Banner Archive for June 2011
 
Fourth of July marked by Carlisle Summerfair events thru July 9
 
  Carlisle Summerfair , June 30 - July 9, is "just outside your back door," according to event organizers.
 
  Activities include 5 and 10K runs, concerts, mini festival and craft show, children's activities, historic walking tours, around the town bike rides and much more.
 
   The Summerfair Musical is "All Shook Up" with performances at Carlisle Theater July 7,8,9 at 7 pm, and July 9 at 2 pm.
 
  The Carlisle Summer Fair website lists dozens of activities:   http://www.carlislesummerfair.org/
 

FIREWORKS DISPLAY "STARS BURST OVER CARLISLE 2011" is scheduled for Saturday, July 2, beginning at 9:30 p.m. at the Carlisle Fairgrounds.

   In addition to the usual array of aerial “bombs bursting in air, this year’s show will again include the addition of “close proximity firework,” according to Carlisle Mayor Kirk Wilson.   The close firing makes them much more entertaining for the audience while using only a fraction of the explosives of conventional fireworks, he explained.

   The close-proximity fireworks will only be visible from the Carlisle Fairgrounds.  As a result there will be some additional restricted parking areas to allow spectators to view the show.  Carlisle Special Fire Police will direct traffic.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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What have you done to save a life today?  Start with safety, this 4th of July holiday

Maj. Gen. Gregg Martin's  Independence Day Safety Message

 

1.    Have a great, safe Fourth of July holiday!  We celebrate our Nation’s freedom and a safe, secure way of life on this holiday.  Generations of Americans have been able to rely on the men and women of the Armed Forces to be there when we’re needed to defend that freedom.  We can’t achieve our mission if we drop our guard against the risks of inattention and risky behaviors.

 

2.    Be the leader of change.  Engage your Soldiers, Civilian Employees, Family members, and friends to reinforce our safety culture during the holiday and the days of summer. I expect you to weave the TRADOC’s safety theme through everything you do, on duty and off: “What have you done to save a life today?” 

 

3.    Make safety –- along with excellence -- your priority habit every day, and especially during the holiday. Don’t mix alcohol with other activities, like driving, boating, and swimming.  Don’t be distracted while driving by cell phones, maps, or music. Do plan to avoid the hazards of summer heat and fireworks injuries. Finally, plan for weather events and traffic delays, and minimize the stress that compromises decision-making while traveling. 

 

4.    As you celebrate the fireworks, parades and barbecues – make smart choices and decisions for safety. Get smart with TRADOC’s new, interactive safety video Off Duty On Guard, online at www.carlisle.army.mil. Be safe, smart and Army Strong!

 

Safety starts here:  Wisdom and Strength for the Future!

Safety is paramount for Soldiers in combat zones, but safety is just as important when off duty as well. "Off Duty On Guard" is an interactive video experience designed to teach soldiers the importance of safety while off duty. http://www.tradoc.army.mil/offdutyonguard/


DeCA announces Commissary Gift Card program

 

 

FORT LEE, Va. Extending the gift of groceries to authorized commissary patrons will soon be a lot easier thanks to the new Commissary Gift Card.

The gift cards, available in denominations of $25 and $50, will be available June 30 for purchase in stateside stores or online through http://www.commissaries.com. Commissary customers overseas can expect to see Commissary Gift Cards in their stores by early July. Customers there should stay tuned to their local store for card availability.

Anyone will be able to purchase the gift cards for commissary shoppers, said Defense Commissary Agency Director and CEO Joseph H. Jeu.

“These gift cards allow anyone to give the gift of groceries – whether it’s mom and dad at home helping their military child in Germany stock up for a holiday dinner or a senior noncommissioned officer who wants to introduce the commissary benefit to a junior soldier who has a family at Fort Hood, Texas,” Jeu said. “We are excited to unveil a program that will allow more people to take full advantage of their benefit.”

This is how the card works: Anyone can purchase the card, but only an authorized patron can redeem it. A customer uses the card as long as there is a balance on it; once the complete $25 or $50 total is exhausted, the card can no longer be used. There is no monetary change issued for unused portions of the card. Shoppers can use the remaining card balance in conjunction with other forms of payment, said Robert J. Bunch, chief of DeCA’s customer service division.

SVM, the global leader in gift card program management, is administering the Commissary Gift Card program on behalf of the commissary agency. SVM has provided businesses and organizations with gift cards for promotions, incentives and rewards for more than a decade.    

“These cards allow us to offer the gift of groceries without a paper voucher or a gift check,” Bunch said. “And, the ability to order them online helps people who may not ordinarily be connected with the military, or even on an installation, to still be able to reach out to support the troops.”

Here are some quick facts about the Commissary Gift Card:

  • The cards will be available at all commissaries worldwide – on a rack at full service, front-end registers – as well as through the DeCA website, http://www.commissaries.com.
  • The cards expire five years from the date of purchase.
  • Online orders incur a handling fee. These fees are not assessed to in-store orders.
  • There is no limit to the number of gift cards that a purchaser can buy. However, DeCA officials recommend organizations and activities consider purchasing online if they need $500 or more in gift cards.
  • Commissary Gift Cards can be shipped anywhere in the United States. Outside the United States, gift cards can be shipped to APO, FPO or DPO addresses.
  • For customer service questions, call the toll-free phone number, 1-877-988-4438, which also allows the user to check the card balance.
  • DeCA is not responsible for replacing lost, stolen, destroyed or mutilated cards.

Once commissaries receive their first gift cards for sale, they will no longer sell gift vouchers. However, customers who have already purchased gift vouchers will be able to redeem them through Aug. 31, 2016.

“In the military we have a longstanding tradition of taking care of our own,” said Army Command Sgt. Maj. John M. Gaines Jr., DeCA senior enlisted advisor to the director. “However, this program also allows families at home, friends, our industry partners and charitable organizations to extend the gift of groceries to our commissary patrons. That’s a wonderful way to say ‘thanks’ for everything they do in serving our nation.”

DeCA began using gift vouchers in 2009 shortly after the agency’s gift check provider, CertifiChecks Inc., ceased operations on Feb. 26, 2009. Since then, customers have redeemed nearly 191,000 vouchers for about $4.7 million in sales. 


Jim Garamone, American Forces Press Service
Obama announces troop reductions, way forward in Afghanistan

Watch the video and read the transcript here

WASHINGTON, June 22, 2011 – Thanks to the tremendous progress U.S., coalition and Afghan troops have made, the United States will draw down the number of troops in Afghanistan by 10,000 this year and 33,000 by the end of summer 2012, President Barack Obama said here tonight.

“The tide of war is receding,” the president said during an address to the nation from the White House. “Fewer of our sons and daughters are serving in harm’s way.”

In a statement released by the Pentagon following the president’s announcement, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said the president’s decision capitalizes on the security successes.

“Over the past 18 months our troops have made tremendous progress degrading the capability of the Taliban while enhancing the Afghan security forces,” Gates said. “It is critical that we continue to aggressively prosecute that strategy. I support the President’s decision because it provides our commanders with enough resources, time and, perhaps most importantly, flexibility to bring the surge to a successful conclusion.”

When completed in September 2012, the drawdown will remove the last of the plus-up of forces in Afghanistan that Obama ordered in December 2009 during a speech at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y.

In that same speech, the president announced the new Afghan strategy, which  was to focus on al-Qaida, reverse the Taliban’s momentum and to train Afghan security forces. He also announced that the drawdown would begin in July 2011.

Obama said his announcement tonight is proof that the strategy is working. “Thanks to our men and women in uniform, our civilian personnel, and our many coalition partners, we are meeting our goals,” he said. When the first stage of the drawdown is complete in September 2012, the surge will be over.

U.S. troops will continue to drawdown as Afghan security forces take the lead for protecting their own country. As this continues, the U.S. mission will switch from combat to support.

“By 2014, this process of transition will be complete, and the Afghan people will be responsible for their own security,” Obama said.

The United States ended its combat role in Iraq last year and there are now about 45,000 U.S. troops in Iraq providing training and support to Iraqi security forces. The reduction of 33,000 troops by the end of summer 2012 will mean about 65,000 Americans in Afghanistan.

“Even as there will be dark days ahead in Afghanistan, the light of a secure peace can be seen in the distance,” Obama said. “These long wars will come to a responsible end.”

Obama said the past 10 years have been difficult for America. “We have learned anew the profound cost of war -- a cost that has been paid by the nearly 4,500 Americans who have given their lives in Iraq, and the over 1,500 who have done so in Afghanistan – men and women who will not live to enjoy the freedom that they defended,” he said. “Thousands more have been wounded. Some have lost limbs on the field of battle, and others still battle the demons that have followed them home.”

The president pledged that America will honor the sacrifices of so many and keep the sacred trust to provide the families of the fallen, those wounded and the veterans of the conflict “the care, and benefits, and opportunity that you deserve.”

In a background briefing before the speech, senior administration officials said the president’s decision had the full support of the national security team. Army Gen. David Petraeus, the commander of NATO’s International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan, presented the president with a range of options and the risks associated with each.

“I think there’s a broad understanding among the national security team that there’s an imperative to both consolidate the gains that have been made and continue our efforts to train Afghan security forces and partner with them in going after the Taliban, while also being very serious about the process of transition and the drawdown of our forces,” the official said.

The drawdown begins from a position of strength, Obama said. Al-Qaida and its Taliban allies are under tremendous pressure. Navy SEALs killed Osama bin Laden in Pakistan and more than half of al-Qaida’s leadership has been killed or captured.

“In Afghanistan, we’ve inflicted serious losses on the Taliban and taken a number of its strongholds,” the president said. “Along with our surge, our allies also increased their commitments, which helped stabilize more of the country. Afghan security forces have grown by over 100,000 troops, and in some provinces and municipalities we have already begun to transition responsibility for security to the Afghan people.”

Everything is not rosy, the president said, and the United States remains committed to preserving the gains made and expanding on them. “We do know that peace cannot come to a land that has known so much war without a political settlement,” he said. “So as we strengthen the Afghan government and security forces, America will join initiatives that reconcile the Afghan people, including the Taliban.” Any reconciliation will be done with Afghans in the lead.

“The goal that we seek is achievable, and can be expressed simply: no safe-haven from which al-Qaida or its affiliates can launch attacks against our homeland, or our allies,” the president said.

“We will not try to make Afghanistan a perfect place. We will not police its streets or patrol its mountains indefinitely. That is the responsibility of the Afghan government, which must step up its ability to protect its people; and move from an economy shaped by war to one that can sustain a lasting peace," Obama said. "What we can do, and will do, is build a partnership with the Afghan people that endures – one that ensures that we will be able to continue targeting terrorists and supporting a sovereign Afghan government.”

