Banner Archive for May 2013
 

American Forces Press Service
DOD adds peer support chat sessions for sexual assault victims

WASHINGTON, May 30, 2013 – In response to a need for peer support services identified by users of the Defense Department’s Safe Helpline for sexual assault victims, Pentagon officials have launched the Safe HelpRoom, a new service that allows victims to participate in group chat sessions to connect with and support one another in a moderated and secure online environment.

The Safe HelpRoom is available at http://SafeHelpline.org, officials said, noting that the moderator can provide referrals as necessary and will ensure that chat postings adhere to all ground rules.

"Survivors of sexual assault have told us that being able to discuss their concerns with peers can provide a level of support not available through other means," said Jessica L. Wright, acting undersecretary of defense for personnel and readiness. "Safe HelpRoom is a groundbreaking development in the department's commitment to support military victims of sexual assault."

Safe HelpRoom sessions will begin immediately and are available twice weekly in two-hour sessions. The session schedule can be found at http://SafeHelpline.org, along with polls to determine session topics to address specific concerns.

The Safe HelpRoom and Safe Helpline are administered by the Defense Department and operated by the nonprofit organization Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network, the nation's largest anti-sexual-violence organization, through a contract with DOD’s sexual assault prevention and response office, known as SAPRO.

"Safe HelpRoom was designed with unique safeguards to ensure a safe and welcoming place for survivors to connect," said Army Maj. Gen. Gary S. Patton, SAPRO director. "Safe HelpRoom is the first of its kind to require participants to commit to a series of 'ground rules' of acceptable behavior before entering a session. Additionally, each participant comment is reviewed to ensure it complies with the ground rules prior to posting for the group to see. Safe HelpRoom provides a secure and private environment for positive and supportive discussions."

When users visit Safe Helpline, the staff provides one-on-one tailored assistance and offers a variety of up-to-date service referrals for resources on and off military bases and installations, officials said in a statement announcing Safe HelpRoom’s launch. Service referrals include information for sexual assault response coordinators, along with legal, medical, mental health, and spiritual military resources.

The referral database also houses information for local civilian and Veterans Affairs Department resources for helpline users seeking information and crisis support away from the military response system, they added.


War College recognizes peacekeepers during ceremony

International Army War College students with peacekeeping experience were among those who recognized the International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers during a ceremony in front of Root Hall May 29.

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May 29, 2013 -- On Monday the nation took time to remember the fallen American Soldiers who died defending their freedom. Today, the U.S. Army War College paused to remember the more than 3,000 'blue helmet' peacekeepers who have fallen in service to world peace, and in recognition and support of those serving in UN PK missions today.

The War College recognized the International Day of United Nations Peacekeepers with a ceremony May 29 that included several international students who had served on such missions and remarks from Maj. Gen. Tony Cucolo, War College Commandant, and Canadian Brigadier General Karl D McQuillan, Chief of Staff Land Operations.

“Being a peacekeeper is a noble role,” said Cucolo. “It requires unquestioned credibility in warrior skills and the discriminate application of force. It requires leaders who are masters of chaos and uncertainty. It requires warriors – the leaders and the led -- who have a reflexive desire to enforce basic human rights and simple justice; and the belief they can make a positive difference in the world – or at least in the human condition of the area for which they are responsible."

While this was the first time The War College observed of the International Day of UN Peacekeepers, Cucolo said he hoped it becomes an annual tradition.

“The vast majority of your magnificent international classmates are from nations that contribute troops to UN and other peace and stability operations,” he said. “The aggregate losses among the nations represented by your international classmates are well over 2,000 killed in action while on these operations. It is only right that we pause and render honors to their losses, pay them our respect for what they have done in this area and take quiet pride together as a class and an organization in the international brother and sisterhood that is the profession of arms. What we do matters in the world.”

Cucolo also had a specific message for the American students.

“I’d like to drive home for my fellow Americans that even though the US financial support of these operations is significant, our priorities have obviously not been on peacekeeping operations lately,” he said. “I would offer to you, and it is only my opinion, that this will change in the future. I believe in our future, alliance operations will be much more frequent. There will be few places we will go alone as a nation and I would offer, too, that as this interconnected world of ours gets smaller and smaller, our national interests will require military influence and power in the human domain. I believe you will plan and execute peace and stability operations because Landpower will be the default solution to bring order to unstable corners of the human domain. 

“This ceremony is punctuation mark reminder that these operations carry high risk and great cost for those who undertake them.”

Mc Quillian spoke of the history of UN Peacekeeping missions, which his nation has been a part of from the very beginning.

“For 57 years the UN has been executing peacekeeping missions, and along the way have lost 3,100 lives,” he said. “The importance of these efforts to reduce tensions around the world, protect civilians, support elections and restore the rule of law can’t be understated.”

International Army War College students with peacekeeping experience were among those who recognized the day.

“Peacekeeping is different than war fighting,” said Canadian Army Col. Marc Gagne. “You have to balance many different factors and still maintain neutrality.”

Gagne stood with his classmates Col. Alhassan Abu, from Ghana, Col. Maksat Alymov from Kyrgyzstan, Col. Ingrid Gjerde from Norway, Lt. Col. Hugh McAslan from New Zealand, and Col. Shane Gabriel from Australia, each of whom have served in UN peacekeeping missions.

There are 120,000 peacekeepers serving in 17 missions in some of the most volatile and dangerous environments throughout the world.


Summer Sense Campaign – Army Substance Abuse Program

 

The “101 Days of Summer” represent one of the most dangerous and deadliest times of year on the nation’s highways. One big reason is a significant jump in alcohol-related traffic crashes and fatalities.

Plan before you party this summer – Don’t forget to use a designated driver (one who is not drinking).

Increased alcohol use throughout the summer, and particularly around major holiday weekends, beginning with Memorial Day, continuing through the Fourth of July and ending with Labor Day, has made the “101 Days of Summer” a very grim season for law enforcement, emergency medical staff, highway safety officials, and the friends and families of impaired driving victims.

“That’s why our goal this summer is to remind everyone, whether they are heading out to the beach, the lake or the mountains, to their favorite summer concert, to the ballpark, or just going to a barbecue or picnic with friends, if they plan on using alcohol, they need to use a designated driver before they get started.”

Impaired driving is one of America’s deadliest problems. Nationally, more than 17,000 people died in alcohol-related highway crashes during 2003. Every 30 minutes, nearly 50 times a day, someone in America dies in an alcohol-related crash, and more than 300,000 are injured each year. According to NHTSA, about three in every 10 Americans will be involved in an alcohol-related crash at some point in their lives.

Driving impaired or riding with someone who is impaired is simply not worth the risk because the consequences are serious and real. Not only do you risk killing yourself or someone else, but the trauma and financial costs of a crash or an arrest for driving while impaired can be really significant.

Too many people still don’t understand that alcohol, drugs and driving don’t mix. Impaired driving is no accident – nor is it a victimless crime.

“Driving impaired is simply not worth any of the pain you can cause yourself or someone else.”

Tips for a safer summer season:

  • Identify your Designated Driver before going out;
  • If drinking alcohol, don’t even think about driving when impaired – and never let your friends drive if you think they are impaired; remember, Friends Don’t Let Friends Drive Drunk.
  • Drink lots of water during your activities to avoid dehydration, and don’t drink alcohol on an “empty stomach”;
  • When impaired, ask a sober friend for a ride home, use mass transit, call a cab or your local sober rides program.
  • Ask a friend or family member to come get you, or just stay where you are and sleep it off until you are sober;
  • And, of course, always remember to wear your safety belt. It is still your single best defense against death or injury in a crash.

Please remember to Plan Before You Party This Summer – Don’t Forget to us a Designated Driver.”

Check the banner for prevention articles and special presentations provided by the Army Substance Abuse Prevention Office.

Educational Lunch and Learn Presentations:

Responsible Drinking”– This class will challenge common beliefs and attitudes that directly contribute to high risk alcohol abuse, physical tolerance vs mental tolerance.  We will discuss how our choices can protect or harm the things that we love and value.

Thursday, June 13, 12–1 p.m.

Thursday, July 11, 12-1 p.m.

Thursday, August 8, 12-1 p.m.

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders - The session will include a brief summary of the cause of FASD, and symptoms in the child. Strengths, Difficulties, and Approaches, Prevention and Risk Reduction Resources

Thursday, June 27, 12-1 p.m.

Thursday, July 25, 12-1 p.m.

Thursday, August 22, 12-1 p.m.

All sessions will be held at the Education Center, Bldg. 632 Wright Ave. Registration is required by calling 245–4576. Register three days before the scheduled class. We must have at least 5 participants registered for the class to be held.

Information provided by the Army Center for Substance Abuse.  For additional information contact the Prevention Office at 245-4576.

 


Civil War Era Church Service to be held at the First Lutheran Church in Carlisle
 
 
 
History will come alive at First Lutheran Church, 21 South Bedford Street, Carlisle on Sunday, June 30, at the 10:15 a.m. worship service as part of the commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War.  The public is cordially invited to participate in the service, complete with Civil War re-enactors in attendance.  
 
Carlisle was invaded and occupied by the Second Corps of the Confederate Army under Lieutenant General Richard S. Ewell for three days, June 27-30, 1863.  From Carlisle, Ewell's unit marched south to the small town of Gettysburg where a great battle was fought, becoming a turning point in the war. 
 
Despite the presence of the enemy in our town, First Lutheran's pastor, the Rev. Dr. Jacob Fry, made the decision to hold a worship service.  Only the Second Presbyterian Church and possibly two other churches in town held services that day.  Our church edifice at that time was located behind the Old Jail in the building now occupied by Bedford Street Antiques.  The congregation that morning consisted of approximately sixty people, at least half of them being Confederate officers. 
 
The service at First Lutheran will be the church's contribution to the Civil War remembrances in Carlisle during Summerfair.  Although we do not have a copy of the actual service held that day, our pastor, the Rev. Charles A. Brophy, has carefully researched the service format and liturgy that was probablybeing used at First Lutheran during the 1860's to make the service as historically accurate as possible.  A sermon that Pastor Fry preached in December 1860, in response to South Carolina's secession from the Union, will be delivered by Pastor Brophy dressed in a ministerial robe of the day.  Congregational singing of hymns reflecting the time period will be accompanied on the church's recently-renovated antique pump organ. 
 
Following the service, the Worship and Music Committee will host a time of fellowship on the lawn serving lemonade along with cakes and cookies that were popular in 1863.
 

Summer Sense Campaign:  Drinking, Boating & the Law
 Information provided by the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board, Alcohol Education
 
Ann Marie Wolf, Army Substance Abuse Program
 
 
It’s a bright, sunny day on the water and you’re getting very thirsty. As you start looking for something to quench your thirst, remember to choose a nonalcoholic drink. The combination of boating and drinking alcohol would be very dangerous for you, your passengers, and other boaters as well.  Each year more than 700 people die in boating accidents. Alcohol use is the leading contributing factor in fatal boating accidents, accounting for nearly 21% of all fatalities.  Long before a person becomes legally intoxicated, alcohol impairs his or her balance, reaction time, vision, and judgment.  On the water, elements like motion, engine noise, vibration, sun, and wind can intensify alcohol’s effects.  Alcohol affects a boater very quickly.  The results of boating under the influence can be just as tragic as drinking and driving.
 
Know the Basics
 
Balance:  A 12-ounce can of beer, a 5-ounce glass of wine, or a 1.5-ounce shot of 80-proof liquor can impair a person’s sense of balance.  When combined with the motion of the boat, this may be enough to cause a boater who has been drinking to fall overboard.  Alcohol can also confuse a person to the point where he or she is unable to swim to the surface.
 
Reaction time:  Alcohol slows the reaction time. It is difficult to process the sights and sounds around you in time to react after you’ve been drinking.
 
Judgment:  Alcohol can keep a person from making sound decisions. A boater who has been drinking may take risks he or she normally would not.
 
Vision:  Alcohol causes tunnel vision and makes it harder to focus. It can also impair depth perception, night vision, and peripheral vision. This makes it harder to judge speed, distance, and follow moving objects.
 
Illegal:  It is illegal to operate a watercraft (including personal watercraft and jet-skis) on all waters of the Commonwealth while under the influence of alcohol or a controlled substance.
 
What Happens if I Get Caught?
 
A BAC of 0.8% is the legal limit for intoxication while operating watercraft on Pennsylvania waterways.
 
If you are arrested for operating a watercraft while under the influence of alcohol or a controlled substance, you could face:
 
  • fines between $300 and $12,500
  • up to five (5) years in jail and/or
  • suspension of your boating privileges for up to one (1) year
 
If you refuse to take a breath, blood, or urine test, the Boating Commission may suspend your boating privileges for 18 months.
 
Homicide by watercraft while under the influence, can result in fines up to $12,500, and three (3) years in prison.
 
Boaters who drink often face other charges, such as:
 
  • reckless or negligent operation of boats
  • public drunkenness
  • disorderly conduct
  • open containers
  • underage drinking
 
Boat Safely
 
Whether you’re operating a sail boat, a motorboat, or a jet ski, safe boating requires a clear head, steady hand, and observant eye. A boater who has been drinking cannot function as sharply as one who has not. If you drink before or while operating a boat, you risk your own life, as well as the lives of your passengers, crew, and others on the water. 
 
Stay safe. Don’t operate a boat under the influence of alcohol.
 
