Banner Archive for March 2009
 

Spc. Jennifer Rick, Army War College Public Affairs Office
APFRI NCO stays busy, upholds standards 

Sgt. 1st Class Ponce Shepard, NCOIC for all three Army Physical Fitness Research Institute annexes, give Sgt. Radesha Dantzler some tips on working out, and finding the maximum weight she can lift. Photo by Spc. Jennifer Rick.

March 26, 2009 -- From coordinating behind-the-scene details that make operation at the Army Physical Fitness Research Institute possible to helping  execute detailed health assessments, APFRI's noncommissioned officer-in-charge, has a hand in almost everything.

    "I'm in charge of safety and security, maintenance and I have a hand in budgeting," 14-year Army veteran Sgt. 1st Class Ponce Shepard said. "But the biggest thing we do here is the assessments."

    Each year, more than 600 students pass through the gates of Carlisle Barracks, and each one is encouraged to participate in an APFRI health assessment. The assessments focus on a person's strengths and weaknesses, how healthy they are and if they are at risk for problems such as heart disease.

    The assessment starts with having blood work done to show us the person's levels are for lipids, proteins and other factors, Shepard explained.

    Then, when they come in, we ask them a lot of questions about their family medical history, their exercising habits and other things. They get their blood pressure taken, and then go to the "Bod Pod".

    The Bod Pod is a machine that measures a person's percentage of body fat through air displacement. While it seems daunting to some, it is important to know exactly how much muscle mass and body fat a person has to accurately predict any health issues that may arise, Shepard said.

    After sitting in the Bod Pod, the participant hits the treadmill to test endurance, heart strength and lung capacity.

    "They are pushed during this phase," Shepard said. "That way, if there is something wrong in their heart or it's not working as well as it should, we will see it."

    Strength and flexibility is tested next, and then they describe their eating habits.

    Once all testing is done, a member of the APFRI fitness team sits down with the participant and discusses their health level, problems or potential problems and gives guidelines and advice on living healthier. They will talk in detail about the best way to gain or lose weight, exercise and avoid injuries.

    Resident students' spouses, distance education students and senior service fellows are also encouraged to have an APFRI assessment done.

    "My role is mostly with the Bod Pod and the other physical parts of the assessment," said Shepard, who is a physical therapy technician.

    Besides working here at Carlisle, Shepard is also the NCOIC of the other two APFRI annexes at the Command and General Staff College at Ft. Leavenworth, Kan., and the Sergeants Major Academy at Ft. Bliss, Texas. He regularly visits and spends time working at each site.

    Shepard enjoys his work and finds it rewarding.

    "What we do for our customers really has a positive influence on their lives," he said. "Sometimes they will come back and tell us how much we helped them, and that's a good feeling."

    Lt. Col. Stephen Barone, APFRI deputy director, sees Shepard's motivation and dedication.

    "He has a very good work ethic and understanding of how NCOs support the organization. He enforces that standards for the organization and does a very good job."


Dunham Army Health Clinic
Tips for food safety

March 24, 2009 -- Food handling safety risks are more common than most people think.  As many as a quarter of Americans suffer a foodborne illness each year, though only a fraction of those cases get linked to high profile outbreaks like the recent salmonella peanut scare.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that foodborne diseases cause approximately 76 million illnesses, 325,000 hospitalizations, and 5,000 deaths in the United States each year.  The next time you have a case of diarrhea that lasts a day or more, chances are better than one in three that it is food illness related.  Common symptoms are serious diarrhea that lasts at least a day and possible nausea, vomiting and/or stomach cramps.

    Four easy steps that you can do to help your family be food safe:

  • CLEAN:  Bacteria can spread throughout the kitchen and get on hands, cutting boards, knives, and counter tops.  Frequent cleaning with soap and hot water can reduce risk.
  • SEPARATE:  Cross-contamination is how bacteria spread.  Keep raw meat, poultry and seafood and their juices away from ready-to-eat foods.
  • COOK:  Even for experienced cooks, the improper heating and preparation of food means bacteria can survive.  Use a food thermometer.  Stir, rotate the dish, and cover food when microwaving.  Bring sauces, soups, and gravies to a rolling boil when reheating.
  • CHILL:  Bacteria spread fastest at temperatures between 40°F and 140ºF, so chilling food through this temperature danger zone within 2 hours is one of the most effective ways to reduce the risk of foodborne illness.

    To find out more about food safety, visit the US Department of Agriculture web site www.befoodsafe.gov or the CDC at http://www.cdc.gov/foodsafety/.

 

 


Lt. Col. George Wright, OCPA Media Relations
Army announces plan to reduce stop-loss; payments to begin soon

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Army announced today that Soldiers affected by "Stop-Loss" will begin receiving $500 per month soon, and the Total Army will gradually reduce the number of those affected by the program that involuntarily extends Soldiers beyond the end of their enlistment or retirement dates in units deploying to combat areas. 

    Under a comprehensive plan to reduce Stop-Loss, the Army Reserve will begin mobilizing units without Stop-Loss in August 2009, followed by the Army National Guard in September 2009. The Active Army will begin deploying units without Stop-Loss beginning in January 2010, according to Lt. Gen. Michael Rochelle, Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel.

    "The Army has used Stop-Loss since 2001 to ensure that units that have trained together remain together in combat, and that they have the qualified and experienced troops necessary for the full spectrum of military operations," Chief of Staff of the Army Gen. George W. Casey, Jr. said.

    "With conditions changing in Iraq, a gradual restoration of balance between deployments, and an increase in the size of the Army, we'll now be able to begin weaning ourselves off of Stop-Loss," Gen. Casey said.

    There are approximately 13,000 stop-lossed Soldiers across all three Army components. In the Active Army, there are 7,307; 4,458 in the Army National Guard; and 1,452 in the Army Reserve. 

    "Stop-Loss is a legal tool that has allowed the Army to sustain a force that has trained together as a cohesive element. Losses caused by separation, retirement, and reassignments can adversely affect training, cohesion, readiness, and stability in deploying units. Limiting the use of Stop-Loss balances the need for unit effectiveness against the impact on individual Soldiers and their Families," Gen. Casey said.

    Before 2001, the Army used Stop-Loss in 1990-91 during Operation Desert Shield and Desert Storm. At that time, Executive Order 12728, dated August 22, 1990, gave Stop Loss authority to the Secretary of Defense to suspend any provision of law relating to retirement or separation applicable to any member of the armed forces determined to be essential to the national security of the United States. This authority remains in effect.


C. Todd Lopez, Army News Service
Stop-Loss stops in January, Army leaders say

Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates responds to a reporter's question during a press conference at the Pentagon, March 18. Gates announced a comprehensive plan to eliminate the current use of "stop-loss" policy while retaining the authority for future use under extraordinary circumstances. Photo by R. D. Ward.

WASHINGTON (Army News Service, March 18, 2009) -- The Army plans to phase out its reliance on stop-loss by January, leaders say.

    Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates announced Thursday a phased plan to begin cutting off stop-loss later this year. During a discussion with members of the press, Lt. Gen. Michael Rochelle, deputy chief of staff for Personnel, G-1, discussed the Army's plan to implement the phased reduction in use of the program that involuntarily extends Soldiers beyond the end of their enlistment or retirement dates in units deploying to combat areas. 

    "It has been a vital tool that has allowed the Army to sustain cohesive operational forces that train and serve together through their deployments," Rochelle said.

    The general said the president's recent announcement of a troop drawdown in Iraq, a gradual restoration of balance between deployments, and an increase in the size of the Army have given the service the opportunity to reduce stop-loss.

    Rochelle said the number of Soldiers affected by stop-loss will be reduced, in a phased approach, across all components of the Army. The Army Reserve will begin mobilizing units without stop-loss in August, he said. For the National Guard, that will happen in September. For the active-duty Army, the change will happen in January.