The president also addressed the terrorist threat that resides in Pakistan. “No country is more endangered by the presence of violent extremists, which is why we will continue to press Pakistan to expand its participation in securing a more peaceful future for this war-torn region,” he said.

The United States will continue to work with Pakistani leaders to go after terrorists. “We will insist that it keep its commitments,” he said. “For there should be no doubt that so long as I am president, the United States will never tolerate a safe-haven for those who aim to kill us: they cannot elude us, nor escape the justice they deserve.”

The president stressed that America’s strength overseas is anchored by prosperity and opportunity at home. “Over the last decade, we have spent a trillion dollars on war, at a time of rising debt and hard economic times,” he said. “Now, we must invest in America’s greatest resource – our people. We must unleash innovation that creates new jobs and industry, while living within our means.”

He said the nation needs to rebuild its infrastructure and find new and clean sources of energy. “Most of all, after a decade of passionate debate, we must recapture the common purpose that we shared at the beginning of this time of war,” he said. “For our nation draws strength from our differences, and when our union is strong no hill is too steep and no horizon is beyond our reach.

“America, it is time to focus on nation building here at home,” he said.


Carlisle Barracks hosts the 2011 Senior Games

 

  If you are wondering what is going on today, Thursday, June 23, on Indian Field, the Strike Zone Bowling Lanes, Thorpe Hall gym, and other locations, Carlisle Barracks is hosting the 2011 Senior Games.

  Senior Games combine sports, recreation, friendly competition and fellowship into one fun-filled day.  The goal is to stimulate active lifestyles, promote healthy living, build lasting friendships and create fond memories.  Any Pennsylvania resident 50 years of age or older is eligible to participate.

  Approximately 94 participants have signed up through Cumberland County Aging and Community Services to participate in events such as:  pinochle, softball and football throws, bowling, 100, 400 and 1600 meters runs, billiards, bocce, horseshoes, basketball foul shooting and more.

  Events began at 9 a.m. and will end at 4 p.m. with presentation of awards


Lisa Daniel, American Forces Press Service

Senate confirms Panetta as Defense Secretary

WASHINGTON, June 21, 2011 - The U.S. Senate voted unanimously this evening to confirm Leon E. Panetta as the next Secretary of Defense.

Panetta received broad bipartisan support following his June 9 confirmation hearing before the Senate Armed Services Committee in which he said his foremost mission as defense secretary would be to protect the United States and ensure it has the "best-trained, the best-equipped and the strongest military in the world."

President Barack Obama nominated him earlier this year to replace outgoing Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates. Panetta, who currently serves as CIA director, is a former Congressman from California who has worked in government for four decades, including as President Bill Clinton's budget director.

Obama has nominated Army Gen. David H. Petraeus, commander of U.S. and NATO troops in Afghanistan, to replace Panetta as CIA director.

Panetta's confirmation comes one day ahead of the president's scheduled address to the nation to outline his plans to drawdown U.S. troops from Afghanistan.

In his hearing before the Senate committee, Panetta called Gates "one of the greatest secretaries of defense in our nation's history" and said he would carry on Gates' initiatives.


Summer Sense Campaign June 19 to July 4

101 Critical Days of Summer (Memorial Day through Labor Day) safety campaign is intended to remind us that we cannot afford to lose focus on safety either on or off duty. The Summer season is a very dangerous time of year for the Army with notable increases in off duty accidental fatalities. Festivals, road trips, swimming, fishing, hiking, boating, softball, and camping are just some of the outdoor activities we like to engage in during the summer. Intense planning often goes into making these outdoor activities a success. When planning your summer activities, remember the effects of alcohol or prescription drugs, and identify the risks associated with impairment while participating in various activities. Always remember, to make responsible decisions while enjoying your summer activities.

Summer Holiday/ celebrations often include barbeques, picnics, water sports, vacationing with family and friends, and fireworks. However, many holiday weekends can be filled with tragedy instead of celebration. The Fourth of July is one of the deadliest holidays of the year when it comes to alcohol-impaired driving crashes on our highways. In 2009 Motor vehicle traffic crashes killed nearly 410 people during the Fourth of July. Of that number, 40 percent of those crashes involved drivers with blood alcohol concentrations (BAC) of .08 grams per deciliter or higher (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration). This summer, don't let your celebrations end in an arrest or tragedy. The consequences are serious and real. Not only do you risk injuring yourself or someone else, but the trauma and financial costs of a crash or an arrest for driving while impaired can be significant and not the way you want to celebrate the July 4th holiday.

For additional information contact the Army Substance Abuse Prevention office at 245 – 4576. Information provided by the Army Center for Substance Abuse web site.


Thomas Zimmerman, Army War College Public Affairs

Distance education class of 2012 reports for first residence session

Distance education student members of the Army War College Class of 2012, take part in the Army Birthday celebration as part of their first residence session. The students will be here for the next two weeks to participate in seminar group sessions, attend lectures, receive an APFRI assessment and more. We’ll add more photos and more for the next two weeks so keep checking back.     

 

June 24, 2011 -- After a year of reading, studying, writing, researching and collaborating behind a computer screen, the members of the Distance Education Class of 2012 reported to the Army War College June 14 for the first of their two resident sessions.

The two-week sessions allow students to participate in seminar group sessions, to attend lectures and work with classified material relevant to the course of instruction. Attendance at both scheduled resident courses of instruction is required for successful completion of the curriculum.

During their two weeks here, the students learned from guest speakers like Amb. Ronald Neumann, who discussed the challenges of diplomacy today; retired Gen. Michael Hayden, who discussed information and intelligence as an instrument of power; visited Washington DC for small group visits; took part in an Antietam staff ride; underwent health assessments from the Army Physical Fitness Research Institute and more.

 “The first residence course really provides a capstone for the first year of studies,” said Col. Darrell Fountain, first resident course director. “We bring in guest speakers who provide a wrap-up on each of the four courses, as well as guest speakers who talk about each element of national power, diplomatic, information, military and economic.”

"The speakers have really been valuable and provided some great insights into some of the issues we're facing," said Col. Thomas Parker. "I thought General Hayden really gave us some candid thoughts on intelligence and how we can effectively use it."

Fountain said that the course ties together all of the strategic themes of the Army War College and prepares them for the second year of studies, including introducing them to  their new seminar mates.

“When they arrive here they are split into the seminars that they will be a part of until graduation,” he said. “This allows them to form relationships here that will carry on during the next year of studies and when they arrive next year for the second residence course.”

The program differs from the resident course in the aspect that it’s a two year program instead of the one year duration for the resident class. Technology overcomes the geographical challenges of students spread around the world.  Instead of mailing in papers, students log onto a secure website and watch videos and guest speaker through Defense Connect Online. The distance education site provides students with primary and supplementary materials and allows students to participate in real-time discussions. This site is the focal point for faculty-student interaction, for viewing multimedia course work, constructing papers, sending course papers, and receiving evaluated work.

Fountain said that the distance education course remains committed to its charter when it was formed in 1960 as the correspondence course.

Members of Seminar Six pose for their group photo in the Bliss Hall foyer.

 

“We have a responsibility to emulate and parallel the curriculum and educational experience of the residence course,” he said. “The delivery method is different, but the educational experience is the same.”  

Students said that the course has been beneficial on many levels.

"It's great to see all the people you've been corresponding with online for the last year and put names to faces," said Lt. Col. David Chacon. "Getting to talk with my fellow students and the faculty has been great."

"It's hard to believe that we're here for our first residence course already," said Lt. Col. Charles Jenks. "The last year has flown by, it's been busy, but has really flown by."


Thomas Zimmerman, Army War College Public Affairs
Former grads reach back to USAWC for assistance

Col. Chris Stockel , a USAWC Class of 2009 graduate, returned to the Army War College recently to meet with faculty member Col. Tom Sexton to discuss strategic issues facing his Civil Military Operations Center during an upcoming deployment. Photo by Thomas Zimmerman.

 

June 20, 2011 – Proving that you can go home again, two Army War College grads returned to Carlisle Barracks recently for assistance with strategic issues facing them in their current and future assignments.

In recent weeks, Col. Chris Stockel and Col. James Mingus both returned to the USAWC to meet with members of the staff and faculty.

“I have maintained strong professional and personal relationships with many staff members,” said Stockel, commander of a Civil Military Operations Center that will support Army Central from July 2011 to June 2012. “The Army War College is a center of academic and professional excellence.” Stockel is a 2009 USAWC graduate.  

Stockel brought back a few members of his team to meet with Col. Tom Sexton because of his expertise in strategic policy planning.

"Our mission is strategic engagement, shaping operations by the Geographic Combatant Commander,” he said. “We came here to help frame the GCC guidance and balancing the ends ways and means.” He said he’s also used papers from institute like the Strategic Studies Institute to help tackle challenges.

This isn’t the first time that he has reached back to the college either.

“The USAWC is a world class asset that is very easy to contact and receive assistance,” he said. “I have even reached out to my faculty instructor from Canada, Col. Ian Hope.”

Mingus, a 2010 grad and commander of the 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division at Ft. Carson,  brought his leadership to meet with Dr. Larry Goodson as they prepare to deploy to Afghanistan.

“The expertise that resides here is amazing,” said Mingus. “Not many people can truly understand and explain the aspects of Afghanistan’s culture quite like the experts here.”

Col. James Mingus, (right) commander of the 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, also came back to the college recently to meet with Dr. Larry Goodson, as they prepare for a deployment to Afghanistan.

 

He said that he knew he had to bring his leadership here to ensure success in their upcoming mission.

“It doesn’t matter if we get over there and build roads or schools or whatever if it’s not what the people really need or want,” he said. “We need to have an awareness of the issues, challenges and cultural aspects that will help us be successful.”

Mingus took part in the Afghanistan regional elective, taught by Goodson and other faculty members.

"They know their stuff better than anyone here at the War College, so what better place to come?" he said.  

Graduates, looking for other ways to stay connected?

Become a member of the Army War College LeaderNet community. Located at https://forums.army.mil/secure/CommunityBrowser.aspx?id=930596&lang=en-US (AKO log-in required) you can ask questions, find resources on topics like contingency operations, health and fitness for strategic leaders, leadership and more.

Army War College homepage
The first and greatest place to keep up on Army War College news and events is the USAWC homepage, located at www.carlisle.army.mil Updated regularly, the site showcases the latest USAWC news, conference, studies and other important events.

