Banner Archive for May 2008
 

Jerry Harben, U.S. Army Medical Command
Army joins in Mental Health Month

May 28, 2008 -- The Army is joining in promoting mental health during May, which is celebrated as Mental Health Month under the sponsorship of Mental Health America, formerly known as the National Mental Health Association. The theme for 2008 is "Get Connected," emphasizing the valuable support people gain by connections with family, friends, community and mental health professionals.

    "Years of research have shown that individuals who feel valued and cared for are better equipped to deal with stress and adversity, and even experience less severe illnesses than those with little social support," said David Shern, president and CEO of Mental Health America.

    "The importance of Mental Health Month is to raise public awareness of mental health being a significant medical issue in this country," said Col. C. J. Diebold. "It should be used as a springboard to raise continuous awareness. Mental illness is a medical disease for which effective treatments are available." Diebold is chief of psychiatry at Tripler Army Medical Center in Hawaii, and has been designated as the Army Surgeon General's expert consultant for psychiatry.

     Last year Army leaders took the unusual step of ordering a chain teaching program throughout the Army. Some 900,000 Soldiers of all ranks were taught how to recognize and respond to symptoms of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Of special importance was command emphasis to counter a perception that Soldiers who seek mental health services are weak or malingerers.

    "We're all worried about it. We've got to get rid of the stigma and that's what this education program is supposed to do," Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. Richard Cody said at a press conference announcing the chain teaching program.

    All leaders have been encouraged to get out the message that getting help early is the best way to avoid long-term problems.

    "We can safely say mental health is an issue of great importance, and this is recognized at all levels of command in the Army," said Diebold. "It is an issue directly related to our operational tempo. The Army has addressed this in multiple ways. Mental health resources have been increased at all installations, in addition to resources such as Military One Source. Mental health support is provided throughout the deployment cycle. Soldiers are screened and provided care as needed before, during and after deployment. Families are taken care of, too."

    The Army Surgeon General demonstrated the importance of mental health support by establishing the Proponency Office for Behavioral Health, a cell of experts to coordinate programs and resources.

    "We seek to bring together all the diverse behavioral health policies and programs along with manpower resources. We are at the forefront of behavioral health practices today and far into the future," said Col. Elspeth C. Ritchie, the office's director.

    Soldiers and families can get professional help through installation mental health clinics, and through primary care clinics using the new RESPECT-MIL program. Combat-stress control teams are deployed to bring front-line assistance to Soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan. Chaplains, social workers and installation drug abuse or family violence programs also can help deal with aspects of mental health issues.

    All deploying Soldiers receive "Battlemind" training to help them prepare for the stresses they face in combat, and another round of training to help them adjust to returning home. There is Battlemind training for families, too, to help them deal with the special stress of having a spouse or parent deployed.

    Military One Source is a 24-hour, toll-free telephone hot line to connect military service members with a variety of support services. By calling 1-800-342-9647, Soldiers or family members can arrange civilian mental health counseling without charge.

    A wealth of information for Soldiers and families is available at www.behavioralhealth.army.mil on the World Wide Web.

    Concern for Soldiers who need mental health support does not stop even after they leave the service.

    "The Department of Defense is working closely with the Department of Veterans Affairs to ensure Soldiers making the transition to civilians continue to get high quality mental health care," Diebold said.

 


Maintenance to delay pool opening to June 7

    Due to maintenance issues the "Splash Zone" Swimming Pool will not be open for Memorial Day Weekend.  However, plans are for the pool to be open on Saturday, June 7.

 


James McNally, Army Heritage Museum
Poster Art of World War II

    May 22, 2008 -- In May 1945, the Allied powers celebrated "Victory in Europe" over an evil Nazi regime. Personal contributions and sacrifices of all Americans helped win that war and thus generate the well-earned euphoria of that historic month. Many factors contributed to that victory – including patriotic posters. 

    Poster Art had been introduced to an American audience in World War I by the Division of Pictorial Publicity of the United States Committee on Public Information, founded in April of 1917. Organized out of the Society of Illustrators, the division included many of the leading artists of the time, who volunteered their creative energies for their country. President Woodrow Wilson realized that victory would depend in considerable measure on positive public opinion. He further understood that personal contributions and sacrifice were essential to mobilize the nation for war. 

    This was true also for World War II. The United States Office of War Information was formed in June of 1942. The mission of the Graphics Division of that office was to link the battlefront with the home front by using powerful images to call upon all American citizens to take their patriotic place in the defense of our country. 

    President Franklin Delano Roosevelt was aware of the success of World War I poster art. He would send a similar message to the American people in World War II. He wanted to use the "necessary information needed to win the war" approach, declaring that American citizens were home-front soldiers and that their country depended on them. He wanted to build the confidence of Americans and have them invest in victory by encouraging them to believe their personal contributions would help win the war. Equally important, he supported the morale of our soldiers and military personnel by reminding them why they were fighting, what they were fighting for, and that they were winning the fight. 

    The illustrators and artists of the time created posters that were vital tools of communication on the home front and battlefront. These posters expressed an air of urgency and unity and impelled citizens to enlist for combat, buy war bonds, increase production, protect important information from foreign spies, conserve resources for the war effort, and keep fighting until we won the war. Many of these posters continued the World War I tradition of illustrating stories. A major difference, however, was that many World War II posters introduced a dynamic, graphic-design, ad-agency approach. 

    Some of the most successful posters were by American artists such as Norman Rockwell, a popular illustrator whose Saturday Evening Post covers informed and delighted readers for decades. He painted what was right and good in America and showed us what we were fighting for, not politics but home and family. His "Let's Give Him Enough and On Time," painted in 1942, is the only combat picture Rockwell ever produced. He prided himself on capturing the character of his models. In this painting, however, we do not see the soldier's face because he is symbolically every soldier in the field, depending on you, the American citizen, for support. We see a wounded machine gunner who has just run out of ammunition; the accompanying words appeal to be more productive in our factories to help our soldiers on the battlefield. 

    The poster by Lawrence Beall Smith, "Don't Let That Shadow Touch Them, Buy War Bonds," shows the menacing shadow of Nazi Germany threatening American children at play and reassures that you can help keep that threat away with your support of the War Bond drive. The poster "More Production," however, is an example of the new posters created by ad agencies, as opposed to story illustrators. It uses bold design and a quick message of a bomb falling on the Nazi swastika and Japanese flag. This prominent, dynamic design is much more characteristic of a modern approach to selling; it shouts to us from the wall that the key to victory is more production of food, supplies, and ammunition. 

    Then there is the new graphic-style poster by Glenn Ernest Grohe, "He's Watching You," a menacing composite image of the M16 steel helmet of the German Army with the eyes of the enemy watching and listening to you in your work place. A wartime concern about security reminds citizens that careless talk may pass critical information to the enemy saboteurs and spies. And finally the poster "Avenge December 7," by Bernard Perlin, is a remarkable, concise, and emotional evocation of the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor. This act of aggression provided the rallying cries of the outrage of our people. 

    While looking at these posters of World War II, we are reminded of a time when our nation worked together, when our citizens were united against a common enemy with dedication, commitment, and an enduring sense of patriotism for this great country. In the words of the 1942 poster campaign series: "This is your America; keep it safe."

 


Terri Helus, U.S. Army Combat Readiness/Safety Center
Safety – Always in Season

    FORT RUCKER, Ala. (May 21, 2008) – The Army reinforces its commitment to "Never Give Safety a Day Off" with the launch of the 101 Critical Days of Summer safety campaign.  This safety campaign emphasizes prevention and vigilance during the summer season—a time when Soldiers, their Families and Army Civilians are at greater risk.

    The Army experiences an increase in accidental fatalities during the summer months.  The majority of these accidents occur off-duty—most often during outdoor activities.

    "Families have a key role to play in safety.  We need to ensure Family members are educated, aware and fully involved in the risk management process," said Army Chief of Staff, General George W. Casey, Jr.  "The 101 Critical Days of Summer safety campaign provides awareness of potential hazards, and empowers Soldiers, Families and Army Civilians with timely information to ensure everyone's well-being during this especially high-risk season."

    To achieve this mission, the U.S. Army Combat Readiness/Safety Center will focus on a different aspect of summer safety each week, using news releases, posters and public service announcements to help educate and inform Soldiers, their Family members and Army Civilians.  Additionally, USACRC has developed an "Off-duty Safety Awareness Presentation" to help identify potential off-duty summer hazards.

    "The enemy 'risk' can be defeated, but it takes teamwork," said USACRC Command Sergeant Major, Tod Glidewell. "That means Soldiers looking out for their battle buddies and Family members looking out for their Soldier, as well as each other.  This summer, stay alert and aware of the hazards particular to this time of year."

    For more information on the 101 Critical Days of Summer safety campaign, visit https://crc.army.mil.

 


MOAA holding essay contest

  May 22, 2008 -- The Military Officers Association of America (MOAA) is seeking entries for its Inaugural Military Professional Essay Contest. Essays may address any topic that has relevance to MOAA's stated mission of preserving a strong national defense. Examples of acceptable topics include immigration, health care, military end-strength, benefits, law of the sea, and NATO expansion.

    This Contest is open to current, former, and retired members of the military, members of their families, and students, staff and faculty members at any Professional Military Education Institution. Writers must be at least 18 years old and an essay must be the writer's own work. Multiple entries are permitted. The Contest opens May 1, 2008. Final entries are due to MOAA by July 31, 2008.

    Entries will be judged by an independent panel, and the top three essays will be printed in an upcoming issue of the Military Officer magazine. Judges will base their selections on original thought, clarity and logic of writing, and style. Readers will vote for the final placement and prizes of $1000 for first place, $500 for second place, and $250 for third place. All entrants will be eligible for a drawing for an Apple Ipod.

    A submission should be sent electronically – in Microsoft Word or Adobe PDF format – and e-mailed as an attachment to: profseries@moaa.org <mailto:profseries@moaa.org> , with the e-mail's subject line reading "MOAA ESSAY CONTEST." An essay should be typed, double-spaced, with a minimum 12-point font, and no more than 500 words long. The 500-word limit excludes a title page.

 


 Young amputee meets recovered Soldier

Twelve-year-old Sean Brame, a quadrilateral amputee, talks with 101st Airborne "Sceaming Eagles" Soldier Sgt. Maxwell Ramsey, at a dinner held at the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post #477 in Carlisle May 15. Ramsey lost his left leg above the knee in March 2006. He has since regained his jump status and continued active duty. Both of Sean's legs are amputated below the knee, his right hand has been amputated, and most of his left hand. 
    Sean is Pennsylvania's ambassador to the Children Miracle Network, an honorary member of the City Islanders soccer team, and has been in a commercial for the Central Pennsylvania Blood Bank. He has met Sarah Reinertsen, the first female amputee to complete Hawaii's Ironman Triathlon, Maj. Rozella, a Soldier with a prosthetic leg who returned to active duty and completed a second tour in Iraq, and has even shook the hand of President George W. Bush.
    He speaks to groups as large as 1,000 people about his experiences. On July 30 he plans to bike several miles with Amputees Across America, four amputees who are biking from Calif. to N.J.


Open house May 22 for new post housing

   Balfour Beatty, Carlisle Barracks' partner in the Residential Communities Initiative, will hold an open house at a newly completed unit at 10,000 A Chickamauga Drive at the Meadows on May 22 from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.  

    The housing unit will be partially furnished and visitors are encouraged to stop by and see the future of Carlisle Barracks housing. This entire housing area is expected to be completed in July.

    The Meadows is located off of Claremont Road and the open house is located directly on the left after entering the Meadows. Representatives from Balfour Beatty will also be on hand to answer questions.    


Ann Marie Wolf, Army Substance Abuse Program
Summer Sense Campaign: Drinking, Boating & the Law

    May 20, 2008 -- It's a bright sunny day on the water. It might seem like an ice-cold beer or a mixed drink would make your day of boating just about perfect, but think again. Alcohol and boating are a dangerous combination. Each year, about 800 people die in boating accidents, and about half of these fatalities involve alcohol.

