Banner Archive for April 2016
 

Chief of the Army Staff Nepal General Rajendra Chhetri inducted into the IF Hall of Fame

April 28, 2016 -- The U.S. Army War College acknowledged the achievements of its former student: Nepalese General Rajendra Chhetri, who was named the 42ndChief of Staff of the Nepalese Army on Sept. 10, 2015.

Maj. Gen. Rapp and Gen. Chhetri stand attention after unveiling Chhetri's portrait during his induction ceremony into the International Fellows Hall of Fame, Bliss Hall, April 28.

The 61stInternational Fellow to be inducted into the International Fellows Hall of Fame, Chhetri spoke to current students and faculty as well as colleagues from his class of 2010 gathered to honor him in a formal ceremony in Bliss Hall.

“It encourages me when I see this body of highly competent professionals from all over the world,” said Chhetri.  “I just know that the Army War College and institutions such as this are helping build the common understanding, the trust and the friendship that is required in the world today,” he said to the audience.

The director of the International Fellows Program introduced Gen. Chhetri’s career achievements.  “Throughout his career Gen. Chhetri has been at the forefront of change, strategic thought and leadership,” said Col. Robert White. Gen. Chhetri has almost 37 years of military experience with service during both peace and conflict, at home and abroad, he noted.

Chhetri was commissioned into the Rajdal (Artillery) Battalion, Nepalese Army, in 1978. That same year he attended the Royal Nepalese Military Academy. Since then Gen. Chhetri has held key staff positions at multiple levels, including as Brigade Major of No. 1 Brigade and Assistant Chief of Staff (Operations) of Mid Division Headquarters. He also served in the National Security Council Secretariat as an analyst. He recently completed tenures as Quarter Master General, Director General of Military Training, Chief of Staff and Chief of General Staff at Army Headquarters.  

Maj. Gen. Rapp and Gen. Chhetri with his family behind him walk down the hall of flags after his induction to the IF Hall of Fame in Bliss Hall, April 28.

Gen. Chhetri's extensive international peacekeeping experiences include service in the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon in 1985; and the United Nations Good Offices Mission in Afghanistan and Pakistan from 1988 to 1989. He served as Zone II operations officer for the United Nations Mission in Haiti in 1995, and as the strategic planning officer of the Military Division of Department of Peacekeeping Operations at the United Nations from 2002 to 2005.

The International Fellows Program was established for a mutual understanding and good working relationship between senior U.S. officers and senior officers of select foreign countries -- to offer an opportunity for senior military officers from allied and friendly countries, to study, research, and write about subjects of significance to the security interest of the their own and allied nations; and to enrich the educational environment of the USAWC and to improve the International Fellows’ firsthand knowledge of U.S. culture and institution through study and travel in the United States.


Army Strategy Conference to explore Defense Choices for the Next Administration, April 27-28

Next, at 1:30 p.m. - 3 p.m. Watch live at http://csis.org --  Future of U.S. Defense Alliances & Partnerships.  

Panel: Dr. Nora Bensahel, Mr. Magnus Norden, Mr. Bilal Saab, Dr. Roger Cliff and retired Lt. Gen. David Barno - live at www.carlisle.army.mil.

Watch live --http://www.carlisle.army.mil/live/
 

The Army’s annual Strategy Conference, April 27-28, explores Defense Choices for the Next Administration. Almost six months before the U.S. presidential elections, the conference will anticipate and examine the broad range of challenges to be faced by the next U.S. Administration, through expert voices from across the political spectrum.

The US Army War College leads a team approach to explore the topic over two days with 3 keynotes speakers at Carlisle with the Army War College @ArmyWarCollege, and at 4 partner-based panel events in Washington D.C. All 7 conference events are accessible virtually, via streaming video and twitter based dialogue @StratConf

  1. WED, April 27, 8:15 – 9:30 a.m. Dr. Gregory F. Treverton– watch at www.carlisle.army.mil                         Treverton is chair of the National Intelligence Council and advisor to the Director of National Intelligence, responsible for overseeing, coordinating intelligence community analyses, e.g., the National Intelligence Estimate.
  2. WED, April 27, 10 – 11:30 a.m. Alternate Defense Strategies– watch at www.aei.org. Panel speakers include -    Mr. Shawn Brimley, Executive Vice President and Director of Studies, Center for a New American Security (CNAS);    Mr. Thomas Donnelly, Resident Fellow and co-director of the Marilyn Ware Center for Security Studies, American Enterprise Institute;  moderator Mr. Nathan Freier is Associate Professor of National Security Studies at the U.S. Army War College Strategic Studies Institute.  [Hosted by American Enterprise Institute @AEI in DC]
  3. WED, April 27, 1:30 – 3 pm. Army Readiness: Fight Tonight & Fit for Tomorrow– at www.cnas.org. Panel includes Maj. Gen. Walt Piatt, Director of Operations, Readiness and Mobilization, Army G3/5/7; Mr. Daniel Feehan, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Readiness;  Dr. Andrew Hill, U.S. Army War College Professor; Ms. Katherine Kidder, Bacevich Fellow at the Center for a New American Security; moderator Vago Muradian is former editor of Defense News & former host of Defense News with Vago Muradian. [Hosted by Center for a New American Security @CNASdc in DC]
  4. THU, April 28, 8:30 – 9:30 a.m. Dr Mathew J. Burrows: Global Trends– at www.carlisle.army.mil.                Burrows is director of the Strategic Foresight Initiative at the Atlantic Council.
  5. THU, April 28, 10 – 11:30 a.m. Deterrence in the 21stCentury– watch at http://csis.org  Panel speakers include Dr. Robert Kagan, Senior Fellow, Foreign Policy, Project on International Order and Strategy at The Brookings Institution; Dr. Michael Green, Senior Vice President for Asia and Japan Chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies & Chair in Japanese Politics and Foreign Policy at Georgetown University; Mr. Nathan Freier, Associate Professor of National Security Studies, U.S. Army War College Strategic Studies Institute; Ms. Lisa Sawyer Samp, Fellow at CSIS International Security Program; moderator Dr. Kathleen Hicks is Senior Vice President & Henry A. Kissinger Chair &  Director of the CSIS International Security Program. [Hosted by Center for Strategic & International Studies @CSIS in DC]
  6. THU, April 28, 1:30 – 3 p.m. Future of U.S. Defense Alliances & Partnerships – watch at http://csis.org. Panel: Dr. Nora Bensahel, Distinguished Scholar in Residence at the School of International Service at American University and Nonresident Fellow of the  Atlantic Council; Mr. Magnus Nordenman, Director of the Transatlantic Security Initiative, Brent Scowcroft Center on International Security, Atlantic Council; Mr. Bilal Saab, Resident Senior Fellow for Middle East Security, Brent Scowcroft Center on International Security, Atlantic Council; Dr. Roger Cliff, Nonresident Senior Fellow, Asia Security Initiative, Atlantic Council; Retired Army Lt. Gen. David W. Barno, (moderator), is the Nonresident Senior Fellow for Military Affairs and National Security Policy, Brent Scowcroft Center on International Security, Atlantic Council. [Hosted by the Atlantic Council @AtlanticCouncil in DC]
  7. THU, April 28, 3:30 – 4:30 p.m., Dr. Eliot Cohen– at www.carlisle.army.mil. Cohen is the Robert E. Osgood Professor of Strategic Studies and Director of the Strategic Studies program at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) and the Carey Business School, Johns Hopkins University.

Registration for in-person attendance of the defense panels in Washington DC will be managed by conference partners. There is no registration to view conference events via the internet – at www.carlisle.army.mil (for all events) or the hosting agency web site.

The Strategic Studies Institute is the research arm of the Army and Army War College; it convenes the Army’s Strategy Conference annually to examine strategic issues and patterns of significance to policy makers, planners, practitioners and academics.

Presentations will be videotaped and available, shortly at www.youtube.com/usarmywarcollegeand at www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil


General of Czech Land Forces becomes 60thInternational Fellows Hall of Fame member

The U.S. Army War College recognized outstanding alumnus Czech Maj. Gen. Jan Gurnik who is Commander of Czech Land Forces, as of July 1, 2013.

Maj. Gen. William Rapp, Commandant of the Army War College and Maj. Gen. Gurnik, Commander of Czech Land Forces unveil his portrait to the International Fellows Hall of Fame, Carlisle Barracks, Bliss Hall, April 19.

The Army War College gathered April 19 in Bliss Hall to honor Maj. Gen. Gurnik as the 60thgraduate to be inducted into the International Fellows Hall of Fame.

Maj. Gen. William Rapp commandant of the Army War College congratulated Gurnik, class 2002: “Well done, sir!”

“Gen. Gurnik exemplifies the ideals of the Army War College through his actions and leadership of his nation’s armed forces,” said Col. Robert White, director of the International Fellows Program.  “Gen. Gurnik has brought great credit to the International Fellows Program and the fact that armies around the world send us their best and brightest officers,” he said. 

Since Gurnik entered the Armed Forces of the Czech Republic in 1979, he has served in many important positions at home and abroad.  His career path included a variety of operational command and staff appointments, of increasing responsibility.  He served as the chief of staff of the 33rdTank Regiment of the 3rdMechanized Division in 1994; the chief of the staff 7thMechanized Brigade in 1998; commander of the Czech contingent, supporting the SFOR mission in 1999; commander of the 4thRapid Deployment Brigade in 2002; and chief of the Logistics Division at the Joint Forces Command Headquarters in Brunssum, Netherlands in 2011.