USAWC library

No matter where you go throughout your career, the U.S. Army War College Library will continue to support your research and information needs.

You will still have access to the Library's online catalog, a selection of excellent publicly available databases, search engines, bibliographies, and other digital resources via the Library's webpage at http://www.carlisle.army.mil/library.

To get in touch with the research librarians, just phone 717.245.3660, or reach back using our webpage's handy "Ask a Librarian" link to submit your question on an automated request form.

Also, for those of you with Army Knowledge Online (AKO) accounts, you will find additional library resources available there too. After entering the AKO portal, on the Self Service dropdown, select My Library. AKO’s My Library provides easy online access to newspaper and journal articles, e-books, defense and military information, and much more for you and your families.

 

Parameters
Want to read the newest articles on the art and science of land warfare, joint and combined matters, national and international security affairs, military strategy, military leadership and management, military history, ethics, and other topics written by USAWC experts? Then sign up for a free “e-subscription” to Parameters and you’ll to be notified by e-mail when a new issue of Parameters is made available online. Simply send an email to CARL_Parameters@conus.army.mil and put the word “subscribe” in the subject line.

Strategic Studies Institute
Go beyond the headlines and be well versed on the latest national security and geopolitical issues. All Strategic Studies Institute (SSI) publications, events, and updates are announced in the SSI monthly newsletter which you received as part of USAWC email distribution. Visit SSI at http://www.StrategicStudiesInstitute.army.mil/newsletter/ to stay on the list.

If you'd like to stay updated instantly via Facebook, SSI is available at http://www.facebook.com/SSInow.  A few of the SSI upcoming studies for this summer and fall include: Is the Organizational Culture of the U.S. Army Congruent with the Professional Development of its Senior Level Officer Corps?; The Paradox of Preparing for One War Only to Get Another; and, The U.S. Army War College Guide to National Security Issues.

Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute
Want to find out the newest policy papers and articles published by the Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute? Then visit http://pksoi.army.mil/

Center for Strategic Leadership
To find out the latest events, exercises and publications for Center for Strategic Leadership visit  http://www.csl.army.mil/

Army Physical Fitness Research Institute
APFRI is a leader development and enhancement program that focuses on the complex interplay of health, fitness, leadership, and readiness and builds on the recognition and understanding that our leaders must confront and master the human dimension of warfare. Importantly, the expansion of the APFRI program leverages the blend of professional expertise, web-based tools, program materials, and lessons-learned from over 25 years of senior leader assessments that APFRI has completed as part of the USAWC. To see the latest APFRI studies and conferences visit https://apfri.carlisle.army.mil/

Army Heritage and Education Center
Catch up on USAHEC news or watch the latest Perspectives in Military History lecture at http://www.carlisle.army.mil/ahec/index.cfm


Army proceeds on 2001 decision to place National Museum of US Army at Ft Belvoir

The Army announced Friday afternoon that the National Museum of the US Army, long-planned for Fort Belvoir, will be sited at the installation’s North Post to open in June 2015.The Army in 2001 selected Fort Belvoir as the site of the National Museum of the US Army after a site selection process that began in 1983. This Army’s decision about the NMUSA was the final guidance needed by the NMUSA planners to move forward in planning the 41-acre museum, scheduled for a June 2015 opening.

"The process that led to the designation of this site has been comprehensive and thorough, beginning with an evalution of over 64 sites around the country, then the examination of eight different site locations on Fort Belvoir during the planning process for NMUSA, and concluding with a successful environmental assessment," wrote Secretary of the Army John M. McHugh in a letter to Army commanders, June 16.

This decision does not change the future of the US Army Heritage and Education Center in Carlisle.  The development of the USAHEC complex has proceeded on a parallel track since the 2001 decision. In 1999, Secretary of the Army Caldera wrote to Pa. Governor Ridge to say that, “An Army museum at Carlisle would be a welcome addition to the Army Museum System.”

The USAHEC complex in Carlisle now includes three facilities funded through federal and non-federal sources.  The Military Heritage Foundation’s fundraising efforts resulted in the $14 million Visitors and Education Center. The VEC was transferred to the Army for its operation and maintenance; it is co-located with Army-funded buildings:  the $17.3 Military History Institute, the $13 million Conservation Center which is now completing construction.

The Visitors and Education Center at Carlisle formally opened on Armed Forces Day, 2011, and includes a large gallery for interpretive exhibits; meeting rooms for conferences, workshops and reunions; administrative areas, and food serve and retail areas. The VEC currently displays a special Civil War 150 exhibit.

Fort Belvoir is undergoing a major transformation as a result of the Base Realignment and Closure Commission of 2005, which directed relocation of multiple organizations and activities, to include a new Army hospital and the NMUSA. The large Fairfax County, Va., base provides logistical, intelligence and administrative support to a large number of Defense commands, activities and agencies.

Initial construction of the NMUSA will include a multi-story, main museum building with exhibit halls, theater, Veterans’ Hall, food service and retail areas, administration areas, an experiential learning center and a lobby with visitor reception area.

The Army is currently the only service without a centralized museum. The Navy Museum is located at the Navy Yard in Washington D.C.; the Marine Corps Museum is located at the Marine Base Quantico in Prince William County, Va.; and the Air Force Museum is located at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio.

 


New director to guide Army Substance Abuse Program at Carlisle Barracks

June 20, 2011 -- A familiar face will return to Carlisle Barracks to assist with the Army Substance Abuse Program here.

Bradley Nielson, former ASAP director here, will assist with supervisory responsibilities in a partnership with Ft. Detrick, Md., where he is currently the director of their ASAP program. 

Daniel Hocker, director of the Substance Abuse Program here, was arrested recently as part of a local, state and federal investigation that charged 20 people with distributing cocaine in the Carlisle area. The investigation that identified 17 local people in a cocaine-trafficking operation was ongoing for more than a year, according to the indictment.

Garrison commander, Lt. Col. Janet Holliday coordinated for the immediate assistance of a trained ASAP professional from another post due to the important mission of the program.  Hocker's security clearance has been suspended and he is on leave pending further action.

The ASAP provides help for the Army community with respect to training and education, testing, and intervention and counseling. The ASAP offices at Carlisle Barracks were recently collocated to provide seamless support military and family members and civilian employees.


Staff Sgt. Corey Baltos, USAWC Public Affairs

Carlisle Barracks celebrates employees’ hard work at the installation awards ceremony

June 20, 2011- On April 27, 2011 Officer Abigail Ziegert, a Directorate of Emergency Services Police Officer provided CPR to a child who fell into the LeTort run waterway.  Her quick reactions were credited with helping to save the life of the child.                                 

On June 20 she was honored with the Achievement Medal for Civilian Service for her actions at the 1st quarter 2011 installation awards ceremony held at the LVCC.

The ceremony, hosted by Maj. Gen. Gregg Martin, USAWC Commandant, honored Ziegert and other Carlisle Barracks employees. 

“Today we honor you the team,” said Martin.

Robert C. (Chris) Browne, publications coordinator for the U.S. Army Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Instittue, was recognized as the 2010 Carlisle Barracks Civilian Employee of the Year

“Chris has done more to improve publication procedures and PKSOI “branding” then anyone in PKSOI’s 10 year history,” said Col. Roy Radovich, chief of the Publications and Knowledge Management Division.

“Along with revising and converting the PKSOI Quarterly Bulletin to an online journal, Chris has also co-opted PKSOI’s summer interns to leverage their combined knowledge and expertise to initiate PKSOI’s YouTube streaming videos, which have played a key role in publicizing PKSOI as an organization,” said Radovich.

Also honored at the awards ceremony was the civilian employee of the quarter -

Karen J. Finkenbinder, research and publications analyst for PKSOI

“Karen has designed and executed a new intern program that has morphed into a premiere university outreach program that attracts many of the top students academia,” said Radovich. 

Finkenbinder has also been instrumental in making sure all PKSOI publications are properly edited and has also assisted students in editing their papers, articles and books.

“She never turns down a request for her assistance in editing papers, articles and books,” said Radovich.

“This is an everyman, every women award,” said Finkenbinder.  “It represents a lot of really great civilians here at the War College.”

Also recognized were:

Ray Liest, Human Resource Department, Military Pay Technician, was presented with the Superior Civilian Service Award for in and out processing of the 2011 USAWC resident student class and 74 Senior Services College Fellows.

Due to his dedication to duty, Liest noticed an issue in one of the student’s finance records and was, after an audit was completed, able to return $50,000 in back pay to him.

“It doesn’t matter if they are a private or a general, I am here to help the Soldiers,” said Liest. 

Kevin M. Hine, Directorate of Emergency Service, Police Department, was presented with theUSAG Certificate of Achievement for identifying the subject of an on-going theft of services at Carlisle Barracks.

Army War College Public Affairs Office was presented with their U.S. Army Installation Management Command 2010 MG Keith L. Ware Public Affairs Awards for both the on-line and hard copy versions of “The Banner.  The office took a First Place Unit Award, for Web Publications for “The Banner” and Second Place Unit Award, Magazine-Format Publication for “The Banner”

Several Soldiers and civilians were awarded achievement medals for their support during the Army War College’s National Security Seminar.

Sgt. Radouane Moukraj

Capt. Michael Tompkins

1st. Sgt. Sabrina Washington

Peter Baltos

Liz Knouse

Elaine Leist

David Myers

Kenny Sjoberg

Don Watkins

Nate Wright

Presidential Championship Awards: 

Elaine A. Leist, HQs U.S. Army Garrison Deputy Commaner - Silver Award

Mary Anne Turnbaugh, Family, Morale, Welfare and Recreation - Silver Award

Peter Collins, Directory, Plans, Operations, Training Division- Bronze Award

Sgt. 1st Class Andrew R. Wicks, Chapel - Bronze Award

Susan L. Wise, Department of Human Resource - Bronze Award

Combined Federal Campaign Recognition: 

Dan L. French, PKSOI

Bernard F. Griffard, Center for Strategic Leadership

Tom Kruegler, PKSOI

Col. James C. Markley, CSL

Balfour Beatty Communities Scholarships:

Andrew Bessler

Emily Bessler

Robert Hume

Length of Service Awards:

Bif Coyle, DPW Housing- 35 Years

Deborah S. Weaver, DHR Military Personnel- 30 Years

Carolyn Humphrey, DHR Military Personnel- 25 Years

Susan Keller, DFMWR Child Development Center - 5 Years


Staff Sgt. Corey Baltos, USAWC Public Affairs

Learning the perspective on West Point during the Civil War

On April 12, 1861, General P.G.T Beauregard, West Point class of 1838, now a general in the Confederate Army, ordered his gunners to open fire on Fort Sumter.  The Union commander was Major Robert Anderson, an Academy graduate who had been Beauregard’s artillery instructor at West Point.