For additional information contact the Substance Abuse Office at 245–4576 or visit the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission at www.fish.state.pa.us or the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board at www.lcb.state.pa.us
 

Students skip 'fun' sites to honor Soldiers

Imagine a class of eighth-graders picking what they want to do for a one-day trip to Washington D.C. Students from the Saint Patrick School of Carlisle didn’t pick the National Zoo, the International Spy Museum or Six Flags. These students decided to visit Arlington National Cemetery and the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, May 23.

They not only visited the tomb, they laid a wreath at the tomb, said Mike Marra, Army War College professor. “It says a lot about them,” he said. “It was a great day to connect the upcoming generation with those who served in the past.”

Molly Marra, Dominick Manetta, Kathleen Gruschow and Katherine Long lay a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Arlington National Cemetery with help from a Staff Sgt. from the Old Guard May 23. The Saint Patrick School of Carlisle eighth graders visited Washington D.C. during a class trip.

Marra’s daughter, Molly Marra, along with Dominick Manetta, Kathleen Gruschow and Katherine Long laid the wreath with help from a staff sergeant from the Old Guard.

The students visited other monuments, the capitol and the Smithsonian but the wreath laying was Molly’s favorite part of the day, said Marra.

Afterward, the students met veterans from all parts of the U.S. who served during World War II and personally thanked them for their service. The veterans were at Arlington as part of an Honor Flight that transports veterans to their monuments in D.C.

The veterans happened to be there at the same time, said Marra. “They were happy that young people would want to meet them,” he said.

Molly Marra meets a World War II veteran in Arlington Cemetery during a class trip to Washington D.C. May 23. She and her classmates laid a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier during the visit.

The students who laid the wreath are officers of the 8th grade class and student council and represent the entire student body at Saint Patrick School.


Carlisle Barracks recognizes Asia-Pacific American heroism, culture, food

A food tasting, martial arts demonstration, an art contest and educational information about heroic deeds absorbed children, spouses, staff and students in the contributions of Asia-Pacific Americans this month on Carlisle Barracks.

Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders embody the American experience, said President Barack Obama in a presidential proclamation. “Asian-Americans and Pacific Islander men and women are leaders in every aspect of American life - in government and industry, science and medicine, the arts and our Armed Forces, education and sports," said Obama.

Food Tasting, Martial Arts Demo and Art Contest:

The Army War College celebrated Asia-Pacific American heritage with a food tasting, martial arts demonstration and art contest at the Letort View Community Center Tiki Bar, May 22.

Baizhong Grabosky, a kindergartner at Bellaire Elementary School in Carlisle, was selected for honors in the Asia/Pacific-American Heritage art contest. Baizhong is a new American whose colorful drawing captured his memories from China.

Baizhong Grabosky wins honors in the Asia/Pacific-American Heritage art contest during a celebration event at the Letort View Community Center’s Tiki Bar May 22. Grabosky is a kindergartener at Bellaire Elementary School in Carlisle.

About a year ago, his adoptive parents Zachary and Tomoko Grabosky brought him to Pennsylvania, introduced him to English, and nurtured the poised child who spoke to the Army War College audience about the intent behind his artwork. He was awarded a gift certificate for art supplies.

The martial arts demonstration featured students from the Dragons Way School of Kenpo, Inc., located in Carlisle. The students showed the event attendees various martial arts moves.

Students from Dragons Way School of Kenpo, Inc. demonstrate martial arts during the Asia/Pacific-American Heritage recognition event at the Letort View Community Center’s Tiki Bar May 22. The students showed the event attendees various martial arts moves.

Heroic Deeds:

During May, Carlisle Barracks has been displaying the heroic deeds of Asian-Pacific Americans who earned the Medal of Honor in the U.S. military throughout post:

World War II:

DANIEL K. INOUYE

Second Lt. Daniel K. Inouye distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism in action on April 21, 1945, in the vicinity of San Terenzo, Italy. While attacking a defended ridge guarding an important road junction, Inouye skillfully directed his platoon through a hail of automatic weapon and small arms fire, in a swift enveloping movement that resulted in the capture of an artillery and mortar post and brought his men to within 40 yards of the hostile force.

                                                                                                                                                Daniel K. Inouye

Other World War II Medal of Honor recipients: Jose Calugas, Rudolph B. Davila, Barney F. Hajiro, Kio Hasemoto, Joe Hayashi, Shizuya Hayashi, Yeiki Kobashigawa, Robert T. Kuroda, Kaora Moto, Sadoa S. Munemori, Kiyoshi K. Muranaga, Masato Nakae, Shinyei Nakamine, William K. Nakamura, Joe M. Nishimoto, Allan M. Ohata, James K. Okubo, Yukio Okutsu, Frank H. Ono, Kazuo Otani, George T. Sakato, Ted T. Tanouye and Francis B. Wai.

Korean War:

ANTHONY T. KAHO’OHANOHANO

On Sept. 1, 1951, Pvt. 1st Class Anthony Kaho'ohanohano was in charge of a machine-gun squad supporting the defensive positioning of Company F when a numerically superior enemy force launched a fierce attack. Because of the enemy's overwhelming numbers, friendly troops were forced to execute a limited withdrawal. As the men fell back, Kaho'ohanohano ordered his squad to take up more defensible positions and provide covering fire for the withdrawing friendly force. Although having been wounded in the shoulder during the initial enemy assault, Kaho'ohanohano gathered a supply of grenades and ammunition and returned to his original position to face the enemy alone.

Anthony T. Kaho'Ohanohano

Other Korea War Medal of Honor recipients: Hiroshi H. Miyamura and Herbert K. Pililaau.

Vietnam War:

Elmelindo R. Smith

During a reconnaissance patrol, Platoon Sgt. Elmelino R. Smith’s platoon was suddenly engaged by intense machine-gun fire hemming in the platoon on three  sides. A defensive perimeter was hastily established, but the enemy added mortar and rocket fire to the deadly fusillade and assaulted the position from several directions. With complete disregard for his safety, Smith moved through the deadly fire along the defensive line, positioning soldiers, distributing ammunition and encouraging his men to repeal the enemy attack.

                                     Elmelindo R. Smith

Other Vietnam War Medal of Honor recipients: Terry "Teruo" Kawamura and Rodney J.T. Yano.

 

 

 

 

 

FIND FULL DETAILS OF HEROISM ON: http://www.army.mil/asianpacificsoldiers/moh.html.


Military speakers scheduled at dozens of Memorial Day observations

 

Maj. Gen. Tony Cucolo, USAWC Commandant, speaks at a Celebration of Service honoring Pennsylvania veterans, at the Pennsylvania Military Museum in Boalsburg, Pa. May 18.

The Joint Veterans Council of Carlisle will hold the annual Memorial Day parade and ceremony on Monday, May 27.  The parade begins at 9 a.m.  The ceremony follows at 9:45 a.m. at Veterans' Memorial Courtyard.  Marine Brig. Gen. Craig C. Crenshaw, Vice Director J4, Joint Staff at the Pentagon is the guest speaker.

 

Maj. Gen. Tony Cucolo, commandant, U.S. Army War College, will be the guest speaker at the Cornwall Manor Retirement Community Memorial Day Program, Cornwall, Pa., Monday, May 27, 10:30 a.m. at Cornwall Manor’s Freeman Auditorium.

 

Fifteen Army War College students and staff will be featured speakers at multiple Memorial Day events around the greater Carlisle area.  Additionally, six students will participate in events at local retirement centers, four with local area churches and one with a company event.

 

Sunday, May 19

 

  Enola - (East PennsboroTownship Board of Recreation and Enola American Legion Post 751) will hold a Memorial Day service at 2 p.m.  The guest speaker is Army Col. Charles C. Rimbey, USAWC Class of 2013.

 

  Newburg - (Newburg Area Veterans Council) will hold their annual Memorial Day Observance with a morning worship service at 11 a.m. on the Village Green.  A prayer service, rifle salute and Taps will take place at the cemetery at 1:15 p.m.  The annual parade will form at 1:30 p.m. at the Newburg UM Church, 203 N. High Street, and move through town promptly at 2 p.m.  Inclement weather:  service will be held at the Newburg UM Church.  The guest speaker is retired Air Force Brig. Gen. Dr. Denny E. Terrell, vice president of administration and finance, Shippensburg University.

 

  New Kingston - (Longsdorf Cemetery Association and St. Stephen Evangelical Lutheran Church) will hold a Memorial Day service at 1 p.m. at the Longsdorf Cemetery.  The guest speaker is Marine Col. Roger J. McFadden, USAWC Senior Service Representative.

 

Friday, May 24

 

  Camp Hill- (Rolling Green Cemetery) will hold a Memorial Day service at noon.

The guest speaker is Army Lt. Col. Raymond M. Dunning II, USAWC Class of 2013.

 

Sunday, May 26

 

  Boiling Springs - (Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 8851) will hold a Memorial Day parade and picnic.  The parade will form behind the Iron Forge Middle School, Forge Road and start at 1 p.m., and end at the Memorial Clock Tower.  The “free” picnic will be held after the parade in the Boiling Springs Tavern parking lot.   Inclement weather:  parade will be canceled and the ceremony will be held in the high school auditorium with the picnic at the VFW Post on Hamilton Road.  The guest speaker is retired Army Col. Thomas E. Faley, Jr.

 

  Dry Run - (American Legion Post 232) will hold a Memorial Day program at 2 p.m. at the Post home.  The guest speaker is Army Col. Lee R. Desjardins, USAWC Class of 2013.

  Mt. Holly Springs - (American Legion Post 674 and Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 7343) will hold a Memorial Day Service with the Carlisle Town Band at 1 p.m. at the Mt. Holly Springs cemetery.  The guest speaker is Army Lieutenant Colonel Sam R. Cook, USAWC Class of 2013.

 

  Newville - (Big Spring United Methodist Church)will hold their Memorial Day service at 10:30 a.m.  The guest speaker is Ms. Jennifer L. Jessup, USAWC Class of 2013.

 

  Shippensburg – (Oakville United Methodist Church) will hold their Memorial Day service at 9 a.m.  The guest speaker is Ms. Jennifer L. Jessup, USAWC Class of 2013.

 

 

Monday, May 27

 

  Camp Hill - (American Legion Post 43) will hold a Memorial Day parade beginning at 9:30 a.m.  A Memorial Day service will follow at 11 a.m. at the Camp Hill cemetery behind the Fire Hall at 2145 Walnut Street, Camp Hill.  Inclement weather:  service will be held at the Camp Hill Borough Building at 2145 Walnut Street, Camp Hill.  The guest speaker is Army Col. George R. Smawley, USAWC Class of 2013.

 

  Carlisle - (Joint Veterans Council of Carlisle)will hold the annual Memorial Day parade forming at 8:30 a.m. and will start promptly at 9 a.m. with a ceremony following the parade at Veterans' Memorial Courtyard at 9:45 a.m.  Inclement weather:  Parade will be cancelled and the ceremony will be held in the Old Courthouse. The guest speaker is Marine Brig. Gen. Craig C. Crenshaw, Vice Director J4, Joint Staff, Pentagon.

 

  Carlisle - (American Legion Post 826) will hold a Memorial service at Union cemetery at 11:30 a.m.  The Cumberland County Honor Guard will provide a firing detail.  Inclement weather:  Ceremony will be held at the post home at 148 W. Penn Street.  The guest speaker is Army Col. Charles D. Mills, USAWC Class of 2013.

 

  Elizabethtown - (American Legion Post 329)will hold a Memorial Day Ceremony at 8 a.m. at the War Memorial Park.  The guest speaker is Army Col. Dean A. Burbridge, USAWC Class of 2013.

 

  Greencastle - (American Legion Post 373 and VFW Post 6319)will hold a Memorial Day Service at 11 a.m. at the Cedar Hill cemetery.  The guest speaker is Navy Cmdr. Sean P. Dalton, USAWC Class of 2013.

 

  Hanover - (Allied Veterans and Post 22) will hold a Memorial Day parade at 8:30 a.m. The service will follow at the cemetery.  The guest speaker is Army Lt. Col. Larry D. Fletcher, Jr., USAWC Class of 2013.

 

  Mechanicsburg - (Lower Allen Township VFW Post 7530)will hold its Memorial Day program at 11 a.m. at the Post Headquarters, 4545 Westport Drive.  Inclement weather:  Ceremony will be held indoors.  The guest speaker is Army Col. Keith J. Lostroh, USAWC Class of 2013.

 

  Mechanicsburg - (Mechanicsburg Area Veterans Council) will hold a Memorial Day parade starting at 10 a.m.  The parade will form at 9:15 a.m. on Keller Street between Filbert Street and Shepherdstown Road.  The parade will be followed by a ceremony at the Mechanicsburg cemetery on Marble Street at 11 a.m.  Inclement weather:  Ceremony will be held inside the VFW Post 6704, 4907 Carlisle Pike, Mechanicsburg.  The guest speaker is retired Col. Robert W. Black.

 

  Mechanicsburg - (The Vietnam Veterans of Mechanicsburg)will hold a Memorial service at 2 p.m. at the Lincoln Colored cemetery off Winding Hill Road in Mechanicsburg.  The service will be conducted rain or shine. 