In thanking the commandant of Army War College for the presentation, Gurnik noted what an honor it was for him to be inducted to the International Hall of Fame.

Maj. Gen. Gurnik and Maj. Gen. Rapp walk down the hall of flags towards Bliss Hall before Gurnik's induction to the International Fellows Hall of Fame, Carlisle Barracks, April 19.

Gurnik offered advice to the class of 2016. He encouraged the students to understand and accept other cultures and to build upon the relationships started here; to stay in touch after graduation; and cooperate with each other because it’s important to preserving the peace. 

The U.S. Army War College International Hall of Fame was established to provide a prestigious and visible means of honoring USAWC International Fellow graduates who have attained the highest position in their respective nations’ armed forces.


Come celebrate Law Day May 2

The Office of the Post Judge Advocate will be hosting a law day cake cutting commemoration for Law Day 2016 on May 2, at 10 a.m. in the Upton Hall Foyer. Army War College student Col. Nicholas Lancaster, and Matt Smith, Chief Deputy District Attorney, Office of the District Attorney, Cumberland, County, Pa., will be the events guest speakers.  The American Bar Association Theme this year is "Miranda: More than words."  Come out and support your PJA office for a small celebration of Law Day 2016.


April “Alcohol Awareness Month” tips

Information Provided By The Army Center For Substance Abuse and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

WHAT IS ALCOHOLISM?

Alcoholism, also known as “alcohol dependence” is a disease that includes four symptoms:

  • Craving: a strong need, or compulsion, to drink.
  • Loss of control: the inability to limit one’s drinking on any given occasion.
  • Physical dependence:withdrawal symptoms, such as nausea, sweating, shakiness, and anxiety, occur when alcohol use is stopped after a period of heavy drinking.
  • Tolerance:the need to drink greater amounts of alcohol in order to “get high”.

WHAT IS HIGH RISK DRINKING?

Information source: Army Center for Substance Abuse

HIGH - risk drinking, also known as episodic drinking, is defined as “the consumption of five or more drinks in a row on one occasion”. High-risk drinkers are not necessarily alcoholics, but they do have a greater chance of being involved in other high-risk behaviors. According to a recent Harvard School of Public Health alcohol study, drinkers who frequently participate in high-risk drinking are 21 times more likely to:

  • Fall behind at work
  • Damage property
  • Be hurt or injured
  • Engage in unplanned or unprotected sexual activity
  • Drive while intoxicated

Tips for responsible drinking

While the misuse and abuse of alcohol to dangerous and high-risk behaviors, it is possible to drink responsibly. The following are some easy tips to assist in making the responsible decision if you decide to drink:

  • Eat before and during drinking – while a full stomach cannot prevent alcohol from affecting you, eating starchy and high-protein foods will slow it down.
  • Don’t gulp or chug your drinks; drink slowly and make the drinks last- try to drink no more than one alcoholic drink per hour.
  • Alternate between alcohol and non-alcoholic drinks – this will give your body extra time to eliminate some of the alcohol.
  • Rememberthe word HALT: NEVER DRINK if you are hungry, angry, lonely, or tired.
  • Before you celebrate, designate – identify a responsible driver who will not drink, or plan ahead to use public transportation.

Tips to avoid drinking

It is always OK not to drink. Whether you always abstain from drinking, you simply aren’t in the mood, or because you are hungry, angry, lonely or tired, it is always your choice to make. In instances where you feel pressured to drink alcohol, there are countless ways of saying no:

  • “No, thank you” – It’s your choice not to drink.
  • “Alcohol’s not my thing”.
  • “I’m the designated driver”.
  • “No thanks, I already have a drink”.
  • “I’m on medication”.
  • Simply walk away.

Another way to avoid drinking alcohol is to enjoy mock tails. Mock tails, contain the same ingredients as many popular alcoholic drinks with one exception, they don’t contain alcohol. Refreshing and fun, they can be consumed without having to worry about any of the consequences of alcoholic drinks.

For additional information contact the ASAP Prevention Office at 245 – 4576.

 

 


Fire hydrant testing slated for April 29-June 17

Beginning at 9 a.m. on April 29, the Carlisle Barracks Fire Department will be testing fire hydrants. During this time the FD will be out working around the hydrant and putting water in the street.  They will begin with the housing areas first, so there's no interference with the upcoming moving out of students. The testing is expected to be complete by June 17 and will occur from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. during the testing days.

Testing will occur on the following days:

First round

Apr 29, 30, May 3, 4, 11, 12, 16

Second Round

May 31, Jun 1, 8, 9, 13, 16, 17


Families gather for food, fun during Fun fair 

Families were able to take a break from the high pressure Jim Thorpe Sports Days (Won of course by the Army War College) and enjoy games, face painting, food bounce houses and performances by local groups during the Family Fun Fair. The annual events pair’s games run by volunteers and organized by the Carlisle Barracks Army Community Services and DFMWR with educational displays from groups like the American Red Cross, Dunham Clinic and Army Wellness Center.

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Jim Thorpe Games: Return of the Commandants Cup to Army  War College

For photos of all schools, all sports, see www.facebook.com/usawc 

April 23, 2016 -- At the formal and fun opening ceremony April 21, student-athletes paraded and the Olympic-style torch was lighted after it was relayed around the track by a cross-section of Army War College students – Marine Lt. Col. Sean Hankard, Navy Cmdr. Tara Hodge, Air Force Lt. Col. Andy Clark, Coast Guard Capt. Scott Langum,  Kenya’s Army Col. Jeff Nyaga, Army Civilian Wil Plumley, and Army Col. Greg Olson.    

Hosting commandant of the Army War College Maj. Gen. Bill Rapp welcomed the US and international students, families, faculty and leaders of the Air, Marine, National and Eisenhower War Colleges to the games with three messages.  He enjoined the discipline and athleticism of the games namesake Jim Thorpe who excelled on the Carlisle fields during the Indian School era and left a legacy of athletic prowess. Rapp noted the purpose of the multi-Service school event:  to advance camaraderie across the student bodies, to develop and strengthen relationships among the senior military officers and civilian leaders of the United States and its partner countries, and to celebrate friendly competition. He got a big laugh at the observation, that the Jim Thorpe Sports Days is a great opportunity for these over-40 students to play in front of cheering crowds – and probably their last!

But, as with any military operation, success has nothing to do with cheering crowds and everything to do with teamwork: being ready and being there for your colleagues when it counts during the 48 hours of Jim Thorpe Sports Days.  The passions are high in the past minutes of a basketball game as the clock winds down and the team keeps its eye on the ball and each other, for example.  But, the heavy lifting is done during thousands of hours of dedicated and often-lonely training.

In each senior Service school team, every student-athlete is a volunteer who chose to represent what they value – and add another goal to their own graduate school experience.  Papers will be due this week.  Individual and group research projects competed for time with team training. Oral comprehensive exams offered a stressor of a different stripe. And, participation in the Thorpe Games will be remembered as one more highlight of the Carlisle Experience – for all the participants.

Again, as with a military operation, unseen actors play essential roles in plans, logistics, operations center, support staff – to include faculty members as coaches, and the MWR Sports staff of Carlisle Barracks, responsible for schedules and rules, referees, and the Family, Morale, Welfare, Recreation staff who sponsored youth activities planned to let the kids be both fans and participants in their own games.   

Then there’s the results.  After releasing the Commandants Cup last year to the winning Air War College, the Army War College’s 100thClass brought the cup home with an overall win: a triumph for the Class of 2016 whose legacy will be new knowledge, enhanced analytical skills, lifelong relationships, a reputation as invaluable to the graduates’ gaining units – and the Jim Thorpe Sports ‘Win’.  The competition was high:

Results:

Winner of the 2016 Commandants Cup is the Army War College.

Running (1-mile women’s relay) – #1 Eisenhower – #2Army

Running (1-mile men’s relay) #1 National – #2 Eisenhower

Running (5K run) – team #1 Eisenhower - #2 National  

  • Fastest individual female athlete in the 5K was Denise Mull, Air.
  • Medal for 2ndplace individual in the 5K goes to Noah Zaring, National
  • First place individual in the 5K with a time of 16:39 goes to Douglas Wicker, Eisenhower

Cycling (Hill Climb & Relay) - #1 Army - #2 National

  • Fastest female cyclist was Denise Mull, Air
  • 2ndplace individual in cycling was Brain O’Neill, Eisenhower
  • 1stplace individual in the cycling event was Sonny Hau, Army

Bowling - #1 Army - # 2 Air

  • Best female bowler medal to Shari Levan, Army
  • Tie for best individual bowler:  Eric Crider, Army, & J.P. Peloquin, Eisenhower

Skeet - #1 Army - # 2 Air

Trap - #1 Army - #2 National

Tennis - #1 Eisenhower - #2 Army

Golf - #1 Army - #2 Air

  • Best female golfer: Dina Wandler, Army
  • 2ndplace individual golfer: Chris Muller
  • 1stplace individual in the golf tournament: Tyson Tahara, Air

Volleyball - #1 Eisenhower - #2 Air

Basketball - #1 Eisenhower - # Army

Soccer - #1 Eisenhower - #2 Air

Softball - #1 Army - #2 Eisenhower

 


Carlisle Barracks youth celebrate Earth Day

Kids from the Moore Child Development Center make their own “chia” butterfly as part of the 2016 Earth Day celebration April 22 at the Delaney Clubhouse. Volunteers from the Penn State Master Gardner program taught the kids about the importance of butterflies and how they help the environment.  want more photos?

Post youth learned about butterflies, made their own “chia pet” and learned about fire safety as part of the 2016 Earth Day celebration here April 22 at the Delaney Clubhouse.

