installation commander to determine the individual presents a potential threat to good order, discipline, or health and safety of the installation.

2. The installation is unable to verify the individual's claimed identity based on the reasonable belief that the individual submitted fraudulent information concerning his or her identity in the attempt to gain access.

3. The individual has a current arrest warrant in NCIC, regardless of the offense or violation.

4. The individual is currently barred from entry to a federal installation or facility.

5. The individual has been convicted of crimes encompassing sexual assault, armed robbery, rape, child molestation, production or possession of child pornography, trafficking in humans, drug possession with intent to sell or drug distribution.

6. The individual has a U.S. conviction for espionage, sabotage or treason.

7. The individual is a registered sex offender.

8. The individual has a felony conviction within the past 10 years, regardless of the offense or violation.

9. The individual has been convicted of a felony firearms or explosives violation.

10. The individual has engaged in acts or activities designed to overthrow the U.S. government by force.

11. The individual is identified in the Terrorist Screening database as a known to be or suspected of being a terrorist or belonging to an organization with known links to terrorism or support of terrorist activity.


June is National Safety Month

“After nearly a decade of steady decline, on- and off-duty fatalities are on the rise across the Total Force. Soldiers and Army Civilians at every level must increase their awareness of safety issues and apply measures to minimize both on- and off-duty accidents ... Thank you for what you do every day in this complex environment to keep our Soldiers, Civilians, and Families safe.”

- Army senior leaders in a tri-signed message

Each June, the U.S. Army observes National Safety Month in conjunction with public and private organizations across the United States. National Safety Month, sponsored by the nonprofit National Safety Council, offers Army leaders a prime opportunity to energize on accident prevention efforts and engage Soldiers on safety.

What has the Army done?

The U.S. Army Combat Readiness Centerlaunches an Army-wide campaign each year in the month of June to mark National Safety Month. This year's campaign focuses on the significance of safety in four key areas: off-duty driving, civilian injury prevention, and groundand aviationoperations.

Numerous online risk management tools and multimedia products are developed and refined to strengthen the current and future Army safety programs for use by leaders, Soldiers and safety professionals in the field, including:

Media products are made available on the USACRC website.

What continued efforts have been planned for the future?

Army Combat Readiness Center will continue to target efforts on safety and risk management issues affecting the entire Army. It will continue to provide supporting products and tools for users in the field. While the yearly campaigns may differ in topic areas or focus, materials will always be developed according to the Army's latest accident trends and risk mitigation initiatives.

Why is this important to the Army?

The spring and summer months are among the most dangerous times of year for Soldiers off duty, especially regarding accidents involving private motor vehicles, motorcycles and personal watercraft. Every day is critical when it comes to risk. Leaders, Soldiers, Family members and Army Civilians must work together to prevent needless losses within their formations. By using National Safety Month as a starting point for dialogue, leaders establish or enhance safety programs that pay dividends throughout the year, regardless of season. Army Safe is Army Strong!


Army embraces diversity, inclusion as part of LGBT Pride Month

The Department of Defense celebrates Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) Pride Month this month. Throughout June, we recognize LGBT Military and Civilian members of our team for their dedicated service to both the DoD mission and to our nation.               

On May 31, 2016, President Barack Obama issued a Presidential Proclamation designating June 2016 as LGBT Pride Month. President Obama pointed to the contributions made by LGBT Americans in promoting equal rights for all regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity. The President ended the proclamation by calling upon the people of the United States to "eliminate prejudice everywhere it exists, and to celebrate the great diversity of the American people."               

Our Army Team is strengthened by the diversity and talent of our teammates.  We are as good as the sum total of our collective talents, and this month we take time to recognize and appreciate the contributions of our LGBT members. 

See the below link to view the full Presidential Proclamation to LGBT Pride Month, 2016.               

https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/05/31/presidential-proclamation-lgbt-pride-month-2016


Carlisle helps celebrate 241 years of service to nation, community

 

Carlisle Borough Councilor Dawn Flowers, Garrison Commander Lt. Col. Greg Ank, Carlisle Mayor Tim Scott and Installation Command Sgt. Maj. Nelson Maldonado cut the cake during a celebration of the U.S. Army’s 241stBirthday June 14 in the Borough Office.  

Carlisle community leaders community joined Carlisle Barracks in honoring the U.S. Army’s 241stBirthday June 14, celebrating a relationship that dates to back before the founding of our nation.