 

  McConnellsburg - (American Legion Post 561)will hold a Memorial Day Ceremony at 10 a.m. at Union cemetery followed by a wreath laying at the Courthouse.  The guest speaker is Army Col. Brian J. McHugh, USAWC Class of 2013.

 

  Newville - (Joint Veterans Council of Newville) will hold a Memorial Day parade starting at 1 p.m. A Memorial Day ceremony will immediately follow the parade at the Fountain at the Veterans Memorial.  Inclement weather:  Parade will be cancelled and the Memorial Day service will be held at the Big Spring Event and Activity Center on Chestnut Street.  The guest speaker is Army Maj. Brian Fickel, a graduate of Big Spring High School.

 

  Silver Springs Township - (Veterans Memorial Committee) will hold a Memorial Day Ceremony at 11 a.m. at Willow Mill Park, 80 Willow Mill Park Road, Mechanicsburg.  The guest speaker is Army Colonel Bryan E. Denny, USAWC Class of 2013.  

 

  Shippensburg - (Joint Veterans Council) will hold the annual Memorial Day ceremony and parade beginning at 10 a.m. at Locust Grove cemetery, followed by a service at Spring Hill cemetery at 11a.m. and flag raising ceremony at Shippensburg Veterans Memorial Park at noon.  At 1:15 p.m. the Navy/Marine Memorial service will be conducted at Branch Bridge on King Street.  The Memorial Day parade will begin at 2 p.m. from the corner of King and Prince Streets.  Inclement weather:  Each unit returns to the post involved for refreshments. 

 

Thursday, May 30

 

  Littlestown - (Littlestown Allied Veterans Council) will hold a Memorial Day parade and ceremony.  The parade will begin at 6 p.m., followed by the ceremony at the cemetery at 6:30 p.m.  The guest speaker is Air Force Lt. Col. Joseph M. Blevins, USAWC Class of 2013.


Col. Jeff Hall, Commander, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Savannah District 
Memorial Day: The Surrender of Soldiers to the Nation

Memorial Day remembers the deaths of those serving in the United States Armed Forces. Pictured here, a Soldier with the 3d U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard), guards the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery, Va.

To see what local events are planned see the related Banner Article

SAVANNAH, Ga. (May 22, 2013) -- We celebrate Memorial Day this coming Monday, so with all of the stress we are under from the challenges and uncertainty before us, I truly want everyone to enjoy this long weekend with family and friends. While you are enjoying the weekend I would ask that you take a some time to think about the significance of Memorial Day and consider the following thoughts.

Memorial Day remembers the deaths of those serving in the United States Armed Forces.

Few people will challenge the significance of a Soldier's ultimate sacrifice. All men die, but for the sake of a higher cause the fallen Soldier's life is stripped away. Therefore it seems most people, and rightly so, consider fallen combatants worth honoring because of the untimely nature and violent condition of their deaths.

This kind of sacrifice is noble and praiseworthy, but it doesn't completely capture the honor attributed to our fallen comrades. We see people in other professions give their lives in similar ways. We see this in firefighters and law enforcement, and we often see citizens give their lives in response to the duress of others. But there is something even more honorable in the death of a service member defending his country -- something unique to combatants alone.

In order for a nation to achieve victory in combat, it requires something like a total surrender of its Soldiers. Every part of a combatant's life, except that which belongs to God, must be consciously yielded over to the discretion of the state. Perhaps no one put it better than one Soldier who fought in the trenches of the First World War:

"All that we fear from all kinds of adversity, severally, is collected together in the life of a soldier on active service. Like sickness, it threatens pain and death. Like poverty, it threatens ill lodging, cold, heat, thirst and hunger. Like slavery, it threatens toil, humiliation, injustice, and arbitrary rule. Like exile, it separates you from all you love. Like the gullies, it imprisons you at close quarters with uncongenial companions." (C. S. Lewis: "Why I am not a Pacifist" 1949)

After enduring some of life's most disagreeable circumstances, our fallen service members never emerge in this life to enjoy the fruit of their service. They are surrounded by peril and misery for long periods until the end. In the midst of these overwhelming conditions Soldiers discipline themselves to access a component of human nature: a phenomenon we call Courage.

Indeed, no other discipline can be achieved through the difficult balance of passion and serenity. And though courage is certainly not limited to combatants, nowhere in life do we find greater and more-frequent opportunities to exercise this virtue than on the battlefield; a place where the Soldier has given up every comfort and right to the benefit of the state. Soldiers are afforded the unsavory prospect of refining their courage over and over again -- to the point of death.

For these reasons I think Memorial Day deserves a notable place on our calendar and in our thoughts. No one deserves our honor more than those service members who surrendered their life for their country.

Please remember our fallen comrades with me throughout this long weekend. And as always, please be safe.   


 


Emergency water outage May 23

Due to necessary emergency repairs, there will be a water outage for the following areas from 6 p.m. tonight, May 23 until 2 a.m. May 24.

  • Heritage Heights Housing
  • The Meadows Housing
  • Retail Complex (PX, Commissary, Outdoor Recreation)
  • The Golf Course Clubhouse

Water is available for residents at the Delaney Field Clubhouse.


Immigrants take oath, become U.S. citizens

May 22, 2013-- New U.S. citizens hailing from around the world raised their hands and took the Oath of Allegiance to the United States on the historic grounds of Carlisle Barracks today. The 17 new citizens came to the United States from Bangladesh, Columbia, Croatia, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Germany, India, Liberia, Mexico, Morocco, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Ukraine, and Yugoslavia.

Pennsylvania Army National Guard Pvt. Edson Wright takes the Oath of Allegiance during a naturalization ceremony at the Army Heritage and Education Ceremony May 22. Wright became a citizen with 16 others during the ceremony. 

Airman Ramon Garcia Floresand Army Pvt. Edson Wright took the Oath of Allegiance, through a program linking military service and citizenship. The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services expedites applications and the naturalization process for members of the U.S. armed forces. Fiscal year 2012 produced nearly 8,700 new citizens serving in the military.

Army War College student Col. Thomas Nguyen, a U.S. naturalized citizen originally from Vietnam, shared his thoughts on citizenship in the public celebration.

"Welcome, welcome, welcome," said Nguyen, before telling his story. Saigon was ready to fall when 7-year-old Nguyen, his mom and sister headed to the U.S. Embassy with three suitcases in hand. Eight thousand miles later, they found refuge and opportunity - not only for a better life but for life, he said. At 18, in Baltimore, he took the oath of citizenship. 

"I was overcome with emotion on the day I took my oath," he said.

The new U.S. citizens nodded with understanding about one of Nguyen's memories.  "I remember saying to myself, hey self, from this day forth, you no longer have to carry that green card in your back pocket," he said.

Now married, with three kids and a successful Army career, he celebrated "the opportunity to be part of the greatest nation on earth." His story is not an anomaly but the story of the American dream, said Nguyen.

Two Immigrants attend a naturalization ceremony at the Army Heritage and Education Center May 22. In all, the 17 new U.S. citizens hailed from Bangladesh, Columbia, Croatia, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Germany, India, Liberia, Mexico, Morocco, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Ukraine, and Yugoslavia.

USCIS District Director Tony Bryson administered the Oath of Allegiance and offered remarks.

I can only imagine how difficult your journey has been, said Bryson, who urged them to take advantage of your new rights and privileges.


U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center joins Blue Star Museums

The Army Heritage and Education Center is a Blue Star Museum this Summer.  AHEC joins more than 1800 museums across America that honor and invite military families with free admission to all active duty military personnel and their families from Memorial Day through Labor Day.

Blue Star Museums brings attention to military men and women, and their families, especially Blue Star Families.  Equally, it brings attention to the richness of exhibits and displays in museums across America. In all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and American Samoa, participating museums include fine arts museums, science museums, nature centeres, children's museums -- and the Army Heritage and Education Center.

USAHEC is a great destination for any Blue Star Family given its focus of military history and attention to all aspects of Army service, including the sacrifice of Soldiers’ families," said USAHEC Director Colonel Matthew Dawson. 

"We are delighted to be part of this initiative," he said. ""We expect this promotional campaign will attract many new visitors this summer and beyond."

  In Pennsylvania, the list includes the Daniel Boone Homestead in Birdsboro, the Brandwine Battlefield and River Museum in Chadds Ford, the Ephrata Cloister, the Jim Thorpe Old Jail Museum, Bucks County Childresn Museum, Pearl S. Buck House in Perkasic, the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia, and Philadelphia's History Museum, Museum of Art and Please Touch Museum, among others. The complete list of participating museums is available at www.arts.gov/bluestarmuseums.

“Blue Star Museums is something that service members and their families look forward to every year and we are thrilled with the continued growth of the program,” said Blue Star Families CEO Kathy Roth-Douquet about the unparalleled opportunity to visit some of the country's finest museums for free.

About Blue Star Museums

Blue Star Museums is a collaboration between the National Endowment for the Arts, Blue Star Families, the Department of Defense, and more than 1,800 museums across America. This is the latest NEA program to bring quality arts programs to the military, veterans, and their families.  Other NEA programs for the military have included the NEA/Walter Reed Healing Arts Partnership; Great American Voices Military Base Tour; and Shakespeare in American Communities Military Base Tour.

About Blue Star Families

Blue Star Families is a national, non-profit network of military families from all ranks and services, including guard and reserve, dedicated to supporting, connecting, and empowering military families.  With its partners, Blue Star Families hosts a robust array of morale and empowerment programs, including Books on Bases, Blue Star Museums, Operation Honor Corp, Blue Star Careers, and Operation Appreciation.  Blue Star Families also works directly with the Department of Defense and senior members of local, State, and Federal government to bring the most important military family issues to light.  Working in concert with fellow non-profits, community advocates, and public officials, Blue Star Families raises awareness of the challenges and strengths of military family life and works to make military life more sustainable.  Its worldwide membership includes military spouses, children, parents, and friends, as well as service members, veterans, and civilians.  To learn more about Blue Star Families, visit http://www.bluestarfam.org<blockedhttp://www.bluestarfam.org> .

 

 

 

 


Summer Sense Campaign – Army Substance Abuse Program

The “101 Days of Summer” represent one of the most dangerous and deadliest times of year on the nation’s highways. One big reason is a significant jump in alcohol-related traffic crashes and fatalities.

Plan Before You Party This Summer – Don’t forget to use a Designated Driver (one who is not drinking).

Increased alcohol use throughout the Summer, and particularly around major holiday weekends, beginning with Memorial Day, continuing through the Fourth of July and ending with Labor Day, has made the “101 Days of Summer” a very grim season for law enforcement, emergency medical staff, highway safety officials, and the friends and families of impaired driving victims.

“That’s why our goal this summer is to remind everyone, whether they are heading out to the beach, the lake or the mountains, to their favorite summer concert, to the ballpark, or just going to a barbecue or picnic with friends, if they plan on using alcohol, they need to use a designated driver before they get started.”

Impaired driving is one of America’s deadliest problems. Nationally, more than 17,000 people died in alcohol-related highway crashes during 2003. Every 30 minutes, nearly 50 times a day, someone in America dies in an alcohol-related crash, and more than 300,000 are injured each year. According to NHTSA, about three in every 10 Americans will be involved in an alcohol-related crash at some point in their lives.

Driving impaired or riding with someone who is impaired is simply not worth the risk because the consequences are serious and real. Not only do you risk killing yourself or someone else, but the trauma and financial costs of a crash or an arrest for driving while impaired can be really significant.

Too many people still don’t understand that alcohol, drugs and driving don’t mix. Impaired driving is no accident – nor is it a victimless crime.

“Driving impaired is simply not worth any of the pain you can cause yourself or someone else.”

Tips for a safer summer season:

  • Identify your Designated Driver before going out;
  • If drinking alcohol, don’t even think about driving when impaired – and never let your friends drive if you think they are impaired; remember, Friends Don’t Let Friends Drive Drunk.
  • Drink lots of water during your activities to avoid dehydration, and don’t drink alcohol on an “empty stomach”;
  • When impaired, ask a sober friend for a ride home, use mass transit, call a cab or your local sober rides program.
  • Ask a friend or family member to come get you, or just stay where you are and sleep it off until you are sober;
  • And, of course, always remember to wear your safety belt. It is still your single best defense against death or injury in a crash.

Please remember to Plan Before You Party This Summer – Don’t Forget to us a Designated Driver.”

Check the banner for prevention articles and special presentations provided by the Army Substance Abuse Prevention Office.

Educational Lunch and Learn Presentations:

Responsible Drinking”– This class will challenge common beliefs and attitudes that directly contribute to high risk alcohol abuse, physical tolerance vs mental tolerance.  We will discuss how our choices can protect or harm the things that we love and value.

Thursday, 13 June, 1200 – 1300

Thursday, 11 July, 1200 – 1300

Thursday, 8 August, 1200 – 1300

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders - The session will include a brief summary of the cause of FASD, and symptoms in the child. Strengths, Difficulties, and Approaches, Prevention and Risk Reduction Resources

Thursday, 27 June, 1200 – 1300

Thursday, 25 July, 1200 – 1300

Thursday, 22 August, 1200 – 1300

All sessions will be held at the Education Center, Bldg. 632 Wright Ave. Registration is required by calling 245 – 4576. Register three days before the scheduled class. We must have at least 5 participants registered for the class to be held.

Information provided by the Army Center for Substance Abuse.  For additional information contact the Prevention Office at 245-4576.

