Banner Archive for June 2013
 

 Post-Traumatic Stress: Get smart, get help, turn it around

Awareness is job one when it comes to Post-Traumatic Stress. That’s why the Dunham Army Health Clinic is sponsoring a screening day event, Thursday, June 27 from 7:30 to 11:30 a.m. in the Dunham Clinic Atrium.

Dunham Army Health Clinic is collaborating with Veterans Affairs to offer education and screening – designed to help active and veteran members of our military community find information and find opportunities for assessment and treatment.

Be aware … be informed … take the post-traumatic stress self-assessment to learn about this common yet treatable condition, at http://www.mentalhealthscreening.org.  It’s a free and anonymous way to size up symptoms and get private advice about whether a further clinic assessment is wise.

Did you know …?  

  • 70 percent of U.S. adults have experienced some type of traumatic event at least once in their lives, such as natural disaster, fire, car accident, acts of violence, war, or terrorism
  • Up to 20 percent of them will develop post-traumatic stress
  • Traumatic events can affect an entire community, such as the Boston Marathon bombings.
  • It’s not just about the military:  PTS is seen in members of the public, especially among first responders, victims of violence and abuse, or those affected by natural disasters
  • Media coverage of traumatic events can affect individuals.

Did you know …?

  • Most individuals will have stress-related reactions following a traumatic event, but not everyone will develop PTSD
  • Symptoms of PTSD generally last 4 weeks or more and can make it hard for an individual to function in daily life
  • Symptoms include:  reliving the event through nightmares and flashbacks; avoiding situations that remind you of the event such as large crowds or driving a car; developing negative changes in beliefs or feelings; and feeling hyper-alert or easily startled.

Do you know … how to learn more?

Do you know anyone who would benefit from, "A Different Kind of Courage" ...?


The United States flag is being flown at half-staff in honor of and tribute to the memory of Admiral Frank B. Kelso, former Chief of Naval Operations, it will remain at half-staff until June 30.


Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation awards academic scholarships to Carlisle Barracks Military Housing Residents

 

Balfour Beatty Communities congratulates Carlisle Barracks residents Ryan Borowski, Kathleen Butler, Kara Horst, Robert McDonough, and Connor McHugh on their academic scholarship award for the 2013-2014 school year through the Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation.

“On behalf of the Foundation, I would like to congratulate this year’s very accomplished scholarship winners. We are proud to support all scholarship recipients on their academic pursuit,” said Chris Williams, President of Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation. “Our hope is that this contribution to their academic pursuits will support their continued development as leaders and positive influencers in their communities. All recipients are on the path to do great things.”

Ryan Borowski will be studying engineering at Drexel University. Kathleen Butler will be attending Furhman University in pursuit of a degree in health sciences. Kara Horst will be attending the College of Charleston. Robert McDonough will be pursuing a degree in music education at The State University of New York at Fredonia. Connor McHugh will be attending Baylor University for a degree in biology.

Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation (BBCF) has awarded 32 academic scholarships in total to the children of active-duty military members for the upcoming 2013-2014 school year. As part of the Foundation’s goal to promote the pursuit of education and a commitment to community leadership, BBCF awards academic scholarships to well-qualified military housing residents that are high school seniors and/or undergraduate students attending accredited educational/technical institutions. Qualifying recipients must be family of active-duty military members currently residing in military housing managed by Balfour Beatty Communities.

Balfour Beatty Communities Foundation is a non-profit organization committed to honoring active, disabled, and fallen military personnel and their families. The Foundation accomplishes this mission by creating veterans memorials honoring the unselfish contributions and sacrifices of our military personnel; assisting returning service members requiring specially-adapted homes; and providing financial support to the children of military families in the form of scholarships to support the pursuit of education. For more information, visit bbcommunitiesfoundation.org.


Balfour Beatty Communities Promotes Safety Awareness

Have you come across the Balfour Beatty Communities Zero Harm logo or had the opportunity to meet BAL-4 or B-T, the defenders of our communities? Many of our residents recognize the Zero Harm yellow banner and our robot friends—but what do they stand for? Safety is a company focus at Balfour Beatty—safety of our residents, contractors, and employees.

 

Zero Harm

More than just a slogan, Balfour Beatty puts safety at the forefront of every move we make. If you notice any unsafe practices or are concerned about the safety in your home or community, please contact the Balfour Beatty Communities office at 717-243-7177.

BAL-4 & B-T

While parents and neighbors within our communities protect and serve our country, BAL-4 and his sidekick B-T educate and empower children within our communities to protect themselves and their family and to live safe and strong lives. For safety and environmental games and activities and to learn more about BAL-4 & B-T visit the Kids Corner section of your property website!

In celebration of National Safety Month, Balfour Beatty called on our all-star employees to share safety tips with our residents. See below for safety snippets— for the full-length articles, visit our Better Living Blog at http://betterliving.balfourbeattycommunities.com.

Taken from“Distracted Behind the Wheel” by Jessica Ennis, LifeWorks Coordinator, NS Mayport Homes,“Text messaging behind the wheel has become the most concerning type of distracted driving because it involves visual, manual and cognitive attention from the driver. According to the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute, text messaging creates a crash risk 23 times worse than driving without distractions. Also, sending or receiving texts while driving takes the driver's eyes off the road for approximately 4.6 seconds. This action is equivalent to driving the length of a football field, blind-folded at 55 mph.

Luckily, distracted driving is something that is easily prevented just by being aware of your behavior. The Governor's Highway Safety Association suggests turning off your phone or silencing it before getting into your vehicle. Another tip is to set up a special message that you can send callers to let them know that you are driving. If there is an emergency, pull over to a safe area to respond. Finally, make sure you are familiar with local laws as many states prohibit the use of hand held devices while driving.”


U.S. Department of Defense

Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs) News Release 

June 26, 2013

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Statement by Secretary Hagel on DOMA Ruling

 

      The Department of Defense welcomes the Supreme Court's decision today on the Defense of Marriage Act.  The department will immediately begin the process of implementing the Supreme Court's decision in consultation with the Department of Justice and other executive branch agencies.  The Department of Defense intends to make the same benefits available to all military spouses -- regardless of sexual orientation -- as soon as possible.  That is now the law and it is the right thing to do.

 

      Every person who serves our nation in uniform stepped forward with courage and commitment.  All that matters is their patriotism, their willingness to serve their country, and their qualifications to do so.  Today's ruling helps ensure that all men and women who serve this country can be treated fairly and equally, with the full dignity and respect they so richly deserve.


Army announces Force Structure, stationing decisions

Today the Department of the Army announced force structure and stationing decisions associated with the active component end-strength reduction of 80,000 soldiers, resulting in an Army end-strength of 490,000 by 2017. These reductions are consistent with fiscal constraints resulting from the Budget Control Act of 2011 and defense planning guidance issued in 2012, but do not reflect  additional reductions that will be required if sequestration-driven funding reductions remain unmitigated.

Based on extensive analysis, the lessons of a dozen years of combat and the need to increase operational capability and flexibility, the Army will make the following changes to its force structure:

-Reorganize infantry and armor brigade combat teams (BCTs) to restore the third maneuver battalion and increase engineer and fires capability.

-Reduce active component BCTs from 45 modular to 33 reorganized BCTs.

-Continue growth in aviation, special operations, missile defense and cyber capabilities.

This active component force structure, in conjunction with Army National Guard and Army Reserve capabilities, supports the current defense strategy and meets combatant command requirements through regional alignment of forces and global responsiveness for contingencies.  The decision to restructure armor and infantry BCTs helps mitigate the loss of BCTs by eliminating the headquarters but preserving 13 Armor and Infantry battalions that would be lost without the reorganization.

Stationing decisions necessitated by the reductions and reorganization were based on a comprehensive analysis of installation quantitative and qualitative considerations to include training, power projection, well-being, expansibility, regeneration, geographic distribution, environmental and socio-economic impacts, cost, and alignment with the defense strategy. Opportunities for community input were included through both the programmatic environment assessment public comment period and community listening sessions conducted in parallel with the military value analysis and qualitative stationing analysis, prior to the final decision.

Based on this comprehensive analysis, a BCT will inactivate at each of the following locations by 2017:  Fort Bliss, Texas; Fort Bragg, N.C.; Fort Campbell, Ky; Fort Carson, Colo.; Fort Drum, N.Y.; Fort Hood, Texas; Fort Knox, Ky.; Fort Riley, Kan.; Fort Stewart, Ga., and Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash.  Two BCTs, stationed at Baumholder and Grafenwoehr, Germany, will complete their inactivation in Fiscal Year 2013, leaving two BCTs in Europe to fulfill strategic commitments. 

The reduction of 80,000 soldiers from the force represents a 14 percent reduction across the AC force. The specific impacts of these decisions on individual installations are being provided to affected Congressional delegations. The Army will conduct Congressional notification in accordance with Section 993, Title 10 U.S.C. prior to taking any irrevocable actions to implement these decisions.


The Gettysburg Connection

Local events to be held commemorating the 150th Anniversary

 

Wednesday, June 19: Exhibit Grand Opening and USAWC Perspectives Lecture on Gettysburg

6 p.m., Army Heritage and Education Center – Exhibit Grand Opening, “A Great Civil War: 1863, Battles that defined a Nation,” is the newest addition to “The Soldier Experience” gallery. This event will include remarks about the exhibit, a ribbon cutting ceremony, and light refreshments.

7 p.m., Army Heritage and Education Center - Dr. Carol Reardon, the George Winfree Professor of American History at Penn State University, will present a lecture entitled, “Telling the Army Story: Voices of Gettysburg’s Slain.” This event will follow the Exhibit opening. Both events are free and open to the public. Call 717-245-3972 for information.

Thursday, June 20: The Irish Brigade and Their Friends from Carlisle

7 p.m., Cumberland County Historical Society, 21 N. Pitt Street – Carlisle Attorney Hubert X. Gilroy will portray fictional Irish Brigade member Private Patrick Farrell. Private Farrell will recount his many escapades with the Irish Brigade throughout the Civil War, and using a bit of “Blarney,” he incorporates factually correct information concerning Carlisle’s involvement in the Civil War. Additional Civil War re-enactors along with numerous Civil War paintings will also be featured during the presentation. Call 717-249-7610 for information.

Saturday, June 22: March to Destiny

9 a.m. – 7 p.m., Shippensburg Fairgrounds, 10131 Possum Hollow Road – This annual Civil War living history event will tell the tale of the Confederate occupation of Shippensburg, PA, before the historic Battle of Gettysburg. Learn about Confederate Camp life stories and demonstrations on artillery firing, mounted cavalry units, cooking and setting up camp. Demonstrations will be led by period-dressed re-enactors. Call 888-513-5130 for information.

Saturday, June 22: Cumberland Valley Race Series: Run to Destiny

1:45 p.m., Shippensburg Public Library, 73 W. King Street – Part of the Cumberland Valley Race Series, the Run to Destiny 5K Race and Walk proceeds will benefit the Shippensburg Public Library Capital Campaign. Civil War-themed prizes will be awarded. Call 717-300-1337 for information.

Sunday, June 23: Flames beyond Gettysburg

2 p.m., Mechanicsburg Museum Association, 2 W. Strawberry Alley – Historian Scott Mingus will talk about the Confederates’ approach led by Lt. Gen. Jubal Early in June 1863 to the Susquehanna River and accepting the surrender of York. State militia defending the river crossing burned the world’s longest covered bridge to prevent Rebel passage. Mr. Mingus is author of Flames beyond Gettysburg: The Confederate Expedition to the Susquehanna River. Call 717-697-6088 for information.

June 28-30: Mechanicsburg Civil War Commemoration

This commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the Confederate Invasion of Mechanicsburg will include an opening ceremony, tours of the Confederate route, living history reenactments and special exhibits from June 28-30.

Friday, June 28

9 a.m.-4 p.m. -- Civil War Trails guided coach tours through the Mechanicsburg area. Tickets required. Available at the Mechanicsburg Museum, 717-697-6088. $8 per ticket.

6:30-9:30 p.m. -- Evening gala at the Orris House Bed and Breakfast, 318 West Main Street. Limited number of tickets available; reservations required. $50 per ticket, call 717-441-3839.

5:30-7:30 p.m. -- Civil War music by Dearest Home at Trinity Lutheran Church, 132 E. Main Street - food and games.

7-9 p.m. -- Confederate Cavalry and Confederate Foot Artillery Infantry Encampment at Memorial Park.

Saturday, June 29

8-9:30 a.m. -- Encampment at Memorial Park.

9:45-10:30 a.m. and 11-11:45 a.m. -- Reenactment events featuring Union and Confederate soldiers; Main Street surrender of town/secure the flag; accompanied by the Mechanicsburg Singer Band.

9 a.m.-noon – Gen. Jenkins Requisition for Rations at PNC Bank, 2 East Main Street. All donations of canned and dry good to be donated to local food banks.

12-2 p.m. -- Dinner with Gen. Jenkins at Washington Firehouse, 53 East Main Street. BBQ Chicken dinner tickets available at firehouse, $8 per ticket. Call 717-697-9877.

1-2 p.m. and 2-3 p.m. -- Civil War magic with magician Marlin Troutman at Historic Union Church, 47 East Main Street.

Be sure to stop by the Mechanicsburg Museum throughout the day for presentations by living historians and re-enactors. 8:30-9:15 a.m. -- Life of a Confederate Soldier; 1-2 p.m. -- Women on the Homefront; 2:45 to 3:45 p.m.-- Civil War Military Weapons and Arms; 2-3 p.m. -- Civil War Medicine.

Sunday, June 30

9-10:30 a.m. -- Reflections Service at Historic Union Church, 47 East Main Street.

1-3 p.m. -- Angel of the Battlefield: A Tea to Honor Clara Barton, at Rosemary House, 120 South Market Street. Tickets required. Call 717-697-5111.

2-3 p.m. -- tours of Historic Peace Churchin Camp Hill.

3-4 p.m. -- Confederate Invasion of Cumberland County presented by Sheldon Munn

3 p.m. -- Civil War Trails Dedication Ceremony, 8th and Indiana Avenue, Lemoyne. Call 717-766-1899 for information.

Saturday, June 29: Eternal Light Peace Memorial Commemoration

2 p.m., Gettysburg – To commemorate the 1938 dedication of the Eternal Light Peace Memorial and the 150thAnniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, join the National Organization Sons of the Union Veterans of the Civil War to honor this history.

Keynote speaker is Maj. Gen. Tony Cucolo, Commandant, U.S. Army War College. The Old Guard U.S. 3rdInfantry will also participate in the program.

The Sons of the Union Veterans and the Sons of the Confederate Veterans will lay wreaths commemorating the reunion and dedication of the Eternal Light Peace Memorial in 1938.

Off-site parking and shuttles will be hosted at the Harrisburg Area Community College, 731 Old Harrisburg Road, Gettysburg. The Eternal Light Peace Memorial will be closed to traffic. Shuttles from the HACC campus will begin at noon and continue until the completion of the ceremony.

Sunday, June 30: When the Civil War came to Carlisle: A Worship Service of Remembrance

8 and 10:30 a.m., Second Presbyterian Church, 528 Garland Drive – There will be two special worship services at 8 and 10:30 a.m. at Second Presbyterian Church. All are welcome! Childcare will be provided at the 10:30 a.m. service. Contact the church at growwithsecond.org or call 717-243-4571.

Sunday, June 30: Civil War-Era Church Service at First Lutheran Church, Carlisle

10:15 a.m., First Evangelical Lutheran Church, 21 S. Bedford Street – History will come alive at First Lutheran Church on Sunday, June 30, during the 10:15 a.m. worship service as part of the commemoration of the 150thanniversary of the Civil War. The public is cordially invited to participate in the service, complete with Civil War re-enactors in attendance. Carlisle was invaded and occupied by the Second Corps of the Confederate Army under Lt. Gen. Richard S. Ewell for three days, June 27-30, 1863. From Carlisle, Ewell’s unit marched south to the small town of Gettysburg where a great battle was fought, becoming a turning point in the war.

Despite the presence of the enemy in our town, First Lutheran’s pastor, the Rev. Dr. Jacob Fry, made the decision to hold a worship service. Only the Second Presbyterian Church and possibly two other churches in town held services that day. Our church edifice at that time was located behind the Old jail in the building now occupied by Bedford Street Antiques. The congregation that morning consisted of approximately sixty people, at least half of them being Confederate officers.

The service at First Lutheran will be the church’s contribution to the Civil War remembrances in Carlisle during Summerfair. Although we do not have a copy of the actual service held that day, our pastor, the Rev. Charles A. Brophy, has carefully researched the service format and liturgy that was probably being used at First Lutheran during the 1860’s to make the service as historically accurate as possible. A sermon that Pastor Fry preached in December 1860, in response to South Carolina’s secession from the Union, will be delivered by Pastor Brophy dressed in a ministerial robe of the day. Congregational singing of hymns reflecting the time period will be accompanied on the church’s recently-renovated antique pump organ. Following the service, the Worship and Music Committee will host a time of fellowship on the lawn serving lemonade along with cakes and cookies that were popular in 1863. For information, call 717-249-3310, or visit www.firstlutherancarlisle.org

Monday, July 1: Grand Commemoration - The 150thAnniversary of the Shelling of Carlisle

The Burning of Carlisle Barracks, July 1, 1863

The U.S. Army War College (co-partnering with Historic Carlisle, Inc.) will offer the following events:

Noon at the Army Heritage and Education Center – Visitors can tour the center and the new exhibit, A Great Civil War: 1863, Battles that Define a Nation, whichprovides a look at the key battles fought during that pivotal year through displays featuring individual Soldier’s stories, artifacts, photographs and more.

