Banner Archive for February 2016
 

Kids learn about heart health courtesy of Dunham experts

Jo Steep, Dunham’s Community Health Nurse, visited the children at the McConnell Youth Center for Healthy Heart Month in February.  Education was provided on Sodium Chloride as another name for salt, reading food labels and consuming all foods in "moderation." The children watched a short video about a Pizza Farm and enjoyed a "Solve the Riddle" game that involved learning to read sodium contents in foods and portion sizes. They were provided a handout on "Tasty Treats" that are healthy for the heart and good to eat.  At the end of the presentation they were given one Hershey Kiss to exemplify moderation, while enjoying the flavanols found in chocolate that are actually good for the heart.


National Prayer Breakfast a reminder to be prepared

Chap. (Maj. Gen.) Paul K. Hurley, the 24th Chief of Chaplains for the United States Army, was the guest speaker for the Carlisle Barracks National Prayer Breakfast Feb. 25 at the LVCC.

For more picture visit www.facebook.com/usawc

 

Members of the Carlisle Barracks community came together today for food, fellowship and a reminder to be prepared in all aspects of their lives as part of National Prayer Breakfast here.

Chap. (Maj. Gen.) Paul K. Hurley, the 24th Chief of Chaplains for the United States Army, was the guest speaker for the Carlisle Barracks National Prayer Breakfast Feb. 25 at the LVCC.

The Army War College Class of 2013 graduate reminded the attendees that time is valuable and to take the time to ensure they are developing spiritual preparedness.

"This is an important component of who we all are as human beings," he said. "Connecting to God is important, no matter what your faith is."

 

Hurley spoke on the importance of being spiritually prepared in order to be effective as a leader, father, husband and friend.

Chap. (Col) Greg D’Emma, Garrison Chaplain, shared stories of his time with Hurley as a student, and even engaged in some friendly joking about the Yankees-Red Sox rivalry. Hurley, as Boston –area native, and D’Emma, a New York-native often joked about who had the better team and other spirited discussions. This was D’Emma’s final prayer breakfast as his military career will end later this Spring.

Members of the chapel staff read scripture, prayers and the crowd was once again treated to the dulcet tone of faculty member Bert Tussing singing the “Soldier’s Hymn,” and song he wrote with retired Lt. Col. John Wheatley a few years ago and has been a requested performance at each of the past breakfasts.

The annual event was hosted by the Chapel staff, with all proceeds from donations going to benefit Project SHARE, a foodbank in Carlisle.


Black History Month commemorating where black history was made

Every year, Black History Month uses a theme to celebrate the contributions made by African- Americans. The national theme for 2016 is “Hallowed Grounds: Sites of African-American Memories.”

Black History Month’s culmination is celebrated at Carlisle Barracks on Feb. 26 at 11:45 a.m. in Bliss Hall. Perspectives in political, national, education and military will be given by a panel made up of civilian, USAWC faculty and residents students. Awards for the outstanding essays will be presented, followed by cultural food in the Bliss Hall Atrium.

To keep these memories alive Carlisle Barracks throughout the month of February has displayed on digital signs African-American service members who have been recipients of the Medal of Honor. Honoring the likes of Powhatan Beaty, lst Lt. Vernon J. Baker, and John R. Fox.

Mixed with the Medal Honor Recipients are “did you know” displays telling the story of African-American such as: Charity Adams Earleythe first African-American commissioned in the women’s Army auxiliary, Gen. Benjamin O. Davis Jr., the first African-American General in the U.S. Air Force and Shirley Chisholmthe first African-American Candidate for U.S. president.

U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center continues the commemoration of African-American History Month by highlighting a significant artifact and piece of Civil War history, which represents the dedicated service of African-American Soldiers in the U.S. Army. http://www.carlisle.army.mil/ahec/feature.cfm

 Area school children between grades 6th, 7th and 8th are invited to participate in Black History Month essay contest hosted by the Army War College.  This year Eagle View Middle School; Good Hope Middle School; Lamberton Middle School; Mechanicsburg Middle School; Wilson Middle School; Saint Patrick School; Yellow Breeches Middle School partnered with Carlisle Barracks for this Black History Month recognition event.


 

Robert D. Martin, USAWC PAO
Gen. Via offers insight to leadership

The Commanding General, U.S. Army Materiel Command, offered insights of leadership, drawing from his own experiences and those learned from peers, to Army War College students during his visit to Bliss hall, Feb. 16.