    "This is great news for the Army family," Rochelle said. "Limiting stop-loss balances our need for unit effectiveness with the impact on individual Soldiers and their families."

    Rochelle also said the Army will implement a special congressionally approved payment for Soldiers currently affected by stop-loss. Soldiers who are under stop-loss this month will begin receiving a $500 per month payment on top of their regular pay for the months they serve on stop-loss. That payment will begin with their March pay, which Soldiers see in their April 1 check.

    The congressional approval also allows the Army to retroactively pay Soldiers as far back as Oct. 1, 2008 for time served under stop-loss. Most Soldiers that qualify to receive the retroactive payments will receive that money in May or June as a lump-sum payment, Rochelle said.

    Additionally, the $500 per month payments for stop-loss time served in a combat tax-exclusion zone will not be taxed, said Col. Larry Lock, Army director of compensation and entitlements.

    The funds Congress appropriated for stop-loss pay are only for Fiscal Year 2009, which runs Oct. 1, 2008 through Sept. 30, 2009. Future funding is being discussed.

Rochelle pointed out that there is risk associated in eliminating the use of stop-loss, such as an unexpected demand for forces beyond what the Army anticipates. But he said such things as the projected reduction of forces in Iraq will mitigate that risk.

    "Let's not diminish the significance of the reduction in demand, anticipated as a result of the drawdown in Iraq. The anticipated reduction in demand, recently announced by President Obama, is a major factor," Rochelle said. He added that were demand not so high for Army forces around the world, the Army would eliminate stop-loss "tomorrow."

    An additional factor in the Army's ability to pare down its use of stop-loss is that the service was able to meet its resize objectives ahead of schedule.

    "The Army has now achieved its end strength growth to its (547,400) end strength, three years ahead of schedule," Rochelle said. "We were on track and projected to achieve that growth through 2012 -- we are there now."

    Thirdly, he said, is the Army's enterprise-wide approach to match up accessions, individual training and leader development training with the Army's Force Generation.

    Rochelle said the Army will create a policy to offer incentives to Soldiers to encourage them to extend their enlistment beyond their date of separation in order to allow them to stay with their unit for the duration of a deployment.

    Those incentives would most likely be financial, said Maj. Gen. Gina Farrisee, director of personnel management.

    "I think it would be safe to say they will be monetary incentives, but the policy has not been written yet as to what the incentives will be," she said. "We would offer incentives for people to extend through the deployment. We currently do not offer extensions. You may re-enlist, and re-enlist only. We would now offer incentives to extend through the deployment and we hope that that would help to continue to fill the unit as needed."

    There are currently around 13,000 Soldiers affected by stop-loss within all three components of the Army. According to Army officials, the active component has some 7,307 affected; the National Guard has 4,458 affected Soldiers; and in the Army Reserve, 1,452 Soldiers are affected. Stop-loss is spelled out in Title 10, United States Code, Section 12305(a).

    The law allowing the military services to implement stop-loss has not changed, and the Army may again use the policy in the future if extraordinary needs require it.


Dianne Borges,Balfour Beatty Communities
New pet policy established for Army Privatized Housing

March 19, 2009 -- Recently, a universal Pet Policy for military families has been developed so that as families relocate, they can evaluate their moving options when transferring from one installation to another as well as maintain a level of consistency that will assist them when making their housing decision. 

    The partners evaluated input from residents, past experiences with animals in residential developments (both on-post and off), insurance implications for liability as well as the standard apartment community pet policies obtained from off-post apartment communities. The policy identifies aggressive breeds as well as pets that are prohibited to board on post.

    "Our number one priority is to provide a safe, family-friendly living environments for the resident families and children who live on post," stated Heidi Puente, Community Manager for Balfour Beatty Communities, "as well as allow families to plan accordingly if they have certain breeds as pets."   

    The aggressive or potentially aggressive breeds of dogs that have been identified in the Pet Policy are Pit Bulls (American Staffordshire Terriers or Staffordshire Bull Terriers), Rottweilers, Doberman Pinschers, Chows and wolf hybrids.  This will also extend to other dogs not listed that demonstrate aggressive behavior. 

    "We understand that people with visual, hearing and physical disability may keep certified service dogs and nothing in this policy will hinder full access to the homes or common areas by anyone with a disability who may have one of these breeds for that purpose," said Puente. 

    However, if a resident currently living in privatized housing has a prohibited pet at the time the policy went into effect, they may keep the pet until they vacate, if there are no pending complaints related to the pet's behavior and they have executed a pet addendum with the appropriate information when they signed their lease or when they acquired the pet. This grandfather exception will terminate when the resident moves from the installation they resided at when the policy was instituted. 

    In addition, residents may not board exotic animals, including reptiles, rodents (other than hamsters and guinea pigs), ferrets, hedgehogs, skunks, rats, raccoons, squirrels, pot bellied pigs, monkeys, arachnids, or any farm animal. 

    "We understand that no policy can address every possible situation, but we have provided standards that families can evaluate when making a decision about housing and ownership of certain pets," added Puente.

    For more information, contact the Community Management Office at 717-243-7177 or consult Frequently Asked Questions posted at www.carlislebarrackshomes.com under Forms and Guides.

 


Maureen Henne, Carlisle Barracks Spouses Club
Spouse Club auction March 20

Feb. 6, 2009 -- Join us for the Carlisle Barracks Spouses Club 2009 Annual Benefit Auction Friday, March 20, at the LVCC. 

     A silent auction begins at 6:30 PM followed immediately by a live auction. All proceeds will go towards the club's scholarship and outreach programs.   

    Great items to bid on - for example - P. Buckley Moss print of Carlisle Barracks valued at $600.  Hot and cold appetizers will be on hand for you to sample as well as an open bar. 

    Tickets are on sale now at $12.00 per person.  Contact Rebecca Hayes at 386-5259 to purchase tickets and further information.

 

 


Barracks Crossing Frame studio sales in Root Hall

The Barracks Crossing Frame Studio will be in the Root Hall Cafeteria on the following days from 11: a.m. to 1 p.m. 
    March 25
    April 1, 8, 15, 22 & 29
    May 6 & 20

Orders can be made anytime during normal business hours at Building 870, Barracks Crossing Frame/Engraving Studio.


Driving Under the Influence – DUI Presentation - ALCOHOL & THE LAW

Pennsylvania has set .08% Blood Alcohol Content (BAC) as the legal limit for Driving Under the Influence (DUI) convictions. This law became effective September 30, 2003.
    Date: Monday, 6 April, 2009
    Time: 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.
    Location: Post Theater

    Mr. George Geisler, from the Pennsylvania DUI Association will provide information related to the costs, both personally and financially, any changes to the law, plus statistical information related to DUI.

    You will be introduced to the “Pupilometer” which is being used in field evaluation to determine what drug or medication an individual may be under the influence.

    You will also learn about the newly trained Police Officers, both Pennsylvania State Police (PSP) and municipal, known as DRE (Drug Recognition Experts).

    Mr. Mike Norris the Cumberland County Coroner, will speak and provide a presentation from the Coroner’s perspective.
For additional information contact the Army Substance Abuse Prevention Office at 245 – 4576.


School Transitions: What Every Parent Should Know

A Military Child Education Coalition Presentation on School Transitions: What Every Parent Should Know is sceduled for Monday, March 16, from 8:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Letort View Community Center.

    There will be three breakout sessions for Elementary , Middle School and High School Parents. You will be shown how to develop a portfolio for your children to make sure that they will have a successful transfer of records when they move from school and much more.

    There will be many great hand outs for you and your children to use on this next move in June.

    For more information, call Jacqueline Schultz at 245-4638 or Joe York at 245-4787 or email jacqueline.schultz@us.army.mil or joe.york1@us.army.mil.