Throughout the Civil War, men who were once classmates found themselves leading opposing armies against their friends and comrades.

As part of the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center’s Perspectives in Military History lecture series, Dr. Wayne Wei-siang Hsieh, an assistant professor at the U.S. Naval Academy, examined the evolution of the military profession from the War of 1812 to the Civil War during his June 15, lecture, “West Pointers and the Civil War: The Old Army in War and Peace.”

When the Civil War broke out most Americans, on both sides of the conflict, assumed that he war would consist of one gigantic battle with the winner marching on, and capturing the loser’s capitol.  However, this was not the case, largely due to the presence of West Point trained officers on both sides, who were building and leading an Army made largely up of untrained civilians.

“Both sides had equilibrium of competence,” said Hsieh.  “They studied the same texts and took the same classes with the same professors.  So there would be no clear decisive victor.”  This meant that the war would be a long, grinding affair with heavy casualties on both sides that would have unforeseen political implications.

During the pre-war  period, the average West Point class consisted of 40-50 cadets.  This meant that everyone knew the name and reputation of not only their classmates but, of every cadet.  This made it very difficult for one commander to obtain an advantage over the other because he knew how his opponent was going to react.

“This equilibrium of competence frequently stymied Civil War generals’ efforts to destroy their opponents in climactic battles of annihilation,” said Hsieh.  “This would have required a marked superiority in resources or in military ability that did not exist.”

In many ways, the West Point trained Soldiers represented everything that 19thCentury America did not want.  American martial tradition had glorified the civic and military virtue of the unprofessional citizen-soldier who would take up arms to fight and then quickly return to civilian life.   During the pre-war period West Point was committed to training professional Soldiers who would be the backbone of a professional standing army. 

This meant that when war broke out the West Point trained Soldiers had one advantage that the citizen-soldier did not have – experience.  This experience of not only prior combat, but discipline prevented, in large part, the Civil War descending into guerrilla led insurgencies.

It was this backbone that would shape the conduct of the war, said Hsieh.

While the presence of West Point officers may have increased the length of the war, they also helped heal the country after the war.  Grant and Lee set the pattern at Appomattox, that the war was over and America was once again united.

The final Perspectives in Military History lecture for the 2010-11 academic year will be, “Preparing for Victory: Thomas Holcomb and the Making of the Modern Marine Corps, 1936-43.”  The lecture is scheduled to take place on July 13 at 7:15 p.m.


Carol Kerr, Army War College Public Affairs Officer
Congressman Platts joins Carlisle Barracks to greet ‘warrior ride’

 

Rep. Todd Platts, 19th District of Pennsylvania, speaks at a ceremony in front of Root Hall for the “warrior Ride,” a group that supports wounded veterans with adaptive bicycles. On June 17, the wounded veterans started at the Army Heritage and Education Center and rode through the streets of Carlisle Barracks, ending at the home of Army War College where they were met by Platts and USAWC leadership in front of 50 state flags, honoring Soldiers and veterans from all 50 states. Photo by Thomas Zimmerman.

want more photos?

Watch a highlight video on our YouTube page.

 

June 17, 2011 -- He was there when the twin towers were attacked on September 11, 2011, and he was there, in Afghanistan and Iraq. Now medically retired after a 28-year career as a military reservist and a 22-year veteran of the New York Police Department, he is there for wounded warriors like himself.

Retired Sr. Master Sgt. Ray Schroeder, Carlisle, has served in all four U.S. military Services. It was the Air Force Reserve unit that deployed him in 2002 to take the fight to Afghanistan after having helped New York City recover from the 9/11 attacks. Schroeder was one of the ‘dirt boys’ of Air Force civil engineering responsible for preparing air fields in Afghanistan and, in 2004-5, in Iraq. Head trauma in May 2002 from an improved explosive device hidden under the top soil near him eventually led to his medical retirement.

Schroeder was among the wounded warriors using adaptive bikes on a multi-day Warrior Ride through the central Pennsylvania countryside with a special stop to meet U.S. Congressman Todd Platts at the Army War College at Carlisle Barracks, June 17.  

Military kids and employees waving American flags will line the roads of Carlisle Barracks along the route to Root Hall. Photo by Staff Sgt. Corey Baltos.

 

“You embody what is good about America, and remind us of the sacrifices you have made and the price paid for the freedom we all enjoy,” said Platts. “You are truly the heroes of America.” 

Military kids and employees from throughout the installation waved American flags along the route to Root Hall where Soldiers, employees and USAWC students gathered to greet the wounded warriors in front of 50 state flags honoring the Riders who represented a slice of America: South Carolina, Virginia, W. Virginia, Pennsylvania, Michigan and more.

 Schroeder’s wife, Anna Maria, served as navigator for the 23 riders whose route included local tourist stops like the Boiling Spring clock tower and the Pa. Capitol in Harrisburg, where Pa. Sen. Pat Vance and Pa. Rep. Scott Perry met them.

Before they started the next, hilly leg of their ride, Carlisle Barracks’ Command Sgt. Major wished them well. “We’re all the same family.”

Carlisle Barracks’ Command Sgt. Major Robert Blakey shakes hands with one of the riders on their way to City Island, the next stop on their three-day bike ride.

“A lot of people don’t understand what you are going through, but I understand as I am a wounded warrior myself, said Command Sgt. Maj. Robert Blakey.  “I could have retired a couple of years ago, but it is men and women like you motivate me to stay in, so I can continue to be a voice for you.”

Warrior Ride is a nonprofit organization that supports wounded veterans with adaptive bicycles for recreation and rehabilitation.


Staff Sgt. Corey Baltos, USAWC public affairs

USAWC Soldiers remember sacrifices during Army birthday celebration

June 15, 2011 - On a hot June day in 1775, a group of British subjects did the unthinkable.   They decided that their continued association with Great Britain was unbearable, and must be severed.   To do this they created a Continental Army, made up of their fellow citizens that would be able to fight and defeat the British Army, in hopes of securing independence from that country.  This citizen’s army would embody “the strength of the nation” that these men hoped to create. 

Lt. Col. Janet Holliday, garrison commander, reads to children at the Moore Child Development Center, as part of the post's Army birthday celebration.  Photo by Staff Sgt. Corey Baltos.

 

Two-hundred and thirty-six years later, the modern incarnations of the Continental Army gathered around the world to celebrate the birthday of the United States Army.  One of the places was at the Army War College, where the next generations of strategic thinkers are developed and inspired

As the Soldiers gathered on the Root Hall patio to celebrate, many of them thought about the sacrifices made by their fellow Soldiers and their families throughout our nation’s history.

“Our country was born in war,” said Maj. Gen. Gregg Martin, Army War College Commandant.  “Today we are a combat hardened force.” 

“From the first battles at Lexington and Concord to the streets of Mosul and Kandahar, Soldiers have always defended freedom and epitomized what is best about America,” said Gen. Martin Dempsey, Chief of Staff of the Army, who spoke to Soldiers in Washington D.C.

“For me the Army birthday gives me a chance to reflect back on the contributions of the folks that are missing,” said Col. John Crews, the Army component commander for U.S. Africa Command, Combined Joint Task Force HOA, Dijbouti.  Crews, a member of the Army War College Distance Education Class of 2012, is at the USAWC for the first resident session of the program.

“The Army birthday establishes what we are as a nation,” said fellow distance education student Col. Paul Hicks, the deputy commander of the 14thDefense Contract Management Agency at Fort Belvoir, Va..  “It reminds us that we have to honor and uphold the legacy of the Soldiers before us.”

The sacrifices were not all on the battlefield.  Some of the biggest sacrifices were made by Soldiers who were committed, “not to promote war, but to preserve peace.” 

Staff Sgt. Jasser Gonzalez, the Carlisle Barracks Non-commissioned officer of the year, Maj. Gen. Gregg Martin, USAWC Commandant, and Private 1st Class Cassandra Phipps, the youngest Soldier on post, cut the Army birthday cake during a celebration on June 14.  Photo by Staff Sgt. Corey Baltos.

“The real story of the Army is in the millions of Soldiers who did not fight a war, but detected a war,” said Martin.  “During the Cold War, an entire generation of Soldiers never fired a shot, but their dedicated professionalism was no less noble then those in combat.”

“We are gathered here today to remember the Soldiers that went before us, to remember the victories we have won with the greatest Army in the world,” said Private 1stClass Cassandra Phipps who works at Dunham clinic, and also helped cut the Army birthday cake with Martin and Staff Sgt. Jasser Gonzalez.


Carlisle Barracks to test alert siren monthly, first date June 15

June 14, 2011 -- Starting at noon June 15, and repeating every third Wednesday of the month, Carlisle Barracks will test their severe weather alert siren as part of their normal emergency notification system.

“We're conducting monthly Severe Weather Warning Siren tests to educate our installation population about the siren and ensure they recognize the sound,” said Barry Farquhar, Director of Plans, Training, Mobilization, and Security. “Recent severe weather events across the nation and in our area highlight the need for early warning and immediate action by residents and employees.”

The test will start with a voice notification that will state:

  • “This is a test of the Severe Weather Siren, this is only a test”
  • Followed by the siren for 30 seconds,
  • Followed by a repeat of the voice notification stating
  • “This was a test of the Severe Weather Siren, this was only a test”

 

ACU changes make Velcro optional, patrol cap default headgear

WASHINGTON (Army News Service, June 11, 2011) -- The voice of the Soldier has been heard: the Army announced the patrol cap will replace the black wool beret as the default headgear for the Army combat uniform.

Also changing are the options for how Soldiers can attach certain items to their ACU shirts. Army Chief of Staff Martin E. Dempsey said Soldiers will soon be able to sew on name tapes, service tapes, rank insignia and skill badges, instead of using Velcro.

The changes were made after Dempsey received input from Sergeant Major of the Army Raymond F. Chandler III, who had been tasked to gather opinions from Soldiers in the field.

"I am a scout for General Dempsey, who asked me to look into everything a Soldier wears from the top of his head to the bottom of his feet," Chandler said. "These are changes that the field said they wanted to see."

Typically, uniform changes come as a result of a board that meets twice a year. But Chandler said issues surrounding both the ACU headgear and the use of Velcro were changes the Army chief of staff wanted to bring to the Secretary of the Army immediately.

Chandler said he spoke with "several thousand" Soldiers and also received comments via social media sites, like Facebook.