 


By Suzanne Reynolds
Area Educators honored by Army War College leaders

Maj. Gen. Tony Cucolo, Army War College Commandant, and Dr. Lance Betros, The War College Provost, present Mrs. Jessica Winesickle, from the Big Springs School District, with a certificate of appreciation, during a ceremony April 30 at their home. The fourth annual reception highlighted the unique relationship between schools and the military children who live a challenging life of many moves and many school transitions.

 watch a video of the ceremony here

Army War College leaders honored top educators of the region’s five school districts and Saint Patrick’s School, while celebrating a strong commitment and caring support to military children.  

Maj. Gen. Tony and Ginger Cucolo hosted the Excellence in Education Reception in their home, Quarters One, on April 30. The fourth annual reception highlighted the unique relationship between schools and the military children who live a challenging life of many moves and many school transitions.

The average military child moves every 2.5 years, and most military families at the Army War College are assigned here for just one year of graduate-level education. Great teachers, counselors, coaches and administrators make transitions easier as they work closely with parents and our liaison to welcome military children into their school communities.

The exceptional principals, teachers, and counselors received personal thanks from leaders and families of the Army War College and Carlisle Barracks community.

The school districts’ membership in the Military Child Education Coalition reflects a commitment to quality educational opportunities for all children influenced by mobility, family separation, and transition. 

 

Honorees

 

CarlisleAreaSchoolDistrict

Mrs.ColleenFriend,Principal

Mr.WaltBond, Teacher

Mrs.JayneHiggins,GuidanceSecretary

Mr.JayRauscher,Principal

Mrs.KathySchwang,Teacher

Mrs.AmyKnapp,Counselor

Mr.KeithColestock,Principal

Mrs.LisaWilliams,Teacher

Mrs.JoanChizmar,Teacher

Mr.AaronCarmichael,Principal

Mrs.MeganBaitzel, Teacher

Mrs.TammyLong,Teacher

 

Cumberland ValleySchoolDistrict

Ms.JudyBaumgardner,Principal

Mr.DonaldSnyder,Principal

Ms.KathyHarlan,Counselor

Ms.KathyHeisler,EnrichmentCoordinator

Ms.AmyBurke,Teacher

 

BigSpring SchoolDistrict

Mr.KevinRoberts,Director,Curriculum

Mrs.JenniferRoberts, Teacher

Mr.Robert Hankes,Teacher

Mrs.WendyHankes,Teacher

Mrs.JessicaWinesickle, Home/School Visitor

 

South MiddletonSchoolDistrict

Mr.MarkCorrell, Principal

Mr.JesseWhite,Principal

Mr.DaveBitner,Assistant Principal

Ms.SharonnWilliams, TechnologyDirector

Mrs.ConnieConnolly,SpecialEdSupervisor

Mr.AndrewGlantz,Director, Buildings &Grounds

Mr.PatDieter,Director

Mr.KevinScharlau,Teacher

Mrs.PattiGeiger,Teacher

Ms.Kristine Rohrer,Teacher

Mrs.TammyEads, Teacher

Mrs.BethMauer,Teacher

Mr.RickVensel,Director,BusinessOperations

 

MechanicsburgAreaSchoolDistrict

Mr.JohnMcIntosh,Principal

Mrs.BrendaBaker,SchoolNurse

Mr.MitchBaum, Counselor

Ms.Megan Thomas,Teacher

Mr.NicholasSadvari,Teacher

 

SaintPatrickSchool

Mrs.LauraKayda,Teacher

 

Child,Youth&SchoolServices

TiemanChild DevelopmentCenter, Letterkenny Army Depot

Mrs.SylviaJarnagin

Mrs.MarcellaWalker

 

MooreChildDevelopment Center, Carlisle Barracks

Mrs.JoyPatterson

Ms.KatieSheffler

 

YouthServices, Carlisle Barracks

Mr.RobertSuskieIII

Ms.TaraMyers


Army Chief of Staff addresses Sexual Assault & Harassment

Over the last twelve years of war, our Army has demonstrated exceptional competence, courage, and resiliency in adapting to the demands of war and accomplishing the mission.  Today, however, the Army is failing in its efforts to combat sexual assault and sexual harassment.  It is time we take on the fight against sexual assault and sexual harassment as our primary mission.  It is up to every one of us, civilian and Soldier, general officer to private, to solve this problem within our ranks.

The Army is committed to the safety and security of every Soldier, civilian, and family member.  Our Army is based on a bedrock of trust – the trust between Soldiers and leaders that we will take care of each other.  Recent incidents of sexual assault and sexual harassment demonstrate that we have violated that trust.  In fact, these acts violate everything our Army stands for.  They are contrary to our Army Values and they must not be tolerated.

It is up to every individual to contribute to a culture in which our Soldiers, civilians, and family members can reach their full potential.  It is imperative that we protect potential victims from ever experiencing a sexual crime.  We must provide compassionate care and protect survivors after a crime has been committed.  Our people must be confident that complaints will be handled quickly and decisively, and that our system will deliver justice and protection throughout the reporting, investigation and adjudication process.

Commanders, non-commissioned officers, and law enforcement must ensure that every allegation of sexual assault and sexual harassment is thoroughly and professionally investigated and that appropriate action is taken.  Leaders at every level are responsible for establishing a command climate and culture of mutual respect, trust, and safety.  Leaders must develop systems to “see” their units, and understand the extent to which their leadership promotes a positive command climate for all Soldiers.  I urge everyone to start a conversation within your unit or organization, among leaders, peers, and subordinates and with family and friends to better understand one another’s experiences and to develop better solutions to this problem.

Our profession is built on the bedrock of trust; sexual assault and sexual harassment betray that trust.  They have a corrosive effect on our unit readiness, team cohesion, good order and discipline.  We are entrusted with ensuring the health and welfare of America’s sons and daughters.  There are no bystanders in this effort.  Our Soldiers, their families, and the American people are counting on us to lead the way in solving this problem within our ranks.

Raymond T. Odierno
General, 38th Chief of Staff
U.S. Army

The strength of our Nation is our Army

The strength of our Army is our Soldiers

The strength of our Soldiers is our Families.

This is what makes us Army Strong!


Assistance needed to place flags at Ft. Indiantown Gap National Cemetery

 

Help is needed to place the Memorial Flag display at the entrance to Fort Indiantown Gap National Cemetery, Wednesday and Thursday, May 15 and 16.

The Memorial to our fallen Veterans has been placed at the entrance of the Avenue of Flags for a number of years and now numbers over 6,000 flags. It is truly a beautiful display.

The project is labor intensive to set-up the grid, punch the ground holes, and place the 6,000+ flags.

If you are interested in assisting, please go to the cemetery at 9 a.m. on Wednesday and/or Thursday.

The first 3 hours will be physical work, laying out the grid and punching ground holes.  By noon Wednesday flags should be able to be displayed. This Memorial will take at least 2 days to complete.

Not all tasks are strenuous and if you can spare a few hours either day, it would be greatly appreciated.

Respectfully Yours in Comradeship

Tom Gordon, VFW Post 9639


Army War College grads in the news May 14

The chief of staff, Army announced today the following officer assignments:

Army Reserve Brig. Gen. Leanne P. Burch, chief judge (Individual Mobilized Augmentee), U.S. Army Court of Criminal Appeals, Fort Belvoir, Va., to commanding general, U.S. Army Reserve Legal Command, Gaithersburg, Md.

Army Reserve Brig. Gen. Ural D. Glanville, commander, Rule of Law Field Force-Afghanistan, U.S. Forces-Afghanistan, Operation Enduring Freedom, Afghanistan, to chief judge, U.S. Army Court of Criminal Appeals, Fort Belvoir, Va.

Army Reserve Brig. Gen. Patrick Reinert, commanding general, U.S. Army Reserve Legal Command, Gaithersburg, Md., to commander, Rule of Law Field Force-Afghanistan, U.S. Forces-Afghanistan, Operation Enduring Freedom, Afghanistan.

Brig. Gen. Rex A. Spitler, Army National Guard, director of effects, U.S. Army Central/Third U.S. Army, Kuwait, to chief of staff, U.S. Army Central/Third U.S. Army, Shaw Air Force Base, S.C.


Joseph Sestak named General Omar N. Bradley Chair in Strategic Leadership

Joseph Sestak, a former three-star admiral and congressman, has been named as the 2013-14 recipient of the General Omar N. Bradley Chair in Strategic Leadership. While in residence, Sestak will conduct classes at Dickinson College, the U.S. Army War College and the Penn State University Dickinson School of Law and School of International Affairs.

Sestak’s distinguished 31-year career in the U.S. Navy included command of the George Washington Aircraft Carrier Battle Group comprising 30 ships during combat operations in Afghanistan and Iraq. He served as President Bill Clinton’s director for defense policy on the National Security Council and managed the Navy’s five-year, $350 billion warfare budget as deputy chief of naval operations. Sestak also served as the first director of “Deep Blue,” the Navy’s counterterrorism unit. 

Sestak served as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives for two terms, from 2007 to 2010, representing Pennsylvania’s 7th congressional district. He served on the Armed Services and Education and Labor Committees and as vice chairman of the Small Business Committee. According to the Office of the House Historian, he is the highest-ranking military officer ever elected to Congress. 

In 2010, Sestak won the Pennsylvania Democratic Senate primary with a victory over incumbent Senator Arlen Specter but lost his Senate bid in the general election. Recently, Sestak has been serving as distinguished practice professor in the School of Public Policy & Management at Carnegie Mellon University’s Heinz College, where he taught ethical leadership and a policy practicum titled “Restoring the American Dream and Its Political Platform.” He also has taught similar courses as an adjunct professor at Cheyney University of Pennsylvania.

He is the recipient of the Defense Distinguished Service Medal, the Defense Superior Service Medal, two Legion of Merit awards, two Meritorious Service Medals, the Joint Service Commendation Medal, three Navy Commendation Medals and the Navy Achievement Medal. A graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy, Sestak holds a master’s degree in public administration and a doctorate in political economy and government from Harvard University.

Named in memory of the World War II hero, the General Omar N. Bradley Chair in Strategic Leadership provides a visiting scholar the opportunity to explore with students and faculty the nature of leadership and how it can best and most ethically be exercised in a world transformed by globalization, technology and cultural change. The chair also seeks to enhance the study of leadership, encourage civilian-military dialogue and contribute to the educational and research activities of the partner institutions.

 A joint initiative among the U.S. Army War College, Dickinson College and Penn State University Dickinson School of Law and School of International Affairs, the General Omar N. Bradley Chair in Strategic Leadership has been held by Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and journalist Rick Atkinson; Dr. Richard Kohn, a nationally recognized expert in the relationship between civilian leadership and the military officer corps; Navy Admiral Dennis Blair; and Phillip “P.J.” Crowley, former assistant secretary of state for public affairs.


Post loudspeaker system test May 15

Carlisle Barracks will be testing their loudspeaker system around noon, May 15.  There will be multiple tests throughout the day. All messages will be for testing purposes only.


Roof replacement to cause temporary lane closure May 15

315 Lovell Ave, on the corner of Ashburn Drive and Lovell Avenue, will be undergoing scheduled roof replacement from May 13-17. The sidewalk along the Lovell Avenue side of the building will be closed for the duration of the project.  For safety purposes, a total of six parking spaces adjacent to the building will be blocked for the duration of the project.

On Wednesday, May 15, one lane of Lovell Avenue will be closed to traffic.  Personnel will be on hand to control traffic. 


By Tom Conning

Outgoing Chief of Staff recognized for major War College contributions

After five years at Carlisle Barracks and a variety of jobs, Col. John Laganelli, exiting Army War College chief of staff, his wife, Dian Laganelli, family, friends and co-workers gathered in the Bliss Hall foyer for an awards ceremony recognizing Laganelli, May 10. Maj. Gen. Tony Cucolo, Army War College Commandant, highlighted Laganelli's accomplishments and capabilities.

"What Col. Laganelli brought to us - besides Dian - was that natural ability to get the very busy and focused members of a diverse organization moving in the same direction for a common purpose," said Cucolo. "A devoted husband and on-call auto repair and personnel recovery dad, Col. Laganelli never lost his sense of humor or his positive outlook."

Cucolo presented Laganelli the Legion of Merit and recognized Dian's contributions to the Carlisle Barracks community with the Outstanding Civilian Service Award.

Col. John Laganelli, outgoing Army War College chief of staff, and his wife, Dian, receive awards in the Bliss Hall foyer during a ceremony recognizing them, May 10. Col. Don Galli is replacing Col. Laganelli who is headed to Kuwait where he will serve as the Deputy Chief of Staff at 3rd Army/U.S. Army Central Command.

"Dian has been a huge supporter in both communities of Carlisle Barracks and greater Carlisle itself," said Cucolo. "Dian, once again, you have made an incredibly positive impact...you literally won friends and influenced people just by being yourself."

We never intended to stay here for five years, said Laganelli. "It's been a great job," he said. "There are a lot of people that I would like to say thank you to and it would take me all day long to thank people."

He highlighted the rewarding relationships the couple made beyond the gates of Carlisle Barracks, working with United Way, Carlisle CARES, and the Chamber of Commerce. 