Before the traditional cake cutting ceremony, Carlisle Mayor Tim Scott and Borough Councilor Dawn Flower thanked Lt. Col. Greg Ank, Garrison Commander, and Command Sgt. Maj. Nelson Maldonado, installation CSM, on behalf of the entire community for their and the hundreds of thousands of Soldiers, Civilians and family members who serve their nation on a daily basis.

 “I come from a military family, so being able to celebrate the Army’s 241stBirthday with you is very special,” said Scott. “I want to thank you and everyone who has served and continues to serve for their selfless dedication to protecting our nation.”

Ank took a moment to recognize the special relationship between the Carlisle community and Carlisle Barracks, which dates back to the days when the post was a British Frontier fort in 1757.

“Our history is your history,” said Ank. “It’s because of communities like this that extraordinary Soldiers, Families and Civilians remain committed to selfless service to national defense. We are also welcomed into this community with open arms and we thank you for that.”

Ank pointed out that so many “Soldiers for Life” choose to remain in Carlisle after their military careers have ended.

“Soldiers are invaluable members of their civilian communities, bringing with them attributes that make them great leaders, professionals and team members in any organization,” he said. “So many of us choose to stay here to give back this community that has given so much to us.”


War College family gathers to celebrate 241st Army birthday

June 14, 2016 -- Beautiful stained glass windows served as silent reminders of history as the Army and Joint family of the Army War College gathered to celebrate the 241 years of the United States Army.

Col. Robert Balcavage, acting deputy commandant of the Army War College, welcomed fellow military and civilan staff and faculty as they assembled in Bliss Hall Foyer for the day’s celebration and the traditional Army cake-cutting ceremony.  

“It takes the entire Army team to put this all together,” said Balcavage, as he addressed the group in attendance. “I appreciate you all being here with me today. It’s always good to be on a winning team.”

Civilian of the Year Rob Clements, Pvt. 2nd Class Daysaundra Price,  Col. Robert Balcavage and Col. Matt Lissner prepare to cut the Army birthday cake during the Army's 241st birthday celebration in the foyer of Bliss Hall, June 14.

“Here at Carlisle Barracks we’re focused on the future, and developing strategic leaders and strategic ideas that shape Army forces to be always ready, always leading, he said.”

“Our commitment to prepare for the future calls for us to learn from the past, and there is probably no better place to learn from the past, no better place for America’s military history to be appreciated, than it is here,” he said.

“I encourage you to get out to AHEC,... or read something about our heritage.... where our Army’s been... We’re making great history today, and you’re part of that history.”

Playing a vital role in the cake-cutting ceremony was Carlisle Barracks’ Civilian of the Year Rob Clements, who works in Collins Hall and hails from Columbus, Ohio. Joining Clements were both the oldest and youngest Soldiers: Col. Mat Lissner is a research advisor in the Strategic Studies Institute and  Pvt. 2nd Class Daysaundra Price is a chaplains assistant

“Let’s not mess this up,” said the 19-year-old Price, from Ft. Worth, Texas. “I’ve had family members in the service, and it’s good to be a part of the birthday, and being able to cut the cake … not everyone gets to cut the cake.”

The day’s cake and punch were courtesy of the AWC Alumni Affairs and the local chapter of the Association of the United States Army.


Carlisle Barracks testing loudspeaker system June 15

Carlisle Barracks will conduct their monthly test of the outdoor mass notification system today at 1 p.m. Any messages or sounds heard are for testing purposes only.


Ways You Can Receive NWS Weather Warnings

NWS Web Page for Ways:  http://www.weather.gov/ctp/WaysToReceiveWarnings

Links to useful Weather Situational Awareness Sites:

National Weather Service Mobile APP

FEMA Mobile APP  (includes NWS Alerts and other Emergency Management tools)

NWS State College Station Radar

NWS Enhanced Data Display 

National Weather Service Page for 17013

Weather Underground Page for 17013

The Weather Channel Page for 17013

 


Summer Sense Campaign - Your degree doesn’t matter

After countless hours of studying and years of focusing on achieving your degree, you land an important job interview. This interview is for the dream job that you’ve thought about even before college. This job could launch your career and set you on a new life journey.

However, there is one thing that could make or break you that has nothing to do with your academics:

A background check.