Claremont Gate: One-way in-bound traffic only starting March 16

March 12, 2009 – Traffic will be in-bound only through the Claremont Gate at Delaney Road beginning Monday, March 16 and lasting approximately three days. 

    Those wishing to exit Carlisle Barracks during this period will need to use Ashburn Gate. 

    Detour signs to Ashburn Gate will be placed on-post directing visitors.

    All in-bound traffic through the Clermont Gate will continue as normal. Brief disruptions in in-bound traffic may occur, but will be minimal as the construction team moves equipment.     

    The team is excavating underneath Delaney Road in order to provide additional power and communication lines as they continue to work on the new Vehicle Access Control Site. 

     For further construction information visit http://www.carlisle.army.mil/construction/ 

 


Thomas Zimmerman, Public Affairs Office
Exercise tests Army War College students to think, act under pressure

Col. Michael Armstead, part of the AFRICOM cell, is interviewed during the Army War College's Strategic Decision Making Exercise. SDME is the capstone exercise for the USAWC resident students. Photo by Megan Clugh. Want more photos?

March 2, 2009 – The last few days have been quite taxing for Army War College students. There was a tense showdown in the Middle East, multiple freedom of navigation issues, a homeland terror attack and a natural disaster all in the span of six days.

    Of course, it was 2021, and each of those scenarios and more were all part of the Strategic Decision Making Exercise, held from March 4 to 11 in the Center for Strategic Leadership at Carlisle Barracks. This year marked the 14th year the exercise has been held.

    The exercise, or SDME as it is commonly referred to, serves as the capstone exercise for U.S. Army War College students. SDME is a six-day, interactive, strategic-level, political-military exercise based in the year 2021, which gives students the opportunity to integrate and apply the knowledge they've acquired during the academic year to a "real-life" situation.

    "Learning by doing is the most effective way to learn, and the exercise allows students to apply the principles they learned in the midst of a fast-paced, complex exercise that allows them to see how frictions affect the processes," said Dr. Bill Johnsen, Dean of Academics.  "The SDME exposes students to new issues and areas that they will become involved in for the remainder of their careers."

    According to Doug Campbell, CSL director, planning for the exercise starts at the beginning of each school year.

   "Initial planning begins with the receipt of student and faculty comments on this year's SDME," explained Campbell. "The second key factor is the receipt of next year's International Fellow student roster so we can determine IF expertise available to support the exercise.  Detailed planning begins in September as we begin to develop scenario material."

Col. Dave Moreland speaks during a media interview. During the exercise, students interact with various national and international news media outlets. Photo by Lizzie Poster.

    The process of developing each scenario for the exercise isn't a simple one either.

    "Scenario development takes considerable time and effort.  We begin with an assessment of learning objectives to be achieved, identify potential areas of the world which meet the criteria of possible, plausible and important enough to the U.S. and its allies that a scenario would pass the 'so what test','" said Campbell. "Following that assessment we develop a story outline, which lays out basic goals, objectives and flow of the scenario.  After scenarios have been developed then all the scenarios must be integrated so that we understand their interaction and load factors and the impact on learning objectives."

    The exercise is designed to give the students a wide range of experiences.

    "The most beneficial parts of the exercise are when we place students in difficult role playing situations," said Campbell. "Frequently that is when they interface with outside participants, such as Congressional Hearings -- during which they testify before members of Congress or Congressional staffers playing Congressman, where they have to engage the media, in either a briefing or in a stand-up question period, where they have to brief and answer questions from Distinguished Visitor's who role play a special assistant to the President." 

    During the exercise War College students also perform many of the duties and tasks that they will face once they graduate.

    "They are also required to conduct VTC's with Combatant Commander Staffs and perform bilateral negotiations with International Fellows role playing foreign government officials," said Campbell. "The most taxing element is the requirement to absorb information and make recommendations or decisions under time pressure."

Lt. Gen. H. Steven Blum, Deputy Combatant Commander of NORTHCOM, speaks to students during a briefing. Photo by Lizzie Poster.

    SDME has been very beneficial and a great learning experience according to one of the students.

    The exercise also brings together more than 600 personnel from the War College and subject matter experts from outside the school to serve as controllers, observer controllers, or exercise facilitators. Personnel participating in the exercise come from numerous government organizations, including the Department of State, Joint Staff, FEMA, CENTCOM, FBI, and the CIA. Each year more than 50 distinguished visitors participate as role-players in the exercise; most as leaders from the military, diplomatic, interagency, business, and education communities.

    "The students participate in video teleconferences with members of Congress, who role-play as members of the House Armed Services Committee while the students testify. Each year there are ten to twelve serving members of Congress who participate by VTC from Washington," said Campbell.

    Another important part of the exercise involves the students interacting with various national and international news media outlets.  During press conferences and interviews, controllers act as reporters from different national and international news organizations. The sound bites from these media events are then incorporated into television news broadcasts televised in Collins Hall each day.

    The filming of the interviews and the actual television broadcasts are produced by Army Reserve Soldiers from the 206th Broadcast Detachment out of Dallas, Texas and the 209th Broadcast Detachment out of Georgia.

       The exercise teaches lessons that will be valuable for years according to Johnsen.

    "The SDME requires students to continue to hone the critical thinking and creative thinking skills that they have developed during the course of this year, and upon which they will rely for the rest of their careers. 


Lt. Col. Frank Misurelli, Army War College Public Affairs Office
Spirit of the Carlisle Indian School competition lives on with Jim Thorpe Sports Day
    March 10, 2009 -- "The Carlisle Indian School spirit of competitiveness and winning lives on with the Jim Thorpe Sports Day competition," said George Yuda, whose father Montreville Speed Yuda, played baseball with Jim Thorpe and graduated from the Carlisle Indian School in 1913.

    The 86-year-old Yuda recently spoke about his memories of meeting Jim Thorpe and the Carlisle Indian School as if they occurred yesterday

    "Dad played second base and Thorpe played the outfield for the Carlisle Indian School baseball team called the "Outlaws" but Jim loved the contact sports like football," said Yuda.

    Yuda will return to the site of their athletic glory April 24 for the opening ceremonies of the Jim Thorpe Sports Day, which pits students from the Air War College, Naval War College, Industrial College Of the Armed Forces, National War College, Army War College and the Marine War College in an annual match up of the nation's senior service schools.

    "Dad and I know Jim Thorpe felt they had a place in their hearts for the Carlisle Indian School, it felt like a homecoming," said Yuda.

The Indian Field Grandstand was packed for a visit by Jim Thorpe to Carlisle Barracks in this undated photo. The spirit of athletic excellence that dates back to the days of the Carlisle Indian Industrial School lives on at Carlisle Barracks during the Jim Thorpe Sports Day. The event will take place April 23-25. File photo.

    Yuda said he was amazed on the endurance and stamina that his father and Thorpe must have had to play baseball and especially football.  "Dad and Thorpe took a beating with very little or no protective equipment if any, but they both had a lot of spirit," exclaimed Yuda.

     Yuda met Thorpe when he was 10 in 1933. "Thorpe would drop in unannounced to see my dad on his way to New York City and talk with dad," he said.   

    Yuda reflected on how Thorpe loved the school and his coach Glenn "Pop" Warner. Thorpe, who this year marks the 100th anniversary of him being named first team "All American"

    As for Thorpe's title as "All American," Yuda said, "Thorpe was the greatest football player on the playing field."

     Yuda said he thinks that the competition is a continuation of athletic excellence at Carlisle.

    "The Carlisle Indian School was noted for its great sport teams and the Army War College carries on this great tradition."

JTSD background

    During the three –day series of sports competitions, student athletes participate in 14 sporting events to include  ladies one-mile relay, men's two-mile relay, ladies 5K run, men's  five- mile run, men's and  women's bowling; men's and women's golf; racquetball; basketball; soccer, softball, tennis, and volleyball.