Gen. Via spoke about the process of reflecting back on leaderships skills, how a leader is to provide encouraging influence which allows for a positive environment and that positive feedback sets the tone to soldiers within their organization.  He noted why professional reputations matter and to build relationships along the way because at the strategic level, their job will be to build partnerships.

Via touched on the significance of Army values of character, loyalty, integrity and trust and how some that thought they never would lose theirs, have.  To be mindful situations and to set high standards for yourself and the organizations that the resident students were going to lead. He also discussed the importance of balancing work and family, and that the only way to teach those around him of the importance of balance was to set the example.

General Dennis L. Via, a class of 1999 U.S. Army War College graduate. Assumed his duties as Commander, U.S. Army Materiel Command August 7, 2012.  


'Hire Our Heroes' workshop set for Feb. 24

This employment workshop for Spouses, Transitioning Service members, Veterans jobs seekers in the area will be held at the Letort View Community Center, 313 Lovell Avenue, 11 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. This is the second in a series of employment events leading up to March 31st Job Fair at the Carlisle Expo Center.   At the event you can learn about:

- How to build your LinkedIn profile

- Gain valuable insight on career planning

- Digital tools inclduing "Career Spark"

- Resume help and professional headshots

Register online at http://carlislebarracks.carlisle.army.mil/MWR/ACSEventRegistration.cfm


 

FY17 budget provides raise for Soldiers but focuses on readiness

WASHINGTON (Army News Service, Feb. 10, 2016) -- In its fiscal year 2017 budget request, the Army - similar to its sister services - has requested for Soldiers a 1.6 percent pay raise, the largest increase in four years.

"The 2017 request for a 1.6 percent pay raise for our service members ... recognizes the unique demands and sacrifices of our service members," said Lt. Gen. Anthony R. Ierardi, director of force structure, resources and assessment with the J-8 directorate, part of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. "It buys down that gap between where we want to be and where we are. The increase in that pay is the largest one over the last four-year period."

Ierardi spoke at the Pentagon, Feb. 9, where he outlined key portions of the FY17 Department of Defense budget.

The services have also requested a 2.9 percent increase in basic allowance for housing, and a 3.4 percent increase in basic allowance for subsistence.

READINESS IS PARAMOUNT

Outlining Army budget specifics was Maj. Gen. Thomas A. Horlander, director of the Army budget.

"Prioritize readiness," said Horlander, calling out just two words on a slide he used to brief the Army's budget. "As we built this budget and sought to strike the best possible balance within our top-line funding level, we ensured that our absolute No. 1 priority remained readiness. This remains our commitment to the nation - to send its sons and daughters as ready as they can possibly be for the missions they are sent to do."

That emphasis on readiness is in line with Army Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Milley's own priorities.

"Readiness to fight and win - ground combat is and will remain the U.S. Army's No. 1 priority. And there will be no other No. 1," Milley said at his swearing in last August. "We will always be ready to fight today, and we will always prepare to fight tomorrow."

The Army budget request for FY17 is $148 billion dollars. That includes $125 billion in the base budget, plus an additional $23 billion in overseas contingency operations funding. The request is approximately the same as what was enacted for the FY16 budget.

Within the base budget, requests across all top-line budgetary categories have decreased from what was enacted in the FY16 budget. The only exception is the request for operations and maintenance. That increased from $43.8 billion in FY16 to $45.2 billion in FY17.

"This is the funding primarily used to generate current readiness," Horlander said. "Resourcing constraints did not allow us to modernize our equipment and facilities at the same pace as we sought to minimize the risk to current readiness."

Readiness, he said, has been maintained and protected - at the cost of modernization and end strength.

For the Regular Army, the budget requests $35.4 billion for operations and maintenance funding, "that seeks to resource a more balanced readiness across the force, instead of the tiered readiness of previous years, where only approximately one-third of the Army's brigade combat teams were ready for contingency force operations," Horlander said.

Now, Horlander said, the Army's readiness goals are to have two-thirds of its Regular Army forces ready at any time.

To support an Army focused on "decisive action" readiness, and with a capability to conduct "major combat operations," the budget proposal requests funding to support 19 combat training center rotations.

"These rotations are focused on decisive-action training for both the Regular Army and the reserve components," Horlander said.

Funding is also requested for regional engagement activities and training missions with allies and strategic partners. That includes activities like Pacific Pathways.

Additionally, the FY17 budget request asks for increased funding for sustainment of Army equipment and an increase in depot maintenance to bring Army equipment to a greater level of repair.

For the reserve components, the budget requests $9.6 billion in operations and maintenance funding. For the Guard, the funding, like for the Regular Army, "seeks to grow readiness to include decisive action training, sustain the force, and fund critical base operations requirements."