Carlisle Barracks, the Penn State Master Gardner program and Balfour Beatty Communities hosted youth from the Moore Child Development Center and spoke of the importance of taking care of the environment.

“It’s key to teach kids at this age how they can better care for the world around them,” said Nancy Bowman, a volunteer with the Master Gardner program. “They are like a sponge at this age and the sooner we’re able to help teach them about the importance of plants, recycling and saving energy the better.”

The kids were read a book about caterpillar and how they turn into butterflies and then made their own “chia” butterfly made of straw and filled with grass seed. The kids are able to then plant them at home to see how grass grows and the importance of sunlight and water.

BBC provided kids coloring books and a fresh flower to plant at home as well. The fire department had a special appearance form Smokey Bear and shared fire prevention with the kids.  

 

The kids listen to a story about butterflies before making their own.

Earth Day is just one part of the environmental program here at Carlisle Barracks, according to Darrell Spoonhour, Biological Science Technician here. He used the energy conservation project, the recycling program and the evasive species programs as a few examples of the ways that Carlisle Barracks helps to protect our environment and conserve resources. The post is also in the process of replacing all light fixture with more energy-efficient LED ones and have installed motion sensors is most high-occupancy buildings.

“Environmental stewardship and energy conservation are very important to us,” said Spoonhour. “It’s our duty to make sure we are using our resources wisely and ensuring we’re doing our part to keep this community beautiful for the next generation.”

Spoonhour shared some tips on how you can conserve energy both here and at home:

  • Make sure that all doors and windows are closed, especially during the heating and cooling seasons.
  • If your building has any unheated rooms or areas, keep their doors closed to prevent infiltration to conditioned spaces.
  • Periodically check the weather stripping and caulking. If it is old and dried or peeling, be sure to submit a work order (or replace for homeowners) for repairs.
  • Inspect for air leakage in and around electrical outlets. Rubber inserts are generally available through self-help to seal any leaky outlets.
  • If the building is drafty, check to see if there is insulation in the attic (if there is one), walls and under the floors if it is above grade.
  • If you have window air conditioners, make sure that they are covered and vents are closed during the heating seasons or have them removed whenever possible.
  • Unplug electronics, battery chargers and other equipment when not in use. Taken together, these small items can use as much power as your refrigerator.

Heating and cooling tips

  • Reduce air conditioning costs by using fans, keeping windows and doors shut and closing shades during the day. Most ceiling fans use less energy than a light bulb.
  • Install a programmable thermostat
  • Recommended temperature are 68 degrees during the winter and 74 degrees in the summer.

Lighting tips

  • Replace standard incandescent light bulbs with compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) and save 75% off lighting costs or LEDs and save 85% or more off lighting costs. LEDs preferred over CFLs for energy savings and environmental issues.
  • Turn off unnecessary lighting and use task or desktop lamps with LEDs or CFLs instead of overhead lights.
  • Use “task” lighting rather than overall room illumination.

Pursue the ‘Game of Thrones’: a strategic wargame through the lens of International Relations Theory

April 22, 2016 -- Opportunity is at hand, to claim the Iron Throne of Westeros.  On Monday, April 26, noon to 4 pm in Wil Washcoe Auditorium, participate in the Game of Thrones as sponsored by the Strategic Wargame Program – open to ALL.

Test your wits and strategic insights … and in doing so, learn how the game relates to International Relations Theory.

If you’re a Game of Thrones fan – or have just heard about it – you’ll know it’s a dramatic struggle for power.   In this board-based simulation, you’ll formulate strategy by understanding interests, executing diplomacy, and apply international relations theories. 

Game of Thrones is part of the CSL series  of serious games or simulations -- enhancing the student experience by using optional game events (afternoon/evening) that are tied to the curriculum.

Participants will take part in pre-game discussion, to outline the game and expectations, as well as a post-game AAR. 

“We’ll have two board games going on simultaneously, with each board game able to hold 6-12 players,” said Lt. Col. Joe Chretien, of the CSL Strategic Simulations Division. “The objective is to celebrate the premier of Season 6 of the award-winning fantasy series (and book) with A Game of Thrones: The Board Game.”


Carlisle community hosting medicine take-back April 30

On Saturday, April 30, from 10am to 2pm, DEA will coordinate a collaborative effort with state and local law enforcement agencies focused on removing potentially dangerous controlled substances from our nation’s medicine cabinets.  A National Take-Back day will provide a unified opportunity for the public to surrender expired, unwanted, or unused pharmaceutical controlled substances and other medications to law enforcement officers for destruction.  This one-day effort will bring national focus to the issue of pharmaceutical controlled substance abuse.  There will be one local collection site on Saturday, 30 April, from 1000 – 2:00 PM, at the collection site at the Pennsylvania State Police Barracks at 1538 Commerce Ave, Carlisle.

Carlisle Barracks will not be hosting a site, but Dunham U.S. Army Health Clinic provides a permanent MedSafe Medication Drop Box for its beneficiaries and Cumberland County now provides permanent MedReturn Boxes to Area Residents as a Safe Way to Dispose of Unused Medications.

In order to combat the growing problem of prescription drug abuse and protect our local water system, the Cumberland County District Attorney in partnership with the Pennsylvania Department of Drug and Alcohol Programs and the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency has installed 18 MedReturn Boxes throughout Cumberland County. These boxes make it easy for residents to dispose of unused and unneeded medications.

The Centers for Disease Control has classified prescription drug abuse as an epidemic. Prescription drug abuse is defined as using a medication that has not been prescribed to you or using a medication in any way other than as instructed by your medical provider.  According the National Institute of Drug Abuse, prescription drugs and over-the-counter medications are the fourth most commonly abused substances by both teens and adults.  Only alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana are abused by more people.  The epidemic of prescription drug abuse has serious consequences. Individuals who abuse prescription drugs risk developing addictions, other health related problems and most seriously death from accidental overdose. In fact, the number of deaths from unintentional overdoses from opioid pain relievers has quadrupled in the last 15 years.

There is something that each of us can do to contribute to ending this crisis. Many individuals who abuse prescription drugs get the drugs from a relative or friend. In fact, this is how most teens who abuse prescription drugs, get them.  We can all pledge to properly dispose of unused medications instead of keeping unused and unnecessary medications in our homes.

Unused medications should not be flushed. Flushed medications enter our water system where they have a negative impact on the environment and eventually the health of everyone in the community. Instead you can deposit unused medications in one of the 18 MedReturn Boxes throughout the county.  This is a free and anonymous service and you can remove any medication labels with identifying information or simply place your pills in a plastic bag before placing your medications in the boxes.  You can use the boxes to dispose of any prescription or over-the-counter pills, tablets, capsules, liquid medications, inhalers, creams, ointments or nasal sprays.  Pet medications can also be placed in the boxes.  Intravenous solutions, injectable medications, hypodermic needles and illegal drugs like marijuana cannot be placed in the boxes. If you unable to bring your unused medications to one of the MedReturn Boxes you can mix your medication in coffee grinds or cat litter and place the mixture in your garbage bag for pick up by the sanitation department.

The newly formed Cumberland County Opiate Overdose Prevention Initiative (COOP) is working on a public awareness campaign to increase awareness of the dangers of flushing medications and the location of local medication drop boxes.  For more you may also call the Cumberland-Perry Drug & Alcohol Coalition at 1-866.240.6300.  For more information on prescription drug abuse and information on how to get help for yourself or a loved one visit www.ddap.pa.gov

Let’s all do our part to protect ourselves, our loved ones, our community and our environment by properly disposing of unused medications.

Contact Army Substance Abuse for additional information 245 – 4576.


Soldiers, employees team up to keep Carlisle Barracks beautiful

More than 40 Carlisle Barracks Soldiers and employees turned out for a spring cleanup on post April 19. Representatives from nearly every on-post organization tuned out to team up to clean the areas around the post perimeter and common areas in an effort to keep the Army’s second oldest active installation beautiful.

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Carlisle Barracks honors ‘backbone of community’

 

Command Sgt. Maj. Nelson Maldonado, Carlisle Barracks CSM, Maj. Gen. Bill Rapp, Army War College Commandant and Lt. Col. Greg Ank, Garrison Commander, accept a “check” representing the money donated to the community by nearly 450 volunteers in the last year. Carlisle Barracks honored volunteers in a ceremony April 15 at the LVCC.

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Volunteerism has been a hallmark of the Army since its earliest days, so it’s only appropriate that nearly 450 volunteers donated nearly 50,000 hours of their time and talents in the last year at the Army’s second oldest installation.

A packed Letort View Community Center was the setting April 15 as nearly 140 volunteers representing the volunteer community of Carlisle Barracks, were honored for their efforts over the last year. Their time provided a “savings” of $1,125, 080 during that time.

“Thank you for what you do,” said Maj. Gen. Bill Rapp, Army War College Commandant, during the ceremony. “This community does not function without you.”

Representatives were on hand for 11 of the 17 organizations on post that benefit from volunteers including the Army Heritage and Education Center, post Chapel, Army Community Services and the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Center.

“The support of volunteers is nothing short of exceptional, you are truly the backbone of this community” said Lt. Col. Greg Ank, Garrison Commander. “Soldiers and their families giving back is a hallmark of our Army.”

 

Valerie Pritchett, a reporter with ABC 27 was the guest speaker for the event and shared her own views on the importance of volunteerism, which she credits with coming from an Air Force family.

“Growing up as an Air Force brat, I learned a lot about the importance of community,” she said. “It instilled in me a strong desire to give back.” 