"I have also discussed this with my board of directors -- the most senior sergeants major of our Army," Chandler said. Post-deployment combat uniform surveys were used as a basis for the changes.

The No. 1 and No. 2 issues, Chandler said, involve the beret and Velcro.

"The Soldiers didn't like the fact that the beret was hot -- it was not something that they wore the majority of the time," he said. "And they didn't like the fact it didn't shade the sun and it took two hands to put on. And they didn't like to carry two pieces of headgear to do different functions during the day."

The beret has been the standard headgear for the Army's ACU -- the camouflage uniform worn by most Soldiers. But most Soldiers still needed to switch to the patrol cap based on the work they were doing -- in a motor pool or in the field, for instance.

Those Soldiers would have to carry two pieces of headgear with them, one in each pocket, and switch depending on what they was doing. In the field, they put on the patrol cap. Back on base, they'd have to switch to the beret.

The new policy will make the patrol cap the standard. But the beret isn't going anywhere. It will remain as the standard for the Army service uniform, and as an optional uniform item with the ACU -- at the discretion of commanders.

"They could choose to say for an event, like change of command, that they want them to wear the beret," Chandler said.

The change in the beret policy will save the Army about $6.5 million over the lifecycle of the ACU. New Soldiers had been issued two berets, now they will be issued one.

Chandler pointed out that Soldiers didn't ask to eliminate the beret -- just to change when it's worn.

"Soldiers said we don't want to wear it with this uniform, but they do feel they look very professional wearing it with the Army service uniform," Chandler said.

The Army implemented a mandatory wear date for the ACU in April 2008. The ACU, a replacement for the Battle Dress Uniform, featured many design changes. Included among those were a different cut for the fabric, new placement for pockets and a new "digital" color pattern.

Also included were Velcro fasteners that allowed pockets to be sealed shut, sleeves to be cinched down, and rank insignia, name tapes, service tapes, patches and skill badges to be added and removed at will -- without time-consuming and sometimes costly trips to clothing alterations.

Still, some Soldiers were displeased with Velcro on the uniform, Chandler said.

The Army's new policy on attaching accouterments to the ACU will allow Soldiers to sew on rank insignia, the name tape and the service tape. Additionally, skill badges such as the Airborne, pathfinder, combat action, combat infantryman's, and expert infantryman's badge will also be authorized for sewing.

Currently, those badges are provided in painted metal and have to be pinned to the uniform. Pinning badges to the uniform can be a lengthy process because they have to be aligned using a ruler. The new policy will allow Soldiers to sew those badges to the uniform.

Combat and unit patches on the left and right sleeve and the U.S. flag will remain Velcro-only, the SMA said. Additionally, the ACU will continue to come with Velcro in the same locations it is now. Where a Soldier is authorized to sew something on, they will sew it on top of the Velcro.

Chandler also said Soldiers had asked for changes to how cargo pockets are fastened. Velcro had been used -- now, ACUs are available with buttons used to keep the pockets closed. A similar change is being discussed for how sleeve cuffs are fastened, but Chandler said that decision will be made by the July uniform board.

A more localized uniform decision will affect Soldiers assigned to the Army's headquarters at the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. There, Soldiers had been wearing the ACU as their daily uniform. By as early as October, those Soldiers will show up to work in the Army service uniform, Chandler said.

"Our perspective is that this is the corporate part of the Army," he said. "The business-part of the Army is done in the Pentagon, and as a professional there are certain standards of attire associated with certain activities. For the business aspect of the Army, it is the Army service uniform."

Implementation dates for the announced changes have not yet been decided. Soldiers should wait for direction from their commands before implementing any uniform changes.


Thomas Zimmerman, Army War College Public Affairs
Crocker, Martin, challenge Army War College grads to lead in uncertain times

Amb. Ryan Crocker, the Dean and Executive Professor at the George Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University, was the guest speaker for the Army War College Class of 2011 graduation. President Barack Obama named him to be the next U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan. Photos by Staff Sgt. Corey Baltos.

      Want more photos? We have a photo of each graduate receiving their diploma.

Want to see videos? Check our YouTube page  

 

June 11, 2011 – Ten months of readings, papers, exercises and complex seminar discussions paid off for the Army War College Class of 2011 as they graduated in front of friends, family, colleagues and international partners on the historic parade grounds of Carlisle Barracks. Under a sun-drenched sky, USAWC graduate Army Col. Rob Barnes sang the national anthem, June 11.

The resident class, made up of senior U.S. and international military officers and senior federal civilians, applied past experiences into today’s complex security environment with new studies to develop themselves for strategic responsibilities. The 10-month school concludes with a masters degree of Strategic Studies.  

Maj. Gen. Gregg Martin, commandant, USAWC, congratulated the students and asked them to reflect on the world they are poised to re-join.

“You’ve done the hard work and hard thinking, and will build on this excellent education. That’s why I know you’ll embrace this quote, in the words of one of our faculty members, Air Force Col. ‘Murf’ Clark:

‘Lives of ease are rarely lives of great meaning. The two rarely intersect. The biographies of our heroes and saints and Soldiers teach us this. You must understand that the work you are doing and the sacrifices you are making are meaningful, so please, do not wish for a life of ease’.

“Meaningful work, selfless service and a purposeful life -- this is what you’ve signed on for and I honor you for that.

“As you navigate the challenges that await, you’ll be wise to recognize and learn from the role models among us,” said Martin.  

He introduced guest speaker Amb. Ryan Crocker, as an extraordinary role model.  Croker is the Dean and Executive Professor at the George Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University. President Barack Obama named him to be the next U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan.

“He is a man who inspires. He is wisdom and strength,” said Martin, about Crocker. “He embodies our vision to strengthen our nation and build a more peaceful future.”

Graduates line up to accept their diplomas.

 

Crocker spoke to the students about the world of international security.  

“One of your responsibilities is to understand that we live in a very complex, messy, military-political world,” he said. “Your diplomatic partners are part of the fight. Unless we want to do it alone, so are our international partners.”

“You leave the college with great responsibility and great tools to operate in national and international security strategy. As strategists you will have to measure these developments and their possible effects on the United States.”

 “You’ve learned the importance of not going at it alone,” he said. “The U.S. alone cannot dictate outcomes. Your colleagues, other services, governments, and international nations are essential to the solution.”

Col. Elmer Speights, Jr. receives his diploma from Maj. Gen. Gregg Martin, USAWC commandant.  Photo by Scott Finger.

As Crocker completed his comments, he said “If confirmed by the Senate I will be the next ambassador to Afghanistan. I look forward to joining you in that fight.”

Students said they were prepared to enter this uncertain, volatile world thanks to the curriculum and the faculty here.

 “What I’ve really learned is how much your focus changes once you begin to operate at the strategic level,” said Army Col. Elmer Speights, Jr. “To get here we all focused on the operational and technical level. This course showed me how much your perspective changes and how you have to change your mind set to think at the strategic level.”

 “This is an experience I could have never gotten somewhere else,” said Diane Knight. “The passion of everybody who works at the war college or supports the war college is just tremendous. The learning opportunities available to you are unparalleled.”

Families were able to get together for one last time at the graduation.

 

“It’s amazing how much this course has made me look at issues, challenges and questions differently,” said Barnes. “It’s really opened my eyes to a whole new way of thinking.”  

“Learning how to think analytically and using the tools that are provided here at the war college to broaden my base of knowledge and how to process critical thinking and look at the overall big picture from a strategic level was really valuable,” said Navy Cmdr. Cedric Richardson.

“It really was an important year in my further development as a leader,” said Army Col. Kevin Vereen. “The skills I learned here will serve me well in the future.”

“This course makes you realize how narrow-focused we can get in our own services,” said Air Force Lt. Col. James Brandenburg. “We need to look at all of the options each service and branch offers. This course helped me realize that.”

“This has been a tremendous 10 months and I really can’t believe it is over,” said Marine Corps Lt. Col. Tray Ardese. “I wish I could stay here longer and keep learning from my classmates and the top-flight faculty here.”

Beyond the lessons of the classrooms, the students appreciated the bonds they formed that will last a lifetime.

“For the rest of our lives we will drop everything to answer our brothers and sisters of the Class of 2011,” said Col. Scott King, class president. 

Netherlands Fellow Col. Wilfred Rietdijk, and international class president thanked the U.S, students for fully integrating the fellows into the year here.

 “You’ve given your friendship, invited us into your homes,” he said to fellow students. “You now have 49 comrades to trust your life with.”

 “The friendship and relationships which we made here is the most important thing,” said Pakistan Fellow Brig. Naveed Mukhtar. “This is a great curriculum and there was a great opportunity to interact with so many people with and learn so many new things and most important from my point of view to share and understand the perspective of each other. ”

Professional development was enhanced by the additional opportunists. 

“The core of the war college is, of course the academic piece,”  said Army Col. Kimo Gallahue, who noted that multiple war college institutes support comprehensive. “There is not one classmate that didn’t benefit from the Army Physical Fitness Research Institute assessment and guidance,” he noted as an example.

“The Army War College looks at the entire individual academically, holistically,” said Army Lt. Col. Adam Roth. “We’re talking about the Army’s commitment to recapitalize its most important asset.”  

Under a sun-drenched sky, USAWC graduate Army Col. Rob Barnes sang the national anthem, June 11.

Class of 2011 details

The 336 members of the U.S. Army War College graduating Class of 2011 include: 198 Army officers, 15 Navy, 32 Air Force, 17 Marine Corps and two Coast Guard officers, representing Active, Reserve and National Guard: 49 international officers: 23 senior civilians of federal agencies.

About the Army War College

The U.S. Army War College was established in 1901 “not to promote war, but to preserve peace,” by developing, inspiring and serving strategic leaders for the wise and effective application of national power in a joint, interagency, intergovernmental, and multinational environment, emphasizing development and employment of land power.  The college educates more than 1,000 officers annually in its resident and distance programs and specialty courses for strategists and strategic leaders.

For more information about the U.S. Army War College, visit the website at http://www.carlisle.army.mil, or share the expertise of the War College at www.youtube.com/usarmywarcollege


Thomas Zimmerman, Army War College Public Affairs
National Security Seminar encourages civilian, military discussions

More than 150 civilian guests came to the Army War College June 6-10 to take share with and learn from USAWC students and faculty during the 2011 National Security Seminar. Photos by Thomas Zimmerman.

 

June 10, 2011 -- Approximately 150 “new members,” citizens drawn from across American life and various fields of endeavor, came to the Army War College June 6-10 for the 57th annual National Security Seminar.