MODERNIZATION

For FY17, the Army's modernization budget has gone down from an enacted $24 billion in FY16 to a requested $22.6 billion in FY17. That $22.6 billion includes $15.1 billion for procurement as well as $7.5 billion for research, development, testing and evaluation.

That reduction represents a risk where the Army has opted for readiness over modernization.

"We assess that this risk will continue until we achieve a greater balance between readiness, end strength and modernization, early into the next decade," Horlander said.

Nevertheless, the budget request includes 12 new-start programs, and no program terminations, he said. The request supports aviation modernization, funds improvements to ground combat vehicle fleets, and begins efforts to increase lethality and mobility for brigade combat teams.

"The Army requires a very broad and encompassing set of modernization efforts to be capable of being successful in any number of diverse missions in support of the combatant commanders," he said. "Our focus remains on the Soldier and the squad, providing aviation and combat vehicles that provide mobility, protection and fire power; to mission command that enables situational awareness and networking; to the Soldier portfolio that provides the individual Soldier with lethality, survivability, and increased visibility."

Within the $22.6 billion modernization budget request, the Army has asked for $15.1 billion for procurement. This request focuses heavily on aircraft procurement - about $3.6 billion is requested for aviation. The investment plan is in line with the Army's Aviation Restructure Initiative, though Horlander said that with the recent release of the recommendations by the National Commission on the Future of the Army, "the Army is studying the recommendations and is assessing the impact to its FY17 funding program."

For aviation, the budget request prioritizes modernization of Apache, Black Hawk and Chinook helicopter fleets, Horlander said. He said the Chinook fleet conversion, for instance, will be completed in FY18. He also said the budget includes funding for aircraft survivability improvements.

Within ground combat vehicles, the FY17 request provides funding for improvements to the M1 Abrams tank, the Bradley Fighting Vehicle, fielding a third Stryker double-V hull brigade set, and conversion of additional flat-bottom hull Strykers to double-V hulls for a fourth double-V hull Stryker set.

The research, development test and evaluation budget request for FY17 is about the same as that which was enacted for FY16. Within that budget are two new program starts for the Army infantry, including "a ground mobile vehicle for a nine-man infantry squad, and a mobile protected fire power that enhances direct fire capabilities of infantry brigade combat teams," Horlander said.

INSTALLATION READINESS

The Army's FY17 budget request for facilities is approximately $1.3 billion, less than what was enacted in FY16. It includes "one of the smallest military construction budgets in recent years."

For FY17, the Army hopes to fund 29 military construction projects across the force, including 15 within the Regular Army, 10 within the Army National Guard, and four within the Army Reserve.

Within the facilities request, only Army Family housing saw an increase. There, growth is aimed at two Family housing construction projects in Korea.

OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS

This year, the request for overseas contingency operations, or OCO, funds totals $25 billion, Horlander said. It supports Operation Freedom's Sentinel in Afghanistan, Kuwait and Qatar. It also supports Operation Spartan Shield within U.S. Central Command, Inherent Resolve in Iraq, and the European Reassurance Initiative, or ERI.

The ERI, Horlander said, "is a means to ensure our NATO allies, and to deter a resurgent Russia, and constitutes much of the growth in the Army's OCO request."

The $2.8 billion requested within OCO funds for ERI supports the rotation of an armored brigade combat team and its enablers. It also supports a full armored brigade combat team static set of prepositioned stocks.

NEW CHALLENGES

Horlander said the Army's budget for FY17 was designed with readiness as a No. 1 priority. But other issues have driven its development as well.

Horlander cited five "evolving security challenges" that are now a threat to the United States -- challenges that have recently been called out by defense secretary. Among those challenges are a return of "great power competition" - which is evidenced by Russian actions in Europe, and a rising China; the threat to the United States and its allies by North Korea; Iranian influence; and the continuing fight against global terrorism.

The general emphasized the importance of balancing readiness, end strength and modernization as a way to sustain the ground forces that will be necessary to generate support to combatant commanders now and into the future.

He said reduction in modernization and equipping accounts puts the Army's technological advantage at risk. Reductions to funding for installations and infrastructure puts future readiness at risk, he said, because Army facilities will require more funding in the future to compensate for years of disrepair.

"Marginalizing one component of readiness to benefit the other may net a near-term solution, but may create an unacceptable risk in the out years," he said. "The U.S. Army needs to retain force structure and end strength, readiness and cutting edge equipment - all critical components to our national security."