Pritchett spoke about the importance of making a difference in your community, with volunteerism being one of the easiest ways.

“Volunteers are vital to our success as a community,” she said. “They are our hometown heroes and bring so much good to our community.”


April – Alcohol Awareness Month -- Prom and Graduation, the choices you make today, impact your life tomorrow

Getting there and home is half the battle. Fifty-five percent of fatal car crashes involving teenage drivers during prom and graduation season also involve alcohol. Here are some tips to help avoid becoming a statistic, as well as general advice to help you arrive safely.

Plan safe transportation well in advance

Never get into a car with someone who’s been drinking, taking drugs, or someone who is exhausted – even if it is your date.

Be aware of others on the road.

Know where you’re going before, during and after the main event. Make sure your parents know where you’ll be.

Don’t forget to wear your seatbelts.

Say “no” gracefully.

Parents – talk to your teen. It is illegal to host or allow teen drinking parties in your home. It is illegal to provide alcohol to anyone under 21.

Underage drinking is against the law.

Information provided by Pennsylvania Department of Health. www.intheknowzone.com. And the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board. www.lcb.state.ps.us

For additional information contact Army Substance Abuse Prevention at 245 – 4576.


Spring is prime time for tornadoes

Tornadoes are one of nature’s most violent storms and can cause death, injury, and destruction within seconds. How to Prepare for a Tornado explains how to protect yourself and details the steps to take now so that you can act quickly at a time when every second counts.

TORNADO BASICS

A tornado is a violently rotating column of air that extends from a thunderstorm to the ground and is often—although not always—visible as a funnel cloud. Once the tornado has passed, the National Weather Service (NWS) rates them using the Enhanced Fujita (EF) scale based on the severity of the damage and estimated wind speed. The scale goes from an EF0 tornado, which causes light damage, to an EF5 tornado, which causes total devastation. Lightning and hail are common in thunderstorms that produce tornadoes.

WHAT

Tornadoes can strike in any season, but occur most often in the spring and summer months. They can occur at all hours of the day and night, but are most likely to occur between 3 p.m. and 9 p.m. 

WHEN

About 1,200 tornadoes hit the United States every year and every state is at risk. Most tornadoes in the United States occur east of the Rocky Mountains.

IMPACT

The destruction and injury caused by a tornado depends on the intensity, size, path, time of day, and amount of time they are on the ground. Wind from tornadoes can reach more than 200 miles per hour, and damage paths can be more than 1 mile wide and 50 miles long.  

- Damage can range from light to catastrophic. Injuries can be minor, serious, or life-threatening. Fatalities can result even in the lower-rated tornadoes (EF0/EF1). Wind from tornadoes can cause structural damage, transform debris into deadly projectiles, move and destroy houses, de-bark trees, and roll cars.

- A tornado may disrupt transportation, power, water, gas, communications, and other services in its direct path and in neighboring areas.  

- Heavy rains, flash flooding, and hail can occur from related thunderstorms.


Reserve, Guard officers get early look behind curtain on academics, student life for resident class of 2017

April 15, 2016 -- Reserve Component officers who are selected for resident study at the Army War College may anticipate all the challenges of any 40-something heading back to school – and for them, moving the family will add one more new experience.

Maj. Gen. William Rapp, Commandant USAWC, speaks to incoming class of 2017 selected RC students and family members during their orientation at Upton Hall, April 14.

Col. George McDonnell drew on his experience as a student here in 2009 when he gave his advice to 56 Reserve and Guard officers, and their spouses, from around the country who gathered this week at Carlisle Barracks for a three-day orientation to their upcoming experience in the Class of 2017. McDonnell is director of Reserve Component Integration for the War College, and helped sponsor the RC first step in the RC officers’ transition.

Incoming students listen to Maj. Gen.Rapp during their orientation in Upton Hall 14 April, Both the Army Reserve and National Guard officers heard briefings on April 11 from their respective leaderships during their NGB orientation.  They were greeted by  Lt. Gen. Timothy Kadavy, director of the Army National Guard, and attended a briefing from Gen. Frank Grass, Chief,  National Guard Bureau on current issues effecting the Guard during their visit.

Life is short, he said, as he urged the incoming students to move their families here for the one-year school. School is the priority, but that leaves ample time to spend and reconnect with family in a great place to live.  “It will be a better year here for your family and yourself to stay together,” he said. “Other than for military schools, many Reserve officers attending are conventional Reservists who have been living in their own neighborhood for most of their military career without experiencing a change-of-station move.” he noted.

“This orientation is a way to reacquaint the officers with academia and start the transition that, if chosen, will move their family to Carlisle,” McDonnell said. “By bringing them in early it allows us to set them up for success. Students get to peak behind the curtain so to speak, in terms of academic requirements and what coming to Carlisle Barracks entails,” he said.

Lt. Col. Werner Stuart, current Class of 2016, gives insight to incoming students on the expectations of academics and student life they can expect in the near year.

The dean, Dr. Richard Lacquement, introduced the academic curriculum.  Dr. Andrew Hill discussed the unique nature of the research-focused Carlisle Scholars, a sub-set of the USAWC curriculum for interested students. Students themselves, from the class of 2016, led sessions for candid discussion of expectations, academic requirements, administration, housing, athletics, medical services, and student life.

The RC officers are drawn from the Army, Air Force, Navy, and Marine Corps – and each of the groups were introduced to the senior Service Representatives on faculty:  Col. Lynn Scheel, Air Force Senior Service Representative; Capt. Jim Kitzmiller, Navy SSR; Col. Tim Frantz, Marine Corps SSR; Col. Ed. Siegfried, Army National Guard SSR.

Key to a smooth transition will be the ay2016 students who volunteer to sponsor incoming RC officers. Many linked up before the orientation even occurs with a planned event the evening before orientation.

Sponsorship benefits officer and spouse alike.

“Making a move as a reservist spouse is something I have never done,” said Katie Hayden, who attended the orientation with her husband in the Class of 2017, from Georgia.  “This is huge life change for us and coming to this seminar has made me feel so much more comfortable. This orientation has been invaluable,” she said.

Tina Strub, who accompanied her National Guard husband to Carlisle for the class of 2016 met with incoming spouses to address their questions in more informal settings.

 “I was I actually surprised when we I found out we could PCS – and even had to ask what ‘PCS-ing’ means,” she said about the military term “permanent change of station.”

Strub shared her thoughts about learning what a military family is, about the ease of making friends for her and her children, and the pleasure of walking out the front door and talking to your neighbor. “It’s such a real sense of community that I have never experienced before,” she said.

 


U. S. Army Reserve Turns 108

As part of the Reserve component orientation the Army War College celebrated the 108th birthday of the USAR today that was attended by the full USAWC class of colleagues from the active component sister services, interagency and multinational partners.

Army Reserve forces are always available for the needs of the Army and the Joint Force. The Army Reserve falls under the day-to-day command and control of the president and the secretary of defense. Army Reserve Soldiers and units can be used by the Joint Force for missions in peacetime and in wartime, during training and when mobilized, for planning and for operations.


Members of the 2016 class stand at attention during the celebratoin of the 108th birthday of the USAR, April 13, Bliss Hall

In addition, the Army can mobilize individuals or parts of units from the Army Reserve in order to meet the needs of a mission. This enables Army Reserve forces to plan and train along with their active counterparts.

The Army Reserve is uniquely capable of providing tailored units and structure in support of combat command requirements. The Army Reserve can draw on a wide base of professional and civilian skills, and can mobilize or activate forces in any combination or in any organization, or it can mobilize individuals. The Army Reserve can tailor forces for specific combat command or contingency requirements.


USAWC Strategy  Conference to explore Defense Choices for the Next Administration -- a virtual conference,  April 27-28

April 11, 2016 --The Army’s annual Strategy Conference will delve into the future:  Defense Choices for the Next Administration,April 27-28, 2016 -- at Carlisle, Pa. and Washington D.C.

In a major shift from previous years, the U.S. Army War College will explore the topic over two days at four locations in order to leverage top expertise – all conference events are accessible virtually, via streaming video and twitter-based dialogue #AWCStratConf.   Guidance to link into all events is found at www.carlisle.army.mil.  Links to view taped videos will be available on this website.

Almost six months before the U.S. presidential elections, the conference will anticipate and examine the broad range of challenges to be faced by the next U.S. Administration, gathering expert voices from across the political spectrum. The 27th Army War College Strategy Conference will focus researchers, academics and practitioners on an examination of the broad range of national defense challenges the next administration will encounter.

Day 1, WED, April 27:  The Strategy Conference launches at the US Army War College @ArmyWarCollege in Carlisle, Pa., with a keynote address to the USA War College class of 2016. Partner-based panel events are scheduled for each of two days.

Dr. Gregory F. Treverton will speak at Carlisle. Treverton is chair of the National Intelligence Council chairman and advisor to the Director of National Intelligence, responsible for overseeing coordinate intelligence community analysis, e.g., the National Intelligence Estimate.  Find streaming video at www.carlisle.army.mil, April 27, 8:15 – 9:30 a.m.

American Enterprise Institute, @AEI, will host the first panel discussion, Alternate Defense Strategies, in DCfor invited guests & virtual audiences, streaming at www.aei.org, April 27, 10 – 11:30 a.m.

Panel speakers include Mr. Shawn Brimley, Executive Vice President and Director of Studies, Center for a New American Security (CNAS);   Mr. Thomas Donnelly, Resident Fellow and co-director of the Marilyn Ware Center for Security Studies, American Enterprise Institute;  and, Mr. Nathan Freier (moderator), Associate Professor of National Security Studies, U.S. Army War College Strategic Studies Institute

Center for a New American Security, @CNASdc, will host panel #2, Army Readiness:  Fight Tonight and Fit for Tomorrow, in DCfor invited guests and virtual audiences, April 27, 1:30 – 3 p.m. Watch at www.cnas.org.