Laganelli began his tour at Carlisle Barracks as an Army War College student. After graduation, he tackled the responsibilities of the Strategic Decision-Making Exercises, creating challenging new scenarios and managing the enormous scope of planning detail required for that capstone student event.  Since 2011, he has served as the Chief of Staff of the Army War College. Laganelli is headed to Kuwait where he will serve as the Deputy Chief of Staff at 3rd Army/U.S. Army Central Command.

Army Col. Don Galli is current USAWC Chief of Staff.

 


Col. David Funk assumes duties as Army War College Deputy Commandant

Colonel David Funk assumed duties as the the 50th Deputy Commandant of the United States Army War College May 13. He received his commission as an Infantry Officer from the United States Military Academy in 1986. He is a graduate of the Infantry Officer Basic and Advanced Courses, The Field Artillery Advanced Course, Airborne School, Air Assault School, Ranger School, Command and General Staff College, the School of Advanced Military Studies, and the United States Army War College.

Prior to his arrival at Carlisle Barracks, he was assigned to U.S. 1st Corps, where among other jobs he served as the Assistant Chief of Staff for the ISAF Joint Command in Kabul, Afghanistan. Previous non-command assignments include service as an Infantry Platoon Leader, Rifle Company XO, and Battalion Mortar Platoon Leader in the 4th ID, 8th ID, and 1st AD; Force Development Officer at PERSCOM in Alexandria, VA; G4 Plans and Operations Officer, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault); Battalion XO and Brigade XO, 187th Infantry Regiment (Rakkasans); Chief of Ground Component Command Plans, Seoul, ROK; and Chief of Plans, and later Deputy Chief of Staff, U.S. 1st Corps.

His command assignments include: 22 months as Commander, D Company, 3d Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 1st Armored Division, Baumholder, FRG; 36 months as Commander, 3d Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment (Cottonbalers, by God!), 3d Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Georgia, where he deployed twice to Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom; 35 months as commander, 3d Brigade, 2d Infantry Division (Stryker), Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington, where he deployed to Iraq in Support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

Colonel Funk holds a Master of Military Arts and Sciences degree from the School of Advanced Military Studies, and a Master of Strategic Studies from the U.S. Army War College. His awards and decorations include the Legion of Merit, Bronze Star Medal with 2 OLC, the Defense Meritorious Service Medal with OLC, the Meritorious Service Medal with 3 OLC, the Army Commendation Medal with 2 OLC, the OIF and OEF Campaign Medals, the Parachutist Badge, the Air Assault Badge, the Combat and Expert Infantryman Badges, and the Ranger Tab.

Col. Bobby Towery, the previous deputy commandant, will retire at a ceremony June 1 at 11 a.m. at the Wheelock Bandstand.


Military Spouse Appreciation Day: "Military Spouses: The Heart and Strength of Army Families"

What is it?

On May 10, 2013, Army leaders will express their gratitude to Army spouses for their support of Soldiers. Observed since 1984, Congress officially made Military Spouse Appreciation Day part of National Military Appreciation Month in 1999. This year's theme is Military Spouses: The Heart and Strength of Army Families which captures the essence of the military spouse and reinforces the message that spouses are vital to the strength, resilience and readiness of the Army.

What has the Army done?

In 1984, President Ronald Reagan signed a proclamation officially recognizing Military Spouse Appreciation Day. The Department of Defense has since standardized the date by declaring the Friday before Mother's Day every year as Military Spouse Appreciation Day to show appreciation for the sacrifices of military spouses.

In celebration of Military Spouse Appreciation Day, garrisons Army-wide will hold a variety of enriching programs and special events to inform, honor and recognize military spouses. Events ranging from spouse appreciation luncheons to educational workshops to spouse employment fairs will take place to pay tribute to military spouses.

Why is this important to the Army?

The Army recognizes the important role Army spouses' play in today's Army. After almost a decade at war and multiple deployments, military spouses continue to support America's Army unconditionally while pursuing careers and serving in multiple roles as community leaders, mothers, fathers, and Soldiers. Through mission, deployment, reintegration and reset, military spouses are the backbone of the families who support our Soldiers. They are the silent heroes who are essential to the strength of the nation.

What continued efforts does the Army have planned for the future?

The Army will continue to provide families a strong, supportive environment. The Army is committed to improving family readiness through funding of programs, better health care, housing, schools, youth services, child care, education and employment opportunities, and we will continue to build upon and improve the tenets of the Army Family Covenant. We salute military spouses; Army Families equal Army Strong!


Remember your mom this Sunday

Mother’s Day had initial roots in gatherings related to peace, as mothers, especially those who had lost children, sought to prevent future wars. It eventually evolved into a day devoted to honoring mothers in general in 1914, but one which still received attention, even in times of war.

“On Mother’s Day, my darling

My thoughts will be of you,

For even though I’m far away

My love is just as true.

 

God gave to me an angel

So good, so kind, and sweet,

A girl above all others

One nobody else could beat.

 

It’s really a wonderful feeling

This love that is just our own,

And on this day, to you my wife

I’m yours, forever, alone.”

V-Mail sent from Corporal John W. Dwyer to his wife in May 1945.

These are the words Cpl. John W. Dwyer enclosed in a V-mail, sent to his wife for Mother’s Day in 1945. Despite many miles separating the pair, Dwyer’s thoughts still rested with his wife on the day devoted to honoring mothers.

The U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center’s archive and artifact collection contains materials related to Mother’s Day. Within the collection there is evidence of the significance of the day, as the U.S. Army and its Soldiers recognized mothers no matter the circumstances.

 


Samaya Brown, Army War College
Carlisle Barracks holds change of command ceremony

 

Lt. Col. William McDonough formally relinquished command of the United States Army Garrison at Carlisle Barracks to Lt. Col. Kimberly Peeples May 10, during a change of command ceremony at the Wheelock Bandstand, hosted by Davis Tindoll, Jr., director of the Atlantic Region, Installation Management Command.

May 10, 2013 -- The passing of command from one leader to another is a timeless tradition that was renewed today as command of the United States Army Garrison was transferred at Carlisle Barracks.

Lt. Col. William McDonough formally relinquished command of the United States Army Garrison at Carlisle Barracks to Lt. Col. Kimberly Peeples May 10, during a change of command ceremony at the Wheelock Bandstand.

The event, hosted by Davis Tindoll, Jr., director of the Atlantic Region, Installation Management Command, introduced Peeples to the community and recognized McDonough for the accomplishments of his two-year command.

Tindoll started his remarks by explaining the mission of Army’s Installation Management Command, which is to “provide Soldiers, Civilians, and their Families with a quality of life akin with the quality of their service.”

The installation is a better home for Army Families, thanks to McDonough’s work, said Tindoll. McDonough executed a campus modernization plan to streamline access to services; completed renovations to the fitness centers; and coordinated the privatization of Army Lodging on Carlisle Barracks.  McDonough also oversaw funding and approval of the final housing construction phase for 56 new post housing units, and broke ground on a new 20,000 square foot youth center facility for completion in 2014, said Tindoll.

McDonough called his time at Carlisle Barracks the “best job I’ve had in 30 years of military service.” He highlighted various memorable aspects of the job:   reading Dr. Seuss to kids at the Child Development Center, getting a fence for a family so their autistic child could explore outside, and providing heating and cooling units to protect the gate guards from the elements. It all gave him the opportunity to grow personally and professionally and keep “a smile on my face every single day,” he said.

McDonough thanked his wife, family, garrison staff, fellow commanders, and the Carlisle Barracks community for the collaborative effort it took to accomplish these things.

McDonough will deploy to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. 

A 1994 graduate of the United States Military Academy, Peeples came to Carlisle Barracks from Washington D.C., where she served as a program manager in the White House Military Office.  Prior to that, she served as brigade engineer for the 4th Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division, at Ft. Stewart, Ga., and has deployed twice in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

During her remarks, Peeples gave thanks to all those who helped make the command opportunity a reality.  She singled out her husband, John, her stepmom, mother in law, and USMA sponsor mom for their love and sacrifices, and for instilling in her a sense of hard work and respect.  She said she looked forward to her son growing up in the Carlisle community, a great example of Army, American, and family values.

Echoing McDonough’s praise for the garrison workforce, Peeples said, “To my Soldiers, Civilians, Families, I can never thank you enough for your loyalty and dedication to the mission.”


Army War College grads in the news May 8

Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel announced recently that the President has made the following nominations. All are Army War College graduates.

Army Reserve Col. Steven W. Ainsworth, to the rank of brigadier general and for assignment as commander (Troop Program Unit), 94th Training Division (Force Sustainment), Fort Lee, Va.  Ainsworth is currently serving as chief of staff (Troop Program Unit), 87th U.S. Army Reserve Support Command (East), Birmingham, Ala.

Army Reserve Col. Brian E. Alvin, the rank of brigadier general and for assignment as assistant chief of staff (Individual Mobilization Augmentee), J-4, United Nations Command/Combined Forces Command/U.S. Forces Korea, Seoul, Korea.  Alvin most recently served as chief of staff (Troop Program Unit), 351st Civil Affairs Command, Mountain View, Calif.

Army Reserve Col. Ronald A. Bassford, to the rank of brigadier general and for assignment as deputy commanding general (Troop Program Unit), 88th Regional Support Command, Fort McCoy, Wis.  Bassford is currently serving as assistant commander-support (Troop Program Unit), 108th Training Command (Initial Entry Training), Charlotte, N.C.

Army Reserve Col. John E. Cardwell, to the rank of brigadier general and for assignment as commander (Troop Program Unit), 9th Mission Support Command, Fort Shafter, Hawaii.  Cardwell most recently served as chief of staff (Troop Program Unit), 84th Training Command, Fort Knox, Ky.

Army Reserve Col. Daniel J. Christian, to the rank of brigadier general and for assignment as commander (Troop Program Unit), 95th Training Division (Initial Entry Training), Oklahoma City, Okla.  Christian is currently serving as chief of staff (Troop Program Unit), 108th Training Command, Charlotte, N.C.

Army Reserve Col. John J. Elam, to the rank of brigadier general and for assignment as commander (Troop Program Unit), 102nd Training Division (Maneuver Support) and deputy commander for mobilization and training, U.S. Army Maneuver Support Center, Fort Leonard Wood, Mo.  Elam is currently serving as deputy commander (Troop Program Unit), 411th Engineer Brigade, New Windsor, N.Y.

Army Reserve Col. Bruce E. Hackett, to the rank of brigadier general and for assignment as commander (Troop Program Unit), 78th Training Division (Operations), Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J.  Hackett is currently serving as deputy commander (Troop Program Unit), 316th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), Coraopolis, Pa.

Army Reserve Col. Joseph J. Heck, to the rank of brigadier general  and for assignment as deputy commander (Troop Program Unit), 3rd Medical Command (Mission Support Element), Atlanta, Ga.  Heck is currently serving as medical advisor (Troop Program Unit), Office of the Chief, Army Reserve, Washington, DC.

Army Reserve Col. William B. Mason, to the rank of brigadier general and for assignment as deputy commanding general (Troop Program Unit), U.S. Army Civil Affairs and Psychological Operations Command (Airborne), Fort Bragg, N.C.  Mason is currently serving as chief of staff (Troop Program Unit), 352nd Civil Affairs Command, Fort Meade, Md.

Army Reserve Col. Kenneth H. Moore, to the rank of brigadier general and for assignment as deputy commander and reserve component integration advisor (Individual Mobilization Augmentee), Southern European Task Force, U.S. Army Africa, Vicenza, Italy.  Moore is currently serving as director, Civil Affairs Branch (Active Guard Reserve), U.S. Army John F. Kennedy Special Warfare Center and School, Fort Bragg, N.C.

Army Reserve Col. Thomas T. Murray, to the rank of brigadier general and for assignment as commander (Troop Program Unit), Gulf Training Division, 75th Training Command  Birmingham, Ala.  Murray is currently serving as commander (Troop Program Unit), 2nd Battle Command Training Group, 4th Brigade, 75th Battle Command Training Division, Birmingham, Ala.

Army Reserve Col. Michael C. O'Guinn, to the rank of brigadier general and for assignment as deputy commander (Troop Program Unit), 807th Medical Command (Mission Support Element), Salt Lake City, Utah.  O'Guinn is currently serving as director, Reserve Affairs (Active Guard Reserve), Office of the Surgeon General, Falls Church, Va.

Army Reserve Col. Miyako N. Schanely, to the rank of brigadier general and for assignment as commander (Troop Program Unit), 411th Engineer Brigade, New Windsor, N.Y.  Schanely is currently serving as chief of staff (Troop Program Unit), 416th Theater Engineer Command, Darien, Ill.

 


New commander to take lead of Garrison at Carlisle Barracks

CARLISLE BARRACKS, Pa. – Lt. Col. Kimberly Peeples will take command of the United States Army Garrison at Carlisle Barracks during a change of command ceremony on the post’s historic parade grounds at Wheelock Bandstand, Friday, May 10 at 9 a.m. 

    Peeples’ comes to Pa. from Washington D.C., where she was a program manager at the White House Military Office.  Prior to her position at the White House, Peeples was assigned to the 4th Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division at Fort Stewart, Ga., as the brigade engineer.

    Peeples has a bachelor’s degree from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and a master’s degree in construction management from the University of Washington.

   Her military education includes the Engineer Officer Basic Course, Air Defense Artillery Advanced Course, Combined Arms Services Staff School, and the Command and General Staff College.

Garrison commanders on Carlisle Barracks provide “city-manager” support to the mission activities of the Army War College and other organizations, as well as to residents living on post.