Air Force Chief creates common cause with the Army War College's joint, interagency and multinational students

Carlisle Barracks, Feb. 1, 2016 -- U.S. and international students leaned forward to ask the four-star Service Chief about Europe, Syria, modernization, recruiting, active-Guard-Reserve force integration, and other issues for which the responses were candid, thoughtful, and at times humorous.
 
Gen. Mark Welsh, Chief of Staff United State Air Force, gestures to the students, faculty and staff during his presentation at Bliss Hall, Feb. 1.
 
Gen. Mark Welsh made his fourth visit in four years to address the joint, interagency and multinational student body of the Army War College.  His emphasis on shared experiences and shared values about 'why we took an oath' inferred his willingness to give credence and respect to their questions today in Bliss Hall.
 
 
Senior leader speakers are a hallmark of the resident student body experience. They contribute insights about decision-making at strategic levels, and Welsh's responses to student questions consistently role-modeled attention to the underlying principle of teamwork within the joint, interagency, and international security environment.
 
Master sgt. Alicia Coil, NCOIC, AF Personnel, shakes the hand of Gen. Welsh as she receives the Air Force Chief of Staff coin. Coil sewed on Master sgt. the same day as the Gen. Welsh visited the U.S. Army War College. Bliss Hall, 1 Feb.
 
Doing so, he noted the success that brought the students to this part of their careers, at the Army War College, where they prepare to be successful on a larger stage.
 
In parallel, he acknowledged the Air Force's domination in missions in the

air, space and cyberspace, even as the Service stretches for the strategic agility needed to stay ahead of the accelerating pace of change.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chief of Staff of the U.S. Air Force, Gen. Mark Welsh speaks to resident Air Force students, giving them personal insights to leadership and the future of the Air Force during his visit the U.S. Army War College, Bliss Hall, Feb.1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

General Mark Welsh, the Chief of Staff of the US Air Force, for a talk with the Resident Class of 2016. GEN Welsh reminded students and faculty of why we serve, the priorities we must maintain, and the teamwork and trust necessary for success in the joint force.


Barracks offers fun, activities for all this month

 

Command Sgt. Maj. Nelson Maldonado, and Lt. Col. Greg Ank, Garrison Commander.

Now that we’ve all dug out from over 30 inches of snow that blanketed Carlisle Barracks last month, it’s time to get out and enjoy some of the great programs and opportunities this month.

If you haven’t already, now is the time to check out our Sports and Fitness Program. MWR provides year-round athletics, fitness classes and instruction for the entire community, ranging from volleyball, basketball and flag football to Zumba, TRX and Army Combatives. There's something for everyone. Check out the full schedule for classes at http://www.carlislemwr.com/images/sports/feb2016.pdf

Thorpe Hall Fitness Center

Whether you are looking for the latest equipment, personal trainers, or a variety of exercise classes, Jim Thorpe Fitness Center has it all for you. You'll find all the amenities you need in an environment that makes you feel at home, regardless of your fitness level.

Root Hall Gym 

Located adjacent to the Root Hall academic building, is the sports and intramurals office. The gym has a full size basketball and volleyball court, regulation-size racquetball court, men's and women's locker rooms with saunas. Seminar groups also conduct basketball and volleyball programs here. 

Indian Field Fitness Center

Located across the street from Root Hall, the center features cardio equipment, a free weight area, treadmills, stationary bikes and a women’s only area from 9-11 a.m. daily.

Being stuck inside a gym not your thing? Get out and enjoy the weather in Central PA with our Outdoor Recreation department. ODR has multiple trips planned over the next few months including cross country skiing, sled and show shoe rentals and bike maintenance classes. Leisure Travel Services also has trips coming up including the Harlem Globetrotters in March, the Hands-On House in Lancaster, Baltimore Inner Harbor, discount tickets to the National Aquarium and more.

At the LVCC, we’re officially opening the Pershing Tavern, the brand-new pub at the Letort View Community Center on from Feb. 10, 4- 10 p.m. Food and drink specials will be available, come out and see the newest addition to the post.

The post chapel is also hosting some great activities this month including a Valentine’s Day Dinner Dance on Feb. 20 and the National Prayer Breakfast on Feb. 25. For more information on both call 245-3318.

These are just a few of the great opportunities coming up in the next few weeks and I hope you take advantage of them before it’s too late. You can always find out the latest on events and activities by visiting www.carlislemwr.com and the Banner Online at www.carlisle.army.mil/banner

Lastly, February is the last time we are producing The Banner in hard copy.  As of 1 March, we will be completely online, which allows us to improve our social media reach and readership.  We are excited about this opportunity as you will receive the same great stories and community information you’ve come to expect, but we’ll also be improving our web views and links to additional community events and activities.  Please continue to join us at the Banner Online at www.carlisle.army.mil/banner


Carlisle Community News & Events

3 - Community Leaders Information Forum (CLIF) 11 a.m.