    Long before a person becomes legally intoxicated, alcohol impairs his or her balance, reaction time, vision, and judgment. On the water, elements like motion, vibration, sun, wind, and spray can intensify alcohol's effects. Alcohol can affect a boater much more quickly than it would an automobile driver, but with the same tragic results.

Know the Basics

Balance: A 1.5 ounce shot of liquor, 5 ounce glass of wine, or a 12 ounce can of beer, can impair a person's sense of balance. When combined with the motion of the boat, this may be enough to cause a boater who has been drinking to fall overboard. Alcohol can also confuse a person to the point where he or she is unable to swim to the surface.

Reaction time: Alcohol slows the reaction time. It is difficult to process the sights and sounds around you in time to react after you've been drinking.

Judgment: Alcohol can keep a person from making sound decisions. A boater who has been drinking make take risks her or she normally would not.

Vision: Alcohol causes tunnel vision and makes it harder to focus. It can also impair depth perception, night vision, and peripheral vision, making it harder to judge speed, distance, and follow moving objects.

Illegal: It is illegal to operate a watercraft (including personal watercraft and jet-skis) on all waters of the Commonwealth while under the influence of alcohol or a controlled substance.

 

What Happens if I Get Caught?

    If you are arrested for operating a watercraft while under the influence of alcohol or a controlled substance, you could face:

  • fines between $500 and $7,500
  • up to 2 years in jail
  • suspension of your boating privileges for up to one year 

    If you refuse to take a breath, blood, or urine test, the Boating Commission will suspend your boating privileges for one year.

    Homicide by watercraft carries fines up to $15,000, and three to seven years in prison.

    Boaters who drink can often face other charges, such as:

  • reckless or negligent operation of boats
  • public drunkenness
  • disorderly conduct
  • open containers
  • underage drinking

Boat Safely

    Whether you're operating a sail boat, a motorboat, or a jet ski, safe boating requires a clear heard, steady hand, and observant eye. A boater who has been drinking cannot function as sharply as one who has not. If you drink before or while operating a boat, you risk your own life, as well as the lives of your passengers, crew, and others on the water. 

Stay safe. Don't operate a boat under the influence of alcohol

    For additional information contact the Substance Abuse Office at 245 – 4576 or visit the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board web site at www.lcb.state.pa.us/edu/  

 


'Summer Sense Campaign' Memorial Day thru Labor Day 2008

Presented by the Army Substance Abuse Program 

    May 20, 2008 -- Summer is upon us and once again the Army Substance Abuse Program will support the Summer Sense Campaign, from Memorial Day through Labor Day.

    For many people summer time means more time outside with friends and family. At the beach, the pool, a BBQ or any other outdoor activity, summer means more social time for many. Unfortunately, summer brings with it an increased rate of alcohol abuse and drunk driving.

    Increased education combined with an increased law enforcement presence on the roads and at sobriety checkpoints, will result in more people realizing that if they're going to drink they need to stay at home or identify a sober designated driver.

    This summer program will emphasize healthy and safe ways to engage in summer activities.

    To raise the awareness level of the community, the Army Substance Abuse Program will be highlighting a variety of topics, and will increase public awareness through a variety of media sources. Check the Banner, Current Events, and bulletin boards throughout the installation for important facts and information that will help you and your family enjoy a safe summer.

    The following prevention classes will be offered throughout the campaign. You must make a reservation to ensure a space in the class.

June – Summer Sense: Alcohol Awareness and Summer Safety

Tues. June 17                                              11 a.m.                       ASAP, Bldg. 632

Thurs. June 19                                             1 p.m.                         ASAP, Bldg. 632

Thurs. June 26                                             11 a.m.                       ASAP, Bldg. 632

    This class will challenge common beliefs and attitudes that directly contribute to high risk alcohol abuse. We will discuss how our choices can protect or harm the things that we love and value. The class will also provide tips for having a safe summer.

July – Stress and Anxiety in The Workplace

Thurs. July 24                                               11 a.m.                       ASAP, Bldg. 632

Tues. July 29                                                1 p.m.                         ASAP, Bldg. 632

Thurs. July 31                                               11 a.m.                       ASAP, Bldg. 632

    This class will help you learn what to stress, or, in other words, how to manage your stress. Whether your stress comes from personal problems or professional pressures, you'll learn how to approach stressful situations on and off the job and how to manage your own reactions to stress.

    For more information or to schedule individual organization training, contact the Prevention office at 245-4576/3790.

 

 

 

 

           

 


Tom Zimmerman, U.S. Army War College Public Affairs Office
Carlisle Barracks learns more about FM 3.0

 

May 20, 2008 -- Lt. Col. Steve Leonard, Combined Arts Center, talks about the new Army Field Manual 3.0 in Bliss Hall on May 20. The Army's new field manual for operations, FM 3-0, brings the first major update of Army capstone doctrine since the terrorist attacks of 9/11.

    "This manual isn't about programs, it isn't about systems, it's about you," said Leonard. "This is all about people and applying what you have learned. Everything revolves around the commander."

    There are several changes in the new operations manual:

  • The operational concept and the operational environment
  • The stability operations construct
  • The information-operations construct
  • Warfighting functions
  • The spectrum of conflict
  • Defeat and stability mechanisms
  • Joint interdependence and modular forces

    FM 3-0 institutionalizes simultaneous offensive, defensive, and stability or civil-support operations as the core of the Army's doctrine. The concept of full-spectrum operations, first introduced in the 2001 manual, still represents a major shift in Army doctrine – forces must be able to address the civil situation at all times, combining tactical tasks affecting noncombatants with tactical tasks directed against the enemy.


Spouses Club and Thrift Shop present scholarships

Several high school and college students were presented scholarships from the Carlisle Barracks Spouses Club and Thrift Shop Scholarship Committee at a ceremony May 18, held at Quarters One. The committee recieved a total of $12,850 from sponsoring organizations, including the Spouses Club, Thrift Shop and First Command. This year's scholarships ranged from $1,000 to $100. Photo by Pfc. Jennifer Rick.


Pfc. Jennifer Rick, U.S. Army War College Public Affairs Office
Mother of fallen Soldier recieves Ordnance award

Brig. Gen. Rebecca Halstead, commanding general of the Army Ordnance Center, presents Carol Fahnestock with the Keeper of the Flame award in the Bliss Hall Foyer May 11. The award is given to spouses and family members that support Ordnance Corps Soldiers. Fahnestock's daughter, Staff Sgt. Kimberly Voelz, 703rd Explosive Ordnance Detachment, Fort Knox, Ky., was killed Dec. 14, 2003 in Iskandariyah, Iraq. Photo by Pfc. Jennifer Rick.

May 20, 2008 -- A time-honored symbol in the United States Army is the flaming bomb with crossed cannons. Originally adopted as a button in 1833, the symbol has represented the Army Ordnance Corps for 175 years.

    In the name of this tradition, the Ordnance Corps Association has created the "Keeper of the Flame" award to honor the spouses and family members that support Ordnance Corps Soldiers.

    A recent recipient of the award is Carol Fahnestock, mother of Staff Sgt. Kimberly Voelz, who was killed Dec. 14, 2003, in Iskandariyah, Iraq. Voelz, originally from Carlisle, was responding to an explosive ordnance call when an improvised explosive device detonated.

    Fahnestock received the award on May 11 from Brig. Gen. Rebecca Halstead, commanding general of the Army Ordnance Center, on behalf of the organization.

    Halstead described Voelz as "confident and spirited", and gave a brief history of Voelz's military career. She was an Explosive Ordnance Disposal technician who met her husband, Sgt. 1st Class Max Voelz, while the two were at Advanced Individual Training at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. She was stationed with the 703rd Explosive Ordnance Detachment based in Fort Knox, Ky. She was a skilled technician, and a good team leader, said Halstead.

    Upon receiving the award, Fahnestock thanked the audience for coming to celebrate the honor of her daughter.

    She described a letter she received from a Soldier who was with Voelz the night she died. The Soldier wrote of the late Voelz as being courageous, even as he had carried her to the Medevac helicopter after she was injured.

    Fahnestock said that her daughter loved the Army and was passionate about what she did, and would have been proud of this award.

    "This is a wonderful tribute to her," she said.

 




Gen. Petraeus talk one highlight of Army Heritage Day

Gen. David Petraeus, Commanding General of  Multi-National Forces – Iraq, speaks to a packed Ridgway Hall Reading Room May 17 during Army Heritage Day. Current operations was the theme of the event and featured Brigade Combat Soldiers talking about their own experiences and demonstrating a house search, two local Soldiers taking part in a panel discussion in addition to a 101st Airborne Division parachute jump. For more be sure to check the Banner Online later for more. Photo by Tom Zimmerman.


Tom Zimmerman, U.S. Army War College Public Affairs Office
Heritage Day allows public to learn first hand about current ops

Gen. David Petraeus, Commanding General of  Multi-National Forces – Iraq, speaks to a packed Ridgway Hall Reading Room May 17 during Army Heritage Day. Current operations was the theme of the event and featured Brigade Combat Soldiers talking about their own experiences and demonstrating a house search, two local Soldiers taking part in a panel discussion in addition to a 101st Airborne Division parachute jump. Photo by Tom Zimmerman.

May 17, 2008 – "This is a great opportunity to see the Soldiers first-hand who are sacrificing so much and be able to thank them; you don't always get to do that," said Jennifer Moore, of Newville, Pa.

    Moore was one of the estimated 4,200 people who came to the Army Heritage and Education Center's Army Heritage Day May 17.  The focus of this year's event was Current Operations and featured a VTC live from Iraq by Gen. David Petraeus, Commanding General of Multi-National Forces – Iraq, members of a Brigade Combat Team who shared their own experiences and demonstrated a house search and a jump by the 101st Airborne Division "Screaming Eagles."

    The VTC by Petraeus allowed an "inside look" into the current situation in Iraq. Petraeus highlighted some of the progresses that have been made in the country and the road ahead. 

    "All I know about Iraq is what I see on TV," said Moore. "But after hearing from the general and talking with the Soldiers here I have a much better understanding of what is going on."

   

A living historian talks with visitors to Army Heritage Day outside of one of the exhibits. More than 45 re-enactor military units brought history to life. Photo by Pfc. Jennifer Rick.

 

    The Soldiers who came to support the event also found it rewarding.

   "It's nice to be able to talk with folks and answer their questions," said Sgt. 1st Class Garrett Williams, a member of the 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. "I think that sometimes people don't understand what exactly our jobs are over there so this is a great opportunity to share that with them." The nine-year Army Soldier has deployed to Kosovo, Afghanistan and two tours to Iraq.

A member of the 101st Airborne Division "Screaming Eagles" prepares for landing as part of Army Heritage Day. After their jump, the Soldiers presented military veterans with certificates, thanking them for their service. Photo by Tom Zimmerman.

     Also drawing a crowd was the jump by the 101st Airborne Division, one of the day's first events. Four Soldiers, including a wounded warrior, Spc. Maxwell Ramsey, who was wounded in Iraq and has returned to active duty with a prosthetic leg. After their jump, the Soldiers presented military veterans with certificates, thanking them for their service.  Presented awards were Sam Lombardo, Lewis Ney and Joe Luciano, veterans of World War II and the Vietnam War.

    Other events included a panel discussion by Soldiers with current operations experiences, a Civil War artillery demonstration and a look at life in the trenches of World War I.  The event drew attention to new additions to the Army Heritage Trail, which is accessible seven days a week. New exhibits include a World War II company area, a Vietnam exhibit and a 18th Century Blockhouse.

Soldiers with current operation experience talk during a panel discussion. Photo by Pfc. Jennifer Rick.