    The outgoing commander, Lt. Col. William McDonough, has served as garrison commander since July 2011.  After the change of command, McDonough will deploy to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.  During his time as garrison commander, he has successfully obtained both funding and approval to demolish the last group of aging housing units on post and to begin the construction of new housing units, obtained permit approval allowing for the construction of a new Youth Center, and managed other long overdue improvements and fixes across the installation.

    The change of command ceremony is a formal tradition to demonstrate continuity of command. The military and civilian members of the Garrison at Carlisle Barracks will assemble for the event, highlighted by the passing of the unit guidon from outgoing commander to presiding officer to new commander.  Davis Tindoll, Jr., director of the Atlantic Region, Installation Management Command, will preside.

    The ceremony will move to Root Hall gym in case of inclement weather.


2013 Army Posture Statement: The Army for the Future

What is it?

The Army for the future will feature regionally aligned and mission-tailored forces designed to respond to combatant commander requirements to prevent conflict, shape the strategic environment and, when necessary, win decisively.

What has the Army done?

Globally Responsive, Regionally Engaged Strategic Land Forces

Regional alignment will provide Geographic Combatant Commands with mission-trained and regionally focused forces that are responsive to all requirements, including operational missions, bilateral and multilateral military exercises and theater security cooperation activities. 2nd Brigade of the 1st Infantry Division, stationed at Fort Riley, Kan., is aligned with U.S. Africa Command for fiscal year 2013.

In support of U.S. Africa Command objectives, the brigade will conduct engagement activities in 34 African nations over the coming year. Lessening demand for forces in Afghanistan will also allow the Army's aligned units in the Asia-Pacific theater to refocus on supporting U.S. Pacific Command's objectives. U.S. Army Pacific will be elevated to a four-star headquarters in 2013. I Corps, stationed at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., is developing Joint Task Force command capability, which will provide a deployable headquarters that can meet contingencies across the full range of military operations.

Training for Operational Adaptability

In recent years the Army has deliberately focused training on counterinsurgency and stability operations to support requirements in Iraq and Afghanistan. The Army will build upon that expertise while transitioning to a more versatile force, with operationally adaptable land forces that will take on a broader range of missions in support of the national defense strategy. Innovative training methods produce ready and responsive forces while optimizing our resources. Army units train at Combat Training Centers, while deployed and at home station. Live, virtual and constructive training enables Army commanders to conduct multi-echelon events in a complex environment at home station.

The Army's Decisive Action Training Environment (DATE), which has been incorporated by each of our three maneuver Combat Training Centers, creates a realistic training environment that includes joint, interagency, intergovernmental and multinational partners against a wide range of opportunistic threats.

What continued efforts does the Army have planned for the future?

Maintaining credible strategic landpower requires the Army to continually assess and refine how we operate, manage our human capital and increase our capabilities, all while mitigating the effects of significant reductions in funding. We must exploit our advantages in some key areas such as leader development; strategic, operational and tactical mobility; command, control, communications, computers and intelligence (C4I) and logistics. As we transition over the next five to ten years, this effort will be underpinned by a strong institutional Army. The institutional Army takes a deep look at the future strategic environment to formulate concepts and plans for the best mix of capabilities to meet the nation's land warfare challenge " the right skills, right doctrine, right equipment and the right qualities in our adaptive leaders.

Why is this important to the Army?

The Army must strike a balance between force structure, readiness and modernization, in a manner that is mindful of fiscal realities yet also provides the nation with optimized but capable landpower. Regionally aligned, mission tailored forces will continue to play an essential role in the defense strategic guidance, which rebalances to the Asia-Pacific region while maintaining our commitment to partners in and around the Middle East.

Resources


Hungarian officer becomes 43rdinductee into the International Hall of Fame
 
by Suzanne Reynolds, Public Affairs
 
Hungarian Defense Forces strategic leader becomes the 43rdinductee into the International Hall of Fame.
 
The War College leadership, student body, and faculty honored Gen. Tibor Benko, Chief of Defense of the Hungarian Defense Forces and USAWC 2001 graduate, with induction into the International Hall of Fame on Apr. 23 in Bliss Hall.
 
“Gen. Benko exemplified the tenants of the United States Army War College through his leadership of his nation’s armed forces and in doing so has greatly honored his alma mater,” said Col. John Burbank, director, International Fellows Program.  “His connection to this institution and to you, as future strategic leaders, remains paramount as we face the dangers and new challenges of the 21stcentury together.”
 
Benko’s career spans 34 years starting as a platoon leader and then brigade commander at the 36thArtillery Regiment in Kiskunhalas, commander of the 5thLight Infantry Brigade in Debrecen, acting commander of the Hungarian Land Forces Command, commander (land forces) of the Joint Force Command  and presently as chief of defense.
 
The Hall of Fame recognizes graduates who have held the highest positions in their nation’s armed forces or an equivalent position by rank or responsibility in a multinational military organization.
 
Gen. Tibor Benko expressed thanks and reminisced about his time at The Army War College 12 years ago—
 
“It is a great feeling to breathe the air of the Army War College again,” said Benko. 
 
Benko thanked his former faculty members, classmates and sponsors for attending the ceremony.
 
“I was fortunate to be a student here, and I can tell you that I spent a year here that was not only successful but unforgettable,” said Benko. “I experienced and learned a lot here which I could use very effectively in my previous positions and currently, as well.  I made excellent friends from the one year from among both American and international students.”
                                                                                                                  Photos by Megan Clugh, USAWC Photo Lab
 
The atmosphere of this auditorium is just like it was back then—and sitting there among you are the top military leaders to be, he said.                        
 
“It is here where strategic leadership and management skills come together, this is something you have already learned about,” said Benko. 
 
Benko spoke of the Hungarian officer who will come to The War College for the next resident course and provided an overview of his nation’s military.
 
Hungary is a small country without large armed forces, but within the alliance it is not the size of the country but the contribution to the common cause that matters, said Benko.  Hungarian forces are present in Afghanistan, Mali and other regions of Africa, Cypress, China, and were also involved in Kosovo and Iraq. 
 
“We field over 160 positions at various NATO commands and headquarters,” said Benko.  “We operate a NATO military medical excellence center and we are responsible for organizing and managing international C-IED course, just to mention some of our contributions.” 
 
Benko also discussed the partnership with the Ohio National Guard which celebrates its 20th year of working together. 
 
Benko outlined the capabilities his country could offer within alliances and in the international area to include a joint engineer battalion with Slovakia, Romania and Ukraine for flood disasters, a multinational land force with Italy and Slovenia, policing missions in 2015 and a partnership with Poland, the Czech Republic and Slovakia in 2016.
 
He closed his remarks by thanking the War College for the honor and reminded students to take full advantage of their year here, which he called the best of his life.
 
 
 

 
America the Beautiful Federal Recreation military passes will continue to be accepted 
 
 
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced on May 1 that it will continue to accept the America the Beautiful Federal Recreation Pass Program's Interagency Annual Pass for Military (Military Pass) at its more than 2,500 USACE-managed recreation areas nationwide. This link will give you more information on the locations of their lakes: http://corpslakes.usace.army.mil/visitors/booklet/Whole.pdf
 
Initiated last year, service men and women - Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, and activated National Guard and Reserves, and their dependents who present the Interagency Military Pass will receive a fee waiver to USACE-managed day-use areas (boat launches and swimming areas).
 
The Military Pass, which is free, may be obtained in person at U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service, Bureau of Reclamation, Bureau of Land Management and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service facilities. Additional information on the Federal Recreation Pass Program is available at http://store.usgs.gov/pass/annual.html
 
Military members and their dependents may also present a Department of the Defense Identification Card or Common Access Card to receive the day-use fee waiver at USACE-managed day-use areas. http://www.army.mil/article/102418/
 

By Thomas Zimmerman, Army War College
Ground broken for the Sgt. Andrew McConnell Youth Center

Col. Scott, Kathy and Amelia McConnell unveil the sign for the Sergeant Andrew McConnell Youth Center during the groundbreaking ceremony May 7. The $6 million, 20,000 square foot facility is named in honor of Sgt. McConnell who was killed in Afghanistan in 2009.

For more photos visit www.facebook.com/usawc

A fallen Solider, father, son, student, friend, and Carlisle Barracks community member was honored and remembered during a ground breaking ceremony for a new Youth Center here May 7.

In front of friends, family and the Carlisle Barracks community, Maj. Gen. Tony Cucolo, Army WarCollege Commandant,hosted the ground breaking ceremony for the Sergeant Andrew McConnell Youth Center. The $6 million, 20,000 square foot facility is named in honor of Sgt. McConnell, the son of Col. Scott and Kathy McConnell, who was killed in Afghanistan in 2009.

“It’s truly an honor for this facility to be named in honor of our son,” said Col. McConnell. “My son would be humbled by this. It ensures that his name will live on.”

Cucolo echoed the sentiment before sharing the story of Sgt. Andrew McConnell.

“Taking an honorable and useful place in the lexicon of Armed Forces Families who live and work at Carlisle Barracks will be the name McConnell,” said Cucolo. “Andrew’s story will be told over and over again, because when you walk into this beautiful facility you will see his picture... and several generations of parents and children, especially the Army kids, will learn that United States Army Sergeant Andrew Harron McConnell, for whom this center will be dedicated and named, was an Army kid too.”

As an Army Brat, Andrew moved eleven times and attended seven different schools. While his father was a student at The War College, Andrew was employed by the Carlisle Barracks Sports Office where he, as he did with everyone he encountered, left an indelible impression, said Cucolo.

Answering a burning desire to serve his country, Andrew enlisted in the Infantry in October 2005, when he knew the country was deeply engaged in two wars.

“He volunteered knowing full well he would go into harm’s way,” said Cucolo.

Maj. Gen. Tony Cucolo, Army War College Commandant, Mel Irwin, Carlisle Barracks Children and Youth Services director, a representative from Atlantic Marine Construction, Amelia McConnell, Command Sgt. Maj. Robert Blakey and Lt. Col. William McDonough, garrison commander, break ground for the new facility.

He arrived at Fort Lewis, Wash., as a Specialist and was assigned to 2-1 Infantry, 5-2 Stryker Brigade Combat Team. While at Fort Lewis, Andrew met and dated Sarah Marie Ficks and they married in December 2008. In July 2009, Andrew deployed as an infantry squad leader in B Company, 2-1 Infantry to Afghanistan.

Six weeks into his deployment, while conducting an early morning, mounted patrol, his Stryker vehicle struck a roadside bomb. The blast killed Andrew and his Platoon Leader, 1st Lt. David Wright, and wounded several members of his squad. Andrew was interred at Tahoma National Cemetery in Kent, Wash.

“The level of sacrifice offered by Andrew will sink in to those who read on and find out that five months after his death, Sarah gave birth to his daughter, Evelyn Mae. In addition to his wife and daughter, Andrew left behind his parents, five sisters, Ashlee, Amanda, Alecia, Abbey, and Amelia, and an abundance of friends and coworkers.

Pennsylvania Senator Pat Toomey, who was unable to attend, shared his thoughts on Andrew’s sacrifice with a letter that was read at the ceremony.

“Recognizing the service of the men and women that have served this country in time of combat, and particularly those that have made the ultimate sacrifice, is a tradition that I take a great deal of pride in. I am deeply appreciative that the Carlisle Barracks and Maj. Gen. Anthony Cucolo have decided to name the new Youth Center on campus in honor of Sgt. McConnell.

“While I never had the honor of meeting Sgt. McConnell, I have come to understand that, in addition to serving his country, Sgt. McConnell was an outstanding athlete and was involved in various community-based organizations. In many cases, the values an individual learns as a result of being involved in ventures such as this are directly in line with the goals of a Youth Center. With this in mind, I believe that naming the Carlisle Barracks Youth Center in honor of Sgt. McConnell a fine and fitting tribute.

“The Carlisle Barracks Youth Center bearing Sgt. McConnell’s name will serve as an enduring tribute to his life and bravery in combat. Moreover, the Youth Center will provide local children with a venue for learning virtues that Sgt. McConnell proudly possessed and displayed on a daily basis.”

 

The ground breaking marks the beginning of the end for a project that has been more than 10 years in the making. Along the way, YS youth have helped plan the features that others would enjoy, like the demonstration kitchen for cooking classes, the full-size gym and patio. The gym will have a sport court that can be used, interchangeably, for roller-skating, roller hockey, and basketball, according to Liz Knouse, DFMWR director.

The Youth Center will be adjacent to the Moore Child Development Center, creating a one-stop center for family access to the YS, CDC, and sports fields.

“Now I know right now to you it’s just a fenced-in grassy area with a bunch of sticks in the ground, but I want you to use your imagination and picture a sprawling 20,000 square foot, state-of-the-art facility, a 21st century Boys and Girls Club, if you will,” said Cucolo. “A new building and in these tough financial times, that is tangible, visible evidence of the Army’s Covenant with its Families.”

Cucolo said that the naming of the center will hopefully serve as a reminder for all that pass through.

“Andrew is still serving us here, his memory will live on and be vivid and strong because as thousands of parents, children and staff pass by his picture and know why we name this building after U.S. Army Sergeant Andrew Harron McConnell, he will remind us not to take life for granted and better yet, he will quietly urge us all to live a life worthy of his sacrifice,” he said.