     In addition to individual medals in each event, the college that accumulates the most points will be awarded the Commandants Cup which maintains the trophy until next year's competition.

 


Spc. Jennifer Rick, Army War College Public Affairs Office
AHEC volunteers are 'the heart of the institution'

Ed Boggs and Karl Smith are two of many dedicated volunteers at the Army Heritage and Education Center. They research and respond to the many inquiries AHEC recieves about family history, military operations and more. Photo by Spc. Jennifer Rick.

March 4, 2009 – At the core of every successful operation are the dedicated people who put their time and energy into making things happen.

    At the Army Heritage and Education Center, many of these people are unpaid volunteers who enjoy being surrounded by years and years of history.

    More than 30 volunteers help out at AHEC, and put in more than 5,600 hours in a nine-month period, explained Nora Lupold, AHEC's volunteer director.

    "All our volunteers are very loyal and they love what they do here," she said.

    The thought is echoed by the volunteers themselves.

    "We have fun here," said Karl Smith. "The most interesting thing is the unknown; never knowing what you're going to run into." Smith has been volunteering at AHEC ten years.

    Ed Boggs, who has also been at AHEC for more than ten years, works with Smith responding to inquiries to the institution. People request information on many topics, ranging from their personal family histories to authors researching topics for books.

    The pair will spend two to three hours per query, finding up to eight pages of information to mail or email to the requestor.

    "We learn so much from helping people find information," Boggs said. "The only hard part is that there is so much information here, and we can't take the time to learn everything."

Stephen Barley volunteers at AHEC creating custom book covers for the institution's older, more fragile books in the collection. Photo by Spc. Jennifer Rick.

    Upstairs at AHEC is Stephen Barley, who has been volunteering there for three years. He works hands-on with some of the older books in the collection, making custom protective covers for them to prevent further damage.

    "Each cover is like an envelope for the book, built specifically for that book to keep it in as good of condition as possible," he said. "We also put photos of the front, back and spine of the book on the cover so you know what you're looking at."

    Jane Smith Stewart, paper conservator, stressed the importance of protecting the historic books.

    "Making these custom enclosures for the books not only protects them, but it also sends a good message to the public," she said. "It tells them that we know the books have some structural problems and a fragile, and that we care – and so they should too. Some of the books here are very rare, and need to be preserved as much as possible."

    From sorting donations given to the institution to helping people learn about their family's military history, the volunteers at AHEC are there to lend a hand.

    "These people are the heart of the institution," Lupold said. They are a huge asset and we couldn't do this without them."


St. Patrick's Day Impaired Driving Prevention Safety Campaign

Saint Patrick's Day is widely observed by Americans of all ethnic backgrounds. While it's a day to celebrate Irish heritage and perhaps enjoy the company of friends, it can turn deadly due to impaired driving.  Whether you're attending a parade or making a trip to the local pub, don't rely on the luck of the Irish to keep you safe. Designate a sober driver before the party begins - Friends Don't Let Friends Drive Drunk.

Driving while impaired during the St. Patrick's Day holiday puts everyone on the roads at risk:

    · Over the past five years, 851 people lost their lives in motor vehicles crashes during the St. Patrick's Day holiday.  Out of that number, 327 were killed in crashes that involved a driver or motorcycle rider (operator) with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .08 or higher.

    · In 2007 alone, 91 people were killed in crashes involving a drunk driver or motorcycle rider (operator) with a BAC of .08 or higher during this holiday.

    · Every year, thousands of people needlessly lose their lives in motor vehicle crashes involving impaired drivers and motorcyclists.  Of the 41,059 people killed in motor vehicle traffic crashes in 2007, 12,998 involved at least one driver or motorcycle rider (operator) with a BAC of .08 or higher. 

    * NHTSA defines the St. Patrick's Day Holiday as 6:00 p.m. March 16th through 6:59 a.m. on March 18th.

Whether you're meeting a few friends at the pub or attending the local parade, if you plan on drinking, don't drive.  If you notice your friend is showing signs of impairment, don't let him or her get behind the wheel.

  • Plan a safe way home before your celebrations begin;
  • If you plan to get a ride home with someone else, designate a sober driver before any drinking begins;
  • If you're impaired, use a taxi, call a sober friend or family member, or use public transportation so you are sure to get home safely;
  • Consider using your community's Sober Rides program
  • If you happen to see a drunk driver on the road, don't hesitate to contact your local law enforcement;
  • And remember, if you know someone who is about to drive or ride their motorcycle while impaired, take their keys and help them make other arrangements to get to where they are going safely.

Impaired driving has dire consequences.  Don't rely on the luck of the Irish this St. Patrick's Day. 

  • The tragedies and costs from drunk driving are not limited to death, disfigurement, disability or injury.  They also can lead to the trauma and financial costs of a crash or an arrest, which can be very significant.
  • People that break the law often face jail time, the loss of their driver's license, higher insurance rates, and dozens of other unanticipated expenses from attorney fees, fines, court costs, increased insurance rates, car towing, repairs, lost time at work, etc.
  • Plus there is the added embarrassment and humiliation after informing family, friends, and employers.  Remember on St. Patrick's Day, Friends Don't Let Friends Drive Drunk.
  • For additional information contact the Army Substance Abuse Program at 245-4576.


Information provided by the Army Center Substance Abuse Program.

 

 

 


Spouses Club luncheon scheduled for March 18

The Carlisle Barracks Spouses' Club cordially invites you to attend our monthly luncheon Wednesday, March 18. Current members cost is $13.00. Social hour begins at 10:30 a.m. with lunch to follow at 11:15 a.m. The main theme of this month's luncheon is the presentation by our International Spouses to include international food, cultural displays from their home countries, national dresses, global entertainment and more.

Please contact the following by March 13 to reserve your seat:

Last name    

    A-I           Shannon Blocker    (717) 386-5335    blockerclan@aol.com

    J-R          Brenda Moreland    (910) 916-2577    DaveandBre@aol.com

    S-Z          Celeste Williams    (717) 386-5385    apftmax@juno.com


Thomas Zimmerman, Army War College Public Affairs Office
APFRI: Sleep tied to operational performance

March 2, 2009 – Most people know that the average person needs about eight hours of sleep per night, but did you know that sleep issues can have a direct link to operational performance?

    Recent studies suggest that many Soldiers are complaining about a lack of sleep. Consequences can include reduced alertness, memory deficits and slower information processing.  Lack of sleep can also have health consequences including increased irritability, greater risk for depression and anxiety and adverse effects on cardiac health.

    "Recovering from chronic, restricted sleep may take several days," said Capt. Christopher Myers, Army Physical Fitness Research Institute. "Sleep restores brain metabolic activity which is the physiological basis for mental performance." 

   But there are steps you can take to help improve your restorative sleep.

·         Bed is for sleep only (no TV/ movies, video games, reading, writing, homework)

·         Maximum of 30 minutes awake in bed at any one time. If you can't fall asleep by 30 minutes, get up and do something relaxing (i.e. read a book) until you begin to feel tired and try again.

·         Establish a consistent bed time 7 days\week. No napping.

·         Eliminate caffeine from your diet and any other stimulants.

·         Eat a balanced diet and avoid big deals within two hours of bed time. A small snack that is high in carbs and\or includes tryptophan (e.g. milk) may help with sleepiness.

·         Exercise regularly, but avoid exercise within two hours of bed time.

·         Establish a relaxation time one hour prior to bed time.

·         Reduce the temperature in your room by a few degrees at night time.

·         Schedule a problem-solving time during the day to deal with things that you might think about while trying to sleep. Keep a notepad next to your bed if necessary.

·         Avoid using alcohol, OTC medications or other drugs in an attempt to help you sleep.