The seminar is the capstone event of the 10-month curriculum at the Army War College, the Army’s senior educational institution. Each “new member” is assigned to one of 20 student seminar groups and becomes an active participant in seminar discussions, sharing from their own background, experience, beliefs and perspectives on these issues.

"What a great week. Thanks to all the new members you made this week tremendous," said Maj. Gen. Gregg Martin, Commandant, USAWC, during the closing remarks. "Just being here shows your support for our armed forces and  you have made us better by sharing your knowledge and experience with our students."

“It’s truly been an educational experience just being around these students,” said Jack Roush, founder and co-owner of Roush Fenway Racing, and NSS guest. “Every night I’ve gone home and looked up more information online to learn more about the topics we’ve discussed.”    

The seminar enables these representative citizens to get to know some of the prospective leaders of their armed forces and, in turn, allows the students to better understand the society they serve.

“I was able to get a better understanding of how the military thinks, and to share with them how journalists think,” said Tom Mattesky, adjunct professor of journalism, Georgetown University and former CBS Washington D.C. News Bureau Chief.  “Together we play an important role in the success of our democracy.”

“The ability to interact on a personal basis with some many leaders of business and the community is really valuable,” said Air Force Lt. Col. David Rodriguez, student.

The guests, or “new members” as they are called, were assigned to each of the 20 USAWC seminar were they took part in discussions, listened to guest lecturers and participated in noon-time lectures. Photo by Scott Finger.

 

“I’ve really enjoyed meeting and talking at length people who work for the military and the government,” said Mark Safranski, department chairman Wikistrat LLC, and Chicago-area schools history teacher. “The ability to engage with them and ask questions and learn one-on-one is excellent.”

“It’s fitting that we close out the year by discussing strategic topics with civilian and business leaders,” said Col. Elmer Speights, Jr., student. “This really shows me how far we’ve come in our development as strategic leaders.”

“I’m absolutely astounded by the knowledge of everyone here,” said Donna Tabor, project director of Building New Hope, a non-profit based out of Pittsburgh, Pa.

Featured speakers for the week include Maj. Gen. John “Mick” Nicholson, deputy chief of staff for operations, ISAF and U.S. Forces-Afghanistan, who opened the week with a keynote presentation on operations in Afghanistan.

“We are in a partnership with the Afghanistan government and the international community to protect the people, neutralize insurgent networks, develop the Afghanistan National Security Force and support the establishment of legitimate governance,” he said.  “The key to Afghanistan is the people. We have tremendous respect for them and they want us to succeed. The do not want a return to the Taliban or terrorism.”

Professor Susan Herman, president of the American Civil Liberties Union, focused her remarks on the state of civil liberties, discussed the issues surrounding detainee abuse, surveillance of American citizens and the Patriot Act.

The seminar is the final academic event for the USAWC Class of 2011 who will graduate June 11.

“Unfortunately risk seems to occur when someone steps outside their bounds when trying to do the right thing,” she said. “We are giving you another side of the issue. We have to make sure there is a balance.” 

Dr. Paul Kan,USAWC associate professor of national security studies, addressed the Mexican drug war and cartel violence.

“I do believe that we’ll be dealing with violence from the Mexican drug cartels for some time,” he said. “Education alone isn’t enough. We continually need to re-assess what we’re doing to protect our borders.”    

Foreign Affairs editor Gideon Rose introduced a discussion on how war’s end.

“All too often we end up getting to where we want to go and say ‘what do we do now?” he said. “We commonly focus on battles, but not as much on the end of wars. Because of the transition from war to peace, this is almost as important.”

The National Security Seminar also included an historian-guided Gettysburg Staff Ride and multiple opportunities to discuss several national security issues facing our country today.

 

Students and guests discussed national security issues facing the nation in seminar, lectures and other special events.

 

About the Army War College

 The U.S. Army War College was established in 1901 “not to promote war, but to preserve peace,” by developing, inspiring and serving strategic leaders for the wise and effective application of national power in a joint, interagency, intergovernmental, and multinational environment, emphasizing development and employment of land power.  The USAWC educates more than 1,000 officers annually in its Resident and Distance programs and specialty courses for strategists and strategic leaders.

About the Class of 2011

 The USAWC graduating class of 2011 consists of 336 students representing a cross-section of the joint military, federal agency and multinational security environment: 198 Army officers, 15 Navy, 32 Air Force, 17 Marine Corps and two Coast Guard officer, representing Active, Reserve and National Guard.  The Class includes 49 international officers, and 23 senior civilians of federal agencies.

For more information about the U.S. Army War College, visit the website at http://www.carlisle.army.mil, or share the expertise of the War College at www.youtube.com/usarmywarcollege


Thomas Zimmerman, Army War College Public Affairs
UPDATE: Carlisle Barracks users to transition to Enterprise Email mid-July

Short term pain, long term gain

June 13, 2011 -- NETCOM postponed the Carlisle Barracks Email Migration scheduled for this week. A few other Army installations' migrations are also being postponed temporarily.  

 The primary reason for the delay is technical. The Defense Information Systems Agency & ARCYBER via NETCOM are conducting  assessments and taking corrective actions. As it stands right now, Carlisle Barracks should expect to migrate sometime in mid to late July.  However, we do not know specifically when the migration will occur, but will get that information to you as soon as we get it.

 In the meantime, our NEC requests that all users remain vigilant in their mailbox clean up & management. Please continue to do your best to keep your mailbox size at or below the 50,000kbs (50 MBs) that most of you have achieved.  This will ensure that when the pause is lifted, you will be ready to migrate. I realize that this will be an inconvenience to some users, but I believe it will be a short term inconvenience at worst and will make your transition seamless at best. 

 

June 2, 2011 -- In mid to late July, when all 1,050 Carlisle Barracks PC users open their Outlook, they will be using the new DISA Enterprise Email system which will allow them expanded storage capabilities, the ability to share calendars and contacts over all of the Department of Defense and more.

“This system will meet all of our needs and it’s a great opportunity,” said Col. Bob Hoelscher, chief information officer. “”It’s great for the Army and for us. We’ll get expanded capabilities and it will save the Army money without having mail servers at each installation.”

The Network Enterprise Center’s Jamie Hulsey briefed the Enterprise Email Migration Plan during a session in Bliss Hall June 2.   The Enterprise Email is a “cloud” based system, which means that individual installations will no longer have email servers; the system will be managed from a few serves around the country. This process will save money and create larger capacities for users.

Much of the process will be transparent to the user but some specific steps will need to be taken to make sure all users email transfers to the new system. Instructions for many of these steps can be found here  If users have questions they can contact their IMO or call the ServiceDesk at 245-3000.  

 

Before migration (this includes organizational mailboxes):

  • Have their mailboxes down to less than 50 megabytes (50,000 kilobytes). If they are above this number, they will not migrate and won’t have full communications capabilities. Users will receive daily emails starting June 3 if their mailboxes exceed this limit.
  • Make sure there are less than 2,000 items in the account (this includes Calendar entries)
  • Log off of their email by 8 p.m. June 15. The migration will begin at this point and users who are accessing their email will not be migrated.
  • .PST files will need to be copied to the users C: drive on their PC, most are currently stored on their U: (Network) drive
  • User accounts will be created in the Enterprise Email system two days before migration. Users will need to access Outlook Web Access (https://web.mail.mil) to check for mail that may be going to that account from users who have already transition to the new system.
  • Blackberry devices will need to be individually transferred.  More information will follow for Blackberry users.

 

After migration users will notice the following:

  • The first PC you log onto on June 16 will be the one your Outlook profile is established on. Make sure you do so on your primary PC.
  • You will be sent Post Migration instructions  
  • There is no longer a single CAC sign in. Users will have to enter their PIN when opening Outlook.
  • Their email address have changed. They will now look like the following:
  • John.a.doe.mil@mail.mil(Military)
  • John.a.doe.civ@mail.mil(Civilian Employees)
  • John.a.doe.ctr@mail.mil(Contractors)
     
  • Users will need to access AKO and change their forwarding address to their new email address. Currently all mail is forward to @conus.army.mil
  • Roaming profiles will no longer be created. This means that users will have to use Outlook Web Access https://web.mail.mil to access their email when away from their normal PC.

The good news though, is that this new system will make life and mail management easier in the long run.

 

Benefits of Enterprise Email

  • Storage capacity of 4 gigabytes (8 times larger than the current mailbox)
  • Ability to access their email from any PC on the DoD network
  • Email addresses will now follow military, civilian employees to new assignments. There will no longer be the need to set up new accounts at each new installation, eliminating downtime.
  • A richer, more capable Outlook Web Access system with more features and capabilities
  • Allows Army users to share calendars, contacts across DoD
  • Global Address list will eventually include all DoD employees

Staff Sgt. Corey Baltos

Carlisle Barracks spouses train, run and finish a marathon together

Frequently, when Soldiers deploy, their spouses seek to accomplish something meaningful during the deployment. Many set personal goals, like learning a foreign language or losing weight.

[l-to-r] Cindy Mohan, Erika Snyder  and Terry Drushal celebrate after running the Pittsburgh Marathon May 5.  The trio finished the race together in under four hours.  Courtesy photo.

Three Fort Lewis-based women, Terry Drushal, Erika Snyder and Cindy Mohan, whose husbands were all deployed, in 2009 formed a running club with the goal of participating in the Portland Marathon in Oregon. 

“It gave us something to focus on while our husbands were deployed,” said Snyder.  "So we decided to run." 

In the summer of 2010, the three moved to Carlisle Barracks when their husbands were selected to attend the Army War College.  That fall, as their husbands started classes, the women started their running club here, this time with the goal of participating in the Pittsburgh Marathon in May. 

“We thought it would be a good opportunity for camaraderie, something to focus on before we go our separate ways,” said Mohan.  After graduation Drushal will be heading to Hawaii, Snyder will stay in Carlisle for another two years and Mohan will be moving to Utah.

“We discussed it last summer, signed up in the fall, and started training in January,” said Snyder.  The 16-week training program consisted of running around four days a week. 

“We did a long run at least once a week, usually on Thursdays,” said Drushal.  “We ran all around Cumberland County, through the Pennsylvania countryside.”  The long runs were broken up by shorter runs, speed work and yoga.

They also ran shorter races to help them train for the event.

“We ran the Army 10-miler in October and the St. Patrick’s Day 5K as well as the Jim Thorpe 5K,” said Snyder.  “We used the 5Ks as a speed workout,” said Mohan with a laugh.

Training together helped the friends stay motivated. 

“There were some days that one of us may not have felt like running but on those days, the other two would pick them up and help them along,” said Mohan.  “If I had been alone, I probably wouldn’t have done this.”