Certain convictions can mean that a number of occupations will be beyond reach. Many professions that require further licensing or certification beyond a degree may be unattainable if one has been convicted of an alcohol-related offense in Pennsylvania.

A lot of students don’t realize how one moment of bad judgment can jeopardize all of their hard work and academic success.

Some alcohol-related convictions include:

• carrying or manufacturing a false ID

• misrepresentation of your age to purchase or attempt to purchase liquor, wine or malt or brewed beverages

• driving under the influence

• disorderly conduct, or

• purchasing and/or furnishing liquor or malt or brewed beverages to minors

Underage Drinking is a summary offense in Pennsylvania. While a summary offense will not prevent the attainment of a license, it will show up on a background check. A prospective employer may consider the offense as a reason not to hire a potential employee.

There are also volunteer jobs that do not need license/certification but may require background checks. Some programs include: camp counselor, student teacher, Little League coach, YMCA volunteer, community coaches (soccer, baseball, cheerleading), 4-H youth development educator, Sunday school teacher, nursing home volunteer.

If there’s one lesson you take to heart as you work toward your degree, make it this one: act with responsibility when it comes to alcohol or you may find, regardless of your good grades and hard work, your degree doesn’t matter.

For Parents - Choosing the Right College

Like many parents, students, and administrators, you may be doing some research on colleges and universities. You've probably looked into:

  • Academics
  • Course offerings
  • Athletic facilities
  • Housing conditions
  • School reputation

During your research, it's essential to remember a key issue, one that influences college students' quality of life every day: the culture of drinking at colleges in the United States.

An "Animal House" environment may seem exciting to students at first, but nothing affects health, safety, and academic performance more than a culture of excessive drinking. Many of the negative consequences associated with college alcohol abuse affect students who themselves are not drinking-and these are serious consequences: sexual assault, violence, vandalism, loss of sleep, and caring for friends and roommates in life-threatening states of alcohol poisoning.

There are a number of ways to investigate whether the schools you're considering are taking this problem seriously. Be sure that each school has created solid alcohol policies and is enforcing underage drinking laws. Collegedrinkingprevention.gov has made it easy for you to get this information for hundreds of colleges and universities in the United States.

  • Visit the College Alcohol Policies page to find an interactive map of college alcohol policies throughout the United States.

To see college drinking-related headlines, check out In the News page.

For additional information contact the Army Substance Abuse Office at 245 – 4576. This information was gathered from The Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board LCB-307 06/15 and The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.


Army Chief of Staff advises strategic leaders: Army War College Class of 2016 graduates

Find photos -- www.flickr.com/photos/usawc

Find video -- www.youtube.com/usarmywarcollege

June 10, 2016 -- For the 100thclass of the U.S. Army War College, graduation represents crossing the bridge to a challenging future while upholding the legacy of past graduates whose strategic leadership shaped U.S. military history. They join the ranks of well-known names like Eisenhower and Patton and those like Fox Conner, whose quietly influential work and mentorship had huge impact on the US strategic approach to World War II despite the fact that he never fought in that war.

“This day is superb … because of the significance of the achievements of these students who have excelled in a tough, but vitally important and relevant program here at the Army War College,” said Commandant Maj. Gen. Bill Rapp to the graduates. “In a world of ever-increasing complexity and velocity of change, putting in the intellectual effort to really think about the future character of war and how to build an Army for success in that world has never been more important.”

Gen. Mark Milley, Chief of Staff of the Army, speaks to the class of 2016 during thier graduating ceremony on the historic parade field, Carlisle Barracks, June 10.

Today, the Army War College graduated its 100thclass:  377 US military officers of all Services, active and reserve, senior civilians of U.S. national security agencies, including 79 officers from 73 countries around the globe. They departed the colorful, international graduation site at Carlisle Barracks with a diploma from the School of Strategic Landpower, a Master degree in Strategic Studies and a set of guidance from the Army’s Chief of Staff, Gen. Mark A. Milley.

Ready to lead, ready to win

“Ready to lead, ready to win,” said Milley, who gave the graduation remarks, and positioned the graduates’ milestone as the beginning of strategic-level responsibilities.  “You’re graduating from one of the nation’s premier educational experiences and, in my view, the nation’s premier war college. It’s just the beginning, it’s not an end. And your future, I guarantee it, is going to be extraordinarily challenging    can imagine today But I’m also confident that every one of you is ready, ready to engage, ready to lead, and ready to win.”