 


 

Lt. Col. Frank Misurelli, Army War College Public Affairs Office
34th Annual Jim Thorpe Sports Days April 23-25

     Feb. 5, 2009 -- Like the traditional rivalry of the annual Army-Navy Football Game, Jim Thorpe Sports Days pits Army, Navy, Marine, Air Force, Coast Guard, Interagency and International Fellow students against each other in an annual match up of the nation's senior service schools.

    "This is a great opportunity to show your service spirit, just like the Army-Navy Game," said Dr. Craig Nation, an Army War College faculty member who has participated in the games as a running coach for ten years.

"The games are a great part of the senior service school experience," he said.

    Participants from the Air War College, Naval War College, Industrial College Of The Armed Forces, National War College, Army War College and the Marine War College will compete in this year's games.

    This year's event will kick off with the opening ceremony on Indian Field at 1 p.m. After the ceremony, the ladies one mile relay and the men's two mile relay will start off the day's events. 

    Nation will serve as an assistant running coach for this year's competition.  Although he has never participated in the games, as an athlete he said he feels that the competition, "builds team work and discipline, and generate relationship that carry over into professional life."

    Nation said he credits the success of the teams to those who coach them.

    "We have had a fantastic team of coaches over the years, all of whom remain dedicated to the program, including Steve Kidder, Karl Thoma, Col. Christine Stark, and current head coach Air Force Col. Ben Leitzel," said Nation.

    He also reflected on his athletic and personal relationship with Col. Brian Allgood, the top runner in the USAWC class of 2002.  Allgood was killed in action when his helicopter crashed in northern Baghdad in January of 2007.

    "Brian gave 110 percent of himself both off and on the track and is a symbol of the warrior spirit and we honor his service," said Nation.

    During the three –day series of sports competitions, student athletes participate in 14 sporting events to include  ladies one-mile relay, men's two-mile relay, ladies 5K run, men's  five- mile run, men's and  women's bowling; men's and women's golf; racquetball; basketball; soccer, softball, tennis, and volleyball.

     In addition to individual medals in each event, the college that accumulates the most points will be awarded the Commandants Cup which maintains the trophy until next year's competition.

   "This is truly a team effort to host this event, it takes everyone from the student athletes, full time employees and many volunteers whom we need to make this event happen," said Chuck Gentile, sports director. Gentile said he needs volunteers to act as road marshals, announcers and help to clean up.

    To volunteer contact Gentile at 245-4343.

Jim Thorpe Sports Days history

    The event is named after Olympian Jim Thorpe who grew to national fame in football, track and other sports. He also attended the Carlisle Industrial Indian School.       

    Thorpe participated in the 1912 Olympic Games and blew away the competition in both the pentathlon and decathlon and set world records that would stand for decades. "This year's event marks the 100th anniversary that Thorpe was named first team All-American.  

     In 1950, the nation's press selected Thorpe as the most outstanding athlete of the first half of the 20th century and in 1996-2001, he was awarded ABC's Wide World of Sports Athlete of the Century for his Olympic accomplishments and as a professional football player.

    Participating in this year's event will be Jim Thorpe's grandson, Mike Koehler, P.h.D., an author of numerous sports books.

   To participate in an event, students should contact the coach for the event. A list of coaches can be found below.

Basketball         Col. Mike Hoadley                                            

Softball                        Col. Christian Brewer                            

Running Events Col. Ben Leitzel                        

                        Dr. Craig Nation                                                                                   

Bowling           Mr. Pat Nolan                                                   

Golf                  Mr. Terry Myers                                                

Tennis               Dr. Marybeth Ulrich                                                                   

Racquetball       Retired Col.  Bob Coon                        

Volleyball          Col. George Teague                                         

                        Retired Col. John Connelly                                

Soccer              Col. Art Loureiro                                               

                        Col. Jim Ruff                                                                                                               

 

 

 

 

 


Kelly Schloesser, Army War College Public Affairs Office
Roundtable becomes a rousing debate on national security, ‘the interagency’

Author Bill Olson (far right) discusses the failings of the interagency alongside fellow panelists Gabriel Marcella, and John Finney. The author roundtable at George Washington University presented the SSI publication “Affairs of State: The Interagency and National Security.” Photo by Kelly Schloesser.

Feb. 25, 2009 -- Few people in this world could gather and intellectually debate the application of national security policy within our major government organizations, discussing shortcomings and providing suggestions for improvement.  

    That rare opportunity occurred on Wednesday, Feb. 25, in our nation’s capitol at George Washington University. Sponsored by the USAWC Strategic Studies Institute, an author roundtable of some of the most experienced minds in government affairs gathered to debate just that. 

    Select authors included on the panel of the SSI-published “Affairs of State: The Interagency and National Security” included Gabriel Marcella, Ph.D., editor & USAWC adjunct faculty, Alan G. Whittaker, Ph.D., Dean, Industrial College of the Armed Forces, William J. Olson, Ph.D., National Defense University, Dennis E. Skocz, Ph.D., Department of State, and John D. Finney, Ph.D., National Guard Bureau and former Department of State. 

    The book analyzes challenges faced by the interagency system as a whole, its weaknesses, and how it can be changed for the better. The authors all brought their own philosophies on how to asses the problems within ‘the interagency’ and of course, how to fix them. Though the authors disagreed over methodology, they all agreed that something needed to be changed.

    The debate also allowed the individual authors to present their findings before many of their experienced national security peers.     

    Participants included foreign dignitaries, former U.S. ambassadors, international economists, members of the National Security Agency, Defense Intelligence Agency, and the Departments of State, Homeland Security, Commerce, and Defense. The crowd debated along with the panelists presenting ideas, posing questions, and sharing their own experiences within the government agencies.  

    Imbalance between the interagency players was designated as one of the most significant problems preventing coordination.

    “The Department of Defense is the big guy in the room. He gets all the resources. So, unless we address that issue first, even if we begin to restructure and redefine the interagency, everyone else will still have to comply with DOD,” said Olson.

    “Right now the DOD has the mission and the resources. Its relationship with the DOS is strained,” said Finney. “There is just no way to ignore that. If we can better balance the relationship the more effective it will be.”

    Olson argued to reorganize the structure of both the State and Defense departments.  

    “We have the military leading the political. Combatant commanders divide the regions of the world and have state department political advisors report to them,” said Olson.  “And yet, it is argued over and over that most regional problems do not have a military solution.  

    “Why not flip roles? Reverse the system and have senior civilians in regional commands and military advisors?” asked Olson.  

    As to why the two major agencies are imbalanced, the National Security Act of 1947 was characterized as extremely outdated.

    Marcella noted that the National Security Act of 1947, which first formed the main government agencies, was created to address a simpler time for a bipolar world.  He argued that the overall structural organization has not changed, the management has not changed, and yet ‘the interagency’ has grown.  

   With significant growth and no reorganization, redundancy in mission among the interagency organizations was also presented as a significant deterrent to achieving national security goals.  

    Audience opinions were as diverse as the panelist.  

    “In our National Security Strategy, where is the line between DHS and NSA?” asked John Dulany, liaison to the Department of Homeland Security. “At first DHS was protecting our international borders and now we are pulled back to domestic issues only.” 

    That’s the major bias in defining strategy, said Skocz.  

    “We are then assuming there is one singular National Security Strategy. One problem. One threat,” said Skocz. 

    “We are not in the Cold War anymore. Containment, for instance, was a singular National Security Strategy. Today, we are constantly dealing with emergent threats and phenomena,” added Whittaker.   

    Olson contended that our National Security Strategy needs to be “a living document.”  He argued it needs to be fluid and consistently reassessed. 

    Myles Frechette cited another important point. The former U.S. Ambassador to Colombia asserted that in his experience the National Security Advisor to the president makes all the difference in the world.  