Their spirit of running together continued through the race. 

“We trained together for the race, we ran together during the race, and we crossed the finish line together,” said Drushal.  “Our unspoken goal was to finish the marathon in less than four hours,” said Snyder.  Which they did. Their run time was 3 hours, 57 minutes, which is well below the US average marathon time of 5 hours 10 minutes for women.


Thomas Zimmerman, Army War College Public Affairs
Dunham Clinic welcomes new commander

June 9, 2011 – Col. Stephanie Wilcher assumed command of the Dunham Army Health Clinic today, from  outgoing commander Col. Kenneth Trzepkowski in a short ceremony officiated by Col. Leon Moores, Commander, MEDDAC Ft. George G. Meade.

“I am honored and humbled to be given this honor,” she said. “Quality Army healthcare has been my passion. I am lucky to be joining a unit that shares this passion.”

Wilcher is a 1986 graduate of the Oregon Health Science University School of Nursing and a scheduled graduate of the Army War College Distance Education program in July.  Her previous assignments include Clinical Nursing OIC at the 28thCombat Support Hospital, Iraq and the 10thCombat Support Hospital, Kuwait.

Trzepkowski will be attending a fellowship in Palliative Medicine and Hospice Care at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, New Hampshire.


SUMMER SENSE CAMPAIGN: Prescription RX Abuse.

Army Substance Abuse Program

 

WHAT CAN YOU DO? TIPS FOR PREVENTING RX ABUSE

Think about your home. What prescription and over-the-counter drugs do you have? Where are they kept? Would you know if some were missing? The good news is that you can take steps immediately to limit access to these drugs and help keep your teen drug-free.

 

1. SAFEGUARD ALL DRUGS AT HOME. MONITOR QUANTITIES AND CONTROL ACCESS.

            Take note of how many pills are in the bottle or pill packet, and keep track of refills. This goes for your own medication, as well as for your teen and other members of your household. If you find you have to refill medication more often than expected, there could be a real problem – someone may be taking your medication, and monitor dosages and refills.

 

2. SET CLEAR RULES FOR TEENS ABOUT ALL DRUG USE, INCLUDING NOT SHARING MEDICINE AND ALWAYS FOLLOWING THE MEDICAL PROVIDER’S ADVICE AND DOSAGES.

            Make sure your teen uses prescription drugs only as directed by a medical provider and follows instructions for OTC products carefully. This includes taking the proper dosage and not using with other substances without a medical provider’s approval. Teens should never take prescription or OTC drugs with street drugs or alcohol. If you have any questions about how to take a drug, call your family physician or pharmacist.

 

3. BE A GOOD ROLE MODEL BY FOLLOWING THESE SAME RULES WITH YOUR OWN MEDICINES.

            Examine your own behavior to ensure you set a good example. If you misuse your prescription drugs, such as share them with your kids, or abuse them, your teen will take notice. Avoid sharing your drugs and always follow your medical provider’s instructions.

 

4. PROPERLY CONCEAL AND DISPOSE OF OLD OR UNUSED MEDICINES IN THE TRASH.

            Unused prescription drugs should be hidden and thrown away in the trash. So that teens and others don’t take them out of the trash, you can mix them with an undesirable substance (like used coffee grounds or kitty litter) and put the mixture in an empty can or bag. Unless the directions say otherwise, do NOT flush medications down the drain or toilet because chemicals can pollute the water supply. Also, remove any personal, identifiable information from prescription bottles or pill packages before you throw them away.

 

 

5. ASK FRIENDS AND FAMILY TO SAFEGUARD THEIR PRESCRIPTION DRUGS AS WELL.

            Make sure your friends and relatives, especially grandparents, know the risks, too, and encourage them to regularly monitor their own medicine cabinets. If there are other households your teen has access to, talk to those families as well about the importance of safeguarding medications. If you don’t know the parents of your child’s friends, then make an effort to get to know them, and get on the same page about rules and expectations for use of all drugs, including alcohol and illicit drugs. Follow up with your teen’s school administration to find out what they are doing to address issues of prescription and over-the-counter drug abuse in schools.

 

            Talk to your teen about the dangers of abusing prescription and over-the-counter drugs. These are powerful drugs that, when abused, can be just as dangerous as street drugs. Tell your teen the risks far outweigh any “benefits.”

 

The above information provided by PARENTS the Anti-Drug. For additional information contact the Army Substance Abuse Program at 245 – 4576.

 

To learn more about Rx & OTC health risks, visit www.TheAntiDrug.com

 

For additional information on proper medication disposal visit www.disposemymeds.org

 

Medication Take Back Program will be held Sept. 17. Watch for details or contact the Prevention Office at 245-4576.

 

 

 


Navajo students travel to historic Carlisle Barracks

 

  June 7, 2011 -- On June 6 a group of Dine´ (Navajo) students from St. Michael Indian School on the Navajo Nation gathered at the site of the former Carlisle Indian School in Carlisle, Pennsylvania to commemorate Diné and other Native students who attended the Indian boarding school from 1879 to 1915.  Students have been learning about Indian boarding schools in preparation for their visit.  They have planned a special time, both public and private, to honor their kin and other tribal members who were touched by the Carlisle School. 

  Twenty-two students, along with their chaperones, travelled to New York City where they toured Ellis Island and then made their way to Carlisle.  As the students have learned, there is a connection between Carlisle Indian School and St. Michael Indian School.  Saint Katharine Drexel and the Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament ministered to the Roman Catholic students at the Carlisle School.  During the same period, Mother Drexel founded St. Michael School in 1902.  Drexel frequented both schools and local parish where news of her visits were reported in the Carlisle Indian School newspapers from 1898-1914.

  In the 1880s, Diné leader Manuelito sent two of his sons to the Carlisle Indian School in hopes of encouraging his people to send their children for an American education.  Although he appeared to favor American education, according to oral history, he was a strong advocate of Diné sovereignty and thought that sending Navajo children to American schools would be a means of learning how to best protect Navajo lands and the people.  Within a year of their arrival at the school, however, one of Manuelito’s sons died.  The Navajo leader demanded the return of his surviving son and all other Navajo children enrolled at the school.  Upon the death of his second son, who died soon after he returned home, it was reported that Manuelito became bitter about Western education. However, according to oral history, after the leader’s death in 1894, his family continued to relay his message about the importance of education for Diné children.  Navajo children were enrolled at the Carlisle School from 1881 to 1915.

  While in Carlisle, the St. Michael students were hosted by Dickinson College and spent an afternoon visiting the sites of the Carlisle Indian Industrial School at Carlisle Barracks.  


Public Affairs Staff
Army War College hosts 57th Annual National Security Seminar

  June 7, 2011 -- Approximately 150 new members, citizens drawn from across American life and various fields of endeavor, are attending the Army War College 57th annual National Security Seminar, June 6-10, here.

  The Seminar is the capstone event of the 10-month curriculum at the Army War College, the Army’s senior educational institution. Each New Member is assigned to one of 20 student seminar groups and becomes an active participant in seminar discussions, sharing from their own background, experience, beliefs and perspectives on these issues  

  The Seminar enables these representative citizens to get to know some of the prospective leaders of their Armed Forces and, in turn, allows the students to better understand the society they serve.

  Featured speakers for the week include Maj. Gen. John “Mick” Nicholson, deputy chief of staff for operations, ISAF and U.S. Forces-Afghanistan, who opened the week with a keynote presentation on operations in Afghanistan. Professor Susan Herman, president of the American Civil Liberties Union, focused the Seminar on the state of civil liberties.  Dr. Paul Kan, USAWC associate professor of national security studies, addressed the Mexican drug war and cartel violence; and Foreign Affairs editor Gideon Rose introduced a discussion on how wars end.

  The National Security Seminar also includes an historian-guided Gettysburg Staff Ride and multiple opportunities to discuss several national security issues facing our country today.

  The U.S. Army War College was established in 1901 “not to promote war, but to preserve peace,” by developing, inspiring and serving strategic leaders for the wise and effective application of national power in a joint, interagency, intergovernmental, and multinational environment, emphasizing development and employment of land power.  The College educates more than 1000 officers annually in its Resident and Distance programs and specialty courses for strategists and strategic leaders.

  The USAWC graduating class of 2011 consists of 336 students representing a cross-section of the joint military, federal agency and multinational security environment:  198 Army officers, 15 Navy, 32 Air Force, 17 Marine Corps and two Coast Guard officer, representing Active, Reserve and National Guard.  The Class includes 49 international officers, and 23 senior civilians of federal agencies.

  For more information about the U.S. Army War College, visit the website at http://www.carlisle.army.mil, or share the expertise of the War College at www.youtube.com/usarmywarcollege


Thomas Zimmerman, Army War College Public Affairs Office
How you can stay connected to the Army War College

 

June 7, 2011 -- Just because you leave the Army War College it doesn’t mean that you can’t still stay connected and up-to-date on all the happenings, new studies and exercises done here. Below are a few easy ways that you can stay connected and engaged.

Army War College homepage
The first and greatest place to keep up on Army War College news and events is the USAWC homepage, located at www.carlisle.army.mil Updated regularly, the site showcases the latest USAWC news, conference, studies and other important events.

Facebook
One of the easiest ways to stay connected is to become a follower on Facebook. Simply go to www.facebook.com/usawc and you’ll see the latest news and events. The best part is you don’t even need an account to see the newest postings.

However if you’d like to have them delivered straight to you, log into your exiting Facebook account and click “Like” on the top right corner of the USAWC page. After that, all of the latest postings from our page will appear directly on your News Feed.

YouTube
Another great way to stay connected is to hear lectures from guest speakers and conferences at the USAWC YouTube page at www.youtube.com/usarmywarcollege The best part is that you don’t even have to register for an account to see the latest videos, just visit the page to see the newest videos, all sorted by event.

Parameters
Want to read the newest articles on the art and science of land warfare, joint and combined matters, national and international security affairs, military strategy, military leadership and management, military history, ethics, and other topics written by USAWC experts? Then sign up for a free “e-subscription” to Parameters and you’ll to be notified by e-mail when a new issue of Parameters is made available online. Simply send an email to CARL_Parameters@conus.army.mil and put the word “subscribe” in the subject line.

Strategic Studies Institute
Go beyond the headlines and be well versed on the latest national security and geopolitical issues. All Strategic Studies Institute (SSI) publications, events, and updates are announced in the SSI monthly newsletter which you received as part of USAWC email distribution. Visit SSI at http://www.StrategicStudiesInstitute.army.mil/newsletter/ to stay on the list.