Panel speakers include Maj. Gen. Walt Piatt, Director of Operations, Readiness and Mobilization, Army G-3/5/7;   Mr. Daniel Feehan, the Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Readiness;    Dr. Andrew Hill, U.S. Army War College Professor;   Ms. Katherine Kidder, Bacevich Fellow at the Center for a New American Security;  and, Vago Muradian (moderator), former editor of Defense News & former host of 'Defense News with Vago Muradian'.

Day 2, THU, April 28

Dr. Mathew J. Burrows will speak at Carlisleabout Global Trends. He isDirector of the Strategic Foresight Initiative at the Atlantic Council. Find streaming video at www.carlisle.army.mil, April 28, 8:30 – 9:30 a.m.

Center for Strategic & International Studies, @CSIS, will host panel #3, Deterrence in the 21stCentury, in DCfor invited guests and virtual audiences, April 28, 10 – 11:30 a.m. Watch at http://csis.org

Panel speakers include Dr. Robert Kagan, Senior Fellow, Foreign Policy, Project on International Order and Strategy at The Brookings Institution;    Dr. Michael Green, Senior Vice President for Asia and Japan Chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies & Chair in Japanese Politics and Foreign Policy at Georgetown University;    Mr. Nathan Freier, Associate Professor of National Security Studies, U.S. Army War College Strategic Studies Institute.    Ms. Lisa Sawyer Samp, Fellow  with the International Security Program at CSIS.                                                                                                                               Dr. Kathleen Hicks (Moderator) is Senior Vice President & Henry A. Kissinger Chair &  Director of the International Security Program at Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS).

 

Atlantic Council in Washington DC, @AtlanticCouncil, will co-sponsor panel #4, Future of US Defense Alliances and Partnerships, at CSIS, April 28, 1:30 – 3 p.m. Watch at http://csis.org.

Panel speakers include Dr. Nora Bensahel, Distinguished Scholar in Residence at the School of International Service at American University and Nonresident Fellow of the  Atlantic Council;  Mr. Magnus Nordenman, Director of the Transatlantic Security Initiative, Brent Scowcroft Center on International Security, Atlantic Council;  Mr. Bilal Saab, Resident Senior Fellow for Middle East Security, Brent Scowcroft Center on International Security, Atlantic Council;   Dr. Roger Cliff, Nonresident Senior Fellow, Asia Security Initiative, Atlantic Council.                    Retired Army Lt. Gen. David W. Barno, (moderator), is the Nonresident Senior Fellow for Military Affairs and National Security Policy, Brent Scowcroft Center on International Security, Atlantic Council

Dr. Eliot Cohen will close the conference in Carlisle, video at www.carlisle.army.mil, April 28, 3:30 – 4:30 p.m.  Cohen is the Robert E. Osgood Professor of Strategic Studies and Director of the Strategic Studies program at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) and the Carey Business School, Johns Hopkins University.

 Registration for in-person attendance of the defense panels in Washington D.C. will be managed by our conference co-hosts. There is no registration needed to view conference events via the internet.

The Strategic Studies Institute is the research arm of the Army and Army War College; it convenes the Army’s Strategy Conference annually to examine strategic issues and patterns of significance to policy makers, planners, practitioners and academics.  

Presentations by speakers at the Army War College, Carlisle, and at DC-based think-tank partners will be taped and made available at www.youtube.com/usarmywarcollege and strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil.

 


National Guard Bureau GEN Grass engages students of US Army War College

April 13, 2016 – Dual missions define the Guard today, he said, and leadership development during warfighting missions pays off in home states for homeland defense and humanitarian assistance missions. Underscoring the leadership dimension, Gen. Frank J. Grass addressed the Total Force represented by the USAWC resident course today.

 

The 27thChief of the National Guard Bureau, Grass weaved a narrative of heritage and progress. America has always looked to the Guard for homeland defense, he noted, and recent history puts Guard Soldiers  on security detail in New York City, flood support in Louisiana, engineer operations to open storm-impacted roads, water support in Flint MI, and fire fighting in the west. “The same men and women who take part in federal missions are those you see doing disaster relief at home,” he said.

Brig. Gen. George Schwartz, USAWC Deputy Commandant/ Reserve Affairs, and Col. Ed Siegfried, the commandant's Senior Guard Advisor, sponsored a working lunch for NGB Chief Gen. Grass and the Army and Air Guard student-officers of the current class.  

The resident course here includes 24 Army Guard and 4 Air Force Guard officers.  In contrast, the distance education program includes 155 Army National Guard officers, pursuing the same degree through a two-year online program that makes possible concurrent civilian and Guard responsibilities. 

This week, the War College Reserve Component Orientation is underway, introducing the 59 National Guard and Reserve officers of the USAWC Resident Class of 2017 to the school, its resources and faculty, and the supporting services of Carlisle Barracks over a three-day program that included orientation for spouses.


Am I Alcoholic?

National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Inc. NCADD

Are you wondering if you have an addiction to alcohol?

Are you concerned about the role alcohol plays in your life?  With 26 questions, this simple self-test is intended to help you determine if you or someone you know needs to find out more about alcoholism. 

Click on the link below to take the self-test.
Am I Alcoholic?

Army Substance Abuse Program

Phone: 717-245-4082

The ASAP mission is to foster resilience and readiness in the Army

and the greater Army family (family members, DA employees, retirees and their beneficiaries) regarding alcohol and drug abuse through awareness, prevention, and treatment.

There are three (3) major ASAP functions:

-- Random drug testing as a means of deterrence and detection.

-- Prevention and Risk Reduction (awareness, education, and training).

-- Clinical Counseling (treatment)--assessment, evaluation, treatment, and follow-up for alcohol and/or drug abuse/dependency.

Hours of Operation:

Monday-Friday 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Address

632 Wright Ave


McConnell Center turned into ‘drive in’ theater

The gym at the McConnell Youth Center was transformed into a "drive in theater" for a free movie as part of the month long celebration of the Month of the Military Child. Free snacks were available and kids sat in cardboard "cars" during the movie. for more photos visit www.facebook.com/usawc

A hush fell over the crowd and kids turned up their car “radios” and took a handful of popcorn as the “drive in” movie started April 9 in the McConnell Youth Center.

The gym was turned into a theater for kids and their families as part of the month-long celebration of the Month of the Military Child. More than 60 kids and their parents took part in this first ever event that featured free popcorn, nachos and hot dogs.

Kids took turns sitting in each other’s “cars” which were empty boxes decorated to look like their favorite car and adorned with stickers and hand-drawn details. Many of the cards were built as part of the pre-school program at the Moore Child Development Center and the programs at the McConnell Center.

“I really appreciate this, it brings both the Youth Services and CDC kids together for a night of free entertainment,” said Beth Broniec-Kessinger, who came with her three-year old son, Aleister, and husband. “The kids had a chance to play with each other outside of the center and see kids they don’t normally get to during the day. I think both parents and kids had a great time.”

 

Free food and drinks were just part of the drive-in experience at the McConnell Center.

This was just one of the many events that Carlisle Barracks has planned for the month-long celebration of military kids. For a complete list visit http://www.carlisle.army.mil/banner/article.cfm?id=54228


Army War College Strategy Conference to explore "Defense Choices for the Next Administration"

April 11, 2016 --The Army’s annual Strategy Conference will delve into the future:  Defense Choices for the Next Administration,April 27-28, 2016 -- at Carlisle, Pa. and Washington D.C.

In a major shift from previous years, the U.S. Army War Collegewill explore the topic over two days at four locations in order to leverage top expertise – all conference events are accessible virtually, via streaming video and twitter-based dialogue #AWCStratConf.   Guidance to link into all events is found at www.carlisle.army.mil.  Links to view taped videos will be available on this website.

Almost six months before the U.S. presidential elections, the conference will anticipate and examine the broad range of challenges to be faced by the next U.S. Administration, gathering expert voices from across the political spectrum. The 27th Army War College Strategy Conference will focus researchers, academics and practitioners on an examination of the broad range of national defense challenges the next administration will encounter.

Day 1, WED, April 27:  The Strategy Conference launches at the US Army War College @ArmyWarCollege in Carlisle, Pa., with a keynote address to the USA War College class of 2016. Partner-based panel events are scheduled for each of two days.

Dr. Gregory F. Treverton will speak at Carlisle. Treverton is chair of the National Intelligence Council chairman and advisor to the Director of National Intelligence, responsible for overseeing coordinate intelligence community analysis, e.g., the National Intelligence Estimate.  Find streaming video at www.carlisle.army.mil, April 27, 8:15 – 9:30 a.m.

 

American Enterprise Institute, @AEI, will host the first panel discussion, Alternate Defense Strategies, in DCfor invited guests & virtual audiences, streaming at www.aei.org, April 27, 10 – 11:30 a.m.

Panel speakers include Mr. Shawn Brimley, Executive Vice President and Director of Studies, Center for a New American Security (CNAS);   Mr. Thomas Donnelly, Resident Fellow and co-director of the Marilyn Ware Center for Security Studies, American Enterprise Institute;  and, Mr. Nathan Freier (moderator), Associate Professor of National Security Studies, U.S. Army War College Strategic Studies Institute

 

Center for a New American Security, @CNASdc, will host panel #2, Army Readiness:  Fight Tonight and Fit for Tomorrow, in DCfor invited guests and virtual audiences, April 27, 1:30 – 3 p.m.