4 - Brooks E. Kleber Memorial Lecture 7:15 p.m., USAHEC

This lecture is free and open to the public. Dr. Jeffrey Sammons and Dr. John Morrow will present a lecture entitled, "The History of the Black Combat Soldier in World War I in Collective and Individual Context." For questions or more information, call: 717-245-3972.

7- Outdoor Recreation Sledding Trip 10 a.m. – 2p.m.

$10 per person, transportation and sleds provided. Must register one week prior to event, for more information call 245-4616.

10- Pershing Tavern Grand Opening, 4 p.m.

The newest addition to Carlisle Barracks will officially open for business Feb. 10 with a special grand opening celebration from 4 to 10 p.m. The tavern is located in the LVCC.

10- Geo bachelor/bachelorette dinner 5:30 p.m., post chapel

13- LVCC Valentines’ Dinner Dance, 5 p.m.

$80 per couple, bar opens at 5 p.m., dinner at 5:30 with dancing to follow at 7 p.m. Reservations required, for more information call 245-4329.

17 - Perspectives in Military History Lecture, 7:15 p.m., USAHEC

This lecture is free and open to the public. Dr. Matthew Muehlbauer and Dr. David Ulbrich will give a presentation entitled, "Ways of War: American Military History from the Colonial Era to the 21st Century." For questions or more information, call: 717-245-3972.

20- Chapel Valentine’s Dinner Dance, LVCC, 6:30 p.m.

Annual Valentine's Dinner and Dance sponsored by the Chapel. For more information call 245-3318.

20 - 5th Annual Reenactor Recruitment Day, 10 a.m., USAHEC

Re-enactors and those interested in living history are encouraged to visit the USAHEC to interact with living history organizations who are looking for new members or are just looking to get the word out about their organization. A range of historical periods will be represented, from the 17th Century to the 20th Century. For more information call 245-4491.

21, 27 – Outdoor Rec Cross Country Skiing, 7 a.m. – 5 p.m.

$40 per person included transportation and equipment. Must register one week prior to event. For more information call 245-3657.

25 – National Prayer Breakfast, LVCC, 6:30 a.m.

26 - Black History Month Observance, Hallowed Grounds: Sites of African American Memory, Bliss Hall, 11 a.m.


Robert D. Martin, PAO USAWC
Renowned professor to speak on climate change

Feb. 10, 2016 -- If you’ve heard the phrase climate change, you’ll want to know the rest of the story from a national voice on climate change and sustainability, as he discusses environmental consequences; options for the United States, the international community; and transnational responsibilities.

Dr. Neil Leary is director of Dickinson College’s Center for Sustainability Education – and a special guest speaker of the Great Decisions 2015 lectures series at the Army Heritage & Education Center, Friday, Feb. 12 at 1-3 p.m.  The event is free and open to all military and civilian community.

One hundred and ninety-three nations agreed a new treaty in Paris on December 12, 2015 that takes a fundamentally different approach from past agreements for motivating international collaboration on climate change. The new approach is built upon voluntary national commitments, commitments that are not binding in international law, and relies on a transparent reporting and review process to promote compliance.

Leary will compare the Paris Agreement with previous climate agreements and consider whether it lays a foundation that is up to the enormous challenge of limiting climate change. Dr. Leary will also discuss the evidence for human caused climate change, its human and environmental consequences, the need for international and transnational cooperation, and US options and strategies.               

Leary teaches about climate change at Dickinson College and has taken students to the UN climate conferences in Copenhagen, Durban, Lima and Paris.         

He has researched climate change vulnerability, adaptation and mitigation for 20 years, led international projects that engaged over 300 scientists from 50 countries in investigations of climate change risks in the developing world, and been an author and editorial board member for the science assessments of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.


Children of Alcoholics Week Feb. 14 - 20


Making a difference in the life of COAs and honoring recovery – Become the star – in the life of a child

Imagine coming home from school and dreading what you might find. Imagine having no friends because you’re too embarrassed to bring them home in case Mom or Dad are drunk, or worse. Imagine living in a home full of fear and having no one to turn to because everyone denies there’s a problem.

Children living with addiction in their family need to know that it is not their fault that a parent is alcoholic or drug addicted. They need to hear the message, “It’s a disease; it is not your fault, and there are safe people who can help.”