Local Memorial Day events

Friday, May 23, 2008

New Cumberland – Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 7415 (with Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 7530) will hold its Memorial Day program at 12 p.m. at Veterans Memorial at Rolling Green Cemetery.  Post 7530's Honor Guard and Commander will participate in the program. 

Sunday, May 25, 2008

Boiling Springs – Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 8851 will hold a Memorial Day parade and picnic.  The annual Memorial Day Parade will form at the Iron Forge Middle School on Forge Road and start promptly at 1 p.m.  The parade will end at the Memorial Clock Tower at Children's Lake where ceremonies will be held.  The "FREE" picnic will be held immediately following the parade across the street in the Boiling Springs Tavern parking lot.  In the event of inclement weather, the parade will be cancelled and the ceremonies will be held in the Boiling Springs High School Auditorium with the picnic at the VFW Post on Hamilton Road.  The guest speaker is MSgt Bill Hartman, USAF Retired. 

Codoras - Jefferson Community Memorial Day Parade and Ceremony will be held at 12:30 p.m. at the Square.  The guest speaker is COL Thomas McDonald, USAWC Class of 2008. 

Landisville – Landisville-Salunga Community will hold a Memorial Day Ceremony beginning at 2 p.m. at the Hempfield Fire Department Park Pavilion.  The guest speaker is COL Christopher J. Papaj, USAWC Class of 2008. 

Mt. Holly Springs – American Legion Post 674 and Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 7343 will hold a Memorial Day service with the Carlisle Town Band at Mt. Holly Springs Cemetery beginning at 1 p.m.  The guest speaker is COL Terrance Wallace, USA Retired, USAWC.  In the event of inclement weather, the service will be held at the American Legion Post 674. 

Spring Grove – Private Allen J. Beck, Jr. VFW Post 5265 will hold a Memorial Day Service at 5 p.m. at the VFW Post.  The guest speaker is COL Scott R. Taylor, USAWC Class of 2008. 

Monday, May 26, 2008

Camp Hill – American Legion Post 43 will hold a Memorial Day parade beginning at 9:30 a.m.  A Memorial Day service will follow the parade at 11 a.m. at the Camp Hill Cemetery behind the Fire Hall at 2145 Walnut Street, Camp Hill.  In the event of inclement weather, the service will be held at the Camp Hill Borough Building at 2145 Walnut Street, Camp Hill.  The guest speaker is LTC Howard L. Eissler, PA National Guard. 

Carlisle - The Joint Veterans Council of Carlisle will hold the Annual Memorial Day Parade forming at 8:30 a.m. and starting promptly at 9 a.m. with services following the parade at Veterans' Memorial Courtyard at 9:45 a.m.  As part of the ceremonies, Hometown Hero Banners will be unveiled to recognize Cumberland County residents killed in action in support of the War on Terror.  In the event of inclement weather, the parade will be cancelled and the ceremonies will be held in the Old Courthouse. The guest speaker will be Neal Delisanti, Cumberland County Director of Veterans Affairs. 

Carlisle – American Legion Post 826 will hold a memorial service in Memorial Park at 11 a.m. followed immediately by a roll call and service at Union Cemetery at 12 p.m.  The guest speaker is COL Bennie Williams, USAWC Class of 2008

Maytown – Donegal American Legion Post 809 will hold a Memorial Day Service at 4:30 p.m. at the Post.  The guest speaker is COL Jacquelyn Russell, USAWC Class of 2008

Marysville/Rye/Perdix – Veterans Memorial Day Committee will hold a Memorial Day Service at 10 a.m. at the Marysville Square.  The guest speaker is COL Rene Burgess, USAWC Class of 2008. 

McConnellsburg – VFW Post 655 will hold a Memorial Day Service at 10 a.m. at the Cemetery.  The guest speaker is LtCol Erik Hansen, USAF, USAWC Class of 2008.  

Mechanicsburg – The Mechanicsburg Area Veterans Council will hold a Memorial Day Parade starting at 10 a.m.  The parade will be followed by a ceremony at the Mechanicsburg Cemetery on Marble Street at 11 a.m.  In case of inclement weather, the ceremony will be held inside the American Legion Post 109, Main and York Streets.

Mechanicsburg - The Vietnam Veterans will hold a memorial service at 2 p.m. at the Lincoln Colored Cemetery off Winding Hill Road in Mechanicsburg.  The service will be conducted rain or shine. 

Mechanicsburg - VFW Post 7530 will hold its Memorial Day program at 11 a.m. at the Post Headquarters, 4545 Westport Drive.  The guest speaker is LTC Christopher S. Wilson, USAWC Class of 2008.  Reception follows for members and guests only.

New Bloomfield will hold a Memorial Day Parade and Service at 9 a.m.  The guest speaker is COL Christion Brewer, USAWC. 

Newville – The Joint Veterans Council of Newville will hold a Memorial Day parade starting at 1 p.m. Memorial Day services will immediately follow the parade.  Guest speaker is Neal Delisanti, Director of Cumberland County Veterans Affairs. In the event of inclement weather, the parade will be cancelled and the Memorial Day services will be held in the Big Springs Community Center.

Reading – Combined Veterans Council will hold two Memorial Day Ceremonies at 8 and 11 a.m.  The guest speaker is COL Jeffrey Feldman, USAWC Class of 2008. 

Red Lion – American Legion Post 543 will hold a Memorial Day Parade and Service at 10 a.m.  The guest speaker is COL Paul Ambrose, USAWC Class of 2008

Shippensburg – The Joint Veterans Council of Shippensburg will hold the annual Memorial Day ceremonies and parade beginning at 10 a.m. at Locust Grove Cemetery, followed by services at Spring Hill Cemetery at 11 a.m. and flag raising ceremony at Veterans Memorial Park at 12 p.m.  At 1:15 p.m. the Navy and Marine Memorial services will be conducted at Branch Bridge.  The Memorial Day parade will begin at 2 p.m. from the corner of King and Prince Streets.  In the event of inclement weather, a brief ceremony will be held at the VFW Post 6168. 

York – West York VFW will hold their Memorial Day Service at 8 a.m. at the VFW Post.  The guest speaker is CAPT William Wilson, US Navy, USAWC Class of 2008. 

Friday, May 30, 2008

Littlestown - Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 6994 will hold a Memorial Day ceremony beginning with a parade at 5 p.m.  The guest speaker will be COL Paul D. Brown, USAWC Class of 2008. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­

 


Dunham to hold nutrition class for diabetics

On Thursday, June 5, from 10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m., Dunham U.S. Army Health Clinic is holding an informational class called "Meal Planning and Carb Counting for Type 2 Diabetics".

    The class will teach simple guidelines on how to use diet as a supplement to oral medication in controlling blood sugar levels.

    It is open to all active duty and retired military and family members who have type 2 diabetes.

    To reserve your space in the class, call (717) 245-3400, Option "0" for the information desk.


Russel named new IMCOM-NER Director 

    May 19, 2008 -- Mr. Russell B. Hallis the Director, Northeast Region, U.S. Army Installation Management Command.

    He is the second Director of the Northeast Region. Previously, Mr. Hall served as the first Director, European Region, U.S. Army Installation Management Command, from August 8, 2002 until May 19, 2008 when he assumed his current duties. Prior to that he was the Assistant Deputy Chief of Staff, Personnel and Installation Management, U. S. Army Europe and 7th Army from September 2001- September 2002. Before his first assignment in the Senior Executive Service he served as the Chief, Resource Integration Office, Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management (ACSIM), Office of the Chief of Staff of the Army from August 1997 – July 2001, where he was the senior resource manager responsible for the development, analysis, coordination, and integration of requirements to support doctrine, plans, programs, policies, and guidance for resourcing and operating Army Installations. The ACSIM is responsible for $12 billion in resources associated with the operation of military installations worldwide to include base operations, repair and maintenance, environment, family programs, base communications, military construction, family housing and base closure, and management controls.

    Originally from Roswell, N.M., Mr. Hall was a Distinguished Military Graduate of the Reserve Officer Training Corps and received a Regular Army commission. He has served in the United States Army and as a government service employee since 1975.

    While on active duty with the United States Army, Mr. Hall held a variety of key command and staff positions including: Deputy Director of Training, 7th Army Training Command; Commander of the 409th Base Support Battalion, Grafenwoehr, Germany; Senior Analyst for the Training and Doctrine Command, Research and Analysis Center; Secretary of the General Staff of the 1st Cavalry Division; Executive Officer of the 3rd Battalion, 82nd Field Artillery; Brigade Fire Support Officer, 2nd Brigade (Blackjack), Fort Hood, Texas, and Charlie Battery Commander 1st Battalion, 77th Field Artillery.

    Mr. Hall's service awards and decorations include: The Legion of Merit, The Bronze Star Medal, the Meritorious Service Medal with three Oak Leaf Clusters, the Army Commendation Medal with three Oak Leaf Clusters, the Saudi-Kuwait Liberation Medal, the Southwest Asia Medal with three Bronze Stars, the Army Service Ribbon and the Overseas Service Ribbon, the Master Parachutist wings and the Ranger Tab.

    Mr. Hall holds a Masters Degree in Operations Research and Systems Management from George Mason University and a Bachelors Degree in Biology from Trinity University.

 

 


Defense Commissary Agency Release
Ground beef recall notification

May 16, 2008 -- The Defense Commissary Agency announced May 15 the voluntary recall of packages of 85 percent lean ground beef product purchased at the Carlisle Barracks Commissary and nine other commissaries May 1-14 because of possible E-coli O157:H7contamination.

    The commissaries are Great Lakes, IL.; Fort McCoy, WI.; Bolling Air Force Base, D.C.; Carlisle Barracks, PA.; Fort Monmouth, NJ; Naval Air Engineering Station Lakehurst, NJ; Naval Submarine Base New London, CT.; Tobyhanna Army Depot, PA.; Fort Carson, CO.; and Fort Leavenworth, KS.

    Commissary customers who have purchased 85 percent lean ground beef product at any of these commissaries May 1 through May 14 should stop consuming it. They can return the product or throw it away and bring their receipt to any DeCA commissary for a full refund.

    The recall is prompted by microbial test results conducted by the Department of Defense Veterinary Food Analysis and Diagnostic Laboratory on beef sent by a supplier to the commissaries involved in the action, said DeCA food safety officials.

    E. coli O157:H7 is a potentially deadly bacterium that can cause diarrhea and dehydration. Seniors, the very young, and persons with compromised immune systems are the most susceptible to foodborne illness. Cooking ground beef to an internal temperature of 160 degrees Fahrenheit kills harmful bacteria.

    Any consumers concerned about an illness should contact a physician. Anyone diagnosed by a physician as having an illness related to E. coli O157:H7 is also urged to contact state and local public health authorities.

    Commissary patrons can also get more information on this and other recalls by going to the DeCA Web site at http://www.commissaries.com, visit the "Food Safety" section and access links to various consumer safety sites. 

 

To all DeCA Patrons:

If you purchased: 85% lean ground beef products with a pack date of May 1 through May 14
 
    Please be aware that these items are being recalled by this store. Please return the ground beef or receipt  to any DeCA commissary for a full store refund. 
   
    The reason for the recall is the possibility that the product may contain E. coli 0157:H7.
 
    If you have any questions please contact Larry Hoover, Store Director  at (717)245-3105.
 
Thank you.
 
DeCA Management

 

 

 


Paving to cause delays at gates May 13

    May 8, 2008 -- On Tuesday, May 13 workers will be paving the depression in the road surface on the incoming lanes at the front and rear gates. This will require temporarily closing these lanes. Traffic will be detoured to the outbound lanes to accomplish the work. Work is slated to start mid-morning for the Route 11 gate and mid-afternoon for the Claremont Road gate.

 


Tom Zimmerman, U.S. Army War College Public Affairs Office
Two local Soldiers to discuss Iraq experiences
Free event explores past, present Army operations

CARLISLE BARRACKS – Two U.S. Army officers from Central Pennsylvania will be at Army Heritage Day to discuss their experiences in Iraq during Army Heritage Day from 9 a. m. - 5 p.m., May 17, in Carlisle, Pa.  