“It’s a critical component in your personal development, and a critical component in the development of our nation’s strategic leaders – but not only our nation. You have partner and allied officers with you, other governmental agencies … in your ranks,” said Milley, who noted that the grads represent a very selective group.” Only 9.3 percent are selected to go to a war college, he noted.

Lt. Col. Joseph Kuchan steps down from Wheellock Bandstand after receiving his graduation diploma on the historic parade field, Carlisle Barracks, June 10

Across the US military officers of the student body, 75 percent have served in combat in Iraq and 65 percent served in combat in Afghanistan. “That’s an enormous amount of tactical and operational combat experience, probably not seen since post-World War II, post-Korea, post-Vietnam.  

From tactical and operational competence, master the skills and art of strategy

“You’re crossing a bridge,” said Milley.

“Today, you’re marking a significant transition in your career ... You are no longer tacticians and operators. You are now, by definition, strategic leaders. And, the past year has provided you some academic understanding and rigor to prepare you for that new role.

“The demand of your strategic thinking and leadership is critical. It’s immediate. And every one of you is going to have to become a master … [to] master the skills and art of strategy and ensure that our U.S. military power or the military power of your respective country is properly wielded.

“Every one of you is going to move on to serve on generals’ staffs, either Joint or Service. Many of you, in a very short time, are going to be general officers. And I can tell you that, – you know it; you’ve studied it – wars are always won by the sergeants, the lieutenants and the captains and colonels, and the private Soldiers, but they’re often lost with bad strategy. Good strategy is necessary but not sufficient to win, but, bad strategy guarantees failure.”

Members of Seminar 1 are all thumbs up after receiving their diplomas during their graduation ceremony on the historic parade field, Carlisle Barracks, June 10.

“Good strategy -- rigorous, thorough strategic thinking -- is essential to winning a war,” he said, introducing his guidance for the graduates’ mandate to be, from this day forward, America’s strategic leaders or the strategic leaders of their respective country.

“Doing so requires that you build and maintain your personal credibility as a strategist. You’re going to have to seize and hold the intellectual high ground on a daily basis and you’re going to have maintain a very deep and thorough understanding of very complex issues.

“You’re going to have to master the skills of debate, argument, logical, critical thinking,” he said. “You’re going to have to have a broad and very deep understanding of military operations and military history. You’re going to have to earn your place at the table, and you’ll be at the table with some very aggressive people. You’re going to shape the future strategy by consistently and continually demonstrating not only your competence but also your integrity over time.”

We are at the cusp of fundamental change in the character of ground warfare

Five fundamental security challenges -- Russia, China, Iran, N. Korea and counterterrorism operations – will frame the remainder of these officers’ careers, he said. Simultaneously, their transition to strategic responsibilities comes at the leading edge of a fundamental change in the character of ground warfare, he said.

Fundamental changes, like the introduction of rifled muskets, airplanes, radio, will require that they address and frame the challenges through the strategic lens:  stay alert to  subtle changes in the strategic environment having an impact on your organization and your mission;  understand the enemy’s capability and depth, his intent, and his behavior both recently and historically; formulate and  communicate clear vision and purpose and intent that supports the national strategy; and  set the agendas, managing the time of yourself and others to reflect the strategic and operational priorities.

“As a strategic leader, your moral courage and your character is going to be critical. It’s going to be tested early, and it’s going to be tested often,” said the Chief.  “You are going to have to maintain your integrity no matter what the pressure and no matter what the cost to your personal career.”

“You’re going to have to have the guts to speak truth to power in a professional competent, respectful way that is based on fact and rigorous analysis, and nothing else.”

Through it all, you’re going to have to take care of people, exercising compassion, setting the example and mentoring them for their own future responsibilities as strategic leaders, he said.

“Grow in them a spirit of lifelong learning, intellectual skepticism, and critical thinking,” he said, offering World War II Maj. Gen. Fox Conner as role model of mentorship. “And I encourage you all to have a deep sense of humility and self-reflection.” “It is your duty to prepare them for what lies ahead as well, and encourage their diversity of thought, their critical analysis, their creativity, and their innovation.”

“I want each of your family members to know that you can have confidence in their leadership – their leadership of America’s armed forces and their leadership of allied and partner armed forces.  Every one of these leaders, you can be proud of. They’re successful in part because of you.”