Join a support group

Many schools have assistance programs that offer support groups for students who are living with alcohol or drug abuse in their families. These programs help with problem solving, and they give you the opportunity to meet other young people who are struggling with the same problems at home that you might face. They can help you see how others are able to have a good life in spite of what is happening at home.

Alateen is for you

Alateen is a group for teens who are affected by someone else’s alcohol or drug use. It holds meetings, like a club, where young people share tips on how to make their lives easier when a family member drinks too much or uses drugs.

The meetings are sponsored by Al-Anon. You can find the location of meetings near you by looking in the phone book under Al-Anon or Alateen, or ask a youth minister, your school counselor, your doctor or another adult you trust to help you get to a meeting near you. You can also find out about Alateen at www.alateen.org or by calling toll-free at 1-888-425-2666.

 If it is your friend’s Mom or Dad who drinks too much

Don’t walk away, and don’t pretend you don’t see it.

Things you can say that might help:

• It’s not your fault that your parent drinks or uses drugs.

• You’re not alone – lots of kids come from families where this is a problem.

• There are people who can help.

Things you can do:

• Tell your pastor or youth minister that you are worried about your friend.

• Be a good friend – include your friend in your activities and your family’s fun.

• Encourage your friend to talk to a trusting adult.

More information is available

Treatment – Carlisle Barracks Clinical staff 245 – 4082

SAMHSA’s Helpline for Alcohol and Drug Information 1-800-662-HELP

www.findtreatment.samhsa.gov

Alateen1-888-425-2666

www.alateen.org

The National Association for Children of

 Alcoholics (NACoA)www.nacoa.org

Contact your Army Substance Abuse Program for additional information 245 – 4576.


Forward Presence, Security Cooperation: Useful foreign policy tools?

Feb. 9, 2016 -- Today, join John Deni, Nathan Freier and Chris Beckert take 'forward presence' and 'security cooperation' in a panel discussion live-streamed from the US Army War College, 11:45 am to 12:45 pm at ow.ly/XTTL5.  Join the discussion by tweets @SSInow.

Military engagement and forward-based U.S. military forces offer decision-makers effective and efficient options for achieving American national security goals.

However, factors such as significant cuts to overseas permanent presence and continuing institutional bias against engagement as a force multiplier and readiness enhancer have combined to limit the perceived leverage possible through these two policy tools.

Are these tools really still useful to policymakers today, and if so, how?

John Deni, PhD, is a research professor of Joint, Interagency, Intergovernmental, and Multinational Security Studies at the Strategic Studies Institute, U.S. Army War College. He previously worked for 8 years as a political advisor for senior U.S. military commanders in Europe. He is the author or editor of three books, including Alliance Management and Maintenance: Restructuring NATO for the 21st Century.

Nathan Freier  is an associate professor of National Security Studies with the Strategic Studies Institute. Mr. Freier came to SSI after 5 years with the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) where he was a senior fellow in the International Security Program, following a 20-year career in the U.S. Army. He has published widely on national security and defense issues, particularly military strategy and policy development, and strategic net and risk assessment.

Chris Beckert is a faculty member of the School of Strategic Landpower, USAWC, and formerly, chief of plans (J5) at USAFRICOM.


Robert D. Martin, PAO USAWC
USAWC Spouses develop professional leadership through FLAGS

Investing in the professional development of spouses of military leaders in the residence course. Facilitating Leadership and Group Skills, FLAGS,workshops guide military, civilian and international spouses of USAWC students in becoming professional leaders, strategic thinkers and problem solvers, paralleling the Army War College mission.

“The opportunity to attend FLAGS facilitator training was a unique and invaluable experience,” said Judy Woodword. “Although the material has a familiar tone, I found the approach of combining the art, science, and skill of self-awareness with group dynamics particularly useful.”

Fourteen of the newest FLAGS Facilitators after a three-week program. These spouses have learned how to facilitate training of other senior spouses in group dynamics and leadership, and will now go on to teach the classes to be held in February and March.

“For me, the most valuable part of the training was the opportunity to capitalize on the collective experience and wisdom of other military spouses in thinking about how to apply skills both at the individual and organizational levels,” she said.

 

“FLAGS helped me discover that one of the keys to both leading and working well within a group is understanding what makes me as an individual tick,” said Karen Wolter. “Gaining a deeper knowledge of how and why I do things the way I do them has given me insight about the same for others,” said Wolter.

The four-day course develops critical skills, confidence and competence in such areas as team-building methods for facilitating; motivation, team collaboration; decision-making; and identification and resolution of interpersonal behaviors.