1 p.m. outside the AHEC building – Navy retired Capt. Steve Knott will discuss Maj. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart’s famous ride and why his troopers end up at Carlisle. (For those planning to attend the “Shelling of Carlisle” at 7 p.m. at the Square, Capt. Knott’s presentation will prepare you for that event.)

1:30 p.m. – Visitors will board an Army bus to go to historic Carlisle Barracks Wheelock Bandstand, to hear Dr. Dick Sommers describe Lt. Gen. Richard Ewell’s occupation of Carlisle Barracks and why Maj. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart decided to burn the barracks just a day later. Dr. Sommers will also point out buildings of interest and describe what Carlisle Barracks looked like prior to the burning.

The 150th Anniversary of the Shelling of Carlisle

7-9 p.m., Old Courthouse, Carlisle – In commemoration of what is probably the single most significant and emotional event in the long, proud history of Carlisle, Historic Carlisle will present, “The Shelling of Carlisle – July 1, 1863,” on the 150th anniversary of the Shelling. On the evening of July 1, 1863, Confederate Cavalry forces, commanded by Maj. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart demanded the surrender of Carlisle and the Union forces, commanded by Union Gen. William “Baldy” Smith. The confederate general threatened to subject the town to artillery fire if the town was not surrendered. “Baldy” Smith answered the challenge, “Shell away and be damned”!

In the course of about seven hours, some 130-140 artillery shells were fired on Carlisle by the Confederate forces from the east side of the town. Other southern troopers set fire to buildings at Carlisle Barracks and the Carlisle Gas Works. But the town and its defending Union soldiers held fast through the long night and by daybreak, the Confederate Cavalry had been recalled to join the Battle of Gettysburg, already in progress.

The Grand Commemoration will take place at 7 p.m., the exact time when the shelling began in 1863. All four streets from the Square will be closed at 6:30 p.m. The Carlisle Town Band will perform before the ceremonies and program at 7 p.m. Military and civilian re-enactors will be on hand to act out the story as it is read on a large PA system. Including will be both Confederate and Union artillery, infantry, Gen. Smith and Gen. Stuart, civilian “Home Guard,” and others. Following the 30-minute program, Historic Carlisle will conduct downtown tours of “Lee Calling Cards.” Interpreters in 19th century attire will lead groups to sites in the immediate area which were scarred by the artillery shells. The tours will last about 70 minutes.

All events are free to the public. Call 717-776-6658 for information.

Friday, July 5: Civil War Walking Tour of Carlisle

1 p.m., Cumberland County Historical Society, 21 N. Pitt Street – Join us for a tour led by volunteer Civil War walking guides. Meet at Cumberland County Historical Society. Reservations required at shop.historicalsociety.com or call 717-249-7610.

Tuesday, July 16: USAWC Perspectives Lecture on Gettysburg

7:15 p.m., Army Heritage and Education Center – Army retired Col. Tom Vossler will present a lecture, “Gettysburg: Whose Hallowed Ground – The Farms that became a Battlefield.” Call 717-245-3972 for information.

Commemoration Exhibits

1863 Invasion in the Valley - Now through Oct. 26, 2013 at the Cumberland County Historical Society, open during normal business hours. Call 717-249-7610 for information.

Civil War Sesquicentennial-1863- Now through Mar. 31, 2014 at the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center, open during normal business hours. Call 717-245-3641 for information.

Shippensburg goes to War- Now through Aug. 31, 2013 at the Shippensburg Historical Society, open Wednesday, Friday and Saturday from 1-4 p.m. Call 717-532-6727 for information.

First Hand: Civil War Era Drawings from the Becker Collection- Now through Oct. 19, 2013 at The Trout Gallery, Dickinson College, open Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Call 717-245-1344 for information.

Mechanicsburg: A Hometown View of the Civil War– Now through Oct. 19, 2013 at the Freight Station Museum at Mechanicsburg Museum Association.

For suggested trip ideas and more, visit the Cumberland Valley Visitors Bureau at: www.cumberlandvalleypa.com

 


That these dead shall not have died in vain

-President Abraham Lincoln, Gettysburg Address, Nov. 1863

 Battle of Gettysburg:

In late June, 1863, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee led the 75,000 man Army of Northern Virginia into Pennsylvania. The 95,000 man Federal Army of the Potomac, commanded by Maj. Gen. George Gordon Meade, moved north to confront Lee’s forces. On July 1, leading elements of the two armies met at Gettysburg, Pa., as much by accident as design.

Although Lee had intended to fight a defensive battle, the chance meeting of the armies caused him to alter his plans and the success gained on the first day convinced him to continue the attack on July 2. Likewise, Meade determined to commit his entire army and ordered a concentration of forces in defensive positions on the ground south of Gettysburg.

The armies clashed again on July 2 at various places like Devil’s Den, the Wheat Field, Little Round Top and Culp’s Hill. On July 3, both armies remained on the field where Lee ordered three Confederate divisions, about 15,000 men, to attack the center of the Union line. The Confederate attack failed.

Graphical depiction of the Battle of Gettysburg from the Army Heritage and Education Center's collection of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States (MOLLUS), Massachusetts Commandary.

Confederate casualties: 28,063 – (3,903 Killed in Action)

Union casualties: 23,049 – (3,155 Killed in Action)

Why it still matters:

The Battle of Gettysburg offers timeless lessons to Soldiers, military leaders, corporate CEOs and others agreed Professor Len Fullenkamp, Army War College lead historian, and Steve Knott, USAWC/retired Navy Captain.

Timeless lessons about leadership:

“As you move around the battlefield you find examples of where leaders stood up, gave directions and their men followed everywhere”. On visits with today’s military leaders, they use Gettysburg experiences to think about the challenges of decision making, the burdens of responsibility, the notion there will always be second-guessers. Video: http://youtu.be/4KtdUOLdU58.

-- Professor Len Fullenkamp, Army War College historian

The principles and leadership from the battlefield are relevant today to the military and Fortune 500 companies. Gen. Meade will win the battle of Gettysburg because he’s empowered his trusted subordinates, gave them clear direction and then stayed out of their way. Video: http://youtu.be/3DM2q6oZgfY.

-- Ret. Navy Capt. Steve Knott, Army War College

Day after the battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, Slaughter Pen, foot of Round top, from the Army Heritage and Education Center's collection of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States (MOLLUS), Massachusetts Commandary.

Soldier courage, discipline and sacrifice:

“Soldiers in 1863 are no different than Soldiers today with respect to courage, discipline and sacrifice.” Stories of heroism are enduring -- like the story of the 1stMinnesota Regiment’s 262 Soldiers who filled a gap in the Union line and attacked 2,000 Confederate Soldiers. Video: http://youtu.be/lOTOLBVHE_0.

-- Steve Knott

Command responsibilities:

“More often than not, a key individual, at a key place, at a key moment, makes a difference.” That’s why it’s important for a commander to inculcate into every one of those individuals a commitment to the endeavor. Video: http://youtu.be/5JI0PB-SXWg.

-- Len Fullenkamp

“You have to communicate your intent or your vision to your people, especially your trusted subordinates. Gen. Lee’s failed to do this with Gen. James Longstreet during the battle. You cannot take it for granted as a senior leader that your trusted subordinates get what you want to do through osmosis.” Video: http://youtu.be/hz5-ByjtAsQ.

-- Steve Knott 

Graphical depiction of the Battle of Gettysburg from the Army Heritage and Education Center's collection of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States (MOLLUS), Massachusetts Commandary.

Compare/Contrast Gettysburg and today’s battles:

“Combat is combat. It’s timeless. It’s one of those things that bring the past and the present together. Good leadership, decisions, training, and courage and camaraderie was important in 1863. It’s absolutely important today.” Video: http://youtu.be/g67Rqflp4Hg.

-- Len Fullenkamp

 

 


Road construction to restrict traffic on Sumner Road

Starting June 25 and scheduled to last until the 28th, Sumner Rd from the intersection of Craig Rd to Forbes Ave will be restricted to one lane. Traffic will be controlled around the construction utilizing flagmen. Please exercise caution through this area.


View the only population of rare regal fritillary butterflies in Pennsylvania
 
 
 
 
 
Regal Fritillary butterfly
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Visitors are invited to see the only population of rare regal fritillary butterflies in Pennsylvania on four days in July at Fort Indiantown Gap.
 
Free guided tours will begin at 10 a.m. July 5, 6, 11 and 12, according to a news release. Those wishing to attend are asked to arrive at least 30 minutes early to fill out the necessary paperwork, attend a mandatory safety and orientation briefing, and receive driving instructions. Tours will last about three hours, but attendees can leave earlier if needed.
 
The tours, which have been offered for more than 10 years, allow the public to see the rare butterfly and its associated habitat on military training ranges, as well as many other natural spectacles on the 17,000-acre military post, which serves as the Pennsylvania National Guard's headquarters.
 
"Although the primary purpose of the installation is the training of soldiers for their combat mission, we also place a very high priority being environmentally friendly and conserving precious land and ecosystems for the future," retired Brig. Gen. Jerry Beck, deputy commander of the Fort Indiantown Gap National Guard Training Site, said in the release. "Our guided butterfly tours promise to be an exciting and educational afternoon because our biologists are knowledgeable not only about butterflies, but birds, plants and other insects."
 
Participants are asked to meet at the Fort Indiantown Gap Recreation Center, Building 13-190, at the intersection of Asher Miner Road, Clement Avenue and Route 443. Visitors are encouraged to bring cameras and binoculars and should wear appropriate clothing and footwear for a nature walk on well-maintained or mowed trails. No reservations are required, and no rain dates will be scheduled.
 
Fort Indiantown Gap is home to 112 Pennsylvania Wildlife Action Plan priority species, including the regal fritillary, the release states. The Gap is the only live-fire, maneuver military training facility in Pennsylvania.
 
For information, call the Wildlife Office at 717-861-2449, email RA-DMVA-Wildlife@pa.gov, or visit dmva.state.pa.us and click on the Featured Topics tab.
 

Summer Sense Campaign--Impaired Driving Prevention Campaign, June 24-July 6, 2013

 

Americans love to celebrate the Fourth of July with family, friends, food and fireworks, but all too often the festivities turn tragic on the nation's roads. The fact is, this iconic American holiday is also one of the deadliest holidays of the year due to drunk-driving crashes.

According to data from NHTSA, during July 4th holidays over the last five years (from 2007 to 2011), 780 people lost their lives in crashes involving drivers who had BACs of at least .08 g/dL. These fatalities account for 40 percent of all motor vehicle traffic fatalities over this same five-year.

Summer holiday celebrations often include barbeques, picnics, water sports, vacationing with family and friends, and fireworks. However, many holiday weekends can be filled with tragedy instead of celebration.

The Fourth of July is one of the deadliest holidays of the year when it comes to alcohol-impaired driving crashes on our highways. According to data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration during July 4th, holidays over the last five years (from 2007 to 2011), 780 people lost their lives in crashes involving drivers who had BACs of at least .08 g/dL. 

This summer, don't let your celebrations end in an arrest or tragedy. The consequences are serious and real.  Not only do you risk injuring yourself or someone else, but the trauma and financial costs of a crash or an arrest for driving while impaired can be significant and not the way you want to celebrate the July 4th holiday.

       July 4th

Don’t Start the Celebration Without Planning Ahead.

Remember Buzzed Driving is Drunk Driving.       

  • The Fourth of July is a celebration that brings friends and family together to enjoy all the delights of summer, including cookouts, fireworks, and time by the pool. So most Americans don’t realize it’s one of the deadliest holidays of the year due to alcohol-impaired driving crashes.
  • That’s why this Fourth of July; the Army Substance Abuse office is reminding everyone that Buzzed Driving is Drunk Driving
  • Impaired driving crashes killed 10,228 people in 2010, accounting for 31 percent of all traffic-related deaths in the United States.  That’s an average of one alcohol impaired driving fatality nearly every 51 minutes. 
  • The Fourth of July holiday period (6 p.m. July 2- 5:59 a.m. July 6)is particularly deadly. During the 2010 holiday, 392 people were killed in motor vehicle traffic crashes. 
  • Of those fatalities, 39 percent were in crashes that involved at least one driver or motorcycle operator with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .08 or higher. 
  • Across the country, impaired driving fatalities spike during nighttime. In fact during the July 4th holiday in 2010 (6 p.m. July 2 - 5:59 a.m. July 6), more than 80 percent of alcohol-impaired driving fatalities took place at nighttime between the hours of 6 p.m. and 5:59 a.m. The proportion of alcohol impairment among drivers involved in fatal crashes in 2010 was almost five times higher at night (6 p.m. to 5:59 a.m.) than during the day (6 a.m. to 5:59 p.m.) for the Fourth of July holiday period (6 p.m. July 2 - 5:59 a.m. July 6)
  • Young (18 to 34 year old) people still don’t get the message that drinking and driving kills. During the 2010 Fourth of July holiday period(6 p.m. July 2 - 5:59 a.m. July 6), 50 percent of young drivers killed in motor vehicle traffic crashes were alcohol impaired (BAC of .08 or higher.) 

Did You Know?

  • Drunk driving is often a symptom of a larger problem: alcohol misuse and abuse.
  • Alcohol-impaired motor vehicle crashes cost more than an estimated $37 billion annually.
  • Death is not the only consequence from impaired driving. Violators often face jail time, loss of their driver’s license and it could cost up to $10,000 in legal fees, fines, and higher insurance rates.

Plan Ahead to Save Lives.

Here are a few simple tips for a safe Fourth of July: 

  • Plan a safe way home before the festivities begin;
  • Before drinking, designate a sober driver; someone not drinking
  • If you’re impaired, use a taxi, call a sober friend or family member, or use public transportation so you are sure to get home safely;
  • Use your community’s sober ride program - "if attending an event at Carlisle Barracks, and you have been drinking and need a safe ride home, speak to the bartender and they will assist you".
  • If you happen to see a drunk driver on the road, don’t hesitate to contact your local law enforcement;
  • And remember, Buzzed Driving is Drunk Driving. If you know someone who is about to drive or ride while impaired, take their keys and help them make other arrangements to get to where they are going safely.

Remember, whether you’ve had way too many or just one too many, it’s never worth the risk to drive impaired. Buzzed Driving is Drunk Driving. 

Planning ahead can mean the difference between life and death. 

The above information is provided by the Army Center for Substance Abuse Program. For additional information contact the Army Substance Abuse Prevention office at 245–4576. 

 

 

 


First week of distance ed resident course draws to a close

 

370 members of the Distance Education Class of 2014 leave Bliss Hall after listening to Dr. Peter Singer. The class is wrapping up their first resident course at Carlisle Barracks.

 

Updated June 26—

Dr. Peter Feaver, spoke about civil military-relations to the class June 26. He focused his remarks on the  relationship of the senior military to the senior national command authority and how it shapes policy and strategy.

Feaver, a Professor of Political Science and Public Policy at Duke University, discussed how the civil-military relationship has changed during recent presidents, and how the current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan have affected the relationship. He said that a civil-military case study moment of decision has come about during both and the fact that both conflicts have still uncertain outcomes which poses challenges for future relations.

“His talk was a good reinforcement of one of our courses during the self-study portion of the course,” said Marine Corps Lt. Col. Jonathan Donigan, Third Marine Expeditionary Unit, Okinawa. “It’s always good to be reminded about the roles of civilian leaders and what’s appropriate for retired generals and active duty officers. “

“I found it surprising when he talked about how each of the incoming administrations had viewed the civil-military relationship,” said Lt. Col. John Maher, deputy commander of the 8thLegal Operations Detachment.  “I think we as senior leaders will need to be cognizant of how important that is when we interact with the civilian leadership.”

“I think it’s very important that we hear from a variety of speakers about topics like this,” said Lt. Col. Dan Hash, state training officer for the Montana National Guard. “This relationship is vital for the success of not only our military but our nation. His talk gave me insights on how our civilian leader may view an issue differently than we do in the military which is very important to know.”

 

June 24 - Retired Gen. Charles Campbell, former Commanding General, United States Army Forces Command and 1991 Army War College grad, spoke to the class June 24.  

Campbell used stories from his career to frame some of the skills and abilities he felt are necessary for strategic leaders.  He pointed to three strategic inflection points during his career that he felt shaped the Army – institution of the all-volunteer force after Vietnam, the falling of the Berlin Wall and 9/11 -- and how the decisions made by leadership at the time had long-term implications.

Among the skills he felt are necessary for strategic leaders were: thinking expansively; being innovative; challenging beliefs and question assumptions; working well with teammates and building consensus; and planning for the future.

He pointed out that during each of the periods, leaders had to re-invest in the force to adapt to the changes that were coming, not dissimilar to the situation currently facing the nation currently.

June 21 -Lunchtime lectures by War College experts like Dr. Paul Kan, Col. Joel Hillison and Dr. James Bolan adds to the experience.