    Capt. Todd Hendrix and Capt. Jeffrey Hendrix, both members of 1st Cavalry Division Brigade Combat teams, will take part in a panel discussion focusing on current operations at 3 p.m. in Ridgway Hall. Other panel members include Soldiers from the 1st Cavalry Division and officers from the U.S. Army War College. 

    Outside on the Army Heritage Trail, Army Heritage Day will feature Brigade Combat Soldiers talking about their own experiences and demonstrating a house search, among other tactical maneuvers.  

    Continuing with the current operations theme, Gen. David Petraeus is scheduled to address the public via video-teleconference. The VTC by the Commanding General of  Multi-National Forces – Iraq is scheduled to take place at 10 a.m. in Ridgway Hall, at the Army Heritage and Education Center and will focus on the current situation in Iraq.  Seating is limited, tickets are required and can be picked up at Ridgway Hall or requested by e-mail at Carl_ahec-ves@conus.army.mil

    Visitors will also want to keep an eye on the sky for the 101st Airborne Division parachute jump at 9:30 a.m. The team, also known as the "Screaming Eagles," will be executing a special parachute demonstration hosted by US Army Recruiting Command to deliver Freedom Team salute certificates honoring veteran Soldiers.

    Members of the team include Sgt. Vince van der Maarel,  from Lancaster, Pa., and Sgt Maxwell Ramsey, was wounded in Iraq and has returned to active duty with a prosthetic leg.  After the performance, the team will be available to answer questions, sign autographs and to share their Army stories.

    Favorites will return as living history interpreters will re-create moments in a World War I trench, a Revolutionary War Redoubt, a French and Indian War way station, a Civil War winter cabins and a World War II company area. More than 45 re-enactor military units will bring history to life. 

Schedule of events

9 a.m. Book sale opens --  Ridgway Hall

9:30 a.m. 101st Airborne Demonstration (approx) -- Landing Area

10 a.m. Lecture: Righting Iraq - New Doctrine and Old Soldiers -- Patron Reading Room, Ridgway Hall

11 a.m. A Citizen Solider (French and Indian cabin) Living History Encampment

Noon Civil War Artillery Demonstration -- Traditions Field

12:30 Lecture: Codes to Victory -- World War II Core Area

1:30 p.m. Small Unit Tactics Demonstration -- Presentation Area

2:30 p.m. Civil War Company Fire -- Presentation Area

3 p.m. Lecture: Army Strong! A Panel Discussion with Current Operations Soldiers -- Patron Reading Room, Ridgway Hall

4 p.m. Life in the Trenches - The WWWI Soldier -- World war I Trench

4:30 p.m. Book sale closes

5 p.m. Program Closes

    AHEC, at 950 Soldiers Drive in Carlisle, Pa, is minutes from Interstate 81, the Pennsylvania Turnpike and Routes 11 and 15. Follow signs to the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center. There is free parking, handicapped accessibility, food sales and a historical book sale.

    For details, visit www.usahec.org

(Editors note: Some information in the story came from an AHEC release).

 


Suzanne Reynolds, U.S. Army War College Public Affairs Office
Carlisle Barracks to hold Yard Sale and Spring Fun Fest

CARLISLE BARRACKS, Pa. –  Carlisle Barracks will be abuzz with events on Saturday, May 17 starting with a Yard Sale at 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. and then a Spring Fun Fest from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. (rain or shine).

    The events, sponsored by the Carlisle Barracks Directorate of Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation, are open to the public.

    The Yard Sale will be conducted in front of the participating individuals' on-post quarters and in the grassy area surrounding the Army and Air Force Exchange Service parking lot off Sumner Road.

Spring Fun Fest

    The Spring Fun Fest, a new addition this year to the Yard Sale, will be held in the parking area in front of the Strike Zone Bowling Center off Butler Road.

    Activities range from a Kids' Corner with inflatable games, face painting and entertainers to more than 30 craft vendors, a DJ playing music, and a variety of food.

    Individuals who do not have a Department of Defense decal on their vehicle will use the Claremont Road entrance to Carlisle Barracks.

    For more information call 717-245-4703 or 245-3537.

 


Admiral M. G. Mullen, Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff
Military Spouse Appreciation Day May 9

    May 9, 2008 -- Today, Friday, May 9, is Military Spouse Appreciation Day. I hope everyone will join me in thanking the wonderful husbands and wives of our Soldiers, sailors, airmen, Marines, Coast Guardsmen and civilian employees for all they do to make our service possible.

    I've often said that no one in our business can do it alone -- not as an organization and certainly not as individuals. We all need help from time to time, someone to turn to for love, support, and even a little guidance. We all need a shoulder to lean on. For many of us, that shoulder belongs to a spouse. I know that's certainly been the case in my home for more than 37 years now.

    Our spouses serve as we serve, and every bit as much. They may not carry a pack, drive a ship or fly combat missions, but the vital link they represent to all things home sustains us and improves the morale of entire units. And that is especially important today as we continue to fight a tough, long war against radical extremists all over the world.

    It almost goes without saying that our combat readiness is tied to family readiness, and our spouses are vital to both. Quite frankly, I'm not sure we can ever say enough or do enough to truly thank them for that effort. But we certainly ought to try.

    I urge all married service members this Friday to thank the one who serves alongside you. Let him or her know how much you appreciate all they do -- every day -- to make what you do possible. I also encourage commands whose operational commitments permit to recognize the husband and wife partnerships upon whose shoulders our military depends so much.

 


Tom Zimmerman, U.S. Army War College Public Affairs Office
Award to be given to mother of fallen Soldier

May 8, 2008 – The mother of a fallen Soldier will be presented with a "Keeper of the Flame Award" from the U.S. Army Ordnance Corps Association in the Bliss Hall foyer on Monday May 12 at 9 a.m.

    Carol Fahnestock, mother of Staff Sgt. Kimberly A. Voelz will receive the award from Brig. Gen. Rebecca S. Halstead, commanding general of the Army Ordnance Center, on behalf of the organization.  Voelz was killed Dec. 14, 2003, in Iskandariyah, Iraq. She was responding to an explosive ordnance disposal call when an improvised explosive device detonated. Voelz was assigned to the 703rd Explosive Ordnance Detachment based in Fort Knox, Ky, but was from the local area.

    The Army Ordnance Corps Association's Keeper of the Flame award is to recognize and show appreciation for the invaluable service Ordnance spouses provide.

    "Throughout history, military spouses have made immeasurable and irreplaceable contributions to our Army," according to the U.S. Army Ordnance Corps Association website. "In addition to keeping their own 'home fires burning', during long duty days and even longer deployments, they willingly dedicate countless hours of hard work in the support of soldiers, soldier families and their military community."

    "Without question, our spouses' devoted service to our Army and the country is distinctive and deserving of our undying gratitude."

 


Postal increase effective May 12

    May 8, 2008 -- The price for a one-ounce First-Class stamp will increase from 41 to 42 cents on May 12.

    Prices for other mailing services, such as Standard Mail, Periodicals, Package Services (including single-piece Parcel Post), and Special Services will also change (see chart below). The average increase by class of mail is at or below the rate of inflation as measured by the Consumer Price Index.

   "The Postal Service developed the Forever Stamp for consumers to ease the transition during price changes," said Postmaster General John Potter. "We encourage Americans to buy Forever Stamps now for 41 cents, because like the name suggests, they are good forever." The price goes up to 42 cents on May 12. 

    The Postal Service has sold 5 billion Forever Stamps since the launch last April and plans to have an additional 5 billion in stock to meet the expected demand before the May price change.

Selected Prices & Services

Current

New
(Effective May 12)

First-Class Mail Letter (1 oz.)

41¢

42¢

First-Class Mail Letter (2 oz.)

58¢

59¢

Postcard

26¢

27¢

Large Envelope (2 oz.)

97¢

$1.00

Money Orders (up to $500)

$1.05

$1.05

Certified Mail

$2.65

$2.70

First-Class Mail International Letter
(1 oz. to Canada and Mexico)

69¢

72¢

First-Class Mail International Letter
(1 oz. to other countries)

90¢

94¢

    Consistent with a new law, prices for mailing services will be adjusted annually each May. The Postal Service plans to provide 90 days' notice before the price changes each year.

   New prices for shipping services, including Express Mail and Priority Mail, will be announced in March. Prices for all postal products and services are available at usps.com/prices.


Chris Gardner, Army News Service
'Unified Quest' focuses on future persistent conflict 

Unified Quest participants, ranging from military officers to professors, plan their response to a fictional conflict set in the future in Africa. The scenario is part of an exercise where the Army looks at its role in future conflicts and how to be better prepared for them. Photo by Chris Gardner.

CARLISLE BARRACKS, Pa. (Army News Service, May 7, 2008) - The Nigerian government is near collapse and rival factions are vying for power in that troubled part of the world, or at least a visitor to the Army War College this week would think that to be the case.
    The War College is hosting Unified Quest 08 which includes military leaders old and new from around the world as well as representatives from academia, industry and several different government agencies to discuss responses to global conflicts of the future.
    The fictitious Nigerian scenario, set in 2013, is one of four such imaginary conflicts being played out.
    Unified Quest 08 is an Army war game, co-sponsored by Joint Forces Command and Special Forces Command, that looks at what the world might be like in five to 25 years and looks at how best to respond to crises that might become a reality. The Army has been doing Unified Quest annually since 2003.
    Using these games, Army leaders hope to understand the Army's role in responding to conflicts around the globe, said Maj. Gen. Barbara Fast, deputy director of the Army Capabilities Integration Center.
    The exercise centers around realistic threats to ongoing peace around the world, like the potentially negative effects of globalization, competition for energy, demographic trends, climate change and natural disasters, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and the existence of failed or failing states that could be havens for terrorists.
    One of the main ideas of the game is the concept of "building partnership capacity" and understanding how the Army can better coordinate with other U.S. agencies and departments when responding to these unique future conflicts throughout the world, Fast said.
    "Much of what we're talking about, more than ever, requires a whole of government approach," Fast said.
   She said that the most important take-away from Unified Quest exercises in the past has been that the Army can't solve every problem alone. It needs to work in concert with different agencies, departments and foreign entities to deal with all facets of future conflicts.
   Because of the understanding of a need for a unified government approach to conflicts around the globe, each year more and more government representatives from outside the Army, like the U.S. Agency for International Development and the State Department, have been coming to Unified Quest, said Lt. Col. John Miller, deputy chief of future warfare at ARCIC. This is so that participants can learn to look at conflicts together and understand how to better coordinate and solve problems before fighting begins, he said.
   "If we have to put troops on the ground, something has failed," Miller said.
    Participants looked at four future scenarios from around the world. Three were set in 2013, one in Peru, one in the Philippines and the Nigerian one. There was also a scenario set in 2025 in Somalia.
   For each scenario, a blue team, red team and green team played out the conflict. The blue team represented the United States and its allies. The red team represented the enemy, whether it was a terrorist organization or a rival tribe vying to overthrow the government. The green team acted as the populace and represented their opinions and reactions to ongoing operations so they could be taken into account.
   While the four specific scenarios played out, one panel of experts also looked at larger issues facing the Army as a whole.
    Panelists there candidly discussed what they each saw as issues facing the Army. For example, one discussion focused on a perceived lack of true cultural awareness among the ranks and a lack of bilingual officers. They also talked about potential solutions, like perhaps putting more emphasis on language skills when considering officer promotions.
   The recommendations and lessons learned from Unified Quest will be crystallized and given directly to Army Chief of Staff Gen. George Casey as well as other Army leaders for their consideration as they plan for the Army's future, Fast said.


U.S. Army Training Center and Fort Jackson redesignated

    Effective Feb. 1,2008, the Training Command, U.S. Army Training Center and Fort Jackson was redesignated as the U.S. Army Basic Combat Training Center of Excellence.