If you'd like to stay updated instantly via Facebook, SSI is available at http://www.facebook.com/SSInow.  A few of the SSI upcoming studies for this summer and fall include: Is the Organizational Culture of the U.S. Army Congruent with the Professional Development of its Senior Level Officer Corps?; The Paradox of Preparing for One War Only to Get Another; and, The U.S. Army War College Guide to National Security Issues.

Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute
Want to find out the newest policy papers and articles published by the Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute? Then visit http://pksoi.army.mil/

Center for Strategic Leadership
To find out the latest events, exercises and publications for Center for Strategic Leadership visit  http://www.csl.army.mil/

Army Physical Fitness Research Institute
APFRI is a leader development and enhancement program that focuses on the complex interplay of health, fitness, leadership, and readiness and builds on the recognition and understanding that our leaders must confront and master the human dimension of warfare. Importantly, the expansion of the APFRI program leverages the blend of professional expertise, web-based tools, program materials, and lessons-learned from over 25 years of senior leader assessments that APFRI has completed as part of the USAWC. To see the latest APFRI studies and conferences visit https://apfri.carlisle.army.mil/

Army Heritage and Education Center
Catch up on USAHEC news or watch the latest Perspectives in Military History lecture at http://www.carlisle.army.mil/ahec/index.cfm

Army War College Foundation and Alumni Affairs
To stay connected you can also become a member of the Army War College Foundation and Alumni Affairs. The Army War College Foundation, Inc. is a non-profit, publicly supported organization that raises funds and provides other assets to enrich the College's academic programs, research activities, and overall campus environment.  Alumni Affairs provides the best possible support to graduates and members.  For more information visit http://www.usawc.org/


Thomas Zimmerman, Army War College Public Affairs
Dempsey congratulates, challenges USAWC Class of 2011

Gen. Martin Dempsey, Chief of Staff of the Army, spoke to the students of the Army War College Class of 2011 in Bliss Hall June 3. He spoke about a variety of topics including strategic leadership and the importance of relationships formed between services and nations at schools like the USAWC. Photo by Megan Clugh.

June 3, 2011 – Shortly before the 336 students of the Army War College Class of 2011 graduate and return to the fight, Gen. Martin Dempsey, Chief of Staff of the Army, spoke to them in Bliss Hall and shared lessons he has learned in strategic leadership.

The class will graduate June 11, completing their 10-month resident course, but Dempsey wanted to speak to them before they began the next phase of their careers. He spoke about strategic leadership, the challenges facing the military and urged them to apply the lessons they had learned and utilize the relationships formed here.

"Congratulations on being here," he said. "The opportunity you have had to interact and develop trust with others here will be worthwhile. Thanks for what you do, and what you will do."

Dempsey, who was recently nominated by President Barack Obama to become the next Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, spoke for about 30 minutes before taking questions from the students.

“I think he gave us some great advice,” said Air Force Lt. Col. David Rodriguez, student. “He was able to talk about a variety of issues very frankly and openly.”


Staff Sgt. Corey Baltos

Carlisle Barracks breaks ground on new SSI building

The Strategic Studies Institute has long played an important part in developing strategic recommendations that help formulate U.S. military strategy and national security policy.  For most of its existence these national security experts have been housed in Root Hall.  The groundbreaking shows that the time has come for a dedicated facility for the researchers and analysts of SSI.

SSI staff members look at a blue print for the new SSI building that is being built.  The building is expected to be finished later this year.  Photo by Staff Sgt. Corey Baltos.

 

The official ground breaking for the building was held at the corner of Gibner and Ashburn Road on June 1.  The building project is part of an overall expansion of the Army War College.  It compliments a increase in seminar rooms and faculty offices in Root Hall, which will absorb a larger student body as of this summer.

“This project is a reflection of the change and evolution of the war college, said Maj. Gen. Gregg Martin, commandant, Army War College.  “As we grow and evolve, SSI optimizes that change.  It is only right that we give you your own new facility.”

Col. David Anderson, commander of the Baltimore Army corps of Engineers District, which has oversight over the construction project, was on hand for the ceremony.

“We really want to knock this out of the park,” he said.  “One’s contribution to the war fight is not measured by the proximity to the battlefield.”

The SSI staff is expected to be working in their new building by the beginning of the new year. 


Suzanne Reynolds, USAWC Public Affairs Office
Norwegian USAWC Class of 1999 grad inducted into Hall of Fame

Norway Gen. Harald Sunde, Chief of Defence of Norway, was inducted into the Army War College International Fellows Hall of Fame on May 31. He is a 1999 graduate of the USAWC. Photo by Scott Finger.

 

May 31, 2011--The U.S. Army War College honored a Norwegian alumnus of the Class of 1999 who has reached the highest position in his nation’s armed forces at an Induction Ceremony on Tuesday, May 31, Bliss Hall auditorium.

  The College welcomed back Gen. Harald Sunde, who is the Chief of Defence Norway.

  “Throughout his career, Gen. Sunde has epitomized the mission and vision of the Army War College,” said Maj. Gen. Gregg Martin, U.S. Army War College Commandant.  “In leading his nation’s armed forces, he has developed, inspired and served strategic leaders on a global scale.  His actions have had a profound and deep impact—not only within the Norwegian military, but also among the military forces of allies, partners and friends,” said Martin.

  Sunde was an honor graduate at the Officer Candidate School for the Cavalry in 1974 and the Norwegian Military Academy in 1979.  He graduated from the Norwegian Army Staff College in 1986.  Following his graduation from the Academy, he served at the Cavalry School and Training Center, followed by a Special Forces assignment and assignment as commander of the famed Brigade North Recce Squadron.     

  From 1989 to 1992, following a stint as a student at the German Fuhrungsakademie, Gen. Sunde was assigned as an instructor at the Norwegian Army Staff College.  From 1992 to 1996 Sunde commanded both Norwegian Special Forces, as well as the Norwegian Defense Special Commando from 1992 to 1996.  Following these commands, he held numerous senior-level command and staff positions.

  Sunde was promoted to general and appointed Norwegian Chief of Defense on Oct. 1, 2009.

  “I am deeply, deeply honored,” said Sunde.  “This is far beyond what I expected, and I have so much to thank the U.S. Army War College for.”

  Sunde shared some of his personal thoughts about his life at the Army War College.  When he and his family arrived in Carlisle on a hot summer day in 1998, he was told that this would be the best year of his life.  “I am not quite sure if it was the best year, but it was one of the most important years in my life,” he said.  “It changed me, it changed my way of thinking, it put me into a new track.”

  Since leaving the War College in 1999, Sunde commented that he has met numerous classmates, both U.S. and international. 

  “It’s a different world when you meet in Iraq, in Afghanistan or somewhere else and you solve some problems.  You are in command, and suddenly beside you, you meet a good friend from Carlisle Barracks.  It makes a huge, huge difference,” said Sunde.  “Bring this friendship from Carlisle Barracks to wherever you go, because you really need it,” he said.

  Sunde attributed attaining his position to the Army War College. 

  “The reason why I am the Chief of Defense Norway is a gift that I was given here at Carlisle Barracks to start thinking about not only the ways, ends and means, but start to think about strategy,” he said.  “Think about how should we in the future connect new ideas into new combinations and do that thinking and bring that forward.”

  Sunde told the Class of 2011 students, “The best piece of advice I can give you is to continue this strategy thinking because it will bring you into new ideas and understanding because the challenge of tomorrow will be more complicated, will be more multifaceted, and we will not be alone, we will be accompanied by all other strategic factors.”

  As the third Norwegian officer to be inducted into the U.S. Army War College International Fellows Hall of Fame, Sunde joins a uniquely prestigious alumni group as the 36th member.


Carlisle Barracks cleans up after storm

Staff Sgt. Corey Baltos

June 1, 2011 - On the evening of May 26 a powerful storm rolled into Carlisle Barracks and caused some wind-related damage to the post.  Clean-up efforts began almost immediately after the storm. 

A portion of a tree in the yard of Quarters 4 fell during a storm that swept through Carlisle Barracks on May 26.  Damage to the home was minimal.  Photo by Jim MacNeil.

“Our first priority is to take care of any storm related injuries,” said Rick McBride, post safety officer.  “Fortunately, while the storm knocked down trees, some of which came close to residences, there were no injuries on post.”

Once injuries have been assessed, the post has three other priorities.   

“The first is making sure that the roadways open, so the flow of traffic isn’t impeded, second, repair any power lines or remove debris that might damage it, and last, make sure we maintain force protection,” said McBride.

Last week’s storm caused a branch to fall and block Delaney Road near the chapel, while another tree fell on one of the parameter fences.  Both obstructions were removed later that evening, while the majority of the clean-up took place over the weekend.

“Our environmentalist is checking the trees that are still standing for structural damage and safety issues, and if she finds any we will remove those as well,” said Lt. Col. Janet Holliday, garrison commander. 

Clean-up crews from Antietam Tree & Turf feeds branches into a wood shredder as part of the post-wide clean-up of debris from the storm.  Photo by Staff Sgt. Corey Baltos.

“We were really very lucky,” said McBride.  “We didn’t lose power, even though over 33,000 Cumberland County residents did.  There was minor damage to a couple of the homes near Garrison Lane.”

After the storm passed through Cumberland County the Carlisle Barracks Directorate of Public Works set to work cleaning up the debris.  Two full tree-removal teams from Antietam tree removal have been on post working to remove the debris.

Fifteen trees were, or are in the process of being moved, because of damage from the storm. 

“The trees are being removed because they cannot be saved or because the damage to them presents a possible hazard to people and property,” said Donna Swauger, the Environmental Protection Specialist for Carlisle Barracks.  “The majority of the trees that are being removed are Norway Maples, which are a common urban tree.”

“Our DPW and our contractors did a superb job in clearing roads and making sure the post was passable immediately after the storm.  They will continue their work to make sure the entire post is standing tall in time for the Class of 2011 graduation next week,” said Holliday.

“It needs to be understood that tree removal after a storm, takes time,” said Swauger.

In the event of severe weather, McBride recommends that people stay where they are, and pay attention to weather updates and alerts. 

“We do try to notify people through the giant voice, email and phones,” said McBride.  Updates to post operations and other important information are also posted on the information line at 245-3700.

If, after a storm, there is damage to your property there are several numbers you can call.

The Department of Public Works has a 24-hour help desk for emergencies to non-residences.  The number is 245-4019.

If there is damage to a home Balfour Beatty can be reached at: 243-7177.

As always residents can call the Carlisle Barracks police help desk in the event of a non-personal emergency at 245-4115.