The participating student spouses develop skills through a peer-to-peer learning process designed to increase self-awareness through exploration of communication, leadership styles, conflict and stress management, group dynamics, as well as preferences for learning and inclusion through the use of instruments and small group activities.

“FLAGS is absolutely the best training the Army has to offer spouses.  I have gained tremendous self-awareness, fine-tuned my leadership skills, and have become a master of group dynamics,” said Gwyn Nielsen.

“These skills will help me in every aspect of my life.  The best part -- I have built relationships with a fabulous group of ladies I now call my Army Sisters. I can hardly wait to facilitate FLAGS for my peers here at the Army War College." Nielsen said.

Nielsen, Woodword, Wolter and 12 other spouses completed three weeks of FLAGS Facilitator training and will soon put their preparation to good use. As facilitators, they will in turn teach other spouses during two types of workshops.

  • The one-day Self-Awareness Workshop is scheduled for Feb. 16 and 18, 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. in Collins Hall. Register NLT Feb. 9. This workshop will explore individuals preferences in behavior and learn how to their behavior can impact groups.
  • The three-day Communication, Leadership and Group Skills workshops are scheduled for March 1 – 3 and 15 -17, from 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.  in Collins Hall Register NLT Feb. 19. These workshops focus on communication, leadership and group skills.

Registration is on a first-come first-served basis. If interested in developing your leadership skills with the guidance of highly-trained peers, contact Lisa Riley of the USAWC Military Family Program: lisa.m.riley.ctr@mail.mil or 717.245.4787. 


Employee Assistance Program is here to help

Today, employees are busy juggling work and family and it is not unusual to encounter difficulties with stress, family, relationships, alcohol, work, or other concerns, which can have an effect on your overall quality of life. To address these concerns, the Army has partnered with Federal Occupational Health, to provide you with a wide range of Employee Assistance Program services at no cost to you. 

With just a phone call or a keystroke, you can access services on the Internet and via a professionally staffed call center. 

EAP services are convenient and confidential. Licensed counselors are available to help with difficult personal issues. These are just some of the services that are available to you:

-- Access to licensed counselors who provide in-person, short-term counseling

-- Assistance with a wide range of concerns – relationships, legal, financial, family, substance abuse, children, and more

-- Crisis Management

-- Supervisor and Management Coaching

-- Information and Resources from a Robust Website - FOH4You.com

-- Child and Elder Care Resources

-- On-Line Presentations, Webinars, and Podcasts

Telephone Access 

To make a confidential EAP appointment with a licensed counselor call 1-800-222-0364 (or 888-262-7848 if you are hearing-impaired). Call anytime – we’re available 24/7. You will be offered assistance or given an appointment to meet with a counselor. Meetings with your counselor are confidential within the guidelines of the law.

When contacting the EAP please use LetterKenny Army Depot to identify your agency.

Online Access 

Go to www.FOH4You.com (click “enter”) to access information and resources, self-help assessments, webinars, podcasts, and more.

To access on-line presentations go to Quick Links and choose the presentation you want to view. Select option “watch video” (for some presentations) and select your agency from the pull down menu.

To access legal and financial information go to Benefits and select Legal and Financial Consultation.


Wheeler brings experience, expertise to USAG team

 

Todd Wheeler, presenting a certificate to Ryan Rockabrand, Emergency Management Director for Santa Barbara County, CA along with 38 other students graduating from the 18 month Leadership Academy program at the Emergency Management Institute. Wheeler is now a member of the Plans and Operations Division of the Directorate of Training, Mobilization and Security here.

 

A longtime former member of the Carlisle Barracks community recently returned after developing new skills at the Department of Homeland Security and New York Joint Field Office for Super Storm Sandy.

Todd Wheeler, Operations Chief for the Operations Branch, in the Plans and Operations Division of the Directorate of Training, Mobilization and Security, coordinates and synchronizes daily operations, manages USAG taskings, orders and support to USAWC and higher headquarters, provides operational management and USAG support to events and ceremonies and provides Situational Awareness to the USAG of current operations.

“As a former employee and graduate of the Army War College, I firmly believe in the mission to educate and equip strategic leaders with critical thinking and complex problem solving skills to face the volatile, uncertain, complex, and often ambiguous challenges in the world,” said Wheeler when asked what brought him back to Carlisle Barracks.

Being part of the Army team was also a huge reason for his return.

“I returned to the community of practice that provided me the opportunity to serve as part of the Army Team for 20 plus years in uniform and five more as a civilian,” he said. “After three years in the interagency and FEMA I missed being part of the Army Team.” 