 


Pennsylvania Department of Military and Veterans Affairs release
Pennsylvania offers bonus to Gulf War Veterans
     Pennsylvania is now recognizing the service of its Gulf War veterans – as well as certain surviving family members – through a new bonus program officially launched on April 4.
    The state's Persian Gulf Conflict Veterans' Bonus provides a one-time benefit for anyone who:

  • served with the U.S. Armed Forces, a reserve component of the U.S. Armed Forces or the Pennsylvania National Guard;
  • served on active duty in the Persian Gulf theater of operations during the period from Aug. 2, 1990, until Aug. 31, 1991, and received the Southwest Asia Service Medal; and
  • was a legal resident of Pennsylvania at the time of active service.


    Eligible veterans qualify for payment of $75 per month – up to $525 – for each month of active service in the Gulf War theater. An additional benefit of $5,000 may be awarded if the veteran was declared a prisoner of war at any time during the period of qualifying service or died in active service or as a result of service-connected injury or disease. In the case of deceased veterans, payments go to the surviving spouse, children or parents, in that order.

    An estimated 32,000 military personnel from Pennsylvania served on active duty in the Gulf War theater. The Gulf War bonus mirrors similar initiatives undertaken in previous decades on behalf of Pennsylvania's World War II, Korea and Vietnam veterans. The program is administered by the Pennsylvania Department of Military and Veterans Affairs.

    Individuals who received a bonus or similar compensation from any other state are not eligible for the Pennsylvania program. The deadline for applying for benefits is Aug. 31, 2015.

    For detailed instructions on how to apply, visit www.persiangulfbonus.state.pa.us.

 


Tom Zimmerman, U.S. Army War College Public Affairs Office
New housing construction in full gear

 New post housing is nearing completion at the Meadows housing area. There will be an open house at 10,000 A Chickamauga Drive at the Meadows on May 22 from 10 a.m.- 2 p.m.  The house is the first one located directly on the left after entering the Meadows.  Photo by Tom Zimmerman.

May 6, 2008 – People at Carlisle Barracks can walk through a new Meadows home during an open house on May 22 from 10 a.m.- 2 p.m.  

    The home is one of nearly 70 new housing units that are nearing completion for Carlisle Barracks residents as part of the Residential Communities Initiative housing project.

    "The weather has really helped us out with our timelines," said Ty McPhillips, the Project Director  for Balfour Beatty Communities. "It's great to see the rapid progress across the multiple phases of development."

The Meadows

        The first new housing neighborhood scheduled to be completed is "The Meadows," which is located off of Claremont Road, adjacent to the Skill Development Center and the Vehicle Access Control point. The neighborhood will have 46 new homes. The housing will be for U.S. Army War College students.

    "Right now we're working on painting the homes, starting the exterior landscaping and finishing the interiors," said McPhillips. The homes are slated to be complete in time for new U.S. Army War College students when they arrive in July.

     "We are installing a wrought-iron looking fence along Claremont and Jim Thorpe Roads and a white vinyl privacy fence along the north and east sides of the neighborhood, " said McPhillips. He said that Balfour Beatty plana to hold an open house at 10,000 A Chickamauga Drive at the Meadows on May 22 from 10 a.m.- 2 p.m.  The house is the first one located directly on the left after entering the Meadows.  

Delaney Field Club House

    Another project that has taken shape in the last few months is the Delaney Field Club House located next to the Post Chapel.

 Construction continues at the Delaney Field Club House located next to the Post Chapel May 5. Photo by Tom Zimmerman.   

    "As you can see just by driving by, the building has been framed and we started to work on the interior with mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems," McPhillips said. "We hope to start shingling this week and it will match the colonial pattern that you can see on the houses on the Meadows."

    Once compete, the building will have two large meeting rooms -- one with a large gas fireplace, a full kitchen, a TV room, an internet library, a conference room, men's and women's bathrooms that are also accessible from the outside and the offices for Balfour Beatty Communities and the RCO.

  The building will also be available as a place for members of the community to gather. 

    "We also want the club house to be a place where residents can get together, hold meetings, or whatever." The club house will also feature two patios with awnings for outside events. Events can be scheduled of the building by contact the Balfour Beatty Communities office. 

     The idea is that post residents will be able to take care of all of their housing arrangements in one place.

    "We really want this to be a one-stop-shop for people who are coming to live on post," he said. The entire building is scheduled for an August completion.  

Marshall Ridge Phase I

    The first phase of the Marshall Ridge project is ongoing and will add 24 new homes.  

    "This area is coming along great," said McPhillips. "We currently executing a lot of interior work, putting up siding and completing  the framing." The houses are made of up three and four bedroom houses, ranging in size from 2000 – 2100 square feet, not including the garage. The development is scheduled for a September completion.  

Upcoming construction

    Once the current construction projects are completed, the focus of the project will shift to the second phase of the Marshall Ridge project and the College Arms, or "Smurf Village," areas.

    "In Marshall Ridge we'll be demolishing the existing red houses and the ranch home and replacing them with 12 new duplex homes and 22 single family homes," McPhillips said. The current occupants on Marshall Ridge will be moved to the new Marshall Ridge homes completed during the first phase of the project."

    Gone also will be the houses along Craig and Sumner Road.

    "In this area of College Arms we'll be demolishing the existing 31 houses and replacing them with 24 new homes, the same as in the Meadows."

    A later part of the RCI project will be the renovation of the historic homes on Forbes Ave.

    "Primarily this will be basic interior renovations occurring when there is a change of occupancy," he said. Work to be accomplished will include renovations in the kitchen, bathrooms, light fixtures and new paint. The homes will remain duplex units.

 


 Public Affairs staff report
Local woman receives recognition as Military Spouse of the Year

 Michelle McIntyre-Brewer was recognized May 6 in Washington, D.C by Military Spouse Magazine. file photo.

May 6, 2008 -- Military Spouse magazine honored Michelle McIntyre-Brewer as the 2008 Military Spouse of the Year in Washington, D.C., on May 6.  

    During the award ceremony, McIntyre-Brewer, 29, said the award represents the idealized military spouse, one who supports the mission of an American military that aims to improve conditions in parts of the world less fortunate than the United States.

    "As military spouses, we have a responsibility that we are humanitarians, that we are not war mongers. We are people who want to be able to bring and instill peace around the world," she said receiving the first-ever award. "We want to show people that our hearts are made of gold."

    The moment you meet Chelle McIntyre-Brewer you can't help but be amazed by her incredible energy, which leads to why she was selected.    

    She said she had no idea she was getting the award when she was first told back in Oct. 2007.  Her best friend since third grade nominated this mother of two for her commitment to more than 15 different organizations and charities. 

    "She's an awesome spouse and an incredible example for military spouses everywhere.  She's always smiling and caring for others," said Debbie Teague who has worked with McIntyre-Brewer at the Post Memorial Chapel.

    Army Second Lt. Stephen Brewer said his wife wanted to accept the award, not to celebrate her own virtue, but for the honor it bestows on all military spouses.

    "I think it's time that the spouses and families are more recognized for the hard work and effort they put in," he said. "As military people, we volunteer, but our families don't, and yet they put forth so much effort with very little recognition. They like to give us medals and ribbons, but very rarely is a spouse given his or hers."

    The list of organizations that have benefited from McIntyre-Brewer's volunteer work seems unending: March of Dimes, American Heart Association, Soldier's List, USO, Ronald McDonald House, Veterans Affairs, United Way, Texas Children's Hospital, Department of Homeland Security's 411 Triage Command, Kiwanis Club, Wounded Warrior and Helmets to Hardhats.  Knowing this makes those around her ask the question, "Where does she find the time?" 

    McIntyre-Brewer says a lot of her accomplishments happen at home, using her living room couch as her office.  A good portion of the day is spent on the phone, following up on activities and making sure the wheels of her charities keep turning.

     Sometimes McIntyre-Brewer serves as the actual momentum behind the wheelchairs.  As a district coordinator with the USO, she takes injured Soldiers to see concerts and even picks them up from airports, driving them where they need to go.  

    With a commitment to veterans, McIntyre-Brewer wants to make sure everyone is taken care of and it's more than just recognizing Soldiers. McIntyre-Brewer's goal is to make sure families and Soldiers get the help they need.

     "Nothing is more frustrating then to see someone's needs ignored and it's not because services aren't there, but because many Soldiers don't know it's there. I want to get people in touch with what they need, and working with the USO and PA Cares gives me a lot of gratification," said McIntyre-Brewer.

     By creating a network of communication throughout military installations, McIntyre-Brewer seeks to educate military families about their rights and privileges.  Those who are looking for medical and financial help are pointed in the right direction with just one phone call to this energetic woman.

      "I feel it's my responsibility, I want to see families who are sacrificing take advantage of what is already there.  Whether it's financial assistance or a restaurant discount, those benefits wouldn't be made available if companies didn't want Soldiers to use them.  The challenge is getting that information out into the open."

     McIntyre-Brewer relies a lot on word of mouth to share information, but anyone can learn what she's learned through her column in Military Spouse Magazine,   www.marriedtothearmy.com, where she reaches out to other spouses, especially families suffering from PTSD.

     "Sometimes we can be our own worst enemy if we don't connect, if we don't work together.  People don't have to deal with issues by themselves," said McIntyre-Brewer.

    To say she's the kind of person to give the shirt off her back, or more accurately, the dryer from her house is definitely true.  McIntyre-Brewer came across one Soldier's family that didn't have a working dryer and couldn't afford one, so the answer to that problem was simple – give them hers. 

    McIntyre-Brewer can't remember when she started volunteering, just that she has always been inspired by her father and her country to help wherever she can. 

    "I've lived all over the world, and seen many people less fortunate than myself.  I feel a responsibility as a military spouse and also as a citizen of the U.S. to help improve the lives of others," said McIntyre-Brewer. 

    "My husband and I try to live by the motto "to leave every day giving more than you've taken."  I've been given a lot, my daughter is a miracle. In actuality, she shouldn't be here today, and my husband is a walking miracle, so the things my family has survived are amazing, and I just know I was meant to give back," said McIntyre-Brewer. 

    McIntyre-Brewer counts her blessings as her daughter is missing half of her heart, which involved their family with the March of Dimes and the American Heart Association.  McIntyre-Brewer helps these causes by getting letters of endorsements from politicians and professional football teams.

    When it comes to charities, McIntyre-Brewer doesn't just participate, she creates wherever she sees a need.  She's proven very successful at making things happen.

    When seeing victim's of Hurricane Katrina on the news, she was moved to action.  Within 48 hours and countless phone calls later, she compiled a rescue force and inspired other volunteers.  To name a few: Harsco Corporation and Hershey Company donated their jets, doctors and nurses donated their services, churches donated supplies, and registered foster families made their homes available to children.

    "To me, that whole experience was a real credit to the American spirit.  So many people pitched in so quickly.  No one turned me down or questioned my credibility and that was proof to me that we are truly a good country," said McIntyre-Brewer.

    McIntyre-Brewer's supportive arms extend beyond her own country to the Soldiers serving on deployment.  She founded the Soldier's List, which is responsible for more than 4,000 care packages sent overseas.  She helps to connect any organization to the names of Soldiers who might not otherwise receive care packages.  

    "There are many Soldiers who grew up in foster care with no parents or family. 'Soldier's List' tries to make sure they get mailed at least one package a month so they know they are supported, they are not alone," said McIntyre-Brewer.

    It's apparent that McIntyre-Brewer cares about U.S. Soldiers, but her caring doesn't stop with the military.  She's raised money for a school in Afghanistan and serves as the liaison for the Sock Monkey Ministry in the Northeast, sending hand puppets for Soldiers to give to children they meet on deployment. 