Hillison discussed why Europe still matters when developing U.S. policy, especially working with NATO and the European Union.

“We’ve kind of forgotten about Europe, “said Hillison. “Our commitment has changed over the years. In the 1950’s we had more than 400,000 troops in Europe, almost one-third of our Army. That has declined significantly.”

Hillison spoke about the strategic shift to Asia and the implications for a rising Asia and declining Europe and how NATO and EU strategies have placed more pressure on the U.S. and caused shifts in policy.

“While we may place less emphasis on Europe militarily, those nations are still important to us economically and in relationship building,” he said. “Europe, and more importantly NATO, provides us valuable focal points for cooperation, while enables the nations to share the burdens when it come to international challenges.”  

Kan delivered a talk on crime in Latin America and talked at great length of the import role Mexico plays for the U.S.

He touched on violence with the drug trade as one of the most difficult challenges facing Mexico and the U.S. At one point, the country average on homicide per half hour.

“Outside of Iraq and Afghanistan, Mexico is where the highest number of Americans have died,” he said. “We can’t over look and take for granted the strategic importance and security of Mexico. The trade partnerships and long-standing relationship we have had has allowed us to focus on other regions like Iraq and Afghanistan. A stable, secure Mexico is very important to us.”

Bolan spoke to the students about the Arab Spring and other recent developments in the Middle East have long-term implications for U.S. policy.

“For the foreseeable future it seems like there will be ongoing instability in the region, “he said. “Our strategies have to support peaceful, evolutional reforms consistent with local culture, traditions and desires. We have to rebalance using the other instruments of power. “

The key challenges according to Bolan when developing strategies for the region are to accommodate ascendant Islam, expand political and social contacts (soft power) to build a civil society, increase economic support for transitions and increased reliance on consensus building and partner contributions.

Previously posted--

The members of the Class of 2014 had their first Bliss Hall session this morning as Maj. Gen. Tony Cucolo, U.S. Army War College Commandant, welcomed the distance education students to the school and gave them advice on how to best take advantage of their time here. The class reported for the first of their two-week residence sessions.

 

After more than a year of learning together behind computer screens all over the world, 370 members of the Army War College Distance Education Class of 2014 came to Carlisle Barracks for the first of two resident courses.

“You are a fantastic class and these two weeks will bond you as a class,” said Maj. Gen. Tony Cucolo, Army War College Commandant, during his opening remarks to the class.  He urged the students to take full advantage of their time here to get to know the staff, faculty and their fellow students.

Cucolo said that keeping an open mind, a willingness to venture outside their comfort zones and a willingness to challenge conventional wisdom and assumptions would be crucial as they moved forward in this new phase of their careers. 

“Think about the contribution to our Nation that you want to make,” he said. “We need to you be critical-thinking advisers and generators of options for solutions to complex problems at the strategic level.”

The two-week sessions allow students to participate in seminar group sessions, to attend lectures and work with classified material relevant to the course of instruction. Attendance at both scheduled resident courses of instruction is required for successful completion of the curriculum.

“The first residence course really provides a capstone for the first year of studies,” said Col. Darrell Fountain, first resident course director. “We bring in guest speakers who provide a wrap-up on each of the four courses, as well as guest speakers who talk about each element of national power, diplomatic, information, military and economic.”

One of those speakers, Dr. Peter Singer, director of the Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence and a senior fellow in the Foreign Policy program at Brookings, spoke to the class about future trends that are shaping the 21stcentury security environment.  He touched on how technology has played both a positive and a negative role in defining strategy and how it also impacts leaders.

 “The use of robots brings up quite the dilemma when it comes to ethics,” said Col. Weedon Gallagher, Commander 1297th CSSB. “I was glad that he touched on that during his remarks and dispelled many notions that operators treated them like video games and showed that it does place high level of stress on them.

 “I especially liked his discussion of how technology has affected the rise of non-state actors,” said  Lt. Col. James Allen, Deputy Director of Instruction, 10thBattalion, 98thTraining Management. “I agree with his assessments that it has really changed the nature of warfare going forward. It makes abilities that they would have no way to attain before possible.

 “He brought up some very through-provoking topics during his talk,” said  Marine Lt. Col. Kevin Heartwell, Command Inspector, Marine Corps Recruiting Command. “I think sometimes we overlook the potential issues that new technologies or abilities can bring.  It’s important to take a step back and take that into consideration before we ‘put all of our eggs into one basket’ like he said.”

 

After each Bliss Hall session, students returned to their seminar to talk about the presentations as a group. Discussions led by faculty member like Terry Wallace, Col. William Blankmeyer and Dennis Keller help bring an even great level of clarity for the students.

Dr. Peter Singer, director of the Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence and a senior fellow in the Foreign Policy program at Brookings, spoke to the class June 17 in Bliss Hall.

 

“I think that getting back and talking about these concepts and ideas with our classmates is really helpful,” said Lt. Col. David Filer, a strategic planner at Camp Smith, Hawaii. “We’ve been working with them for a year behind our screens, so it’s nice to put a face with a name and have even more dialogue.”

“The faculty have done such an outstanding job helping us navigate the system, interact with others and help us understand the types of complex issues we’ll be facing later in the future,” said Lt. Col. Kris Belanger, commander of the 11th Battalion (OES), 97th Training Brigade.

Fountain said that the course ties together all of the strategic themes of the Army War College and prepares them for the second year of studies, including introducing them to their new seminar mates.

“When they arrive here they are split into the seminars that they will be a part of until graduation,” he said. “This allows them to form relationships here that will carry on during the next year of studies and when they arrive next year for the second residence course.”

The program differs from the resident course in the aspect that it’s a two year program instead of the one year duration for the resident class. Technology overcomes the geographical challenges of students spread around the world.  Instead of mailing in papers, students log onto a secure website and watch videos and guest speakers through Defense Connect Online. The distance education site provides students with primary and supplementary materials and allows students to participate in real-time discussions. This site is the focal point for faculty-student interaction, for viewing multimedia course work, constructing papers, sending course papers, and receiving evaluated work.

Fountain said that the distance education course remains committed to its charter when it was formed in 1960 as the correspondence course.

“We have a responsibility to emulate and parallel the curriculum and educational experience of the residence course,” he said. “The delivery method is different, but the educational experience is the same.”  

The class includes 348 Army officers (153 National Guard, 156 Army Reserve and 39 Active), seven Marine Corps officers, one Navy officer and six International Fellows from Armenia, Estonia, Latvia, Netherlands, Taiwan and the United Kingdom.


Suzanne Reynolds

Soldiers, Veterans, Carlisle Barracks and Cumberland Valley community celebrate Army’s Birthday

 
The Army’s 238th birthday was celebrated in Army units around the world today. At Carlisle Barracks, home of the Army War College and Army Heritage and Education Center, the event paid homage to Korean War veterans and neighbors. 
 
“I’m glad that we’re still here and not under another country’s rule,” said Arthur Kalcher of Lavale, Md., who served in the 58th Field Artillery Battalion, 3rd Infantry Division. He was accompanied today by former POW James Dickel of Mount Savage, Md., a “Tiger Survivor” who lived through 38 months in a N. Korea POW camp while 59 percent of the group died in captivity. George Easterly also traveled from Maryland; he served in the 31st Heavy Mortar Company of the 7th Infantry Division.
 
“This event helps set the example of patriotism because patriotism is an example of what parents and teachers need to pass on to children,” said Carl Rebele of Swanton, Md.  He served in the 578th Combat Engineers, 40th Infantry Division, in the Korean War. “We were the cause of ‘freedom is not free.’ And what we accomplished with the South Korean people in both training and services has caused them to be a leader in the world economy and an example of what we should be accomplishing today with other countries,” said Rebele.
 
“I am glad that I could be here to represent the 2nd Ranger Company,” said Winston Jackson of Washington D.C., who was a member of the only all-black unit in the Korean War.  He attended the birthday celebration with his brothers in arms who made the first black paratrooper combat jumps at Munson-ni with the 187th Infantry Regiment:  Herculano “Heavy Duty” Dias of Savage, Md., and Eugene Coleman of Upper Marlboro, Md.
 
Donald Deshong of McConnelsburg, Pa., served with the 8081st Army Unit Para-Quartermaster Company during the Korean War. He was excited to meet the veterans of the black paratrooper unit because Deshong had loaded and dropped supplies to Dias, Coleman and their fellow troopers after the jump.
 
 
Winston Jackson, Korean War Veteran speaks to the
youngest Soldier on Carlisle Barracks Spc. Benjamin
Tweedie during the Army Birthday Celebration, Jun. 14
at AHEC.
 
 
Other local veterans of the Korean conflict included Walter Weishaupt of Shippensburg who served in F Company, 5th Regimental Combat Team; and Eugene Johnson of Carlisle who was serving with the 57th Field Artillery Battalion, 7th Infantry Division, when he became a prisoner of war.
 
The Korean War was a “brothers’ war” for Koreans north and south, much as the Civil War was for Americans, said Dr. Conrad Crane, AHEC historian, as he described this anniversary of the Army as it was 60 years ago in stories at the strategic, operational and tactical levels of war.  To view Dr. Crane's presentation, "A Forgotten Day in a Forgotten War, Sixty Years on:  June 14, 1953," go to:  www.youtube.com/watch?v=gDCVm7y0FmA  
 
During the ceremony, Army War College Assistant Commandant Col. John Salvetti welcomed fellow Soldiers and community members before the traditional cake cutting—with help from a cross section of the Army Family—the post’s youngest Soldier Spc. Benjamin Tweedie; oldest Soldier Sgt 1st Class Robert Forbes; Carlisle Army Recruiting Company’s newest recruit Pvt. Perianna Brown; Civilian of the Year James McNally; and Korean War veteran Winston “Action” Jackson.
 
Salvetti pledged that, “The Army will always remain true to its enduring professional values, honoring the sacred trust bestowed by the nation.  American citizens have throughout our nation’s history have been called to serve in the Army to defend those things we hold important.  And nothing we see of the world today should lead us to believe that the next 238 years will be any different.
 
So as we celebrate the continued strength, professionalism and bravery of our ready and resilient Soldiers in the all-volunteer force, remember America’s Army is America’s team.
 
Continuing the honors to veterans, Salvetti said:  “Army veterans have always returned home with the new skills, deep-seated patriotism, and dedication to their fellow citizens…and they have served us on school boards, elective offices, small businesses and volunteer organizations.
 
“Army veterans did so after Korea, and they are doing so now, returning to college in record numbers and taking their place to shape America’s great future.”
 
Check out the Army Birthday video on Youtube at: http://youtu.be/IOBhyzWcUU8

 


Stand-To Army Leader Development Strategy 2013

What is it?

The Army Leader Development Strategy (ALDS) outlines the Army senior leaders' vision and strategy for leader development of all Army professionals through lifelong training, education and experiences acquired through opportunities in the operational, institutional and self-development domains.

What has the Army done?

The secretary of the Army, chief of staff of the Army and sergeant major of the Army approved the 2013 ALDS June 5, 2013. This is the first time a leader development strategy has been codified in a formal manner by Army senior leadership. This emphasizes the importance senior leaders place on leader development at all levels, and sets forth a vision of an Army that develops competent and committed leaders of character with the skills and attributes necessary to meet the challenges of the 21st century.

What continued efforts does the Army have planned for the future?

As a result of the ALDS, units will see a renewed commitment and emphasis on the Army Profession and lifelong learning. The strategy will seek to balance the three components of leader development: training, education and experience.

U.S. Army Human Resources Command and Deputy Chief of Staff Army G-1 will work to develop talent management policies that benefit both the Army and the individual. Those leaders identified as possessing positive leader attributes and proficiency in core competencies will be prepared for responsibility at higher levels. Meanwhile, each cohort will see mission command principles embedded into leader development and will have the opportunity for a broad range of leader experiences and developmental opportunities.

The ALDS sets conditions for developing adaptive and creative leaders capable of operating within the complex operational environment and the entire range of military operations.

Why is this important to the Army?

The ALDS lays out the guiding principles by which the Army will develop leaders of character, presence and intellect across the force. It is a strategy for the entire Army - not just for those currently in leadership positions, but for future leaders as well. The mission of leader development is to train, educate and provide experiences to progressively develop leaders to prevail in unified land operations and to lead the Army using mission command in a 21st century environment.

The ALDS establishes the framework of leader development as a shared responsibility between the institutional Army (education and training institutions), the operational force (organizations and units) and the individual. The ALDS includes three components: training, education, and experience. Focusing on and balancing these three components will ensure that officers, warrant officers, non commissioned officers, civilians and strategic leaders achieve the Army's vision for leader development.


Army describes plans for integrating women into combat

WASHINGTON (Army News Service, Jun 18, 2013) -- No later than Jan. 1, 2016, women will be able to apply to all military occupational specialties, and to all Army units, across the total force.

"The Army is very excited about the approval of our implementation plan to move forward," said Maj. Gen. Howard Bromberg, Army G-1, during a June 18 multi-service briefing in the Pentagon.

Bromberg and representatives from the Marine Corps, Navy, Air Force and Special Operations Command explained how they would implement their specific plans to integrate women into all areas of military service.

The Army's plan, like the plans from other services, include first opening closed units to women, and then opening all closed military occupational specialties, or MOSs, to women.

CLOSED UNITS

Today in the Army, some combat units at battalion level and below are still closed to women. One of the first steps the Army will take is to open those closed units. This step will not involve opening closed MOSs to women, but rather, opening closed units to allow women to serve there in MOSs that are already open to both genders.

Already, the Army has made headway in this area, Bromberg said.

In 2012, the Army opened 14,000 positions in closed units to female Soldiers with the elimination of the "co-location restriction" through its "Exception to Policy" program. Women were assigned to maneuver battalion headquarters in nine brigade combat teams, known as BCTs, as an exception to the Direct Ground Combat Definition and Assignment Rule.

This year, the Army has already signaled its intent to open an additional 6,000 positions within closed units. The Army will accomplish that by opening up an additional eight active-duty BCTs to women -- for a total of 17; nine Army National Guard BCTs; and also positions within special operations aviation.

In a plan submitted to the secretary of defense in April, Secretary of the Army John M. McHugh spelled out the details of the Army's way ahead to integrate women into closed units.

The Army will continue to open positions in closed units, initially within the headquarters of combat arms units such as infantry, armor and field artillery. The Army will also open headquarters positions to women in reconnaissance, surveillance, targeting and acquisition maneuver battalions.

For enlisted Soldiers, about 76 military occupational specialties that are open to both male and female Soldiers are represented within closed units. For officers, there are about 35 officer areas of concentration represented within closed units. And for warrant officers, there are 19 warrant officer military occupational specialties represented in closed units.

The Army will begin allowing women to move into positions within previously-closed units in early 2014, first with officers and non-commissioned officers, and then with junior Soldiers.

"The further assignment of women to companies and batteries below the level of headquarters will be based on assessments, deployment cycles and specific guidance," reads the implementation plan the Army sent forward to the secretary of defense. "This process will be completed at the end of calendar year 2014 and will provide the framework for opening positions that are currently closed to women."

OPENING NEW JOBS TO WOMEN

For occupations currently closed to women, the Army is planning on developing gender-neutral standards to ensure all Soldiers have fair access to jobs.

However, Bromberg said that it is important for the Army to ensure that the standards meet job requirements.

"Whatever that job or that occupational specialty, we have to make sure we have the requirements of that task established -- regardless of male or female," Bromberg said. "The worst thing we could do is change that standard for that position. We have to be absolutely certain that performance can be understood and applied in combat situations. This isn't to set anybody up for failure. This is all about success. We're calling it Soldier of 2020 -- it's not male Soldier or female Soldier."

Beginning in July 2014, the Army will first open military occupational specialties within the Army Engineer Branch. New opportunities for women there include combat engineer and combat engineer senior sergeant. Once those occupations open, the Army will assign female engineer officers and any reclassified NCOs to combat engineer companies. This will open up approximately 10,281 positions to women.

Beginning in the second quarter of fiscal year 2015, the Army will open previously-closed positions within the Field Artillery Branch. After that, opportunities for women will expand to include cannon crewmembers, field artillery automated tactical data systems, fire support specialists and field artillery senior sergeants. Within the Field Artillery Branch, the change will ultimately open about 15,941 jobs to women.

Additionally, the Army will open positions to women with the Armor Branch and the Infantry Branch. Positions there are numerous. Enlisted women will for the first time have the opportunity to serve as cavalry scouts, armor crewmen, infantrymen, and indirect-fire artillery. As a result of this change, about 90,640 positions will open for women in the Army.

Within the Armor Branch and the Infantry Branch, the Army will also offer junior officers and junior NCOs the opportunity to transfer branches or reclassify into these occupations as a way to build a cadre of experienced female Soldiers prior to the arrival of Soldiers who are new to the Army.   


                                                 The Gettysburg Connection
                     Local events to be held commemorating the 150th Anniversary
 
 
Wednesday, June 19:  Exhibit Grand Opening and USAWC Perspectives Lecture on Gettysburg
 
6 p.m., Army Heritage and Education Center – Exhibit Grand Opening, “A Great Civil War:  1863, Battles that defined a Nation,” is the newest addition to “The Soldier Experience” gallery.  This event will include remarks about the exhibit, a ribbon cutting ceremony, and light refreshments.
 