 Panel speakers include Maj. Gen. Walt Piatt, Director of Operations, Readiness and Mobilization, Army G-3/5/7;   Mr. Daniel Feehan, the Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Readiness;    Dr. Andrew Hill, U.S. Army War College Professor;   Ms. Katherine Kidder, Bacevich Fellow at the Center for a New American Security;  and, Vago Muradian (moderator), former editor of Defense News & former host of 'Defense News with Vago Muradian'

 

Day 2, THU, April 28

Dr. Mathew J. Burrows will speak at Carlisleabout Global Trends. He isDirector of the Strategic Foresight Initiative at the Atlantic Council. Find streaming video at www.carlisle.army.mil, April 28, 8:30 – 9:30 a.m.

 

Center for Strategic & International Studies, @CSIS, will host panel #3, Deterrence in the 21stCentury, in DCfor invited guests and virtual audiences, April 28, 10 – 11:30 a.m.

Panel speakers include Dr. Robert Kagan, Senior Fellow, Foreign Policy, Project on International Order and Strategy at The Brookings Institution;    Dr. Michael Green, Senior Vice President for Asia and Japan Chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies & Chair in Japanese Politics and Foreign Policy at Georgetown University;    Mr. Nathan Freier, Associate Professor of National Security Studies, U.S. Army War College Strategic Studies Institute.    Ms. Lisa Sawyer Samp, Fellow  with the International Security Program at CSIS.                                                                                                                               Dr. Kathleen Hicks (Moderator) is Senior Vice President & Henry A. Kissinger Chair &  Director of the International Security Program at Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS).

 

Atlantic Council in Washington DC, @AtlanticCouncil, will co-sponsor panel #4, Future of US Defense Alliances and Partnerships, at CSIS, April 28, 1:30 – 3 p.m.

Panel speakers include Dr. Nora Bensahel, Distinguished Scholar in Residence at the School of International Service at American University and Nonresident Fellow of the  Atlantic Council;  Mr. Magnus Nordenman, Director of the Transatlantic Security Initiative, Brent Scowcroft Center on International Security, Atlantic Council;  Mr. Bilal Saab, Resident Senior Fellow for Middle East Security, Brent Scowcroft Center on International Security, Atlantic Council;   Dr. Roger Cliff, Nonresident Senior Fellow, Asia Security Initiative, Atlantic Council.                    Retired Army Lt. Gen. David W. Barno, (moderator), is the Nonresident Senior Fellow for Military Affairs and National Security Policy, Brent Scowcroft Center on International Security, Atlantic Council.

 

Dr. Eliot Cohen will close the conference in Carlisle, video at www.carlisle.army.mil, April 28, 3:30 – 4:30 p.m.  Cohen is the Robert E. Osgood Professor of Strategic Studies and Director of the Strategic Studies program at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) and the Carey Business School, Johns Hopkins University.

 

Registration for in-person attendance of the defense panels in Washington D.C. will be managed by our conference co-hosts. There is no registration needed to view conference events via the internet.

The Strategic Studies Institute is the research arm of the Army and Army War College; it convenes the Army’s Strategy Conference annually to examine strategic issues and patterns of significance to policy makers, planners, practitioners and academics.  


Army focusing on making installations more resourceful

WASHINGTON (Army News Service, April 6, 2016) -- A key to building readiness during downward budgetary pressures is to continue making installations more efficient, resourceful and opportunistic, said Katherine Hammack, assistant secretary of the Army for Installations, Energy and the Environment.

As keynote speaker at an Installation Management "Hot Topics" forum here, March 31, Hammack reiterated Army Chief of Staff Gen. Mark Milley's No. 1 priority: readiness.

"We know we must continue to lean our installations; lean our activities; change our expectations and prioritize our most essential services to ensure the Army remains ready," she said, noting that the Army continues to undergo dramatic changes.

Originally the Army expected to cease its activities in Iraq and Afghanistan, but instead it's changing and shifting as other conflicts and missions have increased worldwide, despite continuing downward budgetary pressures, she said.

With more than 50 percent of the Army budget going into manpower, what follows on are the costs of training and equipping, which are both priorities related to readiness, she said, adding that what drops to the bottom of the pile is installation funding and maintenance of facilities.

"We're trying to figure out how to support Soldiers, Families, civilians and operations without the budgets that they need, with the budgets they get, so every installation has had to prioritize based upon risk and funding the most critical," she continued. "It has given us an opportunity at the headquarters level to re-evaluate our programs and services… which can be merged and consolidated."

Hammack discussed five key areas affecting the installation community:

-- communicating how installations support readiness and where they're taking risks;

-- prioritizing resources while consolidating services and programs

-- continuing to establish creative partnering to leverage core competencies

-- developing a model for installations to 2025 and beyond

-- calling for a Base Realignment & Closure authorization in 2017.

"We have more than 155 installations when you take into account the Guard and Reserve and they each contribute to our total Army and our total force, but they all have different capabilities," she said. "It is essential we communicate with one voice in the education of our colleagues and leaders and better articulate how installation infrastructures and services directly impact readiness and where the risk is being taken and its impact on the operating force."

PRIORITIZING RESOURCES

She said the second key area is in the risk involved to maximize funding for training and operations, which forces the Army to further prioritize its most critical projects and programs while becoming more prudent with investments.

"This doesn't mean we have removed decision-making from senior commanders at the installation level, nor does it mean we cannot adjust during the budget year -- it just means there's less room," Hammack said. "It means that new emerging priorities must come up to the headquarters level so we can try to figure out how to balance to ensure projects are validated by the commands there -- indeed, the command's highest priority and then some can be absorbed dependent upon need, but many are addressed as unfunded."

CREATIVE PARTNERING

In the area of creative partnering, Hammack said that over the last decade, the Army had been divesting itself of services and programs that are better performed by those companies who make their living in those areas such as housing.

"The private sector has invested about $12 billion of private-sector capital in Army housing so Soldiers have a better quality of life and at the same time there is no backlog of maintenance like we're seeing in our commercial buildings," she said.

The Army has also had great success with the privatization of energy, she said, adding the Army needs diversity in power choices and renewable energy. There are presently 14 projects in various stages of the contracting process to provide more than 400 megawatts of renewable energy, representing more than $800 million of investment, which enables the Army to put its limited funds more on readiness.

"We want to continue to explore how we can expand partnerships, strengthen community ties, while benefitting both the Army and our service-providing partners," she said.

BASE CLOSURE AND REALIGNMENT

Hammack called for another round of BRAC, noting the Army spends about $500 million annually on excess or under-used facilities. At a total force of 980,000 Soldiers, the Army has estimated a 21-percent excess in infrastructure.

"We must have authority from Congress to consolidate into our highest-value military bases and divest of low military value or under-utilized facilities," Hammack said. "Today, facilities that are needed to support readiness, to support training exercises, airfields and other priorities are deteriorating because the resources are spent to support installations that could be closed.

Hammack said that $500 million wasted on installations and facilities that aren't needed equates to five training rotations at the National Training Center and the manning of a Stryker brigade of 5,000 Soldiers. It represents readiness, she said.

She anticipates that another BRAC would be primarily focused on the Army and Air Force -- which has some 30-percent excess infrastructure. It would cost $6 billion initially, she estimated, but would save $2 billion annually in the years following.


Housing survey coming soon to post residents

Soon Carlisle Barracks’ family housing residents will be receiving a Headquarters, Department of the Army Residential Communities Initiative Resident Survey.

The purpose of this online survey is to let servicemembers and their families tell the Army and its housing partners how well housing occupants needs are being met.  The Army is surveying more than 80,000 residents living in RCI accompanied and unaccompanied housing.

Responses to the survey are strictly confidential. The survey is expected to be sent to Carlisle Barracks residents by April 21. The survey end date is May 23, 2016.


APRIL – Alcohol Awareness Month - Under 21 in PA – Zero Tolerance

Under 21 in PA – Zero Tolerance

Under 21: It is illegal for anyone under 21 to possess, purchase, attempt to purchase, consume or transport any alcohol, liquor, malt or brewed beverages. It is also illegal for anyone under 21 to lie about their age or to carry a false ID card to obtain any alcohol, liquor, malt or brewed beverages.

Penalty: Minors (persons under 21) convicted of any of the offenses cited above face fines up to $500. Minors convicted of the above offenses will also lose their driver’s license for ninety (90) days for the first offense, one (1) year for the second offense, and two (2) years for any offense thereafter. If the offender is under sixteen (16) years of age, the suspension will begin on the offender’s 16th birthday.

Zero Tolerance

Mixing alcohol with driving is always extremely dangerous. If you’re under 21, drinking and driving in Pennsylvania imposes stiff penalties. If you’re caught driving with ANYmeasurable amount of alcohol in your blood, you may be arrested for Driving Under the Influence (DUI). The “Zero Tolerance” law (Section 3802(e) of the PA Vehicle Code, Title 75) lowered the Blood Alcohol Content (BAC) for minors to .02%.

Why Zero Tolerance?

Motor vehicle crashes were the number one cause of death for U.S. citizens ages 15-24 in 2010. That accounts for one third of all fatalities in that age group or 7,250 in one year.³ In 2009, 33% of car crash fatalities between the ages of 15 and 20 had a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .01 or higher, and over 28% had a BAC of .08 or higher. 4.  An estimated 6% of 16 or 17 year olds and 15% of 18 to 20 year olds reported driving under the influence of alcohol in 2010.