    “If you provide a president with a sound advisor, he will help direct the president in creating a strategy. If the advisor, like under the previous administration, only presents the bits and pieces of information because it’s what they think the president wants to hear, then you have a completely different strategy,” said Frechette.  

    Whittaker agreed, but countered that at the end of the day the system operates the way the president wants it to operate.  

     Ultimately, over the two-hour discussion, all panelist and many audience members presented numerous failings within the interagency and ideas for reform.  Few were in complete agreement.

    This forum was certainly a first step on the long road ahead, said Marcella.

Find the full book online at http://www.strategicstudiesinstitute.army.mil/pubs/display.cfm?PubID=896.
   


Ken Malick, Dunham Army Health Clinic
Food handling: Keeping your family safe

Food handling safety risks are more common than most people think.  As many as a quarter of Americans suffer a foodborne illness each year, though only a fraction of those cases get linked to high profile outbreaks like the recent salmonella peanut scare.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that foodborne diseases cause approximately 76 million illnesses, 325,000 hospitalizations, and 5,000 deaths in the United States each year.  The next time you have a case of diarrhea that lasts a day or more, chances are better than one in three that it is food illness related.  Common symptoms are serious diarrhea that lasts at least a day and possible nausea, vomiting and/or stomach cramps.

    Four easy steps that you can do to help your family be food safe:

CLEAN:  Bacteria can spread throughout the kitchen and get on hands, cutting boards, knives, and counter tops.  Frequent cleaning with soap and hot water can reduce risk.

SEPARATE:  Cross-contamination is how bacteria spread.  Keep raw meat, poultry and seafood and their juices away from ready-to-eat foods.

COOK:  Even for experienced cooks, the improper heating and preparation of food means bacteria can survive.  Use a food thermometer.  Stir, rotate the dish, and cover food when microwaving.  Bring sauces, soups, and gravies to a rolling boil when reheating.

CHILL:  Bacteria spread fastest at temperatures between 40°F and 140ºF, so chilling food through this temperature danger zone within 2 hours is one of the most effective ways to reduce the risk of foodborne illness.

     To find out more about food safety, visit the US Department of Agriculture web site www.befoodsafe.gov or the CDC at http://www.cdc.gov/foodsafety/.

 

 

 



Lt. Col. Frank Misurelli, Army War College Public Affairs Office 

"Spirit of the Carlisle Indian School competition lives on with Jim Thorpe Sports Day"

March 3, 2009 -- "The Carlisle Indian School spirit of competitiveness and winning lives on with the Jim Thorpe Sports Day competition," said George Yuda, whose father, Montreville Speed Yuda, played baseball with Jim Thorpe and graduated from the Carlisle Indian School in 1913. The 86-year-old Yuda spoke about his memories of meeting Jim Thorpe and the Carlisle Indian School as if they occurred yesterday.

    "Dad played second base and Thorpe played the outfield for the Carlisle Indian School baseball team called the "Outlaws" but Jim loved the contact sports like football," said Yuda.

    Yuda will return to the site of their athletic glory April 24 for the opening ceremonies of the Jim Thorpe Sports Day, which pits students from the Air War College, Naval War College, Industrial College of the Armed Forces, National War College, Army War College and the Marine War College in an annual match up of the nation's senior service schools.

   "Dad and I know Jim Thorpe felt they had a place in their hearts for the Carlisle Indian School, it feels like a homecoming," said Yuda.

    Yuda said he was amazed on the endurance and stamina that his father and Thorpe must have had to play baseball and especially football.  "Dad and Thorpe took a beating with very little or no protective equipment if any, but they both had a lot of spirit," exclaimed Yuda.

    Yuda met Thorpe when he was ten years old in 1933. "Thorpe would drop in unannounced to see my dad on his way to New York City," he said.   

    Yuda reflected on how Thorpe loved the school and his coach Glenn "Pop" Warner. 

    This year marks the 100th anniversary of Thorpe being named first team "All American"

    As for Thorpe's title as "All American", Yuda said, "Thorpe was the greatest football player on the playing field."

    Yuda said he thinks that the competition is a continuation of athletic excellence at Carlisle.

    "The Carlisle Indian School was noted for its great sport teams and the Army War College carries on this great tradition.


Army Substance Abuse Program
National Inhalants and Poisons Week is March 15-21

They're all over your house. They're in your child's school. In fact, you probably picked some up the last time you went to the grocery store. Educate yourself. Find out about inhalants before your children do. 

    Most parents are in the dark regarding the popularity and dangers of inhalant use. But children are quickly discovering that common household products are inexpensive to obtain, easy to hide and the easiest way to get high. According to national surveys, inhaling dangerous products is becoming one of the most widespread problems in the country. It is as popular as marijuana with young people. More than a million people used inhalants to get high just last year. By the time a student reaches the 8th grade, one in five will have used inhalants.

    What is inhalant use?Inhalant use refers to the intentional breathing of gas or vapors with the purpose of reaching a high. Inhalants are legal, everyday products which have a useful purpose, but can be misused. You're probably familiar with many of these substances -- paint, glue and others. But you probably don't know that there are more than 1,000 products that are very dangerous when inhaled -- things like typewriter correction fluid, air-conditioning refrigerant, felt tip markers, spray paint, air freshener, butane and even cooking spray. See Products Abused as Inhalants for more details.

    Who is at risk? Inhalants are an equal opportunity method of substance abuse. Statistics show that young, white males have the highest usage rates. Hispanic and American Indian populations also show high rates of usage. See Characteristics of Users and Signs of an Inhalant User for more details.

    What can inhalants do to the body? Nearly all abused products produce effects similar to anesthetics, which slow down the body's function. Varying upon level of dosage, the user can experience slight stimulation, feeling of less inhibition or loss of consciousness. The user can also suffer from Sudden Sniffing Death Syndrome. This means the user can die the 1st, 10th or 100th time he or she uses an inhalant. Other effects include damage to the heart, kidney, brain, liver, bone marrow and other organs. Results similar to Fetal Alcohol Syndrome may also occur when inhalants are used during pregnancy. Inhalants are physically and psychologically addicting and users suffer withdrawal symptoms. See Damage Inhalants Can Cause to the Body and Brain, Long-Term Effects of Inhalant Usage and Signs and Symptoms of a Long-Term User for more details.

    What can I do if someone I know is huffing and appears in a state of crisis? If someone you know is huffing, the best thing to do is remain calm and seek help. Agitation may cause the huffer to become violent, experience hallucinations or suffer heart dysfunction which can cause Sudden Sniffing Death Syndrome. Make sure the room is well ventilated and call EMS. If the person is not breathing, administer CPR. Once recovered, seek professional treatment and counseling. See What To Do If Someone is Huffing for more details.

    Can inhalant use be treated? Treatment facilities for inhalant users are rare and difficult to find. Users suffer a high rate of relapse, and require thirty to forty days or more of detoxification. Users suffer withdrawal symptoms which can include hallucinations, nausea, excessive sweating, hand tremors, muscle cramps, headaches, chills and delirium tremens. Follow-up treatment is very important. If you or someone you know is seeking help for inhalant abuse, you can contact the National Inhalant Prevention Coalition at 1-800-269-4237 for information on treatment centers and general information on inhalants. Through a network of nationwide contacts, NIPC can help (but not guarantee) finding a center in your area that treats inhalant use.

    What should I tell my child or students about inhalants? It is never too early to teach your children about the dangers of inhalants. Don't just say "not my kid." Inhalant use starts as early as elementary school and is considered a gateway to further substance abuse. Parents often remain ignorant of inhalant use or do not educate their children until it is too late. Inhalants are not drugs. They are poisons and toxins and should be discussed as such. There are, however, a few age appropriate guidelines that can be useful when educating your children. See Tips for Teachers for more details on how much to tell your children or students in the classroom about inhalants.