7 p.m., Army Heritage and Education Center - Dr. Carol Reardon, the George Winfree Professor of American History at Penn State University, will present a lecture entitled, “Telling the Army Story:  Voices of Gettysburg’s Slain.”  This event will follow the Exhibit opening.  Both events are free and open to the public.  Call 717-245-3972 for information.
 
Thursday, June 20:  The Irish Brigade and Their Friends from Carlisle
 
7 p.m., Cumberland County Historical Society, 21 N. Pitt Street – Carlisle Attorney Hubert X. Gilroy will portray fictional Irish Brigade member Private Patrick Farrell.  Private Farrell will recount his many escapades with the Irish Brigade throughout the Civil War, and using a bit of “Blarney,” he incorporates factually correct information concerning Carlisle’s involvement in the Civil War.  Additional Civil War re-enactors along with numerous Civil War paintings will also be featured during the presentation.  Call 717-249-7610 for information.
 
Saturday, June 22:  March to Destiny
 
9 a.m. – 7 p.m., Shippensburg Fairgrounds, 10131 Possum Hollow Road – This annual Civil War living history event will tell the tale of the Confederate occupation of Shippensburg, PA, before the historic Battle of Gettysburg.  Learn about Confederate Camp life stories and demonstrations on artillery firing, mounted cavalry units, cooking and setting up camp.  Demonstrations will be led by period-dressed re-enactors.  Call 888-513-5130 for information.
 
Saturday, June 22:  Cumberland Valley Race Series:  Run to Destiny
 
1:45 p.m., Shippensburg Public Library, 73 W. King Street – Part of the Cumberland Valley Race Series, the Run to Destiny 5K Race and Walk proceeds will benefit the Shippensburg Public Library Capital Campaign.  Civil War-themed prizes will be awarded.  Call 717-300-1337 for information.
 
Sunday, June 23:  Flames beyond Gettysburg
 
2 p.m., Mechanicsburg Museum Association, 2 W. Strawberry Alley – Historian Scott Mingus will talk about the Confederates’ approach led by Lt. Gen. Jubal Early in June 1863 to the Susquehanna River and accepting the surrender of York.  State militia defending the river crossing burned the world’s longest covered bridge to prevent Rebel passage.  Mr. Mingus is author of Flames beyond Gettysburg:  The Confederate Expedition to the Susquehanna River.  Call 717-697-6088 for information.
 
June 28-30:  Mechanicsburg Civil War Commemoration
 
This commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the Confederate Invasion of Mechanicsburg will include an opening ceremony, tours of the Confederate route, living history reenactments and special exhibits from June 28-30.
 
Friday, June 28
9 a.m.-4 p.m. -- Civil War Trails guided coach tours through the Mechanicsburg area. Tickets required.  Available at the Mechanicsburg Museum, 717-697-6088. $8 per ticket.
6:30-9:30 p.m. -- Evening gala at the Orris House Bed and Breakfast, 318 West Main Street. Limited number of tickets available; reservations required. $50 per ticket, call 717-441-3839.
5:30-7:30 p.m. -- Civil War music by Dearest Home at Trinity Lutheran Church, 132 E. Main Street - food and games.
7-9 p.m. -- Confederate Cavalry and Confederate Foot Artillery Infantry Encampment at Memorial Park.
 
Saturday, June 29
8-9:30 a.m. -- Encampment at Memorial Park.
9:45-10:30 a.m. and 11-11:45 a.m. -- Reenactment events featuring Union and Confederate soldiers; Main Street surrender of town/secure the flag; accompanied by the Mechanicsburg Singer Band.
9 a.m.-noon – Gen. Jenkins Requisition for Rations at PNC Bank, 2 East Main Street. All donations of canned and dry good to be donated to local food banks.
12-2 p.m. -- Dinner with Gen. Jenkins at Washington Firehouse, 53 East Main Street. BBQ Chicken dinner tickets available at firehouse, $8 per ticket. Call 717-697-9877.
1-2 p.m. and 2-3 p.m. -- Civil War magic with magician Marlin Troutman at Historic Union Church, 47 East Main Street.
Be sure to stop by the Mechanicsburg Museum throughout the day for presentations by living historians and re-enactors. 8:30-9:15 a.m. -- Life of a Confederate Soldier; 1-2 p.m. -- Women on the Homefront; 2:45 to 3:45 p.m.-- Civil War Military Weapons and Arms; 2-3 p.m. -- Civil War Medicine.
 
Sunday, June 30
9-10:30 a.m. -- Reflections Service at Historic Union Church, 47 East Main Street.
1-3 p.m. -- Angel of the Battlefield: A Tea to Honor Clara Barton, at Rosemary House, 120 South Market Street. Tickets required. Call 717-697-5111.
2-3 p.m. -- tours of Historic Peace Churchin Camp Hill.
3-4 p.m. -- Confederate Invasion of Cumberland County presented by Sheldon Munn
3 p.m. -- Civil War Trails Dedication Ceremony, 8th and Indiana Avenue, Lemoyne. Call 717-766-1899 for information.
 
Saturday, June 29:  Eternal Light Peace Memorial Commemoration
 
2 p.m., Gettysburg – To commemorate the 1938 dedication of the Eternal Light Peace Memorial and the 150thAnniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, join the National Organization Sons of the Union Veterans of the Civil War to honor this history.
Keynote speaker is Maj. Gen. Tony Cucolo, Commandant, U.S. Army War College.  The Old Guard U.S. 3rdInfantry will also participate in the program.
The Sons of the Union Veterans and the Sons of the Confederate Veterans will lay wreaths commemorating the reunion and dedication of the Eternal Light Peace Memorial in 1938.
Off-site parking and shuttles will be hosted at the Harrisburg Area Community College, 731 Old Harrisburg Road, Gettysburg.  The Eternal Light Peace Memorial will be closed to traffic.  Shuttles from the HACC campus will begin at noon and continue until the completion of the ceremony.
 
Sunday, June 30:  When the Civil War came to Carlisle:  A Worship Service of Remembrance
 
8 and 10:30 a.m., Second Presbyterian Church, 528 Garland Drive – There will be two special worship services at 8 and 10:30 a.m. at Second Presbyterian Church.  All are welcome!  Childcare will be provided at the 10:30 a.m. service.  Contact the church at growwithsecond.org or call 717-243-4571.
 
Sunday, June 30:  Civil War-Era Church Service at First Lutheran Church, Carlisle
 
10:15 a.m., First Evangelical Lutheran Church, 21 S. Bedford Street – History will come alive at First Lutheran Church on Sunday, June 30, during the 10:15 a.m. worship service as part of the commemoration of the 150thanniversary of the Civil War.  The public is cordially invited to participate in the service, complete with Civil War re-enactors in attendance.  Carlisle was invaded and occupied by the Second Corps of the Confederate Army under Lt. Gen. Richard S. Ewell for three days, June 27-30, 1863.  From Carlisle, Ewell’s unit marched south to the small town of Gettysburg where a great battle was fought, becoming a turning point in the war.
Despite the presence of the enemy in our town, First Lutheran’s pastor, the Rev. Dr. Jacob Fry, made the decision to hold a worship service.  Only the Second Presbyterian Church and possibly two other churches in town held services that day.  Our church edifice at that time was located behind the Old jail in the building now occupied by Bedford Street Antiques.  The congregation that morning consisted of approximately sixty people, at least half of them being Confederate officers. 
The service at First Lutheran will be the church’s contribution to the Civil War remembrances in Carlisle during Summerfair.  Although we do not have a copy of the actual service held that day, our pastor, the Rev. Charles A. Brophy, has carefully researched the service format and liturgy that was probably being used at First Lutheran during the 1860’s to make the service as historically accurate as possible.  A sermon that Pastor Fry preached in December 1860, in response to South Carolina’s secession from the Union, will be delivered by Pastor Brophy dressed in a ministerial robe of the day.  Congregational singing of hymns reflecting the time period will be accompanied on the church’s recently-renovated antique pump organ.  Following the service, the Worship and Music Committee will host a time of fellowship on the lawn serving lemonade along with cakes and cookies that were popular in 1863.  For information, call 717-249-3310, or visit www.firstlutherancarlisle.org
 
Monday, July 1:  Grand Commemoration - The 150thAnniversary of the Shelling of Carlisle
 
The Burning of Carlisle Barracks, July 1, 1863
The U.S. Army War College (co-partnering with Historic Carlisle, Inc.) will offer the following events:
 
Noon at the Army Heritage and Education Center – Visitors can tour the center and the new exhibit, A Great Civil War:  1863, Battles that Define a Nation, whichprovides a look at the key battles fought during that pivotal year through displays featuring individual Soldier’s stories, artifacts, photographs and more.
 
1 p.m. outside the AHEC building – Navy retired Capt. Steve Knott will discuss Maj. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart’s famous ride and why his troopers end up at Carlisle.  (For those planning to attend the “Shelling of Carlisle” at 7 p.m. at the Square, Capt. Knott’s presentation will prepare you for that event.)
 
1:30 p.m. – Visitors will board an Army bus to go to historic Carlisle Barracks Wheelock Bandstand, to hear Dr. Dick Sommers describe Lt. Gen. Richard Ewell’s occupation of Carlisle Barracks and why Maj. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart decided to burn the barracks just a day later.  Dr. Sommers will also point out buildings of interest and describe what Carlisle Barracks looked like prior to the burning.
 
The 150th Anniversary of the Shelling of Carlisle
 
7-9 p.m., Old Courthouse, Carlisle – In commemoration of what is probably the single most significant and emotional event in the long, proud history of Carlisle, Historic Carlisle will present, “The Shelling of Carlisle – July 1, 1863,” on the 150th anniversary of the Shelling.  On the evening of July 1, 1863, Confederate Calvary forces, commanded by Maj. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart demanded the surrender of Carlisle and the Union forces, commanded by Union Gen. William “Baldy” Smith.  The confederate general threatened to subject the town to artillery fire if the town was not surrendered.  “Baldy” Smith answered the challenge, “Shell away and be damned”!
 
In the course of about seven hours, some 130-140 artillery shells were fired on Carlisle by the Confederate forces from the east side of the town.  Other southern troopers set fire to buildings at Carlisle Barracks and the Carlisle Gas Works.  But the town and its defending Union soldiers held fast through the long night and by daybreak, the Confederate Calvary had been recalled to join the Battle of Gettysburg, already in progress.
 
The Grand Commemoration will take place at 7 p.m., the exact time when the shelling began in 1863.  All four streets from the Square will be closed at 6:30 p.m.  The Carlisle Town Band will perform before the ceremonies and program at 7 p.m.  Military and civilian re-enactors will be on hand to act out the story as it is read on a large PA system.  Including will be both Confederate and Union artillery, infantry, Gen. Smith and Gen. Stuart, civilian “Home Guard,” and others.  Following the 30-minute program, Historic Carlisle will conduct downtown tours of “Lee Calling Cards.”  Interpreters in 19th century attire will lead groups to sites in the immediate area which were scarred by the artillery shells.  The tours will last about 70 minutes.
All events are free to the public.  Call 717-776-6658 for information.
 
Friday, July 5:  Civil War Walking Tour of Carlisle
 
1 p.m., Cumberland County Historical Society, 21 N. Pitt Street – Join us for a tour led by volunteer Civil War walking guides.  Meet at Cumberland County Historical Society.  Reservations required at shop.historicalsociety.com or call 717-249-7610.
 
Tuesday, July 16:  USAWC Perspectives Lecture on Gettysburg
 
7:15 p.m., Army Heritage and Education Center – Army retired Col. Tom Vossler will present a lecture, “Gettysburg:  Whose Hallowed Ground – The Farms that became a Battlefield.”  Call 717-245-3972 for information.
 
 
Commemoration Exhibits
 
1863 Invasion in the Valley - Now through Oct. 26, 2013 at the Cumberland County Historical Society, open during normal business hours.  Call 717-249-7610 for information.
 
Civil War Sesquicentennial-1863- Now through Mar. 31, 2014 at the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center, open during normal business hours.  Call 717-245-3641 for information.
 
Shippensburg goes to War- Now through Aug. 31, 2013 at the Shippensburg Historical Society, open Wednesday, Friday and Saturday from 1-4 p.m.  Call 717-532-6727 for information.
 
First Hand:  Civil War Era Drawings from the Becker Collection- Now through Oct. 19, 2013 at The Trout Gallery, Dickinson College, open Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.  Call 717-245-1344 for information.
 
Mechanicsburg:  A Hometown View of the Civil War– Now through Oct. 19, 2013 at the Freight Station Museum at Mechanicsburg Museum Association.
 
 
For suggested trip ideas and more, visit the Cumberland Valley Visitors Bureau at: www.cumberlandvalleypa.com
 
 
 
 
 
 

Defense Department releases Women in Service Review Implementation Plans

Today, the Defense Department released the U.S. military services' and U.S. Special Operations Command's plans for implementing women into previously closed positions.

These plans, which were reviewed by Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Martin Dempsey, outline how the services and U.S. Special Operations Command will manage the incremental opening of these previously closed positions.

The successful integration of women into currently closed positions requires the department to be thoughtful and deliberate in determining the next steps.  The department will proceed in a measured and responsible way to open positions to women.  In all cases, notification to Congress is required prior to opening these positions.  Full implementation by the services should occur by Jan. 1, 2016.

The secretary's memo is available at:  http://www.defense.gov/news/SecDefWISRMemo.pdf

The U.S. Army's plan is available at:  http://www.defense.gov/news/ArmyWISRImplementationPlan.pdf

The U.S. Navy's plan is available at: http://www.defense.gov/news/NavyWISRImplementationPlan.pdf

The U.S. Air Force's plan is available at:  http://www.defense.gov/news/AirForceWISRImplementationPlan.pdf

The U.S. Marine Corps' plan is available at:  http://www.defense.gov/news/MarineCorpsWISRImplementationPlan.pdf

The U.S. Special Operations Command's plan is available at:  http://www.defense.gov/news/SOCOMWISRImplementationPlan.pdf

The decision to rescind the 1994 Direct Ground Combat Definition and Assignment Rule for women was originally announced Jan. 24, 2013, by former Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta and Gen. Dempsey.


By Karen Parrish
American Forces Press Service

Pentagon Announces Progress in Opening Jobs to Women

WASHINGTON, June 18, 2013 – The services and U.S. Special Operations Command have completed plans to gradually open jobs to female service members that used to be closed to them, senior Pentagon officials announced today.

Joined by senior service officials at a Pentagon news conference, Juliet Beyler, the Defense Department’s director of officer and enlisted personnel management, said today’s announcement is a milestone.

In January, then-Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta and Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, rescinded the 1994 Direct Ground Combat Definition and Assignment Rule. That policy barred women from jobs performed near combat units.

She noted that in January, then-Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta and Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, rescinded the 1994 Direct Ground Combat Definition and Assignment Rule. That policy barred women from jobs -- such as tank mechanic and field artillery radar operator -- performed near combat units. It also prohibited women in jobs such as intelligence, communications and logistics from assignment at units smaller than a brigade.

“Our goal is to ensure that the mission is met with the best-qualified and most capable people, regardless of gender,” Beyler said in prepared remarks. This year, she added, the services and Socom have worked diligently to plan two lines of effort aimed at integrating women:

-- Currently open occupations that were restricted: for example, administrative clerk in a tank battalion or truck driver in an artillery battery; and

-- Currently closed occupations that require review and validation of occupational standards: for example, infantry, armor and combat engineer.

The services and Socom have filed separate plans, which Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has reviewed, she noted. Beyler added that while the plans differ, they all involve work with scientific and research agencies to review occupational standards and ensure they are current, operationally valid and applied on a gender-neutral basis.

All the plans are incremental in opening closed positions, which requires congressional notification, she said.

“Each service and Socom is conducting thorough doctrine, organization, training, materiel, leadership and education, personnel, facilities and policy analyses to ensure deliberate and responsible implementation,” she said.

Pentagon officials said the department expects to issue a report to Congress later this summer detailing more implementation specifics. Full implementation across the services should occur by Jan. 1, 2016, officials said.

The services and Socom have identified decision points by which they will make final determinations to open occupations and positions or to request an exception to policy to keep a position or occupation closed, Beyler said. The defense secretary and the Joint Chiefs chairman must personally approve any exceptions to policy, she added.


Army celebrates 238th birthday in Pentagon ceremony

Senior defense leaders and Soldiers cut a birthday cake, June 13, 2013, at the Pentagon, as part of the Army's 238th birthday celebration.

 

WASHINGTON (Army News Service, 06 13, 2013) -- At the ceremony celebrating the 238th birthday of the Army, Secretary of the Army John McHugh said birthdays can be bittersweet.

"When I blow out candles, I start thinking it's another year closer to that inevitable conclusion," McHugh said. "But I want to make a suggestion for this occasion: that we consider instead of turning a year older, the Army is turning a year newer, a year better, a year stronger."

Throughout the ceremony, which took place in the Pentagon auditorium, McHugh, Chief of Staff of the Army Gen. Ray Odierno, and Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel spoke on the idea of looking forward, while also reflecting on the past and the sacrifices made in the last 238 years.