Young people ages 15-24 represent only 14% of the U.S. population. However, they account for 30% ($19 billion) of the total costs of motor vehicle injuries among males and 28% ($7 billion) of the total costs of motor vehicle injuries among females.6  In 2010, approximately 1,300 Pennsylvania drivers who were under the age of 21 were involved in alcohol-related crashes.

The effects of a DUI arrest can continue for years. You may experience:

Work Problems – without a driver’s license, you may not be able to get to work. If your job requires travel, you could be fired. Future employers may use the DUI arrest as reason not to hire you.

Insurance problems – you can expect your car insurance rates to increase after an arrest. Some companies may cancel your policy, and others may refuse coverage.

For information concerning the serious consequences and other penalties for a DUI if under 21 go to the LCB link below.

For additional information contact Army Substance Abuse Prevention at 245 – 4576 or visit the PA LCB website at www.lcb.state.pa.us.

Information provided by Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board Alcohol Education.

A special emphasis program will be held for Middle School and Teens - PA’s Tolerance for Underage Drinking is ZERO, Under 21 Know the Law – The choice you make today will impact your life tomorrow, will be held April 12  4-5 p.m. at the McConnell Youth Center – Carlisle Barracks.

Contact Army Substance Abuse Program for additional information at 245 – 4576.

Remember–

It’s Not Your Call,

It’s the Law


Carlisle Barracks celebrating military kids all month long

Military kids of all ages stream into the McConnell Youth Center as part of the kick-off for the 2016 Month of the Military Child. This year's theme, Their Journeys and Adventures, captures the Army's story through the eyes of military children. Throughout the month of April, Army organizations will provide a variety of fun and exciting events such as family fun nights, parades, festivals, and special luncheons, to officially recognize the Army children. Find more photos at www.facebook.com/usawc

 

 

April is the time of year that we set aside to honor the youngest members of our military community, the military child. Month of the Military Child is an opportunity to acknowledge the personal sacrifice and important contributions of military children. The strength of the nation is built on the readiness and resilience of every member of the premier all-volunteer Army including the military children and youth.

In 1986, the Department of Defense designated April as Month of the Military Child. This year marks the observance's 30th anniversary.

The Army is fully committed to helping Families remain strong by offering a variety of programs and services through U.S. Army Installation Management Command. This year's theme, Their Journeys and Adventures, captures the Army's story through the eyes of military children. Throughout the month of April, Army organizations will provide a variety of fun and exciting events such as family fun nights, parades, festivals, and special luncheons, to officially recognize the Army children.

Special events for MOMC 2016 include the Young Lives, Big Stories contest, where military children are invited to share their experiences and win prizes, and Operation Megaphone, a worldwide lock-in for military teens on April 29-30, 2016.

At Carlisle Barracks, the following events are planned for children and their families.

McConnell Youth Center School Age Care Events

Multicultural Week

April 4 - Drum Circle

April 5 – International Speaker / Storytime

April 6 – Adventure Collage

April 7 – World Map Activity

April 8 – International Menu and Cooking

April 9 - Drive In Party, 6:30pm - Movie conclusion

 

Career Week

April 11 - Police Day

April 12 – Fitness Day

April 13 – Firefighter Day

April 14 – Military Family Day

April 15 – Purple Up Day / Career Day, 4pm

                 Family Dinner, 5:30pm

April 16 – Lock-In, 6-10pm

 

Earth Week

April 18 – Bird Seed Ornaments

April 19 – On Post Trash Pick Up Activity

April 20 – Community Garden

April 21 – Earth Conscience Collage

April 22 – Earth Day Projects

 

 

Spirit Week

April 25 – Family Photo Day

                  Bring your favorite photo

April 26 – USA Day

April 27 – My Hero Day

April 28 – Photo Booth

April 29 – Show and Tell

 

McConnell Youth Center Middle School Teen Events

Multicultural Week

April 4 - Passport to Manhood & Smart Girls– Gender Roles in Other Countries

April 5 – International Speaker

April 6 – International Cooking Club Activity

April 7 – World Map Activity

April 8 – Extended Hours, 9-11pm

 

Career Week

April 11 - Have you Chosen a Pathway Activity

April 12 – These careers make WHAT? Online Scavenger Hunt– Tech Club

April 13 – Career Vision Board Collages

April 14 – College Day!  & High School Only Rock–N–Bowl 7-9pm

April 15 – Day off School & Career Day 1-3pm

April 16 – Paintball Trip, 12:30-6:00pm

 

Earth Week

April 18 – Papermaking

April 19 – On Post Trash Pick Up Activity

April 20 – Community Garden

April 21 – Earth Conscience Cooking

April 22 – Extended Hours, 9-11pm & Magazine Beads Craft

April 23 – Dodgeball Tournament, 4-8pm

 

Spirit Week

April 25 – Photo Bombs

April 26 – Sports Team Jersey Day & Team Logo Trivia

April 27 – Tie Dye Day – Make a Tie Dye Shirt

April 28 – Extended Hours, 9-11pm

April 29 – Operation Megaphone

World Wide Lock-In, Start, 7pm

April 30 – Operation Megaphone

World Wide Lock-In, End, 7am

 

Moore Child Development Center Events

Kick-OFF Parade

April 1st, 9:15-11 A.M.

Parents & children will walk around Carlisle Barracks ending at the YS for a

Month of the Military Child Kick-Off Celebration with Garrison Command.

 

CREATIVE ME DAYS

April 4 - Make a Box Car for Drive In

April 7 – Friendship Comes in Many Colors

April 12 – Love for your country

 

CREATIVE DRESS DAYS

April 5 – Wear a Military Hat or Shirt Day

April 15 – Share Purple Up Photos

April 22 – Sports /Jersey Day

April 26 – Silly Hair Day

April 27 – Mismatch Day

 

ALL ABOUT ME WEEK

April 4 – 8, All About Me

 

ICE CREAM SOCIAL

April 11 – 2:45-3:45pm open to parents and families

 

WHY I LOVE BEING A MILTARY CHILD INTERVIEWS

April 13 – All Day

 

BIKE DAY

April 29 – Bike Day

 

OH! THE PLACES YOU GO

April 8 – Flat Stanley

 

EARTH DAY

April 19 – Plant a Flower

 

 

 

MOVIE DAY

April 25

 

FIELD DAY

April 21 – Youth Sports Olympics

 

LETTERS TO CHILDREN

April 25 – Letters to children all day

 

CYSS DIVERSITY DAY & LUNCHEON

April 28 – 11:30 A.M.

 


Antiterrorism Awareness Quarterly Theme - Measuring Antiterrorism Performance

What is it?

The U.S. Army antiterrorism awareness theme for the third quarter (April through June) fiscal year 2016 (3Q/FY16) is measuring antiterrorism performance. The primary audience for this theme is antiterrorism officers (ATO), antiterrorism coordinators (ATC), and leaders at all levels who are responsible for planning, executing, and measuring performance of antiterrorism plans and programs.

What has the Army done?

Measuring antiterrorism performance seeks to enhance the Army's ability to objectively assess the effectiveness of the antiterrorism policy, doctrine, training, and community outreach.

The main focus areas for this quarterly theme include:

  • Use of antiterrorism awareness survey report (Jan 29, 2016) and ability to address improvement areas.
  • Review of command assessment and tracking processes.
  • Assessment of higher headquarters and command special interest items.
  • Expansion of standalone facilities working group antiterrorism reporting requirements to HQDA OPMG.
  • Use and training of antiterrorism coordinators to enhance antiterrorism performance.
  • Emphasis on new-hire, face-to-face antiterrorism awareness (Level 1) training.
  • Increased use of cyber and social media to enhance antiterrorism performance.

In support of this theme, the Department's Office of Provost Marshal General(OPMG) conducted an antiterrorism awareness survey and produced a summary report of the results. OPMG also developed two checklists/guides to assist standalone facility and installation ATO/ATC in measuring antiterrorism performance. These new products are available on the Army Antiterrorism Enterprise Portal (see resources section below).

What continued efforts have been planned for the future?

The other themes and events planned for the remainder of FY16 include:

  • 4Q/FY16 Theme: Insider Threat
  • Antiterrorism Awareness Month (August 2016)

Why is this important to the Army?

As terrorists adopt new tactics and techniques in an attempt to exploit any identifiable weaknesses or vulnerabilities in the nation's defense, the Army must continue to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of its antiterrorism efforts.

Measuring antiterrorism performance is a critical aspect of understanding where the Army is today and what direction it should take for the future. Measuring program performance helps the Army to -

  • Find out what is happening
  • Understand the extent and relevancy of current issues and challenges
  • Provide value-added information suitable for decision makers
  • Allocate resources effectively
  • Fulfill its responsibility to be good stewards

Resources:

Note: The Army Policing Portal and the Army Antiterrorism Enterprise Portal (ATEP) have migrated. Users must select their "e-mail certificate" to gain access to either portal.

 


Reserve Retirement Service to Conduct USAR Retirement briefings

On May 14, 2016, Carlisle Barracks will host the retirement briefing for Reserve Soldiers -- a first-time effort to make this location available for the large number of Reserve Soldiers in the region.
 
The 99th Reserve Retirement Services will conduct Retirement Briefing for Reserve Soldiers.  The 99th is comprised of 185 units served by more than 20,000 soldiers in Pa., Va., W.V., Md., De. and the District of Columbia. Units of the 99th RSC span the spectrum of the Combat Support and Combat Service Support branches of the Army.
 
The 99th RSC, Retirement Services Office, requested to have Carlisle Barracks as a venue for a retirement briefing for soon-to-be retiring USAR Soldiers and their families in Central PA area. 
 