“The military, no matter what country, is a family affair, and none could survive the rigors of service, none of us could travel overseas in a combat zones without the support of our families,” he said. “Our character, our integrity, our intellectual development is all the result of our mothers and our fathers, brothers and sisters, grandparents and even our sons and daughters.”

______________

The Army Chief honored the Army War College faculty team for their investment as educators and mentors; the many ambassadors and diplomats and attaches present on behalf of their countries’ graduates; leaders and retired leaders from the active and reserve components; professional colleagues from Carlisle and the broader community of support over centuries of partnership; the 108thsalute battery from the Pa. Army National Guard; and the Army band from Fort Dix.

General Mark A. Milley is the 39thChief of Staff of the Army. In his introduction, Maj. Gen. Rapp noted the Chief’s steady leadership through turbulent times with Soldiers at platoon leader up to the Joint Chiefs of Staff.  “Since becoming Chief of Staff of the Army in August 2015, he has energized the wide team to look at the future and what that means for our Army [so as to] defend America, preserve national freedom of action, and provide strategic options for the President worldwide.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Zika Virus: What you need to know and do

Eighty percent of patients with Zika virus never develop symptoms. Twenty percent develop fever, rash, muscle aches, and joint pain lasting about one week. More serious complications are very rare. Many fear that Zika infection might be associated with birth defects. More study is needed, but the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that pregnant women consider postponing trips to countries where Zika virus is being locally transmitted, such as Central America and northern and central South America.

Treatment for Zika virus includes controlling pain and fever, good fluid intake, and rest. Other medications including antibiotics are not effective and there is no vaccine. People can reduce their chance of becoming infected with good mosquito protection: (http://www.cdc.gov/zika/disease-qa.html):

•Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants.
•Stay in places with air conditioning or that use window and door screens to keep mosquitoes outside.

•Use Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) registered insect repellents. All EPA- registered insect repellents are evaluated for safety and effectiveness.
?Always follow the product label instructions
?Reapply insect repellent every few hours.
?Do not spray repellent on the skin under clothing.
?If you are also using sunscreen, apply sunscreen before applying insect repellent.

•If you have a baby or child:
?Do not use insect repellent on babies younger than 2 months of age.
?Dress your child in clothing that covers arms and legs, or
?Cover crib, stroller, and baby carrier with mosquito netting.
?Do not apply insect repellent onto a child's hands, eyes, mouth, and cut or irritated skin.
?Adults: Spray insect repellent onto your hands and then apply to a child's face.

•Treat clothing and gear with permethrin or purchase permethrin-treated items.
?Treated clothing remains protective after multiple washings. See product information to learn how long the protection will last.
?If treating items yourself, follow the product instructions carefully.
?Do NOT use permethrin products directly on skin. They are intended to treat clothing.

•Sleep under a mosquito bed net if you are overseas or outside and are not able to protect yourself from mosquito bites.

The recent outbreak of Zika virus is a genuine concern. However, by taking a few simple precautions, Soldiers and Families can protect themselves.


Opioid prevention - Summer Sense Campaign

 

Information provided by: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. SAMHSA Opioid Overdose Prevention Toolkit. HHS Publication No. (SMA) 16-4742. Rockville, MD: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2016.

 

Opioid overdose continues to be a major public health problem in the United States. It has contributed significantly to accidental deaths among those who use or misuse illicit and prescription opioids. In fact, U.S. overdose deaths involving prescription opioid analgesics increased to about 19,000 deaths in 20141 According to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) data, health care providers wrote 259 million prescriptions for painkillers in 2012, enough for every American adult to have a bottle of pills.1,2 more than three times the number in 2001.3-4

 

WHAT ARE OPIOIDS? Opioids include illegal drugs such as heroin, as well as prescription medications used to treat pain such as morphine, codeine, methadone, oxycodone (OxyContin®, Percodan®, Percocet®), hydrocodone (Vicodin®, Lortab®, Norco®), fentanyl (Duragesic®, Fentora®), hydromorphone (Dilaudid®, Exalgo®), and buprenorphine (Subutex®, Suboxone®).

Opioids work by binding to specific receptors in the brain, spinal cord, and gastrointestinal tract. In doing so, they minimize the body’s perception of pain. However, stimulating the opioid receptors or “reward centers” in the brain can also trigger other systems of the body, such as those responsible for regulating mood, breathing, and blood pressure.