    Inhalants are a diverse group of organic solvents, volatile substances, and propellant gases that are intentionally concentrated and inhaled for their psychoactive effects, which range from an alcohol-like intoxication to hallucinations.

The above information was taken from the National Inhalant Prevention Coalition site and the Army Center for Substance Abuse site. For additional information contact the Carlisle Barracks Army Substance Abuse Prevention office at 245 – 4576.


2009 Army War College class print now available

Feb. 5, 2009 -- The 2009 Army War College class print, "Answering Liberty's Call," by Don Troiani is now available. 

    Now available for a special price of $120.

    Contact your seminar gift committee representative for more information or contact the USAWC gift committee at box 377 or  Col. Michael J. Dominique at  Michael.Dominique@us.army.mil  for more information.  

 


Thomas Zimmerman and Spc. Jennifer Rick, Army War College Public Affairs Office
Students get first-hand look at future military technology 

Two Bucknell college students talk to one of the vendors during the Robotics Day demonstration Feb. 19 in the Root Hall Gym. Robotics Day was the finale for a three-day technology exploration designed to orient Army War College students to the Future Combat Systems, robotic technology, and expert speakers in the field of civilian and military technology development. Photo by Spc. Jennifer Rick.  

 

Feb. 19, 2009 – The Root Hall gymnasium looked like a Sci-Fi geek's dream on Feb. 19 as it was teeming with robots of all shapes and sizes as part of the Robotics day demonstration.

    Robotics Day was the finale for a three-day technology exploration designed to orient Army War College students to the Future Combat Systems, robotic technology, and expert speakers in the field of civilian and military technology development.

    The three-day program is an important learning opportunity for the students, according to Maj. Gen. Robert Williams, USAWC commandant.

    "We hope to create a better understanding of the vital relationship between government and industry in providing capabilities to our warfighters," said Williams. "Our goal is that the knowledge you gain here will assist you in the role of advisor to senior leaders on how to best support our warfighters while balancing things like cost, schedule, performance and risk." 

·         Feb. 17 filled the campus with the Future Combat Systems, ranging from the NLOS, the Nonline-of-Sight Cannon to the MULE, the Multifunction Utility/Logistics and Equipment Vehicle

·         Feb. 18 featured a panel discussion and discussion with students about acquisition and industry challenges and opportunities

·         Feb. 19 brought mechanical creations large and small and with varying tasks, most of which are designed to perform dangerous in-theater tasks that put may Soldiers at risk. War College students were joined by local college and high school students who watched the future technologies in action and asked questions about the engineering and about application of these tools in support of Soldiers.

    "Robotics Day introduces the students to technology they will see on the battlefield," said Bill Waddell, director of the Command and Control Group. "It provides an educational opportunity for them to learn about some of the things they will be helping to make decisions about when they leave here."

 

Local high school and college students were also invited to the event. Photo by Spc. Jennifer Rick.    

 

    "We want to show the students some of the advances in technologies that the Army and civilian companies are coming up with to make their jobs easier," said Bob Barnes, who helped manage the demo event. "There is a good chance these students will encounter some of these types of machines in the near future."  Highlights included --

·         MDARS security robot – Currently deployed protecting Army Ammunition depots in the western U.S., it will operate autonomously on Indian Field

·         T- Hawk flyable vertical takeoff and landing UAV now in use as the FCS Tier One UAV.

    iRobot demonstrated the PackBot, a Small Unmanned Ground Vehicle, that has been used to detect bombs and conduct dangerous military operations while keeping our troops safe in Iraq and Afghanistan.  The robots are controlled remotely and allow for the safe detonation of IEDs according to Jeff Ostaszewski, of iRobot.

    "It's important that we learn about the new technology and what is possible now and in the future," said Marine Lt. Col. Robert Sofge, student. "We are seeing an increase in the use of robotic tools. It's good to be able to take it off the slides and be able to really see it and put our hands on it."

    While some of the robots are still new, and their potential not fully realized, some of them are already being used every day in Iraq and Afghanistan to save the lives of U.S. servicemembers.

    One new technology is the Chemical and Biological Agent Detector by ChemImage. This robot shines a light on a sample, and based on the light pattern that bounces back, tells exactly what the agent is, explained Dr. Chuck Gardner, vice president of engineering at ChemImage. It was originally developed to test the area around casualties to see if it is contaminated, keeping other Soldiers from being put at risk.

   

An Army War College student talks to one of the FCS personnel in the Root Hall Gym Feb. 17. Photo by Thomas Zimmerman.

    Another new project is a portable Intensive Care Unit, which takes a casualty's vital signs, so that a doctor can help a patient remotely, said. Dr. Sylvain Cardin, senior medical science and technology consultant at the Army Medical Research and Materiel Command. She described efforts to incorporate other technologies into the robot, to go as far as treating the casualty. Supported by ultrasound, for example, it can stop and cauterize internal bleeding, said Cardin.

   In use on the battlefield today is the TALON SWORDS (Special Weapons Observation Reconnaissance Direct-action System). This robot has the ability to disarm and disable unexploded ordnance, move it to a safer location, blow it up in place, and more. It is controlled by a small control system that can be worn in conjunction with a Soldier's other equipment, said Jake Warren, representative for Foster-Miller.

 

Industry Day

     On Wed. Feb 18, Industry Day brought together civilian partners and two leaders from FCS for a panel discussion in Bliss Hall.  

   "All the speakers came from very unique acquisition backgrounds," said student Dennis Haag, who introduced the panel. "All involved in getting capabilities from new systems out to the end users. Three different backgrounds but all three are needed to get you that final product."

    The keynote speaker was Charles Hall, Executive Vice President of Combat Systems Business, General Dynamics. He spoke about the American defense industry, the relationship between the government and industry and thanked the students for the service to their country.

    "It inspiring to know that the future of our country is in such capable hands," he said.

Speaker Helen Greiner, co-founder of iRobot and Droid Works, discussed the ways that technology can improve the lives of Soldiers and even save lives. She pointed out that some of the technology already ha have real-world uses.

    "The U.S. is leading the world in all unmanned systems," she said. "They have been credited to saving the lives of hundreds of Soldiers and thousands of civilians."

    She felt this was just a glimpse of what may come.

    "The capabilities you see today are just the tip of the iceberg," said Grainer. 

   Scott Davis, deputy program manager for platforms at Future Combat Systems, spoke about the good and bad of FCS and what the future holds for the program.

    "The Future Combat Systems is the cornerstone of Army Modernization," said Davis. "FCS is the Army's promise to provide Soldiers the best equipment and technology available as soon as practical."

    Col. Michael Williamson, project manager of Future Combat Systems Integration, spoke about the importance of the integration of the different elements of FCS.

    "We have to maintain interoperability. There are some amazing things out there but we need to make sure it can work in all environments."

     FCS is not just a technology development program-it is the development of new Brigade Combat Teams-these new brigades, with more infantry, better equipment, unmatched situational awareness and communications allowing complete domination in asymmetric ground warfare while allowing the Army to build a force that can sustain itself in remote areas.

    "FCS is the core of the Army's modernization program," said Williams. "The capabilities they provide are the most demanded by commanders in the field today."

 

FCS background

    The FCS program consists of eight new Manned Ground Vehicles (MGVs), a family of unmanned air and ground vehicles, the Non Line of Sight-Launch System, and advanced tactical and urban sensors that are all connected by a state-of-the-art network. Working together, these systems will help Soldiers share real-time information across the battlefield. Overall, FCS will provide Soldiers vastly increased situational awareness, survivability, and lethality-ensuring they can take the fight to the enemy before the enemy has time to react.