Youth Services has occupied its current facility since the 1990s. The YS building at 637 Liggett Road was built in 1940 and has served as a bowling alley and headquarters building. Youth Services has used it since the 1990s, and parents and youth have given it art and character, but couldn’t overcome underlying challenges.

“The heating, ventilation and air conditioning units are beyond their useful life span,” said Tom Kelly, public works director. “We have had to install window air conditioning to supplement the current system. As a whole the entire facility needs to be modernized.”

Construction by Atlantic Marine Construction is expected to last approximately 12 months.

.


Thomas Zimmerman, Army War College
Seminar helps to add to senior spouses’ toolkits

 

A senior spouse asks a question of the panel during the three-day Senior Spouse Leadership Seminar.

Today’s military depends on strong, effective and caring leaders but those leaders are not always wearing a uniform as pointed out during a recent seminar held at the Army War College.

65 senior spouses took part in the three-day Senior Spouse Leadership Seminar designed to provide them training to enhance their roles as program mentors and advisors and to provide them with relevant, useful information as they serve the military community, according to Christine Yuengert, head of the Military family Program. MFP sponsors the program along with the Carlisle Barracks Army Community Services office.

The seminar allows participants to discuss their “inherent” and “implied” roles as program advisors, mentors, and advocates,” said Yuengert. Topics discussed included Working with Volunteer Organizations; Coaching, Mentoring, and Advising; The Balancing Act: Taking Care of Yourself so you can Take Care of Others; and Protocol for Senior Spouses.

“They have an opportunity to explore and refresh skills that can help make those roles more successful regardless of their component affiliation,” she said. 

“It is always beneficial to acquire another resource notebook to keep in my professional volunteer library,” said Army Spouse Kimberly McHugh. “I have always encouraged others to be ‘resource pack-rats’ as well. Information and pro-activity makes for a stronger Army Family.

“My intention was to glean additional knowledge on expectations that may be held and hear experiences of senior spouses that have held leadership positions, specifically regarding Brigade Command,” said Army Spouse B.J. Holman. “I believe any opportunity to gather individuals together and share in a collaborative manner from their lived experience and knowledge is greatly beneficial.” 

Holman pointed out one activity she feels will be especially useful in the future.

“I will definitely incorporate into my leadership position a very insightful activity called ‘catch phrase’,” she said. “The activity requires teams to identify encouraging phases that can be produced from one or two letter words.  For example, beef jerky was given and our group came up with the phase ‘Thanks, you beefed up our strength on an enduring task.’ I always look for creative ways to incentivize volunteers.  This along with others will be added to my pocketbook of care and concern.”

As part of the seminar a panel of Senior Spouses was assembled from the Carlisle Barracks and Army War College Community to offer their perspective of serving at the Senior Spouse level while their spouse served in Brigade or centrally selected Key Billet positions.

“In an open discussion format, panel members shared their experiences, insights and "lessons learned" with SSLS participants as this next wave of senior spouses prepares to serve as leaders, mentors, advisors in their future assignments,” said Yuengert.  

The panel was facilitated by Ginger Cucolo, Senior Leader Spouse panelists included Lisa Towery, Nellie Funk, Liz Beaudette, Beth Crutchfield, Ann Efflandt, Jennifer Frank, and Cynthia Maranian.

“I think it is invaluable to the mission of supporting our Soldiers to provide learning opportunities to our Army spouses,” said McHugh. “There is such a wide-range of experience levels in the volunteer pool that it is always beneficial to educate us to available resources and programming. An informed Army Family is a Mission Ready Army Family.”


Thomas Zimmerman, Army War College
Exercise set in 2023 challenges War College students to apply lesson learned

The challenges facing the nation and world in April  -- ongoing operations in Afghanistan, continued unrest in Syria, rhetoric emanating from North Korea, coupled with the tragic events at the Boston Marathon and in the small town of West, Texas -- were eerily similar to those facing the students of the 30th annual Joint Land, Air, and Sea Strategic Exercise (JLASS-EX).  

From April 14-19, 48 students from the United States Army War College, along with 87 of their colleagues from the Air War College, Marine Corps War College, Naval War College, National War College, the Dwight D. Eisenhower School for National Security and Resource Strategy, and the National Intelligence University, met at the Curtis E. LeMay Wargaming Institute at Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama, to culminate their participation in this year’s strategic exercise, set in 2023.  

“JLASS-EX is a two-phased special program elective that involves all of the senior service colleges,” said Army Col. Jim Muskopf, the exercise director. “This allows the students to apply the ideas and concepts they’ve learned during the core curriculum into a complex and realistic global scenario set ten years in the future.”

The event provides future leaders an opportunity to confront these kinds of serious issues in a learning environment before dealing with them in reality. JLASS-EX is a showcase wargame that integrates all the senior-level colleges across DoD, according to Air Force Maj. Gen. Walter Givhan, LeMay Center commander.

Army War College students played to roles of the Joint Staff, AFRICOM, EUCOM, NATO/SHAPE and for the first time ever, the Department of Homeland Security.

“We recognize that our students will go on to serve in a variety of different assignments once they leave here,” said Army Lt. Col. Chris Rogers, the course director for JLASS-EX at the Army War College. “Bert Tussing, our homeland security expert, was really an advocate for our students to play the role of DHS this year; JLASS-EX provides the benefit of practical application to supplement their classroom lessons.”

Since its inception, the exercise has evolved significantly – growing from a computer simulation at the operational level to a decision-making exercise at the strategic level – while remaining true to its original intent.  Today the exercise occurs in two phases: a distributed phase at the parent senior-leader colleges' home station and an execution phase at Maxwell. During the distributed phase, students communicate via web contact, telephone and videoteleconferencing to develop theater strategies, select courses of action and coordinate resources.

During the collective phase at Maxwell, the scenario culminated with several domestic and regional crises that allowed the students to make strategic decisions, evaluate the impact of those decisions, and then adjust course in a fully-adjudicated “free-play” exercise environment.

 “The students are challenged to use all of the elements of national power, diplomatic, interagency, military and economic,” said Muskopf. “The challenges faced range from humanitarian assistance to an ongoing armed conflict so the students really had to lean on their core courses to help guide their decisions.”

The exercise environment, however, is not limited to merely adaptive mission planning processes.  Students also face simulated real-world challenges, such as media interaction and public pressure.  Mock press conferences, media interviews and student press releases, all facilitated by the U.S. Air Force Public Affairs Center of Excellence, provide exceptional training and educational benefit, while also serving as a means to provide injects and feedback to student decision making. 

"Simulating press coverage exposes students to some of the public pressures they face while responding to complex situations," said Air Force Lt. Col. Don Langley, JLASS-EX media cell chief and deputy director for the U.S. Air Force Public Affairs Center of Excellence. "Our goal is to show them the need to be effective public communicators and identify the skills they need to develop in that area."

To set the stage for each day’s wargaming events, students view special reports by the fictional Global News Network, as well as daily news updates in the Early Worm - a fabricated news digest that replicates our own Defense Department’s news service. Simulated press coverage was a highlight of the exercise for many students as it exposed them to some of the external pressure they face while responding to complex situations and emphasized the requirement for effective public communication to support successful strategies and plans. 

JLASS-EX and its earlier iterations have graduated nearly 3,000 senior leaders since the initial exercise in 1983. The list of graduates includes Gen. Martin Dempsey, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and at least 30 general officers still on active duty in each of the service branches.

JLASS-EX traces its roots back to 1983 and the Carlisle-Maxwell series of computer-assisted exercises. CARMAX was the product of an agreement between the Army and Air Force Chiefs of Staff to integrate a coordinated wargame into the curriculum of their respective war colleges to develop a better understanding of Joint war fighting through experiential learning and student interaction. 

Editors note: Some information used in this story came from a Maxwell Air Force Base release.


Army War College grads in the news

Maj. Gen. Patrick M. Higgins, director, Joint Integrated Air and Missile Defense Organization, J-8, Joint Staff, Arlington, Va., to deputy director, Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Organization, Arlington, Va.

Maj. Gen. John R. O'Connor, deputy chief of staff, G-4, U.S. Army Forces Command, Fort Bragg, N.C., to commanding general, 21st Theater Sustainment Command, U.S. Army Europe and Seventh Army, Germany.

Maj. Gen. John W. Peabody, commanding general, U.S. Army Engineer Division, Mississippi Valley, Vicksburg, Miss., to deputy commanding general for civil and emergency operations, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Washington, D.C.

Maj. Gen. Aundre F. Piggee, commanding general, 21st Theater Sustainment Command, U.S. Army Europe and Seventh Army, Germany, to director, J-4, U.S. Central Command, MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.

Maj. Gen. Perry L. Wigginsfor appointment to the rank of lieutenant general and for assignment as commanding general, U.S. Army North/Fifth U.S. Army, Fort Sam Houston, Texas.  Wiggins is currently serving as commanding general, First Army Division West, Fort Hood, Texas.

Brig. Gen Kevin G. O'Connell, who has been selected to the rank of major general, commanding general, Joint Munitions and Lethality Life Cycle Management Command/Joint Munitions Command, Rock Island Arsenal, Ill., to deputy chief of staff, G-4, U.S. Army Forces Command, Fort Bragg, N.C.

Brig. Gen. David G. Fox, special assistant to the commanding general, U.S. Army Special Operations Command, Fort Bragg, N.C., to deputy commanding general, U.S. Army John F. Kennedy Special Warfare Center, Fort Bragg, N.C.

Brig. Gen. Kristin K. French, commanding general, 3rd Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), Fort Knox, Ky., to commanding general, Joint Munitions and Lethality Life Cycle Management Command/Joint Munitions Command, Rock Island Arsenal, Ill.

Brig. Gen. Anthony C. Funkhouser, commanding general, U.S. Army Engineer Division, Northwestern, Portland, Ore., to commandant, U.S. Army Engineer School, U.S. Army Maneuver Support Center of Excellence, Fort Leonard Wood, Mo.

Brig. Gen. Mark W. Gillette, senior defense official/defense attaché-Cambodia, U.S. Defense Intelligence Agency, Cambodia, to defense attaché-China, U.S. Defense Intelligence Agency, China.

Brig. Gen. Paul M. Nakasone, deputy chief of staff, intelligence, International Security Assistance Force Joint Command, Operation Enduring Freedom, Afghanistan, to director, Army Cyber Operations Integration Center/G-3, Second Army/U.S. Army Cyber Command, Fort Belvoir, Va.

Col. Flem B. Walker Jr., who has been selected for the rank of brigadier general, director for strategy and integration (G-45/7), Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, G-4, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C., to commander, 3rd Sustainment Command (Expeditionary), Fort Knox, Ky.

 

Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel announced recently that the President has made the following nominations:

Col. Michael Dillard, for appointment to the rank of brigadier general and for assignment as commander (troop program unit), 310th Expeditionary Sustainment Command, Indianapolis, Ind.  Dillard most recently served as chief of staff (troop program unit), 451st Combat Support Sustainment Expeditionary Command, Wichita, Kan.

Col. Donald E. Jackson Jr., for appointment to the rank of brigadier general.  Jackson is currently serving as commander, U.S. Army Engineer Division, South Atlantic, Atlanta, Ga.


By Tom Conning

Soldiers wall to honor Pennsylvania’s fallen Soldiers

Carlisle Barracks will soon dedicate a memorial site to honor Soldiers who have died on active Army duty, inviting family members to the recognition ceremony.

The initiative developed with guidance from Army Community Service, and with assistance from Cub Scouts and from Carlisle Barracks Soldiers in the “Better Opportunities for Single Soldiers” program. The Soldiers’ Wall will honor 70 Soldiers from 11 counties in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

The wall will be located in Shughart Hall, where Soldiers will daily walk by the wall and remember the sacrifice of Pennsylvania Soldiers.  The wall will feature photos of fallen Soldiers, a reflection area with seating and a fountain.

Jeffrey Hanks, Carlisle Barracks Survivor Outreach Coordinator, is leading the effort. It’s common-sense to have a memorial here for our fallen Soldiers, he said. “It was one of the things that should be done.”

Carlisle Barracks Soldiers raised $1,200 for the project by holding two car washes last summer. People supported the cause, said Staff Sgt. Charles Posey, Carlisle Barracks military personnel noncommissioned officer in charge. “If it was me, I would want somebody to have a place to come to, too,” he said.

Soldiers on post embraced the idea, said Capt. Michael Tompkins, former headquarters company commander. “The wall was to go in the Shughart Hall, one of the few buildings on post dedicated to enlisted soldiers and would be a constant reminder to those who pass through the building of the sacrifices of these conflicts,” he said.

“I was very proud of the Soldiers that volunteered their time on consecutive weekends in order to raise the necessary funds to get movement started on developing and installing the wall,” said Tompkins.

 


By Tom Conning

Soldier balances work, training, competitions

What Soldier can find 12 to 18 hours worth of time to indulge in their hobby on a weekly basis after working, conducting physical fitness training and spending time with family? The answer: 1st Sgt. Sabrina Washington, headquarters company first sergeant at Carlisle Barracks. Indulging in her hobby might be easier for Washington than some Soldiers because it’s related to Army physical fitness. She’s a competitive body-builder.

A Marine talked her into trying the sport in 2002 and she entered a competition with limited preparation, she said. “We did two weeks of training and he told me how to pose,” said Washington. “I did my first show in Norfolk and got first place.”