 

HOW DOES OVERDOSE OCCUR? A variety of effects can occur after a person takes opioids, ranging from pleasure to nausea, vomiting, severe allergic reactions (anaphylaxis), and overdose, in which breathing and heartbeat slow or even stop.

Opioid overdose can occur when a patient deliberately misuses a prescription opioid or an illicit drug such as heroin. It can also occur when a patient takes an opioid as directed, but the prescriber miscalculated the opioid dose or an error was made by the dispensing pharmacist or the patient misunderstood the directions for use.

Also at risk are individuals who misuse opioids and combine them with sedative hypnotic agents resulting in sedation and respiratory depression.5,6 Opioid Overdose Prevention

PREVENTING OVERDOSE

If you are concerned about your own use of opioids, don’t wait! Talk with the health care professional(s) who prescribed the medications for you. If you are concerned about a family member or friend, urge him or her to talk to whoever prescribed the medication. Effective treatment of opioid use disorder can reduce the risk of overdose and help a person who is misusing or addicted to opioid medications attain a healthier life. An evidence-based practice for treating opioid addiction is the use of United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved medications, along with counseling and other supportive services. These services are available at SAMHSA-certified and DEA-registered opioid treatment programs (OTPs).28,29 In addition, physicians who are trained to provide treatment for opioid addiction in office-based and other settings with medications such as buprenorphine/naloxone and naltrexone may be available in your community.30

 

 

IF YOU SUSPECT AN OVERDOSE

 

An opioid overdose requires immediate medical attention. An essential first step is to get help from someone with medical expertise as soon as possible. Call 911 immediately if you or someone you know exhibits any of the symptoms listed below. All you have to say: “Someone is unresponsive and not breathing.” Give a clear address and/or description of your location.

Signs of OVERDOSE, which is a life-threatening emergency, include the following:

                The face is extremely pale and/or clammy to the touch.

                The body is limp.

                Fingernails or lips have a blue or purple cast.

                The person is vomiting or making gurgling noises.

                He or she cannot be awakened from sleep or is unable to speak.

                Breathing is very slow or stopped.

                The heartbeat is very slow or stopped.

 

Signs of OVERMEDICATION, which may progress to overdose, include:

                Unusual sleepiness or drowsiness.

                Mental confusion, slurred speech, or intoxicated behavior.

                Slow or shallow breathing.

                Extremely small “pinpoint” pupils.

                Slow heartbeat or low blood pressure.

                Difficulty in being awakened from sleep.

 

 WHO IS AT RISK? Anyone who uses opioids for long-term management of chronic cancer or non-cancer pain is at risk for opioid overdose, as are persons who use heroin.7 Others at risk include persons who are:

                Receiving rotating opioid medication regimens (and thus are at risk for incomplete cross-tolerance).

                Discharged from emergency medical care following opioid intoxication or poisoning.

                At high risk for overdose because of a legitimate medical need for analgesia, coupled with a suspected or confirmed substance use disorder, or non-medical use of prescription or illicit opioids.

                Completing mandatory opioid detoxification or abstinent for a period of time (and presumably with reduced opioid tolerance and high risk of relapse to opioid use).

                Recently released from incarceration and who have a history of opioid use disorder (and presumably have reduced opioid tolerance and high risk of relapse to opioid use).

 

 

Tolerance develops when someone uses an opioid drug regularly, so that their body becomes accustomed to the drug and needs a larger or more frequent dose to continue to experience the same effect.

 

Loss of tolerance occurs when someone stops taking an opioid after long-term use. When someone loses tolerance and then takes the opioid drug again, they can experience serious adverse effects, including overdose, even if they take an amount that caused them no problem in the past.and needs a larger or more frequent dose to continue to experience the

Overdose is common among persons who use illicit opioids such as heroin and among those who misuse medications prescribed for pain, such as oxycodone, hydrocodone, and morphine. The incidence of opioid overdose is rising nationwide. In 2014, 28,647 of drug overdose deaths involved some type of opioid, including heroin.1,2 more than three times the number in 2001.1 14 U.S. overdose deaths involving prescription opioid analgesics increased to about 19,000 deaths in 2014