"We stand on the shoulders of those who come before us," Odierno said. "Today, we're the best Army in the world. Two years from now, we'll be the best Army in the world. And ten years from now, we'll be the best Army in the world, because that's who we are."

Wounded warriors and their families were present at the ceremony, along with many Soldiers in uniform.

"If you want to know how we became this great nation, you look into the eyes of wounded warriors," McHugh said. "You see the strength that they bring and it's really a reflection of the celebration that we have here today."

McHugh said today's Soldiers for life are more ready and resilient than they have ever been, as they continue to serve the nation that they have served now for more than 200 years now.

Odierno and Hagel said that while the families of Soldiers don't wear a uniform, they sacrifice just as much.

"The strength of our nation is our Army," Odierno said. "The strength of our Army is our Soldiers. And the strength of our Soldiers is our families, and that's what makes us Army strong."

Hagel said the Army's birthday celebrates an institution that is unmatched in the confidence and trust placed in it by citizens.

"I don't know of another country in the world that can say that," Hagel said. "[This celebration] represents an institution that has essentially been around longer than the republic."

After senior defense leaders spoke, four Soldiers with the 3d U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard), recited the Soldiers' creed. After the audience sang the Army song, senior leaders cut the service's birthday cake.


By Karen Parrish, American Forces Press Service
Comptroller offers glimpse of post-sequester options

WASHINGTON, June 13, 2013 - The budget storms assailing the Pentagon are unprecedented, the Defense Department's chief financial officer said here today.

"I've never seen anything like this," Pentagon Comptroller Robert F. Hale told an audience attending the 2013 Defense Communities National Summit, "and I hope we never see it again."

Hale asked attendees how many of them had seen serious effects from sequestration defense spending cuts at their home installations, and dozens of hands went up around the room.

Hale said the across-the-board cuts, costs for the war in Afghanistan that were higher than expected, and continuing resolutions that have in recent years replaced approved budgets have left Pentagon planners unable to make long-term course corrections.

Remaining shortfalls in fiscal year 2013 clearly show "we haven't fully landed this plane," Hale acknowledged, and he warned that 2014 and 2015 could be just as bad.

Cuts to training and maintenance this year will result in future "get-well" costs as the services clear backlogs and retrain members, Hale noted. If Congress passes a budget this year, he added, he's confident defense programs will be funded near the levels President Barack Obama requested. If a continuing resolution again takes the place of an approved budget, however, "we would face the get-well costs without the resources to get well," the comptroller said.

Defense officials, including Hale, have maintained repeatedly that they can save greatly in the long term if Congress allows them to close excess facilities, and the budget request this year again asks for a round of base realignments and closures, Hale noted.

Studies have shown DOD has 25 percent too much infrastructure, all of which is expensive to maintain and operate, the comptroller said. He added that while it's a "significant understatement" to say Congress is reluctant to approve base closures, previous BRAC rounds resulted in ongoing savings of $12 billion per year. Consolidating or closing underused military facilities will be essential to the department's future financial health, he added.

"We need the help of the United States Congress. BRAC is an obvious example," he said, but it's not the only area in which the Pentagon needs Congress to act.

"We need their permission to retire lower-priority weapons ... [and] slow the growth in military pay and benefits," he said, noting "uniform agreement" among the Joint Chiefs of Staff that the department must contain personnel costs.

Hale said results from Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel's strategic choices in management review -- which has been completed and is now being studied at the Pentagon's highest levels -- will guide spending decisions in the coming years.

Sequestration has been and remains a painful experience, Hale said, but he added that defense managers are learning to identify lower-priority initiatives as cuts increase.

"Some of those decisions shouldn't be reversed. ... As we recover from this long disease called sequestration, I hope we can benefit just a little bit from the cure," he said.


By Tom Conning

Strong-willed woman visits AHEC exhibit

Imagine wearing the same item day after day that isn’t a wedding ring for almost four decades - a task that takes a strong will.

In 1972, 12-year-old Kathy Strong asked "Santa" for a simple, shiny stainless steel POW/MIA bracelet for Christmas. The bracelets were a fad at the time and popular with students, said Strong. “I remember that every single student in my 7th grade English class had one,” she said.

The difference between Strong and others in her English class was that she swore to wear that metal band every day and then did so for the next 39 years. The Soldier, Spc. James Moreland, was on her mind every day, said Strong. “I just wanted "my" Soldier to come home and be reunited with his family,” said Strong. “It was that simple.” 

Spc. James Leslie Moreland was a medic in an Army Special Forces unit during the Vietnam War. On Feb. 7, 1968, the North Vietnamese Army attacked Moreland’s Special Forces camp in Lang Vei. After the battle, the Army listed Moreland as missing in action.

More than 40 years after the battle, the Army positively identified Moreland’s remains in 2011 and he was buried in a family plot later that year.

Strong attended the funeral, wrapped the bracelet she had been wearing for so many years around the sleeve of Moreland’s uniform and watched the burial.

This story found its way into the Soldier Experience exhibit at the Army Heritage and Education Center in Carlisle, Pa. by coincidence, said Jack Leighow, Army Heritage Museum director. Our collections provided 99 percent of the material in the exhibit but the organization that put together the exhibit brought it to our attention and it was the civilian-to-Soldier connection we were looking for, said Leighow.

Kathy Strong visits an Army Heritage and Education Center exhibit featuring her and the POW/KIA bracelet that she wore for nearly 40 years May 11. “Santa” gave her a bracelet for Christmas in 1972 that was inscribed with the name Spc. James Moreland who served in Vietnam.

“It met the aim of the exhibit in terms of educating and inspiring Soldiers and members of the public.”

Another coincidence was that a staff member at the Army Heritage and Education Center knew Strong personally and contacted her about the exhibit, said Leighow.

Last Saturday, May 11, Strong visited the Soldier Experience exhibit and saw her and Moreland’s story. “I feel very honored that James and I are included in the AHEC exhibit,” said Strong.

“Part of my promise to James is to make sure he is never forgotten, so I'm thrilled each and every time that someone takes interest in his story. Even though we never met, he is with me every day.”

The exhibit features a photo of Strong and a simple, shiny stainless steel POW/MIA band with the name James Moreland inscribed on it.

The Army Heritage and Education Center, located at 950 Soldiers Drive, Carlisle, Pa., is free and open, Tuesday-Saturday, 9:00am-5:00pm, and Sunday, 11:00am-5:00pm. Visit http://www.carlisle.army.mil/AHEC/index.cfm for more information.


Battle of the Bulge veteran enhances learning in Army War College class
 
 
USAWC students gained knowledge on the Battle of the Bulge from the experiences shared by their guest speaker, a veteran who was there.
 
John Fague, a local Battle of the Bulge veteran from Shippensburg, and member of the Cumberland County Veterans of the Battle of the Bulge, shared his experiences from World War II with students on April 9 in the “European Campaign 1944-1945” elective class, taught by Col. Greg Cantwell and Col. Jim Scuderi.
 
“John provides the service of connecting Army War College students with the Carlisle Battle of the Bulge Veterans group, enabling the students to interact with these heroes and learn from their experiences,” said Army student Col. Mark Haseman.
 
Fague assisted with teaching a lesson on the Battle of the Bulge and provided Soldier insights that were invaluable in understanding the campaign, said Haseman.
 
“While we analyzed the battle from the strategic level, getting a foxhole-level view was enlightening, since this battle was won by small groups of American Soldiers slowing the German advance,” said Haseman.
 
 
John Fague with students in the "European Campaign
1944-45" Elective Class, Apr. 9, Root Hall

CSA releases new Army Leader Development Strategy

click here to see the strategy

See Gen. Ray Odierno, Army Chief of Staff, discuss ALD during the Army War College graduation ceremony June 8.

Leader development is fundamental to our Army, particularly to an Army of preparation. We are currently out of balance given the emphasis we have had to place on warfighting. This strategy will help the Army re-balance the three crucial leader development components of training, education, and experience. This Army Leader Development Strategy (ALDS) provides vision and guidance on ends, ways, and means for developing leaders of all cohorts that exercise Mission Command while planning, preparing, executing, and assessing Unified Land Operations to meet the challenges of the 21st Century. Leaders must understand the strategic environment, be able to think critically and creatively, visualize solutions, and describe and communicate crucial information to achieve shared understanding, collaborate, and build teams.


 

Porter assumes command of ‘best in the Army’ team at Dunham Clinic

 

First nurse and first woman to command the Dunham U.S. Army Health Clinic, Col. Stephanie Wilcher was honored by the military community here today as she passed to the incoming commander a healthcare campus that has achieved more access to care, more types of healthcare and wellness programs, and more efficiency.

Col. Rebecca Porterformally assumed command of the Dunham healthcare-and-wellnessmission and a staff of 182  from Col. Stephanie Wilcher Friday, June 14 in Reynolds Theater, in a ceremony officiated by  Col. Danny Jaghab who commands the U.S. Army Medical Department Activity Commander at Fort George G. Meade, Md.

As the commander of Dunham, Wilcher managed and provided effective leadership, strategic vision and a discipline focus across four geographically dispersed clinics and an Army Wellness Center, according to Jaghab. 

Wilcher, an Army War College graduate, served as a strategic leadership through unprecedented fiscal and transformational challenges, said Jaghab. She led the transition of Dunham Clinic from a healthcare system to a “system of health” operating in four locations:  Carlisle Barracks, Fort Indiantown Gap, Letterkenny Army Depot, and New Cumberland Defense Depot.

Wilcher planned and managed the introduction of the Army Wellness Center at Carlisle Barracks.  She made Dunham Clinic a role model for the command as a first and successful adopter of the patient-centered Medical Home program and the Anderson Model of team care. Her initiatives and management paid off with improved scores, increased capacity and access to care, and higher patient satisfaction scores, said the MEDDAC commander.

Wilcher credited the Dunham staff the credit for the clinic’s achievements on behalf of military patients and beneficiaries – noting especially her deputy for clinical services  COL George Patterson, deputy commander for nursing MAJ Vanessa Worsham, deputy commander for nursing nurse who led the nursing team to practice at the top of their license; and clinic administrator Joe Vancosky, who leads the administrative staff.

“You guys did all that,” said Wilcher, giving all credit to the doctors, nurses, and staff of the Dunham system of health – at Carlisle Barracks.  “We have transformed the way healthcare is delivered.

 “Your incredible dedication and work ethic I have not seen across the Army before. It is people working together as a team, she said, to incorporate ‘wellness’ into “wellest community in the Army – and we are well on our way.”

I don’t think there’s another team that could have done so much in such a short time,” she said. “I know that Col. Porter will take it to the next level.”

“While a change of command represents a symbolic transfer of responsibility, authority and accountability to a new leader,  it is important to remember that the heart of the organization – the people – remain steady. Dunham Clinic will continue to provide the same excellent care, delivered with the utmost kindness and respect to its patients.

“The organization will continue to be a trusted neighbor and we will remain reliable teammates with our fellow organizations at Carlisle Barracks,” said Porter. “I look forward to working with this outstanding Dunham team and am grateful for this opportunity.”

An extensive education and multitude of leadership experiences at all levels have prepared Porter for command of this unique Army health clinic, noted Jaghab. Porter is a board-certified Clinical Health Psychologist and served most recently as director of Psychological Health for the Army and the Chief of the Behavioral Health Division at the Office of the Surgeon General. She completed the doctoral program at Fielding Graduate University, and is a graduate of Tripler's Postdoctoral Health Psychology Fellowship.

Previously, she was assigned to the National Capital Region Medical Task Force, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, the United States Military Academy, the Office of the Chief of Staff of the Army, and the Office of the Chief of Legislative

Commissioned as an Army military police officer from the University of Washington in 1983, Porter’s early career in the MP Corps gave way to education and experience in counseling psychology while an Army Reserve officer. She transferred to the Medical Service Corps and returned to active duty to complete the Clinical Psychology Internship Program at Tripler Army Medical Center, Hawaii. She since served at

William Beaumont Army Medical Center at Fort Bliss, Texas; the Office of the Chief of Legislative Liaison; Office of the Chief of Staff of the Army; United States Military Academy; Walter Reed Army Medical Center; and the Joint Task Force of the National Capital Region Medical Command.

Wilcher will next serve as the Associate Dean for Academics for the Military Education Training Center at Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, Texas.

 


Capt. Douglas Lowery
Father’s Day – Army style

“Dear Pop, Thinking of you on – Father’s Day”, wrote Sergeant Sherlyn Hansen on a cartoon which showed a Soldier lying in a fox hole, thinking of his father sitting in a chair with his feet up reading the newspaper and listening to the radio. Hansen sent this cartoon via V-mail to his father during World War II.

 

 “So far all I know is that I have a son, weighing 7 pounds, 9 ounces (presume in the raw) and that Mother and Son are doing nicely, as the home town paper will say. So you must tell me everything. What does he look like? Etc. and etc…I’ll be waiting for your letter. I have had a usual work day amid accepting congratulations on my fatherhood. In fact, they’re beginning to call me “POP” around here. I dropped in at the PX last night, where our Signal Co. boys were, each one I talked to wanted to bet me 2 to 1 I wouldn’t have a son. And I was taking all comers. So my beers won’t cost me a cent for the next few weeks.”  B. McElvain (Walter McElvain 2010, 6: 62 )

---Private 1st Class Walter McElvain to his wife Josephine, 25 April 1944.This was McElvain’s first letter after receiving a phone call from his Mother informing him of the birth of his son, Bill. McElvain was training for overseas duty with the U.S. Army 44th Division at Camp Phillips, Kansas.

Since our country’s beginning, tens of thousands of Soldiers have written similar letters home as their duties precluded them from being present for their child’s birth, family birthday celebrations, graduations, anniversaries, or other special days.

The origin of Father’s Day can be traced back to Babylon some 4,000 years ago. In the United States, it is generally accepted that Ms. Sonora Louise Smart Dodd, daughter of a Civil War veteran, is the founder of the modern day Father’s Day.  In fact, President Woodrow Wilson approved of the festival in 1916.

In 1966, Lyndon Johnson signed a Presidential Proclamation which declared the third Sunday of June as Father’s Day. Ultimately, in 1972 Richard Nixon established the permanent national observation of Father’s Day on the third Sunday of June.

 

 

 

The U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center’s (USAHEC) houses and preserves an archive and artifact collection which provides a detailed record of U.S. Army history.  Located in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, these hundreds of thousands of items tell the stories of Soldiers, in times of war and peace, close to home and far away, including a congratulatory letter to the parents of Brigadier General O. Benjamin Davis Sr. when he received his commission as a second lieutenant in 1901.  Davis went on to become the first African-American to attain the rank of General Officer.

Brigadier General O. Benjamin Davis.

Within the collection there is evidence of the significance of Father’s Day, including letters from Soldiers to their fathers while serving overseas during World War II. A great example is a World War II cartoon drawn by Sergeant Sherlyn Hansen which showed a Soldier lying in a fox hole, thinking of his father sitting in a chair with his feet up reading the newspaper and listening to the radio. The card was sent via V-mail.    

Victory, or V-mail as it was commonly called, was the process of microfilming letters written on specially designed letterhead sheets, shipping the microfilmed copies overseas, “blowing” the letters up, printing them at a processing center overseas, and then delivering them. The intent of V-mail was to free up valuable shipping and container space for war materials. A single mail bag of V-mail microfilm could replace 37 mail bags needed for 150,000 one page letters, reducing the weight from 2,575 pounds for letters to 45 pounds of V-mail. While V-mail did not replace traditional mail, it did substantially reduce the shipping space needed for traditional letters. Between June 1942 and April 1945, 556,513,795 pieces of V-mail were sent from the U.S. to military personnel overseas.

The USAHEC preserves materials, such as these related to Father’s Day, to ensure the many different stories connected to the history of the U.S. Army live on forever.  For more information about the USAHEC and its resources, visit: www.usahec.org


SUMMER SENSE CAMPAIGN:  Prescription RX and Over the Counter Abuse
 
 
Teens are abusing some over-the-counter (OTC) drugs, such as cough and cold remedies, to get high. Many of these products are widely available and can be purchased at supermarkets, drugstores, and convenience stores. Many OTC drugs that are intended to treat headaches, sinus pressure, or cold/flu symptoms contain the active ingredient dextromethorphan (DXM) and are the ones that teens are using to get high. When taken in high doses, DXM can produce a "high" feeling and can be extremely dangerous in excessive amounts.
 
Over-the-counter drug abuse also occurs with laxatives, diuretics, emetics, and diet pills, as teens try to achieve an idealized weight.1Young people may start taking just a few diet pills but then graduate to full addiction and dependence. Ephedrine, caffeine, and phenylpropranolamine are just some of the dangerous and addictive substances found in diet pills. Herbal, sometimes referred to as "natural", weight loss products can be just as dangerous as diet pills. All of these substances act as stimulants to the central nervous system and much like speed, can have serious and potentially fatal side effects.2
 
WHAT CAN YOU DO? TIPS FOR PREVENTING RX ABUSE
  Think about your home. What prescription and over-the-counter drugs do you have? Where are they kept? Would you know if some were missing? The good news is that you can take steps immediately to limit access to these drugs and help keep your teen drug-free.
 