    "Sock puppets may seem like silly stuff, but they serve a multitude of purposes especially as therapy for serious brain injuries.  Something so simple can make a big difference, put a smile on faces and connect Soldiers to people," said McIntyre-Brewer.

    Babette Maxwell, Military Spouse magazine co-founder and executive editor, called McIntyre-Brewer an inspiration.

    "Chelle is a reminder that inside each of us is the same passionate and committed spirit that puts others before themselves, sees the need and fills it, and follows dreams," Maxwell said. "Chelle's relentless dedication to her family and others in need make her a most deserving candidate for military spouse of the year."

    In a video message to the audience, first lady Laura Bush said the award presented was a chance to pay tribute to the hard work and dedication of military spouses, as embodied by McIntyre-Brewer.

    "I offer her my heartfelt congratulations on receiving this award," Bush said of McIntyre-Brewer. "Chelle, you're an inspiration. To all the military spouses: President Bush and I are proud of your service, and the American people are grateful to your sacrifice."

    When asked about her favorite honor, McIntyre-Brewer said she was touched when members from the 82nd Airborne came to Carlisle Barracks to present her their colors in appreciation for Christmas care packages, complete with ornaments and trees.

    To McIntyre-Brewer, no one is a stranger and she will always find the time to lend a hand, but she admits she can't do it all by herself.

    "I do need help. There is still so much to do, there are many people in need and there's plenty to give." said McIntyre-Brewer. 

(Editors note: Portions of the story came from a John J. Kruzel, American Forces Press Service story and a previous story by Shelaine Tuytschaevers.)


Tom Zimmerman, U.S. Army War College Public Affairs Office
GMH Military Housing becomes Balfour Beatty Communities

     May 6, 2008 -- A change recently at the corporate level was the acquisition of GMH Military Housing by Balfour Beatty, plc on Wednesday, April 30, 2008. 

    "Going forward, GMH Military Housing will be known as Balfour Beatty Communities.  Initially the company will operate under both names—Balfour Beatty Communities and GMH Military Housing—until the transition of our identity is complete in about four months," according to a news release. While our name is changing, our core focus remains exactly the same:  to provide exceptional housing and responsive world class service to the U.S. Military personnel who live in the properties we manage." Additionally, the local Team known by the residents and the community will remain exactly the same.  

    Those comments were echoed by McPhillips.

    "Balfour Beatty Communities' commitment to military families at Carlisle Barracks is to provide a community they are proud to call home." 

Who is Balfour Beatty?

    Balfour Beatty plc is a engineering, construction, services, and investment group headquartered in London with 35,000 employees worldwide. Balfour Beatty plc has operations involving construction and management of a wide range of privatization projects from schools to hospitals, highways to railways, and water supply systems to power generation.   

    The Balfour Beatty Group is familiar with working in the defense/security and other sensitive sectors in the US and the UK.  Balfour Beatty Construction is currently working on the 9/11 Memorial at the Pentagon and has significant design and construction contracts with various US military entities, including the New Campus East at Fort Belvoir for the US Army Corps of Engineers, the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center at the Naval Base in Bethesda, Maryland, and the new training facilities for the US Army Corps of Engineers at Fort Lee, VirginiaThis is in addition to Balfour Beatty Construction's work on the GMH Military Housing privatization projects.


Traffic change  for Lovell Ave May 6

May 5, 2008 -- Traffic will be reduced to one-way on Tuesday, May 6 from 10 a.m.- 1 p.m. to support an LVCC function.


Tom Zimmerman, U.S. Army War College Public Affairs Office
International Fellows program looking for sponsors

May 5, 2008 – Interested in helping an international student at the U.S. Army War College adjust to their new surroundings next year and learn more about their country at the same time? Then you should sign up to be a Carlisle Barracks sponsor.

   "It's that time of year again where the International Fellows Program is busy matching potential sponsors to the incoming class of International Fellows," said Kevin Bremer, Deputy Director of the International Fellows Program.

    The International Fellow's sponsorship program consists of three sponsors.

    Each IF will have a Carlisle Barracks Sponsor, a Community Sponsor and a Seminar Sponsor. The sponsors are part of a team that helps with logistical and administrative arrangements necessary to make the Fellow's year in the United States professionally and personally rewarding. Sponsor meetings are scheduled for May 29 and June 5 at 6 p.m. in the Root Hall Wil Waschoe Auditorium.

   For more information or if you're interested in become a sponsor contact Bremer at 245-4830.


Public Affairs staff report
Rubber duck race raises $3,300 for outreach

May 6, 2008 – If you walked by the Letort Spring Run on Saturday, April 26 you may have seen thousand of small, rubber ducks floating down the stream. Don't worry though, it's not time to go see the eye doctor, it was just the 2008 Duck Derby sponsored by the Carlisle Barracks Spouses Club.   

    "All 1,000 ducks were adopted which assisted in raising $3,300 that will go toward scholarships and community outreach funds," said Angela Yarbrough, publicity chair for the spouses club.

    The top winners for the derby were:

  • 1st prize of $300  Danette Lyles
  • 2nd prize of $150 David Juras)
  • 3rd prize of $75 Craig Dye

  The winning seminar was #15.  They received a $500 party package that included donations from the ClassVI, AAFES, MWR, the Party Store, Hanover Grill and Alibis as well as gift certificates to the Commissary and Wengers of Carlisle. Many of the items were donated by the Pomfret Street Business Group.

  "The Junior Duck Derby was a popular event for children who there to cheer their ducks through the rapids of Letort Springs," said Yarbrough. First and second prizes were a remote control helicopter and an Ipod chair.


Pfc. Jennifer Rick, U.S. Army War College Public Affairs Office
Award dedicated to fallen Soldier during ceremony 

Maj. Gen. Robert Williams, U.S. Army War College Commandant, shakes the hand of Sgt. First Class Richard Hall, who received the Army Commendation Medal at the Quarterly Awards Ceremony at the LVCC May 1. Master Sgt. Barry Sessoms was also given the Army Commendation Medal. Sgt. Radesha Dantzler was awarded the Army Achievement Medal. The Soldiers recieved these awards for their work during the Strategic Decision Making Exercise. Photo by Megan Clugh.

May 6, 2008 -- Each quarter, Carlisle Barracks takes time to stop and recognize the hard work and accomplishments of the people who live and work on the post.

    "One thing that I've learned in the short time I've been here is that there are great, hard working  people here," said Maj. Gen. Robert Williams, U.S. Army War College Commandant, during the ceremony held in the LVCC May 1. "You may not realize it but you're a part of something much bigger than just Carlisle Barracks and you should be proud." 

    During the ceremony the following people received awards:

 Civilian Employee of the Year:

  • Lynne Wilson-Bruchet, Dunham U.S. Army Health Clinic

    Wilson-Bruchet dedicated her award to the late Sgt. Emerson Brand, 1st Cavalry Division, 2nd BCT, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Squadron, who was one of four Soldiers killed by a roadside bomb in Baghdad on March 15, 2007.

    She decided to dedicate her award to a fallen Soldier to show her gratitude toward servicemembers who give so much for their country.

    "The fact that I could offer some small service to those who have given so much is truly an honor and a privilege," she said. "There is, and will be, nothing more important that I could ever do in this capacity to serve my country."

    Present at the ceremony was Brand's wife, Belinda, who said she is honored by Wilson-Bruchet's decision to dedicate her award to her husband.

    "This really means a lot to me," she said. "And Lynne is more than deserving of this award."

Civilian Employee of the Quarter:

  • Suzanne Reynolds, Public Affairs

Army Commendation Medal:

  • Master Sgt. Barry Sessoms, Center for Strategic Learning
  • Sgt. First Class Richard Hall, Center for Strategic Learning

Army Achievement Medal:

  • Sgt. Radesha Dantzler, Headquarters Company

    Sessoms, Hall and Dantzler were honored for their work supporting the Strategic Decision Making Exercise.

Commanding General's Bonus Program:

  • Karen Bailey, Dunham U.S. Army Health Clinic
  • Linda Berkowitz, Executive Services
  • Laura Bistline, Army Physical Fitness Research Institute
  • Judy Serach, Department of Distance Education
  • Fred Gleave, Military Personnel Division

Length of Service Awards:

  • Rachel Moritz, Equal Employment Office, 30 years of service
  • Anne Hurst, Army Community Service, 20 years of service
  • Martha Thomas, Children/Youth Services, 20 years of service
  • James Price, Directorate of Family and Morale, Welfare, and Recreation Sports, 10 years of service
  • John Bannon, Directorate of Moral, Welfare, and Recreation, 5 years of service
  • Rick Price, Directorate of Family and Morale, Welfare, and Recreation Sports, 5 years of service
  • Don Watkins, Children/Youth Services, 5 years of service.

Tom Zimmerman, Public Affairs Office
CBTV brings the news you want to know 24 hours a day

 

April 30, 2008  – Want to know what time the Spring Fun fest is going on? Need to know what day Army Heritage Day is this year? One place to turn is Carlisle Barracks Television, located on Comcast channels 14 in post housing and channel 10 in post facilities.

    When you tune into CBTV, not only will you see the exciting and informative Pentagon Channel, you will also see news and information about post organizations, events and changes in hours of operations. There is also a crawl at the bottom of the screen that will give you the current time and temperature, so you know if you need to grab that jacket or not.  

    We have set up three times during the day where you can tune in and get all the post information you need. At 6 a.m., 8 a.m., 12 p.m. and 5 p.m. you can tune into CBTV and view full-screen information about upcoming post events.

    We've also set up two blocks per day to run original post programming. Did you miss the recent lecture at AHEC? It will run on CBTV in the near future. This and other exciting events will be re-broadcast on CBTV as they become available at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. every day.

    CBTV and the Banner Online are your one-stop shops for all the post information you need to know.

    In addition to airing the Pentagon Channel and programming information slides, CBTV will also be the place to turn to during weather-related and force protection events. CBTV will be updated with the most current information, day or night when it comes to delays, closings or emergency situations. Why sit through 10 minutes of delay or school closing information on the local news channels when you can turn to CBTV and get it right away? Important information will either run on the screen, or appear as a crawl on the bottom.

    This is your station that has the news and information that's important to you. Tune into CBTV today.     

 


Public Affairs staff report
Gen. Petraeus talk to headline Army Heritage Day
Free event explores past, present Army operations

May 1, 2008 -- Gen. David Petraeus is scheduled to address the public via video-teleconference at Army Heritage Day, from 9 a. m. - 5 p.m., May 17 in Carlisle, Pa.

    The VTC, by the Commanding General, Multi-National Forces – Iraq, is scheduled to take place at 10 a.m. in Ridgway Hall, at the Army Heritage and Education Center and will focus on the current situation in Iraq and the real-world application of the Counterinsurgency Manual. Seating is limited, tickets are required and can be picked up at Ridgway Hall or requested by e-mail at Carl_ahec-ves@conus.army.mil starting May 5.

     Outside on the Army Heritage Trail, Army Heritage Day will highlight today's Army operations and feature Soldiers talking about their own experiences. Activities will include tactical squad operations, demonstrated by a Brigade Combat Team.  Visitors will also want to keep an eye on the sky for the 101st Airborne Division parachute jump at 9:30 a.m.  Living history interpreters will re-create moments in a World War I trench, a Revolutionary War Redoubt, a French and Indian War way station, a Civil War winter cabins and a World War II company area. More than 45 re-enactor military units will bring history to life. 

    AHEC, at 950 Soldiers Drive in Carlisle, Pa, is minutes from Interstate 81, the Pennsylvania Turnpike and Routes 11 and 15. Follow signs to the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center. There is free parking, handicapped accessibility, food sales and a historical book sale.

    For details, visit www.usahec.org.

 


DDE Orientation to take up some parking in Anne Ely Hall

      May 2, 2008 -- Portion of the Anne Ely parking lot will be blocked on May 2, 2008 for DDE Orientation parking.