For questions about eligibility to participate, contact your unit.

Gold Star Spouses' Day honors surviving husbands, wives of fallen Soldiers

April 5, 2016 --  Gold Star Spouses' Day is an opportunity for the U.S. Army to honor the surviving husbands and wives of fallen Soldiers.

The first Gold Star Wives Day was designated Dec. 18, 2010. Since 2012, the Senate has passed a resolution designating Apr. 5 as Gold Star Wives Day. Per recent guidance by the Department of the Army, this day is now observed as the Gold Spouses' Day.

Locally, Army Community Services at Carlisle Barracks offers support to all members of Gold Star Families -- spouses, mothers, fathers, and children, said Becky Myers, ACS Director.

An annual Hershey Park family outing is among the efforts to honor families. The amusement park, Poconos Raceway outing, and luncheons, co-sponsored with the National Guard and Army Reserve Survivor Outreach Services, are planned to give gold Star families the potential for new  bonds and, the trust to identify how  ACS can help.

Jeff Hanks is the Survivor Outreach Coordinator for the region. A member of ACS at Carlisle Barracks, he can be contacted at 717.245.3684.

Help can include ID cards for Gold Star families, offers of counseling and financial assistance, or a way to address specific needs, added Myers.

Background

The Gold Star is a symbol of loss dating back to World War I. In 1947, Congress approved the design, manufacture and distribution of the official Gold Star Lapel Button, a symbol worn by Family of service members who lost their lives in combat operations. In 1973, the Lapel Button for Next of Kin of Deceased Personnel was introduced to symbolize active-duty Soldiers who lost their lives in non-combat operations. The surviving Family members wear either a Gold Star Lapel Button or the Lapel Button for Next of Kin of Deceased Personnel in honor of their fallen Soldier. Family members typically receive these pins from the Army during their Soldier's funeral service.

On Gold Star Spouses' Day, the Army will join the nation to remember the surviving military spouses and honor the legacy of their husbands and wives who died in service to the nation. Army leaders encourage the military community to take time on this day to remember the fallen service members and recognize the sacrifices of the loved ones who have been left behind.

Across the Army, Army Survivor Outreach Services is hosting events such as remembrance ceremonies, luncheons and Run for the Fallen races. Events are open to all survivors.

The Army is dedicated to providing ongoing support to over 60,000 surviving Family members of fallen Soldiers. Army Survivor Outreach Services offers resources including supportive counseling, financial education, benefits coordination, and support groups to surviving Family members for as long as the surviving Family members needs or requests Army involvement.

The Army will remain grateful for all individuals, non-profit organizations, and non-governmental organizations which complement the Army's continuum of support.

Gold Star spouses are and always will be a part of the Army Family. The Army recognizes their courage and sacrifice and is committed to supporting them while honoring the legacy of their fallen husbands and wives.


April 2016 Marks 30th Alcohol Awareness Month

 

This year's theme, "Talk Early, Talk Often: Parents Can Make a Difference in Teen Alcohol Use"

Each April since 1987, the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Inc. (NCADD) has sponsored Alcohol Awareness Month to increase public awareness and understanding, reduce stigma and encourage local communities to focus on alcoholism and alcohol-related issues.

With this year's theme, "Talk Early, Talk Often: Parents Can Make a Difference in Teen Alcohol Use," the month of April 2016 will be filled with local, state, and national events aimed at educating people about the treatment and prevention of alcoholism, particularly among our youth, and the benefits of providing early education to give kids a better understanding of the impact that alcohol can have on their lives.

Alcohol use by young people is extremely dangerous—both to themselves and to society, and is directly associated with traffic fatalities, violence, suicide, educational failure, alcohol overdose, unsafe sex and other problem behaviors, even for those who may never develop a dependence or addiction.

Adolescence is a time of heightened risk taking and young people may not be fully prepared to anticipate all the consequences of drinking alcohol, such as swigging drinks to "celebrate" a special occasion, or being in a car with a driver who has been drinking.

Alcohol is the number one drug of choice for America's youth, and is more likely to kill young people than all illegal drugs combined.

Reducing underage drinking is critical to securing a healthy future for America's youth and requires a cooperative effort from parents, schools, community organizations, business leaders, government agencies, the entertainment industry, alcohol manufacturers/retailers and young people themselves.

"Underage drinking is a complex issue," says Andrew Pucher, President and Chief Executive Officer of NCADD, "one that can only be solved through a sustained and cooperative effort. As a nation, we need to wake up to the reality that for some, alcoholism and addiction develop at a young age and that intervention, treatment, and recovery support are essential for them and their families," says Pucher. "We can't afford to wait any longer."

 

Alcohol is the most commonly abused drug. Alcohol is popular, socially accepted, and legal. Yet it is the most frequent cause of individual and family pain and suffering.

 

Understanding Alcohol and Alcoholism

If you're visiting the NCADD website to find out about alcohol, you are in the right place. We have chosen to have a separate section about alcohol because it is our most commonly used drug and it represents our number one drug problem.

Ethanol, commonly known as alcohol, found in beer, wine and spirits (like whiskey, gin, scotch, vodka, etc.) is a psychoactive drug that has a depressant effect. Alcohol, consumed across cultures, often used to help and promote social interaction, is popular, generally accepted and legal.

However, for millions of individuals and family members, alcohol is a source devastating pain and loss. Alcohol is addictive and the state of addiction to alcohol is known as the disease of alcoholism.

But, to begin to better understand alcoholism, there is a great deal we need to talk about regarding alcohol and it’s effect on the individual, the family and many of major problems faced by our society - crime, drinking and driving and in the workplace. In addition, we need to discuss the special role that alcohol plays in problems among women, veterans and seniors.

Within this section of the NCADD website, offers valuable information about:

NCADD Affiliatesoffer a range of services including help for individuals and family members. If you are concerned about your own alcohol or other drug use or that of someone you care about—a child or other relative, a friend or co-worker—please make the contact. You will be able to speak to someone who will listen, assess your needs and provide information aboutavailable services, costs and how to deal with another person’s alcohol and/or drug use. Help is just a call or visit away—Make the contact now by calling Carlisle Barracks Substance Abuse Counseling Services at 245 – 4082.

For more information about NCADD, underage drinking, Alcohol Awareness Month, visit the NCADD website at: www.ncadd.org.

Middle School & Teen Event -- PA’s Tolerance for Underage Drinking is ZERO

Under 21 Know the Law – The choice you make today will impact your life tomorrow

April 12, 4-5 p.m.  at the McConnell Youth Center – Carlisle Barracks

Contact Army Substance Abuse Program for additional information at 245 – 4576.


Post Volunteer Tax Center, volunteers recognized for excellence

 

Capt. Katie Dang, Deputy Post Judge Advocate, presents Steve Doyle, Dan Barney, and Jay Tisserand certificates of appreciation from the Internal Revenue Service for the work at the post Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Center.

The Carlisle Barracks Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program and its volunteers were recently singled out for excellence by the Internal Revenue Service.

“For the past nearly 30 years, the Carlisle Barrack's Tax Center has been the go-to tax solution for thousands in our military community,” said Capt. Katie Dang, Deputy Post Judge Advocate. “Our volunteer tax preparers are true professionals who make this happen.”

The tax center revived a 20-year milestone award and the following volunteers received pins of appreciation for their years of service.

  • Nick Mineo - 19 years
  • Dan Barney - 15 years
  • His service is not only limited to his time during the tax season, he is also the instructor who certifies the other volunteers well before the Tax Center opens. 
  • Jay Tisserand - 15 years
  • Every tax return is quality checked electronically and again by a live person, and you won't find a more thorough quality reviewer
  • Steve Doyle - 12 years
  • Stays on the cutting edge of the tax law changes and sends updates to the tax team throughout the year. 

The tax center is on pace to meet, if not exceed, last year's record of $250,000 in tax preparation fees saved for their clients. 

 

Dang, Kami Hertzler, and Staff Sgt. Liane Folkestad were in charge of the tax center this year, which is on pace for an all-time high in savings for clients.

“They have the highest standards of integrity and are meticulous,” said Dang. “It's no wonder that most of our clients are repeat customers, some of whom have been coming for 18 years.”


International Fellows root on Flyers
 
The Philadelphia Flyers moved closer to playing for the Stanley Cup and the International Fellows and families learned more about American culture as they rooted for the Flyers’ win, 3-2, against the Ottawa Senators.
 
Lou Manzi (center), former USAWC foundatoin member stands with Kevin Bremer (right), Chief of the international student management office and Christine Harvey along with two unidentified Flyer excutives.
 
Fellows and families were able to attend a Flyers game this year by a gift making a special section available in the Wells Fargo Center, April 2, in Philadelphia.
 
In a great scheduling move, the game took place right after each fellow completed oral comprehensive exams and submitted a Strategic Research Project on a national security topic.  The fellows were also to build a better understanding of American through sports.
 
They are here 79 senior military officers from 73 different countries who studying and research alongside U.S. officers to expand their international relationships.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
International Fellows enjoy their Saturday afternoon watching the Philidlephia Flyers play the Ottawa Senators at the Wells Fargo Center, Philidelphia, April 2.

Public announcement re debts of the Colonel Andrew Poznick estate.

Anyone on Carlisle Barracks with debts owed to or by the estate of COL Andrew Poznick, U.S. Army War College and Fort Jackson, must contact COL Joseph W. Secino at (717) 245-3493, or joseph.w.secino.mil@mail.mil.

COL Poznick passed away March 20. 2016.