1. SAFEGUARD ALL DRUGS AT HOME. MONITOR QUANTITIES AND CONTROL ACCESS.
  Take note of how many pills are in the bottle or pill packet, and keep track of refills. This goes for your own medication, as well as for your teen and other members of your household. If you find you have to refill medication more often than expected, there could be a real problem – someone may be taking your medication, and monitor dosages and refills.
 
2. SET CLEAR RULES FOR TEENS ABOUT ALL DRUG USE, INCLUDING NOT SHARING MEDICINE AND ALWAYS FOLLOWING THE MEDICAL PROVIDER’S ADVICE AND DOSAGES.
  Make sure your teen uses prescription drugs only as directed by a medical provider and follows instructions for OTC products carefully. This includes taking the proper dosage and not using with other substances without a medical provider’s approval. Teens should never take prescription or OTC drugs with street drugs or alcohol. If you have any questions about how to take a drug, call your family physician or pharmacist.
 
3. BE A GOOD ROLE MODEL BY FOLLOWING THESE SAME RULES WITH YOUR OWN MEDICINES.
  Examine your own behavior to ensure you set a good example. If you misuse your prescription drugs, such as share them with your kids, or abuse them, your teen will take notice. Avoid sharing your drugs and always follow your medical provider’s instructions.
 
4. PROPERLY CONCEAL AND DISPOSE OF OLD OR UNUSED MEDICINES IN THE TRASH.
  Unused prescription drugs should be hidden and thrown away in the trash. So that teens and others don’t take them out of the trash, you can mix them with an undesirable substance (like used coffee grounds or kitty litter) and put the mixture in an empty can or bag. Unless the directions say otherwise, do NOT flush medications down the drain or toilet because chemicals can pollute the water supply. Also, remove any personal, identifiable information from prescription bottles or pill packages before you throw them away. Become familiar with your communities DEA National Medication Take Back events.
 
5. ASK FRIENDS AND FAMILY TO SAFEGUARD THEIR PRESCRIPTION DRUGS AS WELL.
  Make sure your friends and relatives, especially grandparents, know the risks, too, and encourage them to regularly monitor their own medicine cabinets. If there are other households your teen has access to, talk to those families as well about the importance of safeguarding medications. If you don’t know the parents of your child’s friends, then make an effort to get to know them, and get on the same page about rules and expectations for use of all drugs, including alcohol and illicit drugs. Follow up with your teen’s school administration to find out what they are doing to address issues of prescription and over-the-counter drug abuse in schools.
 
Talk to your teen about the dangers of abusing prescription and over-the-counter drugs. These are powerful drugs that, when abused, can be just as dangerous as street drugs. Tell your teen the risks far outweigh any “benefits.”
 
The above information provided by PARENTS the Anti-Drug. For additional information contact the Army Substance Abuse Program at 245 – 4576.
 
To learn more about Rx & OTC health risks, visit drugfree.org.
 
For additional information on proper medication disposal visit www.disposemymeds.org
 
DEA Medication Take Back Event will be held in the fall of 2013. Watch for details or contact the Prevention Office at 245-4576.
 
 
 

Authors to help celebrate Army’s birthday at USAHEC
 
 
On June 14, 2013 from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. the Army Heritage Center Foundation will host Dr. Daniel Felix and David F. Manning for a book signing at the Foundation’s Museum Store within the Visitor and Education Center at the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center, 950 Soldiers Drive, Carlisle.
 
As part of the festivities during USAHEC’s Army birthday celebration, Cumberland County author Dr. Daniel Felix will be available to sign his book, A Scout for E Company: 1944 – The Story of PFC Gene Wentz.  Felix is a long-time Pennsylvania Educator and has taught at Elizabethtown College, Shippensburg University, and Messiah College. 
 
Based on the experiences of a Pennsylvanian who served in World War II during the Italian campaign, Felix provides a first-hand account of what the Army was like for a young draftee in the European theater.  “As the World War II generation ages, we are increasingly losing the living history of those who served in the war,” he said.  “This is also a unique book about a young man from Pennsylvania—and how he made it through that remarkable period in history.”
 
A Scout for E Company: 1944 takes the reader through Pennsylvanian Gene Wentz’s early years growing up in a small coal mining town in Western Pennsylvania and follows him up to the present day.  The story centers on his time in the Army, but shares anecdotes of his life after he came home—and like the rest of his generation, how his Army life shaped his life back in the States.
 
During World War II, Wentz went to the European theater by way of Africa as one of many replacement troops in 1943.  He was assigned to the 36th Infantry Division in November 1943 and was severely wounded the next spring outside Rome. The book describes his life in basic training, a gut-wrenching trip across the Atlantic, and a train ride through exotic North Africa.  After landing in Naples, the story follows Wentz into battle at San Pietro, attempts to cross the Rapido River outside Cassino, and relates the slow march up Italy's boot under frigid conditions as the 36th Division slogged their way through Italy’s stiff, German defensive lines. 
 
David Manning will also be signing copies of Global Arms of Collegiality from the Global Arms Series, a five book set about international senior military officers-diplomats who attend school at United States Defense Universities and Command and General Staff Colleges. Manning is an International Military Historian from Lawrence, Kansas. He retired from the United States Air Force as a Master Sergeant after 24 years of service.
 
The Global Arms Series speaks about a “Family of Nations”: learning military tactics and strategy, promoting respect, cultural understanding, and the insights to International Military relationship building and the long term partnerships that garner world peace.
 
Proceeds from the sale of the Global Arms Series books at this event will benefit the Wounded Warrior Project.
 
About the Army Heritage Center Foundation
 
The Military Heritage Foundation, doing business as the Army Heritage Center Foundation, is a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) that that, through donated support, is funding the construction of the public components of the Center—the Visitor and Education Center (VEC) and the Army Heritage Center.  As the phased construction program is completed, the Foundation transfers these facilities to the Army to operate, staff, and maintain as part of the Center. The Foundation will then focus on “margin of excellence support” to meet the needs of educational programs and other activities at USAHEC where federal funds are inadequate or unavailable. 
 
The Foundation completed its Voices of the Past capital campaign in 2010 with the construction of Phase One of the Visitor and Education Center, a key component of the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center campus.  Opened to the public on May 20, 2011, the Visitor and Education Center is the focal point for the campus, containing the first large exhibit gallery, and hosting educational activities on the USAHEC Campus.
 
The Foundation is now seeking grants and donations to build Phase Two of the Visitor and Education Center and to create an endowment to sustain and enhance educational programs. The Foundation’s education program coordinates the National History Day in Pennsylvania, complements the Center’s programs and exhibits, and is a state approved continuing education provider. The Foundation also supports and enhances USAHEC’s public outreach by supporting marketing initiatives and serving as a public advocate of the Center’s mission and programs. Learn more about the Foundation at www.armyheritage.org

Customer Alert for Carlisle Barracks Commissary shoppers
 
 
Normal days of operation will change beginning July 8 due to the furlough of Carlisle Barracks Commissary employees.
 
At that time, and for as long as furloughs are in effect, the Commissary will be closed on TUESDAYS, in addition to the normal MONDAY closure.
 
Please keep in mind, this schedule is subject to change and new information will be posted when received.
 
Thanks for your continued patronage and support.

Carol Kerr, Public Affairs Officer
Graduation speaker Gen. Odierno spotlights leader development strategy at Army War College ceremony

 

 Gen. Ray Odierno, Army Chief of Staff, discusses the Army War College education in context of the Army's new Leader Development Strategy 2013 -- emphasizing the graduates' role in developing the next generation of young leaders through training, education and experience.    

 

 

To find photos of each graduate visit http://www.carlisle.army.mil/banner/PhotoAlbum/Graduation2013/default.cfm

For more photos visit www.facebook.com/usawc

The Army War College graduation ceremony June 8 at historic Carlisle Barracks parade field celebrated the academic achievements of senior leaders and underscored the significance of leader development, as guest speaker Gen. Raymond Odierno introduced the graduates to the new Army Leader Development Strategy.

“As we begin our transition following 12 years of war, we must rededicate ourselves to the development of our leaders as our best hedge against complexity and uncertainty,” said the Chief of Staff of the Army to the resident Class of 2013.

 “Developing leaders is a competitive advantage the Army possesses that cannot be replaced by technology or substituted for with weaponry and platforms,” said Odierno. “That is why today, we are releasing the 2013 Army Leader Development Strategy across the Army.

The Army Chief defined leader development as the deliberate, continuous, and progressive process that grows Soldiers and Army Civilians into competent, committed professional leaders of character.  The strategy will focus on career-long synthesis of the training, education, and experience; it addresses opportunities in the institutional, operational, and self-development domains.

“We are implementing this leader development strategy with the advantage of having the most combat-seasoned force the Army has ever had. Virtually every leader at every echelon has led in combat. We must harness our experience in conducting complex operations with joint, interagency, intergovernmental and multinational partners to achieve tactical, operational and strategic objectives on the ground,” said Odierno.

The Army War College class of 2013 reflects the diversity of national security partners.   Graduates include U.S. officers – 225 Army, 32 Air Force, 15 Navy, 17 Marine Corps, 1 Coast Guard -- including Reserve and National Guard officers;  24 Civilian Students;  and 71 International Officers.  They average 22 years service with extensive campaign experience in Operations Iraqi Freedom or Enduring Freedom, among others of the past two decades. 

“The U.S. Army has historically been in the business of building leaders,” said the Army Chief to the 385 leaders who celebrated a “tremendous milestone in their career,” according to Odierno.  Most students earned a master’s degree in Strategic Studies as well as Joint Professional Military Education level II credit.

“I am relying on each of you here today, particularly U.S. Army officers, not only to be guided by the Army Leader Development Strategy but to implement it. At its core, this strategy is about investing in our single most precious resource, our people.

“We owe it to them to ensure they are well led and prepared for the future,” said Odierno.

“I appreciate that the Chief tied our mission and the changes we’re making to strengthen The War College curriculum to the new leader development programs the school offers, said Col. Richard Lacquement, dean of the School of Strategic Landpower here.  “The end of more than a dozen years of war and the knowledge that we’re transitioning to a new era of greater uncertainty puts a premium on education.  Looking to the future and the challenges that we may face is a particularly demanding educational task.

War College studies incorporate core courses in strategic leadership, theory of war and strategy, national security policy and strategy, campaigning, regional security;  as well as student-driven electives and a major strategy research paper.  Student research explored multiple topics relevant to their Service or Nation:  suicide prevention, cyber strategy, the industrial base, stewardship of the Army Profession; weighed options with respect to targeted killing, private security companies, intelligence and regionalization, and border security; and proposed strategies with respect to Libya, Guam, China, and Malaysia.

New graduate Col. Mark O’Donnell wrote his SRP on leadership development and keyed on the Army Chief’s remarks. 

“He talked about things I’ve been putting a lot of thought into throughout the year – especially about development of junior leaders and what I hope to implement in my brigade, said O’Donnell, who will take command of the 1st Brigade, 10th Mountain Division and, later this year, learn of the unit’s regional alignment.

“Those young leaders will have leadership responsibility – this unique opportunity to lead America’s sons and daughters.”  It may not be in combat, said O’Donnell, who noted that they will not know what’s in store. “We’ll be preparing for something unknown: the challenge is a little different. The end of the war is not the end of the opportunity to lead.

“This is certainly an interesting time to be in the Army.  If you love to lead and love being around people, this is the best place you can possibly be,” he said. “It’s going to require some creativity and leveraging of the skills I learned here, to achieve the same effect in a fiscally constrained environment as we were able to achieve in the last years.  Leader development is the biggest of all those challenges.” 

 

 

 

 

 


Two dozen students win writing and research awards

Graduating from a distinguished university is a monumental occasion for most students, especially those who graduate and earn awards for their academic achievements.

Twenty-five Army War College students, International Fellows and Fellows from the 2013 class are among 385 graduates who have distinguished themselves by winning various writing, speaking and research awards.

This year’s award winners represent the U.S. Air Force, Marines, Army, Army Reserves, Army National Guard and Department of State as well as two International Fellows from the Austrian and Pakistani Armed Forces.

Congratulations to the award-winning students,  recognized during the USAWC graduation ceremony June 8.Air Force Col. Jonathan C. Rice, awarded first place for the 2013 Secretary of Defense National Security Essay Competition for the essay, “Four Core Questions for U.S. Cyberattack Guidance.”

Army Lt. Col. Brian E. Linvill, Stanford University fellow, awarded third place for the 2013 Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff National Defense and Military Strategy Essay Competition for the essay, “Retaking the Lead: A New Role for America in Libya.”

The Commandant’s Award for Distinction in Research is awarded to multiple students:

o  Navy Capt. Scott A. McClellan, for the essay “The Shanghai Cooperation Organization: Should the U.S. Be Concerned?”

o Army Col. Timothy D. Mitchell, for the essay “The Army FAO Training Program: Time to Break More Glass” 

o Austrian Col. Rudolf Zauner, for the essay “Cooperation and Integration: Keeping Austria’s Forces Relevant for 21st Century” 

o John M. Finkbeiner, Department of State, for the essay “Malaysia’s Great Power Balance and the South China Sea Disputes.”

The Army War College Foundation Award for Outstanding Strategy Research Paper has multiple awardees:

o Army Col. Douglas W. Winton, for the essay “China’s Economic Statecraft in Africa: Implications for the U.S. Rebalance”

o Pakistani Brig. Gen. Muhammad Arif Malik, for the essay “Militancy in Pakistan: Rebottling the Genie”

o Army Col. Jon R. Drushal, Atlantic Council of the United States fellow, for the essay “Additive Manufacturing: Implications to the Army Organic Industrial Base in 2030”

o  Army Col. Scott L. Efflandt, for the essay “Under Siege: How Private Security Companies Threaten the Military Profession.”

Army Col. Charles C. Rimbey, awarded the Army War College Foundation Daniel M. Lewin Cyber-Terrorism Technology Writing Award for the essay, “Off We Go Into the Wild Digital Yonder Building Cyber Forces.”

Air Force Col. Gregory P. Gilbreath, awarded the Army War College Foundation Col. Francis J. Kelly Counterinsurgency Writing Award for the essay, “America’s Targeted Killing Policy: Is it Right? Is it Working?”

Army Lt. Col. Daniel C. Hodne, awarded the Army War College Foundation Dr. Sara L. Morgan Civilian Development and Management Writing Award for the essay, “We Want You: It Takes a Village to Market the Army.”

Marine Corps Lt. Col. Stanton L. Chambers, awarded the Army War College Foundation Col. Jerry D. Cashion Writing Award for the essay, “Force Multiplier: The Military’s Future Role in U.S. Border Protection.”

Army Col. Frederick M. O’Donnell, awarded the Army War College Foundation Anton Myrer Strategic Writing Award for the essay, “Developing Strategic Leader Competencies in Today’s Junior Officer Corps.”

Army Col. Enrique Camacho, awarded the Col. Don and Mrs. Anne Bussey Military Intelligence Writing Award for the essay, “Regionalization: The Cure for an Ailing Intelligence Career Field.”

Army Col. John A. Vermeesch, awarded the Carlisle Barracks and Cumberland Valley Chapter of the Association of the U.S. Army (AUSA) Award for Excellence in Public Speaking, for the speech “U.S. – Iranian Relations: A Stalemate of Mistrust.”

The Military Officer Association of America (MOAA) Writing Award has multiple awardees:

o Army Col. Patrick D. Reardon, for the essay “US-Vietnam Mil-Mil Relations: How to Elevate the Relationship”

o Army Col. Michael J. Philbin, for the essay “Cyber Deterrence: An Old Concept in a New Domain.”

Army Lt. Col. Roger P. Hedgepeth, awarded the Association of the United States Army (AUSA) Institute for Land Warfare Award for the essay “Avoiding the Leviathan: A Strategy to Limit Post-conflict Normative Breakdown.”

Army National Guard Lt. Col. Robert A. Crisostomo, awarded the Military Order of the World Wars Writing Award for the essay “Strategic Guam: Past, Present, and Future.”

Army Reserve Lt. Col. Joseph V. Ignazzitto II, awarded the Lt. Gen. Thomas J. Plewes Reserve Components National Security Strategy Writing Award for the essay “The Army’s Use of Spirituality in the Prevention of Suicide.”

Army Col. George R. Smawley, awarded the U.S. Military Academy’s William E. Simon Center for the Professional Military Ethic (SCPME) Writing Award for the essay “Stewardship and the Retired Senior Leader: Toward a New Professional Ethic.”

Army Col. Daniel J. W. King, awarded the Armed Forces Communications-Electronics Association (AFCEA) Writing Award for the essay “Enabled Masses: Challenge and Trust within Modern Social Networks.”

Marine Corps Lt. Col. Brian L. Gilman, awarded the Gen. Thomas Holcomb Writing Award for the essay “Worthy of His Sufferings‘: How Strategic Leaders Learned from Failure.”

Army Col. Stephen J. Maranian, awarded the Army War College Alumni Association Lifetime Membership Award.


Norwegian Military Academy classmates reunite at USAWC Graduation ceremony

International families reflect on their year at Carlisle 

The Army War College graduation ceremony was celebration and reunion for two Norwegian officers with ties to Carlisle and to graduating Norwegian Fellow Col. Ingrid Gjerde, June 8.