Jerry Harben, U.S. Army Medical Command
Army joins in celebration of Mental Health Month

    May 1, 2008 -- The Army is joining in promoting mental health during May, which is celebrated as Mental Health Month under the sponsorship of Mental Health America, formerly known as the National Mental Health Association. The theme for 2008 is "Get Connected," emphasizing the valuable support people gain by connections with family, friends, community and mental health professionals.

    "Years of research have shown that individuals who feel valued and cared for are better equipped to deal with stress and adversity, and even experience less severe illnesses than those with little social support," said David Shern, president and CEO of Mental Health America.

    "The importance of Mental Health Month is to raise public awareness of mental health being a significant medical issue in this country," said Col. C. J. Diebold. "It should be used as a springboard to raise continuous awareness. Mental illness is a medical disease for which effective treatments are available." Diebold is chief of psychiatry at Tripler Army Medical Center in Hawaii, and has been designated as the Army Surgeon General's expert consultant for psychiatry.

    Last year Army leaders took the unusual step of ordering a chain teaching program throughout the Army. Some 900,000 Soldiers of all ranks were taught how to recognize and respond to symptoms of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Of special importance was command emphasis to counter a perception that Soldiers who seek mental health services are weak or malingerers.

    "We're all worried about it. We've got to get rid of the stigma and that's what this education program is supposed to do," Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. Richard Cody said at a press conference announcing the chain teaching program.

    All leaders have been encouraged to get out the message that getting help early is the best way to avoid long-term problems.

    "We can safely say mental health is an issue of great importance, and this is recognized at all levels of command in the Army," said Diebold. "It is an issue directly related to our operational tempo. The Army has addressed this in multiple ways. Mental health resources have been increased at all installations, in addition to resources such as Military One Source. Mental health support is provided throughout the deployment cycle. Soldiers are screened and provided care as needed before, during and after deployment. Families are taken care of, too."

    The Army Surgeon General demonstrated the importance of mental health support by establishing the Proponency Office for Behavioral Health, a cell of experts to coordinate programs and resources.

    "We seek to bring together all the diverse behavioral health policies and programs along with manpower resources. We are at the forefront of behavioral health practices today and far into the future," said Col. Elspeth C. Ritchie, the office's director.

    Soldiers and families can get professional help through installation mental health clinics, and through primary care clinics using the new RESPECT-MIL program. Combat-stress control teams are deployed to bring front-line assistance to Soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan. Chaplains, social workers and installation drug abuse or family violence programs also can help deal with aspects of mental health issues.

    All deploying Soldiers receive "Battlemind" training to help them prepare for the stresses they face in combat, and another round of training to help them adjust to returning home. There is Battlemind training for families, too, to help them deal with the special stress of having a spouse or parent deployed.

    Military One Source is a 24-hour, toll-free telephone hot line to connect military service members with a variety of support services. By calling 1-800-342-9647, Soldiers or family members can arrange civilian mental health counseling without charge.

    A wealth of information for Soldiers and families is available at www.behavioralhealth.army.mil on the World Wide Web.

    Concern for Soldiers who need mental health support does not stop even after they leave the service.

    "The Department of Defense is working closely with the Department of Veterans Affairs to ensure Soldiers making the transition to civilians continue to get high quality mental health care," Diebold said.

 

 

 

 


J.D. Leipold, Army News Service
Benning Signs First Covenant with Local Communities  

As Army Family members and civic leaders gather around, Secretary of the Army Pete Geren (center) signs the Army's first formal community covenant between Fort Benning, Ga., and the towns of Columbus, Ga., and Phenix City, Ala. To the secretary's left: Sgt. Maj. the Army Kenneth O. Preston. who also signed. Other signers included , to the secretary's right: Columbus Mayor Jim Wetherington ; Maj. Gen. Walt Wojdakowski, Fort Benning commander ; and Phenix City mayor Jeff Hardin. Photo by J.D. Leipold.  

    April 17, 2008 -- The Army formally signed its first community covenant April 17, between Fort Benning and the towns of Columbus, Ga., and Phenix City, Ala., launching a mutual commitment of support by the Army and the local communities to Soldiers and Families.

    This symbolic first will serve as a kick-off to other community covenant signings across the nation which will be put in place between April and December 2008. Fort Benning was chosen to launch the program because the tri-community area has served as an example of long-standing relationships and history shared between the installation and local communities, officials said.

    Secretary of the Army Pete Geren addressed the audience of Soldiers, Families and community leaders thanking them for the support they've given Fort Benning in its 90-year history, saying the Army hopes to build on the great successes nationwide that Columbus and Phenix City have set through their examples of solid support.

    "We've doubled the funding in the budget for family programs over the last year and we're continuing to have that funding, but there's no substitute for neighbors helping neighbors and that's why (we have) this community covenant to thank Columbus and Phenix City for the wonderful support they give our Families and to affirm what they do and to build upon it," he said.

    "Nearly two-thirds of the Soldiers based at Fort Benning live in the community and the community embraces them, works with them through hard times," Geren added. "You have programs like 'God Bless Fort Benning' and 'Home for Heroes' and other initiatives that touch Soldiers and their Families... it's a blessing in their lives."

   Columbus mayor Jim Wetherington thanked Fort Benning Soldiers for doing "such a great job representing us all over the country, in wartime and in peacetime."

    "You are top-notch and we just want you to know that we're so grateful to you and your Families that you leave behind when you go to places in the world to put your lives on the line," he said. "So, on behalf of Columbus, Ga., we appreciate you more than you know and God bless our military people, and especially those at Fort Benning."

    Phenix City Mayor Jeff Hardin pledged his community as one with the Army saying each has always focused on taking care of the other and that would not stop.

    "Fort Benning means more to us than simple economics; together our partnership with Columbus and Fort Benning will endeavor to achieve positive solutions to the many challenges our military and their Families face," he said. "Whatever we can do to enhance the lives and increase the partnership with the tri-community Families, we will pursue vigorously."

 

The Army Community Covenant states:

Supporting those who serve

Together, We are committed to building strong communities. We, the Community, recognize...

The commitment Soldiers and their Families are making every day.

The strength of Soldiers comes from the strength of their Families.

The strength of Families is supported by the strength of the Community.

The strength of the Community comes from the support of Employers, Educators, Civic and Business leaders, and its Citizens.

We, the Community, are committed to...

Building partnerships that support the strength, resilience, and readiness of Soldiers and their Families.

 

 


Pfc. Jennifer Rick, U.S. Army War College Public Affairs Office
Army Reserve celebrates 100th anniversary  

Lt. Gen. Jack Stultz, Commanding General of the U.S. Army Reserve Command, speaks at Carlisle Barracks' Army Reserve 100th Birthday Celebration April 16 at the LVCC. Photo by Lizzie Poster. 

   April 16, 2008 -- The United States Army has a rich history that is an important part of today's military world. A century ago, the Army expanded its horizons and created the Medical Reserve Corps to provide the Army with a reservoir of trained officers for times of war.

    A century later, the Army Reserve is an essential part of the Army. Since Sept. 11, 2001, more than 193,000 Reserve Soldiers have been mobilized, said Lt. Gen. Jack Stultz, Commanding General of the U.S. Army Reserve Command. Stultz was the guest speaker at Carlisle Barracks' Army Reserve 100th Birthday Celebration, held April 16 at the Letort View Community Center. He gave a brief overview of the Reserve's history, and how important it is today.

    The Army Reserve component has gone from a small group of medical officers in 1908 to a large group and trained Soldiers, ready to support the Active Army in every way they can, he said.

    "In the civilian arena, personal accomplishments are the most important. In the Army, you learn the necessity of teamwork. It is up the utmost importance," said Lt. Col. Sylvester Brown, U.S. Army War College student and Army Reservist.

    "We are a combat-enabler," said Col. Clark Summers, USAWC student and Army Reservist. "We fill needs that would not otherwise be easily met."

    According to Stultz, as a Soldier-civilian, Reservists can utilize the same skills they use in their every day jobs when working with their Reserve unit, especially when mobilized.

    "The Reserve is full of people who are successful, highly competent and qualified, and want to serve their country," Stultz said. "It is the center of excellence for the future of this Army."

 


Tom Zimmerman, U.S. Army War College Public Affairs Office
USAWC repeats as Sports Days champs 
 

Maj. Gen. Robert Williams, U.S. Army War College Commandant, holds the Commandants Cup at the Jim Thorpe Sports Days Awards Ceremony April 27. The USAWC team won the sports competition for the 10th time in 11 years. Photo by Megan Clugh. Want more photos?

April 25, 2008 -- A balanced effort across all sports at the 2008 Jim Thorpe Sports Days allowed the Commandants Cup to remain at the U.S. Army War College for another year.  

    The USAWC team won with a total of 120 points. The Industrial College of the Armed Forces was second with 98 points, the Air War College was third with 78 points, Naval War College 4th with 72 points and the National War College finished 5th with 48 points.

    The win marked the 10th time in the last 11 years that the Army War College won the sports competition pitting the nation's military service schools against each other in events like basketball, soccer and softball. The USAWC team took first place in basketball, women's golf, volleyball, women's 5K run, men's two-mile relay and women's one-mile relay.

    The 2008 games kicked off officially with a pair of relay team wins, one by the men’s team and one by the women’s team on April 25.

    Though the games started on April 24, the relays were the first events held after the opening ceremony on Indian Field.  Named in honor of Jim Thorpe, the great American athlete, Jim Thorpe Sports Days is an annual event which began in 1974 and demonstrates teamwork, discipline and physical fitness in a collegial environment.

    The colorful ceremony kicked off the sports competition between student athletes of the Army War College, Air War College, Naval War College, National War College and Industrial College of the Armed Forces. The athletes of the various senior service colleges marched onto the field, the official 'Olympic' style torch was lit and the Carlisle Barracks cannon was fired. 

    "This competition and the planned social events give us an opportunity to share sportsmanship and comradeship" said Maj. Gen. Robert Williams, USAWC Commandant. "General of the Army Douglas MacArthur said that 'upon the fields of friendly strife are sown the seeds that upon other days, on other fields, will bear the fruits of victory.' Let us sow the seeds during Jim Thorpe Sports Day 2008 with good sportsmanship that will later serve our Nation on other fields of strife." The student athletes compete in soccer, golf, volleyball, basketball, softball, bowling, tennis, racquetball and in several running events. 

    This years event was a success according to Chuck Gentile, Carlisle Barracks sports director.

    "The main importance is that there are a lot of old friendships that are renewed, and a lot of new ones that have been made and will be carried out through out their careers, " he said. "No one really can relate to the magnitude of the event until it's over. However each individual will carry this remarkable experience through the rest of their lives."

  

 


Days of Remembrance Observance slated for May 1 

A Days of Remembrance Observance will take place in Anne Ely Hall in Room 202 on May 1 from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.  

    "The event will not be your typical event with a guest speaker or festive dances.  This event will be more like a repast that follows a funeral than a festive event," said Rachel Moritz, Equal Employment Manager.

  "Room 202 will be designed to have a museum-like effect. Guests are invited to view displays and PowerPoint presentations," she said.   

   NOTE:  Some pictures may be too graphic for adults and children.  Light refreshments will be served. 

    If you have any questions, contact the EEO Office at 245-3151 or 245-3950.

 

 


People's Choice Award added to 10th annual USAWC Speech Contest

Air Force Lt. Col. Carmia Salcedo steps out to receive Top Speaker honors at the 2007 USAWC Speech Contest. File photo.

April 28, 2008 -- The 10th annual Army War College Speech Contest takes place Wednesday, May 7 at 6 p.m. in Bliss Hall.  The event is free and open to everyone.

     Fellow students and faculty members, family and friends are invited to be inspired by eight excellent speakers who have emerged from the USAWC class of 2008:  Lt. Col. Donald Dunne, Lt. Col. Nikki Butler, Mr Steve Crawford, Lt. Col. Jeffrey Kelly, Lt. Col. Carolyn Kleiner, Lt. Col. John McPhaul, Col. Nico Tak, and Col. Lora Tucker.