“From then on I was like, yeah I can do this,” said Washington.

1st Sgt. Sabrina Washington, headquarters company first sergeant at Carlisle Barracks, lifts weights in Indian Field Fitness Center. Washington recently won 1st and 3rd place in two categories during a body-building competition in Baltimore, Mar. 23.

Washington trained for four years and attended five different competitions before she stopped after a permanent change of station to Kuwait in 2006. She started training again last November and went to her first non-military competition since 2006 in Maryland March 23. She took first place in the female body-building Armed Forces Division and third place in the National Physique Committee division at the Baltimore Gladiator Classic.

Army life has made it difficult to maintain a schedule, diet and a body-building physique, especially when she was a drill instructor, she said. “My training time was when we were actually training Soldiers,” said Washington. “If we go on a road march, I’ll add more weights or put some weight plates or something in my rucksack.”

Training has been easier for her at Carlisle Barracks but she still has to maintain a balance between body-building exercises and Army physical fitness training, she said.

“Training up for a competition, I’m getting heavier because I’m gaining more muscle mass,” said Washington. “And then of course running, the heavier I am it slows me down.”

The balancing act seems to be working. Washington had a perfect score on her last Army Physical Fitness Test at the beginning of April.

Others take note.

Sgt. Shaketa Rodgers, a Carlisle Barracks chaplain’s assistant, called Washington a great example. “It does inspire me to make sure I live healthy and that I condition my body to always be ready if called upon to go to war,” said Rodgers.

It’s great to make physical fitness a recreational hobby, said Capt. Joseph Wiseman, commander of headquarters company. “It sets a good example for the Soldiers that she’s not only being fit because it’s part of her job, but she’s also made it part of her life.”

Washington’s body-building has influenced her as a Soldier, said Elaine Leist, deputy garrison commander. “It’s dedication. It’s perseverance. It’s taking on something unknown and making something positive out of it. It can’t help but make you a better person and better Soldier,” said Leist. “I can only imagine what she looks like on stage as she’s going through her different poses.”

Now that she’s perfected her physical fitness test score, she’s turned back to training for her next competition. She plans on competing in the Delaware State Classic in August and in the Baltimore Gladiator Classic again, in November.


My God, my God, what will the country say!

-President Abraham Lincoln, after the Battle of Chancellorsville, 1863

Battle of Chancellorsville:

The American Civil War Battle of Chancellorsville, fought May 1-3, 1863 in Virginia’s Piedmont region, pitted the 130,000 man Army of the Potomac under its newly appointed commander, Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker, against the 60,000 man Army of Northern Virginia under Gen. Robert E. Lee.

Battle of Chancellorsville, General Sickles' Division convering the retreat, by John R. Chapin, Chancellorsville, Virginia.

Hooker developed a plan to hold Lee’s Confederates at Fredericksburg with a small part of the Army of the Potomac and march most of his troops in a wide flanking maneuver to the west to attack Lee’s flank and rear. Hooker hoped this move would either crush Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia or force it to flee. Hooker anticipated a glorious victory. Instead, Lee and Maj. Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson achieved their greatest victory.

Hooker executed his plan and initially took Lee by surprise; however, the resilient and adaptable Confederate leaders regrouped, seized the initiative, made several risky tactical moves and drove the Federals from the field after three days of intense fighting. Both armies suffered more than 30,000 casualties, including “Stonewall” Jackson.

            -Battle information taken from conversations with Dr. Christian B. Keller and The Chancellorsville Campaign January – May 1863 by Bradford A. Wineman (part of the U.S. Army Center of Military History’s collection).

Why it still matters:

Today is the start of the 150th anniversary of Chancellorsville.  To commemorate the anniversary, Dr. Christian B. Keller, Army War College professor, author and historian, discusses the battle and why it’s important for today’s leaders to understand and contemplate.

Chancellorsville is a contingency point in the Civil War, said Keller. “It is a laboratory of understanding good command and control and command relationships -- what makes them work well -- what doesn’t make them work well,” he said.

Remains of unburied Soldiers in the woods on south side of "Plank road."

Command Teams:

Lee had built and cultured a command team consisting of Jackson, James Longstreet and J.E.B. Stuart who he relied upon during moments of crisis, said Keller. “When you have built a team like that, when the moment of crisis comes, when resiliency is necessary, that command team can be relied upon to execute your wishes to the best result of the force,” said Keller. “Lee was able to utilize it very effectively at Chancellorsville, outnumbered as he was.”

Resiliency:

“When he finds that his plan on the 1st of May, 1863, has been disrupted by what the enemy did to it -- by Jackson’s and Lee’s quick reaction to the operational out-flanking of their army and their aggressiveness in meeting Hooker’s flanking force head-on -- Hooker loses his nerve and retreats back into the Wilderness,” said Keller.

“We want to avoid moments like that today for our strategic leaders and leaders at all levels of command,” Keller said.

“We hope to be able to build a sense of self-confidence but also a sense of reflection. The ability to think carefully when a moment of crisis has arrived, within the allotted time,  realizing that you do have a chain of command that you can turn to for advice during that moment of emergency and that you can take a few minutes, however fleeting they may be, to reflect, to think critically, to think creatively.”

“Joe Hooker did not do any of that.”

Lee and Jackson were resilient and Hooker was less so, allowing the Confederate leaders to adapt to the situation, explained Keller.

View on "Plank road" at point at which "Stonewall" Jackson was killed.

Adaptability:

“The greatest example of adaptation in the Chancellorsville Campaign has to be Robert E. Lee’s and ‘Stonewall’ Jackson’s realization of the operational dilemma that they found themselves in with Hooker’s flanking movement,” said Keller. “Instead of spending much time lamenting what had happened, gnashing their teeth and wringing their hands, they jumped into action – realizing the reality of the problem, assessing it, looking at it head-on and making a decision.”

Multinational Command:

During the battle, Jackson flanked Hooker’s army, attacking the XI Corps, which was one half to 60 percent German-American,” said Keller. “You have a natural disjoint looming here with this half-German corps that has a language of command that is foreign, i.e. German,” said Keller.

This wasn’t addressed adequately beforehand and became a crucial mistake by the leaders of the Army of the Potomac, said Keller. “Finding a way to overcome the language barrier, finding a way to integrate the command and control systems, which will naturally be different among nations and cultures, needs to be done ahead of time. It can’t be an afterthought.”

When you’re dealing with a multinational force, you can learn from Chancellorsville on multiple levels, Keller said.

     -The photos are from the Army Heritage and Education Center’s Military Orderof the Loyal Legion of the United States Massachusetts Commandary (MOLLUS-MASS) Civil War Photographs Collection. This part of the collection features photos that are a mix of Civil War Soldiers, both during the  war and after at Chancellorsville, Va. 


Robert Dozier, U.S. Army Installation Management

Sequester preparations await furlough announcement

SAN ANTONIO (April 11, 2013) - - Employees will have to wait a bit longer to find out the details of their furlough, including the exact number of non-pay status days, as officials attempt to minimize the impact on mission and personnel.

The extensive planning and deliberations for the release of Notice of Proposed Furlough Letters to Army civilians have been stalled between Congressional action and White House budget proposals.

The reason for the delay is complex. On March 21, the Pentagon put off sending out notices to give officials time to review the Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act of 2013. This continuing resolution put $10 billion back in the budget, restored tuition assistance for military members and gave the services some flexibility in the application of the furloughs.

After a detailed review, the Defense Department revised the number of non-pay status days from 22 to 14 and delayed the start of furloughs until mid- to late June. Around 750,000 civilians had been facing a 20 percent reduction in pay for the remaining weeks of fiscal year 2013.

Congressional approval of the defense appropriations bill late in March reduced the shortfall in the budget from $46 to $41 billion, taking some of the pressure off sequestration. Overseas operations, however, are still the highest priority. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel directed Deputy Defense Secretary Ashton Carter and Army GEN Martin E. Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, to conduct an intensive, department-wide review of how to protect the nation with fewer resources.

How budget cuts will affect readiness and the department's overall mission is of the utmost concern, according to secretary Hagel. "We will have to trade at some level and to some degree our future readiness for current operations," he said.

On April 2, Hagel announced he will voluntarily commit to a partial forfeiture of his pay during the furlough period, even though he is exempt as a political appointee. This gesture prompted other leaders, including the President of the United States, to make similar gestures of solidarity.

The White House released its 2014 budget proposal, including a $526.6 billion defense base budget request, April 10. This budget adds more variables to the process. Besides repealing the sequestration, President Obama's proposal addresses taxes and entitlement spending and calls for a new round of base realignment and closure.

Meanwhile, officials across the Army await the exact details and wording of the furlough communication. The Department of the Army has requested an internal review to gauge the impact of both a 7-day furlough and no furlough; however, there is no decision to reduce the number of days below 14.

To accomplish a full 14-day non-pay status furlough, employees of the U.S. Army Installation Management Command are expected to receive their notification letters starting on or about May 16. Approximately 27,000 IMCOM employees will be notified directly by their supervisors under specific guidance from Assistant Secretary of the Army for Manpower and Reserve Affairs Thomas R. Lamont.

Once employees are notified, they will be required to acknowledge in writing their receipt of notification. Then they will have seven days to exercise their right to reply. Employees may appeal orally, in writing or both to the designated reply official.

LTG Mike Ferriter, commander of IMCOM, has announced if furloughs occur, the headquarters will move to a four day work week. Each garrison commander will make scheduling decisions locally in coordination with the senior commander.

Employees on garrisons under collective bargaining agreements should consult directly with their union officials for any updates.

Once final furlough decision notices are sent, employees may appeal their agency's decision to the Merit System Protection Board within 30 days from the effective date of the furlough.

For more information on how sequestration and furloughs affect the IMCOM workforce, go to http://www.imcom.army.mil/Organization/G1Personnel.aspx.


by Chris Browne, Peacekeeping & Stability Operations Institute
Army War College’s PKSOI 2013 interns excel 

Peacekeeping & Stability Operations Institute 2013 Spring Interns, from left to right:Jake Agliata (Dickinson College), Jacob Pester (PSU), Christopher Wyscocki (PSU), Nora Snee (Dickinson College), Scott Cowman (Dickinson College), Anna Leistikow (Dickinson College), and Ross Clark (PSU).

On April 26 seven Peacekeeping & Stability Operations Institute Interns received PKSOI coins and certificates of achievement for their outstanding service assigned as interns for the 2013 winter/spring semester.  Each intern had specific projects they were assigned by PKSOI subject matter experts.  Their accomplishments are listed below.

Jake Agliata provided research for Prof. Jennifer Bryson for a lecture on the Arab Spring and a book chapter on Peace Tendencies in Islamic Theologies.  He assisted with course preparations for electives on Religion and Violence, Introduction to Islam, and Islam and Modernity.  Jake contributed to PKSOI's Holocaust Remembrance Month efforts by conducting a half-hour radio interview with an expert on mass atrocity prevention. Jake's radio interview was broadcast on the Dickinson, and was assigned as required listening to Army War College students in the Religion and Violence elective.

Scott Cowman (Dickinson College)made significant contributions to the US Army War College and PKSOI Holocaust Remembrance Month activities.  He conceived planned, coordinated, and supervised execution of this month's multiple educational events in outstanding fashion. Scott devised an advertisement and publicity plan that was lauded by our Public Affairs Officer as 'best seen to date'.  He also arranged DOS, DOD, and academic speakers' presentations; scripted weekly historical factoids and linked them to current US policy; and advanced senior leader education on mass atrocity prevention challenges.

Ross W. Clark (PSU)made significant contributions to the U.S. Position Paper on United Nations Command and Control. Ross also worked on the Challenges Forum with his primary focus on the Challenges database.  He researched the country of Jordan’s engagement in UN missions with Police Units and reviewed UN policy development about UN policing missions.

Anna Leistikow (Dickinson College) was instrumental in her research and support efforts towards course development for conflict prevention. She created support materials for electives courses PS2219 (Peace and Stability Operations) and PS2210 (Conflict Analysis, Assessment, and Prevention) such as references, case studies and an annotated bibliography.  She was organized, dependable, thoughtful and meticulous and displayed an exceptional grasp of conflict prevention.

Jacob Pester (PSU) contributed to the U.S. Position Paper on UN Command and Control. He worked on the Challenges Forum project his primary focus was on the Challenges database. Jacob also researched the Regionally Aligned Forces (RAF) training modules for AFRICOM and provided expertise and collaboration with Nigeria, which was very supportive of PKSOI’s task to support training The Army’s Regionally Aligned Forces (RAF) concept.

Nora Snee (Dickinson College) developed for the Combined Arms Training Strategy (CATS) the task “Support Elections” which defines the training and preparation of U.S. Army units, to conduct stability tasks. The result was an impressive task description, which is now waiting for approval to be published for all U.S. Army units. Nora also requested and assigned a second task to develop an entire section on peace operations. She conducted detailed research and developed a new approach to make it easier to finish such tasks. 

Christopher Wyscocki (PSU) worked for PKSOI’s Doctrine, Concepts, Education and Training division (DCET) where he contributed to the U.S. Position Paper on UN Command & Control.   He also worked on the Challenges Forum project with his primary focus on the Challenges database. During this time he worked with the Challenges Database in the areas of Protection of Civilians and Gender Based Violence. He researched both of these areas and developed a discussion forum based on extracts from his research.