Maj. Sissel Mellgren Mangersnes, Lt. Col. Hilde Solheim formed a friendship with Gjerde while attending the Norwegian Military Academy, from 1989 to 1992.  Now, back in the United States for the Joint Women’s Leadership Symposium in Washington D.C., this week, they embraced the opportunity to witness Gjerde’s graduation and visit Carlisle friends.

Both Mangersnes and Solheim spent a year each in Carlisle when their spouses attended the Army War College. Both made the most of experiences and friendships, they noted.

Norwegian Fellow Col. Ingrid Gjerde (center) celebrates her graduation from the U.S. Army War College with Norwegian Army Lt. Col. Hilde Solheim (left) and Norwegian Army Maj. Sissel Mellgren Mangersnes (right), June 8. Mangersnes and Solheim spent a year each in Carlisle when their spouses attended the War College. The three formed a friendship while attending the Norwegian Military Academy.

Mangersnes, now a senior staff officer in Norway’s Department of Defense, worked on gender issues with the Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute and attended classes at Dickinson College when her husband, Col. John Morten Mangersnes, was in the Army War College class of 2012.

During academic year 2010-2011, Solheim studied Global Eastern Africa at Dickinson College while her husband, Col. Odin Johannessen was an International Fellow at the Army War College. She is currently a senior staff officer on the Norwegian Defense Staff.

In an email they co-authored, Mangersnes and Solheim wrote of appreciating their families’ great time living in Carlisle and the friendship, friendliness and hospitality of our neighbors and sponsors that they’re enjoying this week.

“The schools, the USAWC and the Carlisle Community all welcomed us with warmth and friendliness, including us in their everyday life,” they wrote.

“The experience of connecting to people from all over the world, including the U.S., has also touched our lives in a positive way.  The friendships we made across the world have shown us that the world is smaller than we thought and people are more alike than we thought.

“We think for sure that the USAWC is in real life contributing to their slogan, ‘Not to promote war but to preserve peace’.”

 

 


Public Affairs staff
Annual Seminar encourages national security discussions between civilian, military

 

 

Maj. Gen. Tony Cucolo, Army War College Commandant, talks to the 2013 National Security Seminar Fellows and The War College Class of 2013 in Bliss Hall. The week-long seminar brings together civilian leaders together with USAWC students to discuss issues facing the nation.

 

More than 140 business leaders, professional educators, doctors and entertainers who have no military affiliations attend the National Security Seminar every June at the Army War College.

The seminar is the capstone event of The War College’s 10-month curriculum that provides a forum for distinguished speakers to discuss their views on important issues regarding the nation's security and welfare with students, International Fellows, faculty, and the  National Security Seminar Fellows of Army War College seminars.

"I need to you continue to challenge our ways of thinking and reminding our students to keep an open mind," said Maj. Gen. Tony Cucolo, Army War Colege Commandant, during the opening of the ceremony.

Inviting these Fellows serves two goals, said Army Col. Michael Phillips, National Security Seminar week director. “The seminar is an opportunity to expose a broad sampling of American citizens to their Army's senior educational institution, to educate them on the school's mission and our contribution to national defense,” said Phillips.

“The second goal is to expose our students to the concerns, experiences and perspectives of the citizens we serve, considerations we can all too easily forget.”

During the week, each attendee is assigned to one of 24 student seminar groups and becomes an active participant in seminar discussions, sharing from their own background, experience, beliefs and perspectives on these issues. The seminar aims for these representative citizens to get to know some of the prospective leaders of their Armed Forces and, in turn, allows the students to better understand the society they serve.

"This is a great opportunity to learn more about and from these senior military leaders," said Markie Post, NSS Fellow and actress. "It really opens your eyes to see the range of issues and challenges we face as a nation."

"I think it's very important to have these types of conferences where the American public and our military can get together and talk about issues like civil liberties and terrorism," said Cheryl Heckler, NSS Fellow and assistant professor at Miami University.

Each day includes a guest speaker who sets the theme for the day's discussions that cover topics such as the challenges of civil-military relations, the role of domestic politics in national security, globalization, foreign policy, international security issues and the future role of the United States.

“It provides an opportunity for the students to synthesize all of their curricular experiences, from strategic leadership and critical thinking, through policy formulation and resource management,” said Phillips.

Carlos Hernandez, a NSS Fellow who works for Goodwill Industries of Greater New York and New Jersey, said he was impressed by expert faculty and students at The War College.

"It really is a small treasure right here in Pennsylvania," he said.

Guest speakers for this year’s NSS include retired Air Force Gen. Michael Hayden, who will deliver the keynote address, Susan Herman, who will speak about challenges to American traditions of liberty, due process, and equality in a changing world; Norm Orenstein, who will address making policy in a dysfunctional political environment; and Dr. Gordon Adams who will speak on defense in an age of fiscal austerity.

Hayden, the former CIA director, spoke about topics ranging from the threat of terrorism to cyber and transnational crime during his address in Bliss Hall. He spoke of trying to find certainty in a chaotic world.

Susan Herman, president of the ACLU, spoke about the challenges involved with women in direct combat, the repeal of the "don't ask, don't tell policy," and what she see as her organizations role in ensuring equality within all organizations.  

Orenstein, a political scientist and resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, spoke about the "complicated" political system in the U.S. and the role of the 24-hour news networks in shaping public opinion and policy.

"We have to transcend differences to make policy," he said. "This is not easy and will take awhile, but it's something that needs to be done."

The National Security Seminar includes an historian-guided Gettysburg Staff Ride and multiple opportunities to discuss several national security issues facing our country today.


Army War College expertise available 24/7 on official YouTube site

Even if you can’t make it to the Army War College you can still take advantage of its world-class faculty, wide breadth of guests speakers and internationally attended conference via our YouTube page.

Located at www.youtube.com/usarmywarcollege the site boasts nearly 400 videos and is updated regularly with new content.

Want to know the best part? You don’t need an account to access the site and watch the videos. Simply click the link above and scroll down the selection of videos available.  You can even watch these on your mobile devices.

If you do want to be notified when a new video is posted it’s easy. Simply log-in YouTube using a Google or YouTube account and click the “subscribe” button on the top of the page.  Now each time we add something new you’ll be the first to know. 


Volunteers are the Face of Carlisle Barracks
 
 
Maj. Gen. Tony Cucolo recognized "incredible volunteerism" within the Class of 2013, May 30, in front of the class leadership. He singled out Indian Army Brig. Gen. Shashank Upasani, who served as class International Fellow Vice President, and led efforts behind the successful International Fellows’ “It’s a Small World After All” cultural exchange and the IF Regimental Dinner, and Army Civilian student Edward Shepherd, who served as class vice president and represented fellow professional federal civilians.
  
 
 Indian Army Brig. Gen. Shashank Upasani receives the Department of the Army Certificate of Appreciation from Maj. Gen. Tony Cucolo for his service as Class International Fellow Vice President, May 30, Root Hall
 
 photo by Megan Clugh
 
 
  
                                                                                                                        
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The Commander's Award for Civilian service was presented to Department of the Army Civilian student Edward Shepherd by Maj. Gen. Tony Cucolo for volunteer service as class Civilian Vice President on May 30, Root Hall.
 
photo by Megan Clugh 
 
 
The Military Outstanding Service Medal is rarely given, according to Cucolo, who took obvious pleasure in awarding it to students and a member of the staff who balanced academic accomplishments and volunteer service:
 
Army Lt. Col. Keith Blodgett, class vice president; Army Lt. Col. Mark Brooks, soccer coach; Army Col. Enrique Camacho, youth basketball and soccer coach; Army Col. Paul Fellinger, youth soccer coach; Air Force Col. Michael Finch, class secretary and Youth Sports volunteer ; Army Col. David Oberlander, Joint Ball committee chair; Lt. Col. Mike Shekleton, USAWC Staff, youth soccer coach; Army Col. Hugh Shoults, class Gift Committee co-chair; Army Lt. Col. Jonathan Stubbs, Jim Thorpe Sports Day committee chair; Marine Lt. Col. Sam Mowery, class treasurer; Navy Cmdr. Richard Thomas, Air Shipwreck Ball committee chair; and Army Lt. Col. Yi Se Gwon, Youth Sports volunteer.
   
 
 
 
  
Army student Lt. Col. Jonathan Stubbs received the Military Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal for his support to the Carlisle Barracks Youth Services Sports Program, May 30, Root Hall
 
photo by Megan Clugh
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Volunteers were celebrated at a post-wide appreciation event hosted by Maj. Gen. Tony and Ginger Cucolo in Quarters One, May 20. Representing hundreds of volunteers that typify the Carlisle Experience are these helping hands --
 
 
  The faces of Volunteers--Erin Swansiger and Air Force student Lt. Col. Mike Mote, Carlisle Barracks Volunteer Reception, Quarters One, May 20
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
American Red Cross volunteers offered medical record keeping, volunteer clinic receptionist and pharmacy assistance
  • Two Army Community Service volunteer represented more than 500 hours with the lending closets, relocation program, and community events
  • Army Heritage and Education Center volunteers who were involved in research, cataloguing, exhibit construction, and conservation of artifacts
  • Cub Scout Pack 173 volunteers and Scouts of Pack 43 contributed 5,600-plus hours to provide leadership, coaching and mentoring to cub scouts
  • Memorial Chapel’s 293 volunteers are responsible for more than 19,000 hours supporting Child Watch, Vacation Bible School, and serving as ushers
  • USAWC Military Family Program volunteers and seminar spouse representatives dedicated hundreds of hours developing the Battle Buddies video set that’s expected to help military families worldwide
  • Retirement Services volunteers represented peers on the Retiree Council
  • Carlisle Barracks Spouses’ Club volunteers contributed thousands of hours and thousands of dollar helping each other and helping others through community outreach donations and scholarships for military family members
  • 20 Youth Services volunteers with over 280 hours of support to children’s events
  • Better Opportunity for Single Soldiers
  • Child, Youth and School Services                                   
  • Conversation and Culture program
  • Girl Scouts volunteers donated more than 740 hours of community service and leadership
  • Youth Services gym and coaching staff volunteers coached games and taught at sports camps
  • Strike Zone Bowling Center volunteers donated 200-plus hours assisting bowling leagues and providing help in the snack bar
  • 8 Volunteer Income Tax Assistance volunteers guided 630 members of the military with tax returns.

Army Chief of Staff to introduce new Leader Development Strategy to Army War College Class of 2013

Keynote speaker Gen. Odierno to honor, challenge graduates who will return to Joint Force

CARLISLE BARRACKS, Pa. – The formal graduation ceremony of the U.S. Army War College Class of 2013 here Saturday, June 8 at 9 a.m. on the historic parade ground will start with a faculty processional to seats in front of the Wheelock Bandstand where graduates will cross to receive congratulations by the Chief of Staff of the Army Gen. Raymond T. Odierno;  the Commandant of the Army War College Maj. Gen. Tony Cucolo; and War College Provost Dr. Lance Betros.

Chief of Staff of the Army Gen. Raymond T. Odierno will be the guest speaker for the Army War College Class of 2013 graduation June 8.

     Gen. Raymond T. Odierno, 38th Army Chief of Staff will be guest speaker for the Army War College graduation ceremony, and will celebrate the graduates achievements and remind them of the challenges ahead for them as they return to the Joint Force.  He is expected to discuss the Army War College education in context of the Army's new Leader Development Strategy 2013 -- emphasizing the graduates' role in developing the next generation of young leaders through training, education and experience.

    The graduating class represents the Joint Force: 385 students competitively selected from the joint U.S. military, federal agency, and multinational security environment: 225 Army officers, 15 Navy, 32 Air Force, 17 Marine Corps and one Coast Guard officer, representing Active, Reserve and National Guard. The Class includes 71 International Officers, and 24 senior civilians of federal agencies engaged in national security.

    Neighboring Pennsylvania Army National Guard’s Alpha Battery, 1st Battalion, 108th Field Artillery will honor the Army Chief with a 19--gun salute.

     Through more than 36 years of service, Gen. Odierno served in a wide variety of command and staff positions. Of particular note, Gen. Odierno was Commander of United States Joint Forces Command from Oct. 2010 until Aug. 2011 and commanded Multi-National Force - Iraq and, subsequently, United States Forces - Iraq from Sept. 2008 until Sept. 2010.

     A native of Rockaway, N.J., Odierno holds a bachelor of science degree in Engineering from the United States Military Academy at West Point, and a master’s degree in Nuclear Effects Engineering from North Carolina State University.  He is a graduate of the U.S. Army War College and holds a master’s degree in National Security and Strategic Studies from the Naval War College.

   ___

     Located at Carlisle Barracks since 1951, the Army War College educates strategic leaders, to include generals Eisenhower, Patton, Schwarzkopf and Odierno, while advancing knowledge in the global application of Landpower.

     [In case of inclement weather, gate signs will announce the decision to move the ceremony to Bliss Hall, with guest seating in Reynolds Theater, the Omar Bradley Room in Upton Hall and in Root Hall conference and seminar rooms. Handicapped seating will be in the Command Conference Room in Root Hall.]


Middlesex Township announces upcoming road closure

Middlesex Township has announced that on June 13-14 and 17-18, Harmony Hall Drive will be closed for paving. The closure will be from 7 a.m.-6 p.m.

Detours will be in place and Middlesex Township apologizes for any inconvenience, asks that everyone plan accordingly and appreciates everyone’s patience during the work.


Information for Veterans exposed to airborne hazards and open burn pits
 
 
Are you an OEF/OIF/OND or 1990–1991 Gulf War Veteran? The Veterans Administration is working on a new Airborne Hazards and Open Burn Pit Registry that will include a web-based questionnaire for you to report health concerns, exposures, and more.  Comments can be submitted through August 5, 2013.
 
To learn more about the registry and how to comment, go to the Federal Register notice:  <http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTMwNjA1LjE5NTY0NzYxJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDEzMDYwNS4xOTU2NDc2MSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3MTQ3OTM0JmVtYWlsaWQ9Y2hpcXVpdGEyMTMxQGNvbWNhc3QubmV0JnVzZXJpZD1jaGlxdWl0YTIxMzFAY29tY2FzdC5uZXQmZmw9JmV4dHJhPU11bHRpdmFyaWF0ZUlkPSYmJg==&&&101&&&https://federalregister.gov/a/2013-13224
 
To learn more about airborne hazards and what the VA is doing to respond to Veterans' concerns, visit: www.publichealth.va.gov/exposures/categories/air-pollutants.asp<http://links.govdelivery.com:80/track?type=click&enid=ZWFzPTEmbWFpbGluZ2lkPTIwMTMwNjA1LjE5NTY0NzYxJm1lc3NhZ2VpZD1NREItUFJELUJVTC0yMDEzMDYwNS4xOTU2NDc2MSZkYXRhYmFzZWlkPTEwMDEmc2VyaWFsPTE3MTQ3OTM0JmVtYWlsaWQ9Y2hpcXVpdGEyMTMxQGNvbWNhc3QubmV0JnVzZXJpZD1jaGlxdWl0YTIxMzFAY29tY2FzdC5uZXQmZmw9JmV4dHJhPU11bHRpdmFyaWF0ZUlkPSYmJg==&&&102&&&http://www.publichealth.va.gov/exposures/categories/air-pollutants.asp

By Dr. Thomas Williams
Students recognized by Army leadership for suicide research project

Dr. Thomas Williams joins with USAWC students Army Lt. Col. Robert Walter, Army Lt. Col. Timothy Holman, Army Col. Keith Lostroh, Veterans Affairs Civilian Jennifer Jessup, DoD Civilian Gloria Duck to receive congratulations from Commandant Maj. Gen. Tony Cucolo.  Williams is director of the Senior Leader Development and Resiliency Program of The War College, and mentor of the students' research and analysis into preventing suicide.

 

During the Army-wide Suicide Stand-Down Day this past September, the 2013 class of U.S. Army War College students were asked to leverage their strategic thinking skills from their very first course work and take a comprehensive look at policy, process, and practices related to the record suicides within the military.

The varied experiences, perspectives, and personal experiences served as the catalyst for collective wisdom of 385 Army War College students in 24 different seminars to then bring forth and brief then Vice Chief of Staff of the Army, General Lloyd Austin.

Austin expressed great appreciation for Army War College students' and their insights and encouraged students to carry-on by exploring suicide within military as their Strategic Research Project. Five students came forward to answer the call, representing the USAR, National Guard, Active Duty, Veterans Administration, and Department of the Army civilians. 

Their SRP entitled, "Preventing Suicide: A Mission Too Big to Fail" was recently briefed to Army's Suicide Senior Review Group, chaired by VCSA General John Campbell. Each of the students were selected because of their background and interest, as well as their demonstrated abilities. These five students helped address a serious societal military issue by completing this very demanding and time-sensitive study. With the  support and encouragement of the other three, two of the five then were  selected to represent the USAWC in presenting the study results and recommendations to the senior Army leadership during the VCSA chaired March 2013 Suicide Senior Review Group at the Pentagon.


International, U.S. students meet on the pitch for friendly soccer match

Army War College International and U.S. students "battled" each other on grassy, historic Indian Field during the annual soccer game, Wed., May 29.

It was a great game, a close game, an always-exciting game, according to the crowds who cheered for family and colleagues. The U.S. team won the game 3-2.