    The audience will relish its role in this competition that's designed to educate and entertain on many levels. Audience members will identify their nomination to move to round two in the second hour. And, the panel of judges will select four of the eight for the second round, impromptu speaking. The top speaker will be announced at the end, and acknowledged at the USAWC graduation ceremony.  Sponsorship by the Army War College Foundation makes possible the $$ awards for the top four speakers.

    This year's most effective speaker will complete a decade of top achievers in public speaking -- Air Force Lt. Col. Carmia Salcedo, 2007 Army Col. Warren Gunderman, 2007 Army Col. Dean Stodter, 2005 Brig. Bikran Singh, India, 2004 Army Col. Jesse Barber, 2003 Marine Lt. Col. Mark Singleton, 2002 Army Col. James L. Hodge, 2001 Navy Cmdr Vincent J. van Joolen, 2000 Brig. Gen. Ossama M. H. El-Sawah, Egypt, 1999.

 


CAC-only = no more passwords

     April 29, 2008 -- Are you tired of constantly changing or trying to remember your post computer network log-on password?

    If you would like to be password-free on the Carlisle Barracks Network, the Directorate of Information Management has great news for you on how you can become strictly "CAC-ified," where you will never need a network log-on password again, just your CAC card and PIN. 

    "If you do not use the HP 4345 Multi-Function Printer (MFP) Email Scanners or have no requirement to access Carlisle Barracks portals or CBNet "externally" from home, then you can be password free immediately," said Ed Otto, DOIM director. "You will never need to change your password again."    

     To do so, simply call the Service Desk at 5-3000 or Email (CARL_Service Desk) and they will remove your network password immediately and you'll be password free at last.

    "Not only is this easier on you, it helps us comply with the Army's future goal of eliminating all passwords," said Otto.  


Pfc. Jennifer Rick, U.S. Army War College Public Affairs Office
Post youth heat up the kitchen during competition

Carlisle Barracks children show off their finished dishes at the first "Junior Iron Chef Competition" held at the Kitchen Shoppe in Carlisle March 26. The kids created six entrees using a secret ingredient. Courtesy photo.

April 30, 2008 -- A cooking craze has swept America in the recent years, bringing with it countless food-oriented TV shows and a renewed zeal within the public to get creative and create their own meals.

    A version of the popular show is "Iron Chef America" on Food Network was created locally with Youth Services' "Junior Iron Chef Competition". Six children, ages ten to twelve, of the Youth Services Cooking Club, participated in the March 26 event, held at the Kitchen Shoppe in Carlisle, explained Allen Campbell, middle school and teen coordinator at Youth Services.

    The youthful contestants were broken into two teams. Team "Super Junior Chefs" consisted of Trystan Rowles, Sean Driscoll and Marc Rodriguez, and team "Might Girl Chefs" was comprised of Jessie Murray, Samantha Merritt and Haylee Morris.

    The secret ingredient for the competition was boneless, skinless chicken breast. Each team created three dishes featuring the secret ingredient, with minimal help from Campbell and Chef Amber Clay of the Kitchen Shoppe.

    The girls created a three course meal, including steamed broccoli and tomatoes, panko breaded chicken with baked potato chips and a colorful pink chicken stir fry.

    The boys made three separate entrèes, including a chicken salad topped with an Asian dressing, a meat lover's dish with cilantro and bacon, and grilled chicken with a tomato and garlic sauce.

    All the junior chefs created their dishes completely from scratch, not even using recipes for their dishes, although they did show good teamwork skills throughout the competition, said Campbell. The boys said they helped each other out whenever they could.

    "I gave Marc the sauce I made," Driscoll said.

    "They all worked very well together," Campbell said. "I had just as much fun watching them as I do teaching them in our weekly cooking club."

    After tasting all the dishes, the judges ruled it a tie, and all the kids received a Kitchen Shoppe gift bag which included a flexible cutting board and a vegetable peeler.

    Everyone involved had fun, and the boys joked about eating a lot of bacon while they were cooking.

    This was the first cooking competition Youth Services has held, and they want to do more in the future.

    As for the Junior Iron Chefs, they have big plans for someday attending culinary school and selling their original masterpieces.

    "We make art that is edible," said Driscoll.


 TRICARE release
DVDs address deployment issues for military children

FALLS CHURCH, VA. - Military pediatricians and youth professionals developed DVDs to help military children understand and deal with the emotions related to a family member's deployment.

    The United States Army Medical Command and the American Academy of Pediatrics produced "Military Youth Coping with Separation: When Family Members Deploy," to address a variety of deployment-related concerns for teens. For elementary age children there is a, "Mr. Poe and Friends Discuss Reunion After Deployment" DVD. The animated host, Mr. Poe, mentors and provides guidance to children and family members as they discuss deployment.

    Maj. Keith Lemmon, an Army pediatrician and adolescent medicine subspecialist, first became aware of the need for more support for deployed families when he was sent to Afghanistan in 2002. The experiences of Maj.

Lemmon and his family during his deployment inspired him to address the affects of deployment on adolescents. His wife, a teacher, suffered with situational depression and his son's behavior changed negatively. While "Military Youth Coping with Separation" tackles numerous issues teens face during deployment including fear of injury or death, stress brought about by changes in the home, it also offers coping techniques for dealing with the absence of a parent or loved one.

    "Our goal is to reduce the anxiety and fear surrounding a military deployment, and let children know they are not alone in the struggles their families are facing," said Lemmon.

    Lemmon decided to make the DVD peer to peer, with teenagers relating their own deployment-related stories and offering advice. "We know adolescents are more comfortable discussing these kinds of emotional issues with each other rather than adults," Lemmon said.

    Cameron Lucke, a teen whose family experienced deployment, guides viewers through candid interviews with other military teens.  The interviews capture true feelings and coping strategies of military youth. Teens interviewed advise their peers to listen to the deployed parent rather than the media or to avoid watching the news completely. They also encouraged others facing the same issues to speak to someone. Recommended sources of support are family members, friends or trusted adults, such as a teacher or their doctor.

    For younger children, "Mr. Poe and Friends," uses cartoon characters to talk about deployment issues. The animated host, Mr. Poe, interacts with families at the airport as they await the return of their deployed loved ones. The video features the voices of real military children, parents, and youth serving professionals who have experienced deployment.

    Both videos are available for online viewing on the American Academy of Pediatrics Deployment Support Web site at www.aap.org/sections/unifserv/deployment/index.htm. They are also available for ordering, in DVD format, through Military One Source at 1-800-342-9647 or http://www.militaryonesource.com/skins/MOS/home.aspx


DoD release
Questionnaire for security clearances revised

    May 1, 2008 -- The Department of Defense, Office of Personnel Management (OPM) and the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) have approved revisions to question 21 on the Questionnaire for National Security Positions, Standard Form (SF) 86, regarding mental and emotional health counseling.

    "Our people deserve the best mental health care we can provide without the fear of hurting their career in the long run," said Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Adm. Michael Mullen.  "It's time we made everyone in uniform aware that the act of reaching out for help is one of the most courageous acts -- and one of the first steps -- to reclaiming your career and future.  All leaders must set an example by seeking help themselves and encouraging others to do so.  Getting this question changed is a terrific first step."

    Per direction of the secretary of defense, DoD components will immediately distribute the revised question 21 language for awareness and use by all DoD personnel completing the security clearance form.

    Until a new SF86 is published by the OPM later this summer, the OMB has agreed to allow DoD members to use the revised version of question 21 with the current SF86.

            The revised question can be viewed at www.defenselink.mil/news/May2008/revisedquestion21.pdf <http://www.defenselink.mil/news/May2008/revisedquestion21.pdf>  .

 


Donna Miles, American Forces Press Service
Gates announces security question change

FORT BLISS, Texas, May 1, 2008 - Seeking mental-health care due to post-traumatic stress will no longer be seen as an obstacle to getting a government security clearance, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates announced here today.

    Gates announced the new policy after touring the Restoration and Resilience Center that opened in July to treat combat veterans diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder. The center, part of Fort Bliss' Beaumont Army Medical Center, uses treatments ranging from group and individual therapy to yoga, acupuncture, massage, chiropractic and hot-stone therapy.

    Its goal, officials at the experimental facility explained, is to help troops recover so they can stay in the Army.

    Gates told reporters he had an "extraordinary experience" visiting the new center and seeing work under way to help soldiers deal with combat stress.

    "They are doing some amazing things here in terms of helping soldiers who want to remain soldiers but who have been wounded with post-traumatic stress disorder," he said. "It is a multi-month effort by a lot of caring people, and they are showing some real success in restoring these soldiers."

    Gates said he'll take the idea of possibly replicating Fort Bliss' prototype program to other posts.

    He also noted other techniques being developed in the combat theater to give troops additional tools to deal with the circumstances they face. "These are clearly worth additional attention as well," he told reporters.

    Gates called additional resources and capabilities to treat troops dealing with PTSD just one aspect of a two-part effort.

    "The second, and in some ways equally challenging, is to remove the stigma that is associated with PTSD and to encourage soldiers, sailors, Marines and airmen who encounter these problems to seek help," he said.

    But he acknowledged that not every soldier returning from Iraq and Afghanistan is getting the treatment they need. He cited an Army inspector general report's findings that troops often forgo mental-health care because they're concerned it could prevent them from getting a security clearance and potentially could damage their careers.

    Gates cited "Question 21" on Standard Form 86, the government security-clearance form that specifically asks applicants whether they have ever received treatment for mental-health issues.

    The question asks if the person has consulted with a mental-health professional or other health-care provider during the past seven years about a mental-health related condition.

    Respondents who answer "yes" must provide dates of treatment and the provider's name and address.

    "For far too long and for far too many, this question has been an obstacle to care," the secretary said.

    The Defense Department has been working with other agencies for eight months to strike a balance that enables troops to get the treatment they need and the intelligence community to get the information it needs, he said.

    "It took longer than I would have hoped, but it is done," Gates said. "Now it is clear to people who answer that question that they can answer 'no' if they have sought help to deal with their combat stress in general times."

    New language for "Question 21" asks if the person consulted with a health-care professional during the past seven years regarding an emotional or mental health condition. It specifies, however, that the answer should be "no" if the care was "strictly related to adjustments from service in a military combat environment."

    Gates directed in a policy letter dated April 18 that the revised language be used by anyone completing the SF 86 form.

    A letter being distributed throughout the military explains the new policy and its rationale.

    "Seeking professional care for these mental health issues should not be perceived to jeopardize an individual's security clearance," states the memo, co-signed by Undersecretary for Intelligence James R. Clapper Jr. and Undersecretary for Personnel and Readiness David S.C. Chu.

    "On the contrary," they wrote, "failure to seek care actually increases the likelihood that psychological stress could escalate to a more serious mental condition, which could preclude an individual from performing sensitive duties."

    The letter urges men and women in uniform who are exhibiting symptoms of PTSD to seek help and makes clear that this is not going to put their security clearances or their careers in jeopardy, he said.

    "The most important thing for us now is to get the word out as far as we can to every man and woman in uniform to let them know about the change, to let them know the efforts under way, to remove the stigma and to encourage them to seek help when they are in the theater or when they return from the theater," Gates said. "So this is a very important issue for us.

    "We have no higher priority in the Department of Defense, apart from the war itself, than taking care of our men and women in uniform who have been wounded -- who have both visible and unseen wounds," he said.

    Gates called the new Restoration and Resilience Center an example of new approaches the military is taking to provide that care. "This center here is illustrative of what can be done," he said.

    Thirty-six volunteers participating in the program, all diagnosed with PTSD after serving in Iraq or Afghanistan, receive care that combines group and individual therapy sessions with meditation, yoga, acupuncture, massage therapy, chiropractic and hot-stone therapy treatments.

    "They are all volunteers," Gates said. "They all come here because they want to."