    Fielding for the first full FCS Brigade is slated for fiscal year 2015, but FCS technology is being accelerated to the Army's modular brigades through Spin Outs. These Spin Outs will allow Soldiers to utilize FCS equipment and technology as it becomes available. Spin Out 1 consisting of FCS (BCT) Battle Command capability, JTRS (GMR/HMS), Unattended Ground Sensors, the Non Line of Sight-Launch System, the small unmanned ground vehicle (SUGV) and the Class I Block O Unmanned Air Vehicle is currently being evaluated by Soldiers of the Army's Evaluation Task Force (AETF).

    FCS has moved from concept to reality. Today, there are currently 75 FCS hardware tests and evaluations ongoing across the country. Equipment is in the hands of Soldiers with successes such as movement of images from FCS sensors across the battlefield using the network, field tests of FCS unmanned systems at Fort Bliss, Texas, and delivery of the first FCS Manned Ground Vehicle (MGV) prototype, the Non Line of Sight-Cannon (NLOS-C) for evaluations to prove full system viability.

   

 


'Buddies' needed for 19th Annual Special Olympics at local Navy Base

  "Buddies" and other volunteers are needed to support the 19th annual Adult Area-M Special Olympics games to be held Saturday, April 25, on the Naval Support Activity in Mechanicsburg.

  The annual competition is the base's largest event, one that brings together athletes, families, and volunteers from all across the mid-state.

  Over 150 Special Olympians, ages 19 and up, will be competing in track and field events, as well as, in basketball, soccer, softball, swimming, and bowling.

  Volunteers must be 18 or older.  Event day begins rain or shine with an opening ceremony and "parade of athletes" at 9 a.m., followed by competitions from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m., and from 1 p.m. until the closing ceremony at 2:30 p.m.

  For sign-up information, contact Joe Krause at (717)605-1786 or e-mail: joseph.krause@navy.mil.

 


Suzanne Reynolds, Army War College Public Affairs Office
Next Great Decisions Lecture to focus on Cuba 

Feb. 25, 2009 --  "Kiss the embargo goodbye."  This concept will be discussed at the next Great Decisions lecture on Friday, Feb. 27 at 1 p.m. in the Carlisle Barracks Post Chapel Assembly Room.

     The presentation will cover the history of the Cuban Revolution, Cuba and the United States during the Cold War and the Cuban state since the end of the Cold War.       

    Col. Alex Crowther of the U.S. Army War College is the sixth of eight presenters taking part in the 2009 Great Decisions program.      

     "I will identify five separate historical events that make the Cuban-American relationship unique," said Crowther.   "The current relations between the two countries, possible scenarios for post-Castro regimes in Cuba, and will make some predictions on which way the relationship will go."

    The Great Decisions lecture series is sponsored by the Carlisle Barracks Spouses' Club.  This program has been a source of information for more than 40 years.

        At the next lecture, scheduled for March 6, Dr. Sherifa Zuhur of the U.S. Army War College will discuss Egypt as a major player in the World. 

 


101st Army Reserve Birthday April 15

Feb. 27, 2009 -- The Army War College and Carlisle Barracks will celebrate the 101st birthday of the Army Reserve April 15, at 4:30 p.m. in the LVCC. The guest speaker will be Maj. Gen. Alan Bell, Army Reserve Command Deputy Commander.

 


Dunham Clinic to close Thursday afternoons starting April 2
Clinic will also close at noon March 5

Feb. 25, 2009 -- Beginning Thursday, April 2, Dunham US Army Health Clinic and its three subordinate clinics at The Defense Distribution Center in New Cumberland, Fort Indiantown Gap and Letterkenney Army Depot will be closed every Thursday Afternoon.  The clinics will close at noon to complete mandatory training and administrative requirements.

    "This dedicated weekly closure time will optimize our ability to care for our patients," said Col. Kenneth Trzepkowski, Dunham Clinic Commander. This closure will include all ancillary services to include Pharmacy, Radiology, Laboratory and Immunizations. 

    Currently Doctors and support staff are being taken away from patient care in order to complete these requirements, which is not efficient, according to Trzepkowski.

    "Our goal is to have the right number of providers seeing patients, with the right number of nursing and ancillary staff in support, to take care of your medical needs," he said. "Our ultimate goal here at Dunham is to maximize the time that providers are seeing patients in the most efficient manner."

     Trzepkowski said that after closer inspection these closures should actually create more patient availability for the patients, as the clinic will be able to remain open on most training holidays, increasing the availability of appointments to the patients we care for.


Spc. Jennifer Rick, Army War College Public Affairs Office
Post starts Army Emergency Relief Campaign with kick-off breakfast

Retired Lt. Gen. Robert F. Foley, director of Army Emergency Relief, was the guest speaker at the Army Emergency Relief kick-off breakfast Feb. 27, held at the Letort View Community Center. he said that in four years AER gave $250 million to Soldiers and their families in need. Photo by Megan Clugh.

February 27, 2009 – The Letort View Community Center was filled with red, white and blue balloons and decorations Feb. 27 for Carlisle Barracks' Army Emergency Relief kick-off breakfast.

    The guest speaker for the event was retired Lt. Gen. Robert F. Foley, director of Army Emergency Relief.

    Foley spoke about the importance of AER in taking care of the Army's most valuable asset – its Soldiers. He said that from 2003 to 2007 AER gave $250 million in grants and loans to Soldiers and families in need.

    "People always have the ability to access AER if needed," he said. "We have never denied a Soldier when proof of need was there."

    Foley cited many examples of AER helping a Soldier in need, with issues ranging from illnesses to traveling for a funeral to paying rent.

    "If a Soldier needs help - we are there," he said.

    The program also included a video by AER Headquarters and a photo slideshow from the Carlisle Barracks Headquarters Company.

    "Today's program was all driven by our Noncommissioned officers; a well executed program to be proud of," said Command Sgt. Maj. Jose Powell, installation CSM. "I spoke with Lt. Gen. Foley and he stated that he noticed the passion and professionalism in which our noncommissioned officers executed today's Army Emergency Relief kick off breakfast, in support of our military community; Soldiers, their families and our retirees."

Army Emergency Relief Annual Campaign

What is it? 

   
The Army conducts its Army Emergency Relief (AER) Annual Campaign from Mar. 1st through May 15th to increase Soldiers awareness of this valuable benefit and offer Soldiers the opportunity to help their fellow Soldiers by donating to AER. In addition to the Annual campaign, AER accepts unsolicited donations from individual donors and corporations anytime.

    AER is a private nonprofit organization incorporated in 1942 by the Secretary of War. AER's sole mission is to provide financial assistance to Soldiers and their families. AER assistance is provided in the form of interest-free loans and grants for:

    Emergency assistance to include rent, food, travel, car repair, funeral, medical and dental expenses Children and spouse scholarships Incidental expenses for Soldiers medically evacuated from Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom Support to families of fallen Soldiers

    AER assistance is available 24/7 and worldwide. The Army operates 87 AER offices at U.S. Army installations where Soldiers and their families may seek AER assistance. To ensure access to AER assistance, Soldiers and their families may also go to any of the other Military Aid Societies (Air Force Aid Society, Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society, and Coast Guard Mutual Assistance) or the American Red Cross.

What has the Army done?

    By conducting its annual campaign and operating 87 local AER offices worldwide, the Army not only helps raise critical support for AER, but improves Soldiers access to AER for much needed assistance. In 2008, AER disbursed $83 million in financial assistance to over 71,000 Soldiers and their families.

What continued efforts does the Army have planned for the future?

    At all levels, the Army supports AER and its annual AER campaign with many local installations conducting various campaign kick-off events to further increase awareness and access to AER assistance.

Why is it important to the Army?

    The well-being of the Army's All-Volunteer Force depends on the well-being of our Soldiers and families. Army Emergency Relief is dedicated to "Helping the Army Take Care of Its Own" and provides Army leaders a valuable asset in accomplishing their command responsibility and moral obligation as leaders to ensure a ready source for financial assistance to Soldiers and their families.

     For more visit the AER Web site http://www.aerhq.org/