It’s the highest level of play that I’ve seen in a long time, said Larry Goodson, U.S. student coach and War College faculty member. It was a game that was notable for the good playing, good sportsmanship and camaraderie, he said.

The fans seemed to have more fun than the hard-working players. They included the International Fellows of the Class of 2014, led by Col. John Burbank in a couple iterations of the all-American "wave". 

For more photos visit https://www.facebook.com/USAWC#!/media/set/?set=a.10151530179278682.1073741837.113116603681&type=1.

 

 

 


By Tom Conning

D.C. academic field trip expands interagency understanding

Army War College students departed Carlisle Barracks again to visit a bustling city, met with senior executives, and expanded their understanding of other organizations' perspectives about national security strategy and policy. The first academic field trip, to New York City, supported the strategic leadership course. This trip to Washington D.C., May 7-9, complemented the strategic perspective of the curriculum by linking 34 small student groups with the leaders and influencers whose work in Congress, government agencies, think tanks and non-governmental organizations has relevance for national security leaders.

Bringing students into contact with members of these organizations is valuable, said Col. Richard Lacquement, dean of the USAWC School of Strategic Leadership. “The core curriculum includes a lot of reading and discussing about Congress and the Executive Branch and the different influencers such as think tanks and the media that have an effect on U.S. national security policy,” said Lacquement.

“This is a level of direct experience and knowledge that we can’t quite capture as easily in the classroom or through readings or even videos, so I think this is a valuable experiential learning event to make "real" key parts of the core curriculum.”

 N.J. Congressman Rodney Frelinghuysen shared ideas with Army War College students during one of several Capitol Hill exchanges. The small group also visited the Deloitte Consulting and the Department of State during their visit.

The diversity in each small group – each with Army War College Fellows, International Fellows, Civilian students and US military leaders in the Class of 2013 – ensured that a diversity of viewpoints were addressed in each visit.

Together, each group learned more than would be possible independently as they met with Members of Congress, personnel within the Department of Homeland Security, National Public Radio, the Rand Corporation, the Congressional Budget Office, the Pew Research Center, the Institute for Defense Analysis, Al Jazeera International and more.

Small Group 30 included Army War College Fellow Lt. Col. Peter Eberhardt, Army student Col. Collin Fortier, Iraqi Fellow Col. Hajar Ismail, Army student Col. Stephen Lockridge, Finland's Fellow Col. Petri Mattila, Czech Fellow Lt. Col. Roman Nahoncik, Army War College Fellow Lt. Col. Steven Nicolucci, Army student Col. Gerald Nixon, Army student Lt. Col. Andrew Rendon and Army student Col. Robert White who participated in a total of six visits.

Group 30 met with New Jersey Congressman Rodney Frelinghuysen, along with several other congressional staff members who offered insider insights about how Congress develops and assesses information, and how they make decisions. Frelinghuysen discussed Syria, sequestration, sexual harassment, resource conservation and the political process.

Understanding congressional perspectives on civil-military relationships is a great opportunity, said Army student Lt. Col. Andy Rendon.  “Everything that expands your scope I think is good, especially here in D.C. where high-level decisions are made, and where major resources are prioritized and allocated,” said Rendon. “Having a basic understanding of how those dynamics work I think will help to serve any officer leaving The War College.”

“It was very valuable for me in that I had an opportunity to look inside a politician's mind, and see how the politics are made and how the institution works,” said Czech Fellow Lt. Col. Roman Nahoncik.

Army War College students discuss changing business practices at the Washington Post during D.C. academic field trip May 7. Thirty-four small groups met with personnel from the Department of Homeland Security, National Public Radio, the Rand Corporation, the Congressional Budget Office, the Pew Research Center, the Institute for Defense Analysis, Al Jazeera International and others.

“This whole year, one of my main goals has been that I try to understand better both the military system and our military colleagues’ way to think on issues and also with your civilian society,” said Finnish Fellow Col. Petri Mattila. “To me this was a possibility to understand the civilian society better,” he said.

“This is the behind-the-scenes things that we talked about during the course,” said Army student Col. Stephen Lockridge. “I always wondered how a politician thought. What are his motivations?” he asked.

“You don’t get that type of insight by watching the news,” said Lockridge.

Group 30 visited also the Washington Post, Deloitte Consulting and the Department of State.

Effective leaders need to understand more than just the military, said Army student Col. Collin Fortier after dialogue with the executive editor and a journalist at the Washington Post. “Getting to understand how the press works and their challenges really broadens a leader to understand the other components that make up the vibrant U.S. cultural and national political debate,” said Fortier. “It was interesting to hear the challenges they have in leadership in the business practices with the changing, disruptive technology that the internet is for that business.”

“To engage with different environments, civilian, different companies, finance, Congressman, State Department -- to see their vision about the United States and about the world and about the relationship between the military and civilians, and how they see the military:  I  think is very important,” said Iraqi Fellow Col. Hajar Ismail.

Students understood their follow-on responsibility to return to their seminar and share key insights with peers.  

Sharing information about group visits benefits other students, said Army student Col. Gerald Nixon. “I’ll take away a few points, share them with my seminar group -- everyone within our seminar will benefit from everyone else’s visits also,” said Nixon, one of 371 Army War College people learning through exchanges.

Dean Lacquement echoed Nixon's point. “It’s not just about the individual visits that each student made," he said. "They were sent with the responsibility to come back to their seminar and report on their key insights and share that with others.”

More than 370 students and Army War College Fellows participated in the visits.


By Karen Parrish, American Forces Press Service
Director details furlough plans for DOD schools
  

ALEXANDRIA, Va., May 22, 2013 - Students, teachers and parents of the Defense Department's schools can be confident that despite the department's upcoming civilian furloughs, the school year will start on time, the Department of Defense Education Activity's director said today.

DODEA operates schools overseas and at some U.S. locations for the children of military families.

In an interview at the school system's headquarters at the Mark Center here, Marilee Fitzgerald told the Pentagon Channel and American Forces Press Service that while her workforce will be affected by the coming furloughs, leaders are working together to ensure the least possible impact on students.

"We'll take a five-day instructional loss," Fitzgerald explained. "Fortunately, this is occurring in the DOD schools, where there is probably no group of teachers who are better prepared for this kind of challenge."

Fitzgerald explained that like other DOD employees, 12-month DODEA employees -- including headquarters workers, principals and others -- will be scheduled for up to 11 furlough days to begin no earlier than July 8. Nine-month DODEA employees, including teachers and some staff members, will be scheduled for up to five furlough days beginning in September, she added.

"The goal of all of our teachers -- and everyone, really, in DODEA -- is to try to ensure that there is the least disruption possible to the educational life and experience of our children," she said. "You know, we're in the teaching and learning business. That's what we do. And we're not going to sacrifice one minute that those children are in front of us, to try and help them gain the kind of knowledge that they will need to be successful in the school year."

DODEA schools will be open, but will not conduct regular classes on furlough days, she said. Fitzgerald explained that many school employees, including host-nation employees in overseas schools, are exempt from furlough.

"We can still do extracurricular activities [on furlough days], but those activities must occur after the school day," she said. The director added that furlough days will not be scheduled on standardized testing days, and will most often happen on a Monday or Friday, to regulate students' schedules as much as possible.

Fitzgerald noted that DODEA's teachers are attuned to the needs of their students, who change schools and even countries of residence frequently, often while also dealing with the challenges of having a parent deployed to a war zone.

The teachers will focus on making the best possible use of the classroom time they do have, and will give students extra reading assignments and homework to help them make up the loss of classroom time, she added.

Fitzgerald noted that education research indicates instructional time is crucial, and that from an educator's perspective, five days should be added to the school year, not subtracted from it.

"We're going to be watching that carefully, and our teachers are acutely aware of that research," she said. "They understand the challenge here in trying to help our children make up, if you will, for that instructional loss. ... We're hoping the effect will be minimal."

Fitzgerald said the question of maintaining school accreditation -- which the current plan will maintain -- was important when the issue of furloughs arose. She said she had been troubled a few months ago, when early discussions spoke of possible 22-day furloughs.

"This was a great concern to the department," she said. "There are threshold requirements in our accreditation standards, and we felt that if we went below 175 days of classroom instruction, we were really threatening our accreditation process. Fortunately, the department was able, even in this very severe budget crisis, to ensure that we took a fewer number of days so that we wouldn't in any way compromise our accreditation."

She said DOD places great value on its education activity and its educators and staffs, who run schools around the world and on military installations across the country.

"They've made great investments in the education of our children, and they certainly understand the importance that a quality education has to our nation, [and] to the recruitment and retention of a quality workforce. ... I think they demonstrated that when they reduced the number of furlough days for our employees," she said.

Furloughing school employees demonstrates the depth of crisis facing DOD, Fitzgerald said. "I found every opportunity, every effort being made, to ensure that we would not have to furlough," she added. "[Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel] himself, in his letters, has said he came by this decision with great pain and great regret."

DOD, DODEA, and every other agency devoted to securing the nation's future are struggling under the current budget and deficit conditions, Fitzgerald noted. "I don't think the department would make this decision if it weren't for this financial crisis," she added.

DODEA is not planning to conduct further furloughs beyond the coming school year, she said.

"That can't become a routine," she added. "I believe the department is committed to this investment that it's making in the education of the children, so budget cuts would have to come from other sources, within DODEA and within the department itself, to try and avoid impacting the educational program. We would just have to stop doing certain things."

Fitzgerald said around the world, DODEA's employees will work to keep morale high and their focus on the children, but she acknowledged the furloughs would have an effect.

"This is going to be a very difficult time for our families and our employees," she said.

Still, Fitzgerald said, she's confident her workforce will "push through" the professional and personal difficulties that a loss of classroom time and a loss of pay will bring.

"It's not a heavy lift to keep our teachers motivated," she said. "In fact, during times of great crisis, you will see our teachers ... be the first ones to tell you, 'Let's stay focused on the mission.'"

Educators are people whose career choice is motivated by love of the work, she pointed out. "They believe they can make a difference in the lives of these children," she said. "That characteristic is actually present in all DODEA employees. That's what makes DODEA so special."

From the headquarters to each individual school, she said, "our focus is on the children. It's not about us, it's about them."

Her entire workforce understands the challenges they're facing with a five-day instructional loss this year, Fitzgerald said.

"I would tell you that the prevailing feeling is, while there is great disappointment and concern ... during this whole process, the one thing I think you'll find in DODEA is that they will rally, and they will look back on this -- and they want everyone to do so -- with the sense that, 'Yes, those were tough times, and we performed magnificently,'" she added.

Principals are now working to schedule the precise furlough schedules their schools will observe, Fitzgerald said. She added that parents should contact their local school offices and websites for more information on furlough schedules.

"I can say this to all of our parents: the school calendar shows a report date, an opening of school, and that won't change," she said. "These furlough days ... are not going to be taken, probably, until after the Labor Day holiday. So teachers, parents, children should report to school on time."


Teammates:

      We have a decision on furloughs from the Secretary of Defense. Secretary Hagel's message to all of us is posted below, but essentially we will be subjected to an 11 day furlough that begins on 8 July and ends with the fiscal year (September 30th).

      Please read the Secretary of Defense's note below so you have his message and sentiments. We'll work with your organization's leadership and our colleagues at the various employee unions in the next few days to finalize the plan of execution, but You can expect individual proposal notices to be sent out between May 28th and June 5th.  

      I deeply regret the current fiscal situation has taken us to this action. You all remain absolutely essential to the mission success of this small but important Army post. I can't thank you enough for your patience and perseverance.

MG Tony Cucolo

 

IMMEDIATE RELEASE No. 329-13

May 14, 2013     

________________________________

 

Message to All Department of Defense Personnel from Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel on Civilian Furloughs 

            "As you are fully aware, the Department of Defense is facing a historic shortfall in our budget for the current fiscal year.  This is the result of current law that went into effect March 1.  It imposes deep across-the-board cuts on DoD and other federal agencies.  Combined with higher than expected wartime operating costs, we are now short more than $30 billion in our operation and maintenance (O&M) accounts -- which are the funds that we use to pay most civilian employees, maintain our military readiness, and respond to global contingencies.

            "The department has been doing everything possible to reduce this shortfall while ensuring we can defend the nation, sustain wartime operations, and preserve DoD's most critical asset -- our world-class civilian and military personnel.  To that end, we have cut back sharply on facilities maintenance, worked to shift funds from investment to O&M accounts, and reduced many other important but non-essential programs.

            "Still, these steps have not been enough to close the shortfall.  Each of the military services has begun to significantly reduce training and maintenance of non-deployed operating forces -- steps that will adversely impact military readiness.  And even these reductions are not enough.  Since deeper cuts to training and maintenance could leave our nation and our military exposed in the event of an unforeseen crisis, we have been forced to consider placing the majority of our civilian employees on administrative furlough. 

            "After extensive review of all options with the DoD's senior military and civilian leadership on how we address this budget crisis, today I am announcing that I have decided to direct furloughs of up to 11 days for most of the department's civilian personnel.  I have made this decision very reluctantly, because I know that the furloughs will disrupt lives and impact DoD operations.  I recognize the significant hardship this places on you and your families.

            "After required notifications, we will begin the furlough period on July 8 at the rate of one furlough day per week for most personnel.  We plan to continue these furloughs through the end of the current fiscal year.  If our budgetary situation permits us to end furloughs early, I would strongly prefer to do so.  That is a decision I will make later in the year.

            "Furloughs for 11 days represent about half of the number we had originally planned, reflecting the department's vigorous efforts to meet our budgetary shortfalls through actions other than furlough.  There will be exceptions driven by law and by the need to minimize harm to the execution of our core missions.  For example, all employees deployed or temporarily assigned to a combat zone will be excepted from furloughs. 

            "Your managers have been given authority to develop specific furlough procedures to minimize adverse mission effects and also limit the harm to morale and productivity.  They will be in touch with you to provide guidance and answers. 

            "The president and I are deeply appreciative of your patience, your hard work, and your dedication and contributions to the critical mission of helping protect America's national security.  I am counting on all of you to stay focused on this vital mission in the days ahead.  As I said the day I assumed the responsibilities of secretary of defense, I'm proud to be part of your team and I'm proud to serve with you."


Towery marks end of 30-year Army career

Former Army War College Deputy Commandant Col. Bobby Towery and his wife, Lisa, were honored at a formal retirement ceremony June 1 at 11 a.m. on the parade grounds of historic Carlisle Barracks. Towery said he will always remember and treasure the honor of reviewing the Old Guard at the Opening Ceremony of the Army War College resident education program each August of the past four years.

 

Colleagues from Mississippi, Louisiana, Kansas, Iraq and Carlisle helped wish godspeed to former Army War College Deputy Commandant now-retired Col. Bobby Towery and his wife, Lisa, Saturday, June 1 at 11 a.m. at the Wheelock Bandstand on the historic parade ground of Carlisle Barracks. His son Army ROTC Cadet Patrick Towery presented Towery’s retirement flag.

“It’s very satisfying being a part of all of the many great things The War College has accomplished in the last few years,” he said. Towery came to The War College in 2008 as the 50th Chief of Staff, before assuming his duties as the 49th Deputy Commandant in June 2009.

Maj. Gen. Tony Cucolo, 49th Commandant, officiated.  accompanied by . Towery will be honored with the Distinguished Service Medal, a Presidential Letter, U.S. Army War College presentations, the Mississippi Magnolia Medal presented by Col. David Smith of the Mississippi Army National Guard,  and a Letter from U.S. Sen. Pa. Toomey.

Lisa Towery was honored for a lifetime of service on behalf of military families with the Secretary of the Army Public Service Award, the Margaret Corbin Medal and a Letter from the Chief of Staff of the Army.

The ceremony marks the end of Bobby Towery’s 30-year Army career that began with commissioning as an Armor Officer through the University of Mississippi ROTC program and continued through command of 2 companies in the 5th Infantry Division, Fort Polk; command of the 3rd Forward Support Battalion, 3d Infantry Division, as it deployed to Kuwait in support of Operation Enduring Freedom and then into Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom, and varied staff positions.  After graduation from the Army War College Class of 2006, he commanded the 61st Ordnance Brigade at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.

Both Bobby and Lisa Towery were deeply engaged in the Carlisle community during the past five years in which he served in the command group of the Army War College:  Carlisle Chamber of Commerce, Military Liaison Committee, Lamberton Middle School and Carlisle Area High School school activities, the Army Heritage Center Foundation supporting USAHEC, the Army War College Foundation and the Omar N. Bradley Foundation. Lisa was a lifelong supporter of Army families and Army communities; as director of the Facilitating Leadership and Group Skills program, here, she helped launch a new generation of community leaders.

“The community here is more welcoming than any other place we’d ever been,” he said. “The school systems here are fantastic. It’s really a great place to be with your family.”

The Army War College counts multiple Towery initiatives to enhance the student academic experience and the military family experience at Carlisle Barracks.  He introduced information technology innovations to streamline knowledge sharing throughout the College;  championed Army War College social media; and created an online forum to link alumni with USAWC resources and experts.

“By taking advantage of technology we were able to condense seven different calendars into one, bring together in one place all of our publications and to better align the support from the foundation, we were able to create a better experience for our students and their Families,” he said.

Bobby and Lisa Towery plan to return to Mississippi.