To address the problem, emergency medical personnel, health care professionals, and patients increasingly are being trained in the use of the opioid antagonist naloxone hydrochloride (naloxone), which is the treatment of choice to reverse the potentially fatal respiratory depression caused by opioid overdose. (Note that naloxone has no effect on non-opioid overdoses, such as those involving cocaine, benzodiazepines, or alcohol.)15

The steps outlined below are recommended to reduce the number of deaths resulting from opioid overdoses2,6,10,16,17,18,19,20

 

SUMMARY: HOW TO AVOID OPIOID OVERDOSE

 

1.            Take medicine only if it has been prescribed to you by your doctor.

2.            Do not take more medicine or take it more often than instructed.

3.            Call a doctor if your pain gets worse.

4.            Never mix pain medicines with alcohol, sleeping pills, or any illicit substance.

5.            Store your medicine in a safe place where children or pets cannot reach it.

6.            Learn the signs of overdose and how to use naloxone to keep it from becoming fatal.

7.            Teach your family and friends how to respond to an overdose.

8.            Dispose of unused medication properly.

 

 

CALL FOR HELP (DIAL 911)

AN OPIOID OVERDOSE NEEDS IMMEDIATE MEDICAL

ATTENTION. An essential step is to get someone with medical expertise to see the patient as soon as possible, so if no emergency medical services (EMS) or other trained personnel are on the scene, dial 911 immediately. All you have to say is “Someone is not breathing.” Be sure to give a clear address and/or description of your location.

 

References are available upon request from the Army Substance Abuse Program. For additional information call 245 – 4576.


Thomas Zimmerman, Carlisle Barracks Public Affairs Officer
Post access changes coming for non-DoD ID card holders

Starting June 1, Carlisle Barracks will begin rolling in the new Visitors Access procedures that will become effective July 1 as part of our random security measures.

Beginning July 1, all visitors to Carlisle Barracks will be required to present a valid government-issued identification card (ID or CAC card) or be accompanied by an ID card holder in order to enter the installation.

Those without a valid ID or CAC card will need to enter through our Visitors Center, located at 870 Jim Thorpe Road, where they will go through a background check as required by Homeland Security Presidential Directive 12. This new policy will affect all U.S. military installations across the United States. For more information, visit the Vistors Center website at http://carlislebarracks.carlisle.army.mil/visitorcenter/

The visitors center will be open Monday-Friday, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. After hours and weekend visitors will process through the far right guard booth as you come around Jim Thorpe Road. Processing times may be delayed on weekends and after hours due to truck processing.  


"For the Soldier, Family member or civilians who already have a common access card or military ID, it isn't going to affect them," said Bob Suskie, Director of Emergency Services here. "They're still going to come through the gate showing that same card."

However, any CAC or military ID holder who does not have their identification with them will be treated as a visitor, and starting July 1, will need to enter the Visitors Center, located at 870 Jim Thorpe Road.

"Beginning July 1, if you show a driver's license at the gate and we ask you for a federal government-issued ID card and you don't produce it, you will be considered a visitor," said Suskie. "You'll be asked to go to the Visitors Center where you’ll undergo the background check and be issued a temporary pass to get on the installation."

Visitors to the installation who are accompanied by a CAC, or military ID holder will be allowed to enter without a background check.

A website is currently being developed that will provide information, FAQs and forms necessary to gain access to the installation that can be completed prior to arrival. A Carlisle Barracks Form 228 has been developed that will allow visitors to apply for access up to 30 days in advance.

Background checks will be conducted using the National Crime Information Center Interstate Identification Index, a Federal Bureau of Investigation database that will provide criminal histories from all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Interior construction is nearly complete at the Visitors Center at 870 Jim Thorpe Road.

Currently, Carlisle Barracks is in the process of clearing as many people as possible, with a focus on contractors.

Each visitor pass will depend on the nature of the visit. For example, a family member visiting over the holidays may be able to obtain a pass that will be valid for a week or more. Those who have a legitimate reason to access the post on a regular basis -- e.g. a spouse or family member who picks a child up from daycare -- will be able to apply for pass that will last one year.

A visitor can be denied access based on 11 different factors and all visitors will need a valid reason for coming onto the installation or will need a government sponsor.

Suskie said background checks are expected to take about 10 minutes each, but that other factors including the numbers of visitors requiring access, and the complexity of a background checks may cause the process to take longer.   


While these are significant changes, Suskie said Carlisle Barracks will continue to try and accommodate as many visitors as possible.

"There are different events that will allow us to do different things, so if the public is invited to come out for something, we still want them to come out," he said. "These are areas where we may be able to do some mitigation to allow people to come out without a background check. Events like the post yard sale, weddings and other special events may allow for flexibility with the new policy.

 

 

The entrance to the Visitors Center is located on the back of 870 Jim Thorpe Road. Signs will be placed and there will be ample parking available.

 

 

Keep an eye on www.carlisle.army.mil for more information and updates.
 

Disqualifying factors for access to Carlisle Barracks

Derogatory information that would bar installation access includes, but is not limited to, the following:

1. The National Crime Information Center Interstate Identification Index contains criminal arrest information about the individual that causes the installation commander to determine the individual presents a potential threat to good order, discipline, or health and safety of the installation.

2. The installation is unable to verify the individual's claimed identity based on the reasonable belief that the individual submitted fraudulent information concerning his or her identity in the attempt to gain access.

3. The individual has a current arrest warrant in NCIC, regardless of the offense or violation.

4. The individual is currently barred from entry to a federal installation or facility.

5. The individual has been convicted of crimes encompassing sexual assault, armed robbery, rape, child molestation, production or possession of child pornography, trafficking in humans, drug possession with intent to sell or drug distribution.

6. The individual has a U.S. conviction for espionage, sabotage or treason.

7. The individual is a registered sex offender.

8. The individual has a felony conviction within the past 10 years, regardless of the offense or violation.

9. The individual has been convicted of a felony firearms or explosives violation.

10. The individual has engaged in acts or activities designed to overthrow the U.S. government by force.

11. The individual is identified in the Terrorist Screening database as a known to be or suspected of being a terrorist or belonging to an organization with known links to terrorism or support of terrorist activity.


Army War College extends early honors to first 3 graduates, Class of 2016

See early-graduation video at https://www.youtube.com/user/USArmyWarCollege/videos

May 31, 2016 -- Deserving the moments of triumph and gratitude, three members of the USAWC resident class of 2016 were graduated early in Bliss Hall in support of imminent assignments.

Army Col. Robert Magee, Col. Mark Purdy, and Col. Lance Varney are “thoroughly tested and found worth of the moniker, U.S. Army War College graduate," according to USAWC Provost Dr. Lance Betros who officiated the brief but meaningful ceremony today in Bliss Hall.

USAWC Commandant Maj. Gen. Bill Rapp congratulates graduate Col. Robert Magee, with Provost Dr. Lance Betros and Dean Dr. Richard Lacquement.

“Ten months ago we challenged you to change your way of thinking,” said Betros. “

“The jobs that you get going forward will demand that you think on a higher plane – think at the strategic level. You must be ready for the ambiguous, wicked problems that tend to reside in those circles. I’m confident that you have the intellectual skills to deal with that kind of a world.

“You’re going to be asked very soon to jump right into that complex world … [where] you’ll be valued members on those teams,” said Betros.

(l to r) Maj. Gen. Bill Rapp, Col. Mark Purdy, Dr. Lance Betros and Dr. Richard Lacquement gather around Purdy's diploma for the Master's degree in Strategic Studies.

Confiding graduation tips, the provost recommended a commitment to life-long learning, despite the difficulty in carving out time. He continued: “Exercise intellectual humility. Recognize that none of us always has the right answers,” he said. “Challenge assumptions. Be skeptical of received wisdom. And, leverage the wisdom of others … And, finally: “Take care of yourself physically, mentally, emotionally, spiritually,” said Betros to the three new members of the Army War College graduate community.

Three graduates receive diplomas in much less time than do 377 – as will become clear on Friday, June 10 at 9 a.m. when the full resident Class of 2016 will walk the stage on the parade field of Carlisle Barracks.

New USAWC graduate Col. Mark Varney accepts congratulations from Commandant Maj. Gen. Bill Rapp, following handshakes from (l to r)  Dr. Lance Betros, USAWC provost, and Dr. Richard Lacquement, dean of the USAWC School of Strategic Landpower.

Less time in line equates to more time for hearty hugs and happy photos, thanks to family members and to colleagues whose lives will intertwine in years to come, from seminar 23  for Magee, seminar 19 for Purdy (below), and seminar 11 for Varney.