A Newville, Pa, native and Shippensburg University graduate, Wheeler served at the Center for Strategic Leadership in the Operations and Gaming Division and prior to retirement as the Operations Officer for the Center. After retiring from active duty, he worked as a DA civilian in the International Fellows Office, Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute, Center for Strategic Leadership and finally as Director for Executive Services as well as graduating from the USAWC Distance Education program.

“Before returning to Carlisle last summer, I served as a Training Specialist for the Department of Homeland Security Federal Emergency Management Agency at the National Emergency Training Center Emergency Management Institute managing national level programs to include the Integrated Emergency Management Course, the Virtual Table Top Exercise Program, Emergency Management Leaders Academy,” he said. “I also deployed to the NY Joint Filed Office for FEMA support to Super Storm Sandy during my tenure and had the opportunity to serve in a Presidential declared disaster helping disaster survivors.”

Wheeler said that the varied experiences provide him with perspective and insight on the enduring challenges that organizations face -- roles and responsibilities; policy, plans and procedures; and communication, coordination and collaboration. Based on my experience and observation of Emergency Management exercises and training around the county, local jurisdictions, State, and Federal agencies face these same challenges routinely. I try and use that perspective to focus my efforts in my new work endeavors.”


Tax Center open for business

Carlisle Barracks Tax Center volunteers, staff and Army war College and Carlisle Barracks leadership celebrate the opening of the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Center at 309 Engineer Ave. The center is open from Feb. 1 to April 18. Appointments are necessary and can be made by calling 245-3986.

The Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Center opened its doors for business February 1 and will close on April 18 for the 2015 tax filling season for all military and their Family Members as well as military retirees.

The Tax Center is located at 309 Engineer Ave and hours of operation are 8 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4 p.m. Monday - Friday. Call 717-245-3986 for appointments.

What to bring:

  • Military ID card
  • W-2 form (active duty will receive W-2s though "My Pay" no later than Jan. 24
  • W-2 forms for each family member who earned income
  • Form 8332 or copy of divorce decree for non-custodial parent claiming a child
  • Social Security card for taxpayer and every family member listed on your return
  • 1099-INT for any taxable interest paid to you or credited to your account
  • 1099-DIV for any income from stocks, mutual funds, investment companies or a real estate trust
  • If you sold stocks, bonds or mutual funds during the tax year, you must know your cost basis. If you do not know, call your broker to obtain the information.
  • Documentation verifying your 2014 real estate taxes paid on your primary residence
  • If you are itemizing deductions, you will need to provide proof of deductions – this is a requirement for charitable contributions
  • A voided check or deposit slip to ensure refund monies are dispersed properly
  • A copy of last year's tax return

OSC updates Hatch Act guidance for social media

WASHINGTON, D.C./November 12, 2015 -- In advance of the upcoming presidential election year, the U.S. Office of Special Counsel (OSC) has revised its guidance regarding the Hatch Act and federal employee use of social media and email. The guidance is in an online Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) format and was last issued in April 2012.


The Hatch Act limits certain political activities of federal employees. Under the Hatch Act, "political activity" refers to any activity directed at the success or failure of a political party or partisan political group (collectively referred to as "partisan groups"), or candidate in a partisan race. Given the unique challenges social media poses to federal employees, OSC crafted guidance to help federal employees understand what is and is not allowed under the Hatch Act. Generally, federal employees can avoid violating the Hatch Act if they (1) do not engage in political activity while on duty or in the workplace; (2) do not engage in political activity in an official capacity at any time; and (3) do not solicit or receive political contributions at any time.


OSC has streamlined the text of its FAQs to be shorter, clearer, and more accessible to federal employees.


While most of OSC's advice remains the same, there are some notable changes and new issues contained in the revised guidance. For example:

• Federal employees may display campaign logos or candidate photographs as their cover or header photo situated at the top of their social media profiles on their personal Facebook or Twitter accounts.

• Federal employees may display campaign logos or candidate photographs as their profile pictures on their personal Facebook or Twitter accounts. However, because a profile picture accompanies most actions on social media, employees would not be permitted, while on duty or in the workplace, to post, "share," "tweet," or "retweet" any items on Facebook or Twitter, since each such action would show their support for a partisan group or candidate in a partisan race, even if the content of the action is not about those entities.

• "Further restricted employees"--similar to all federal employees--may "like" a social media post from a partisan group or candidate in a partisan race and may comment on such an entity's social media pages when not at work. Note: No federal employee may "like" a post soliciting for partisan political contributions at any time. Most further restricted employees work in law enforcement and intelligence agencies.


OSC also has issued brief guidance on the Hatch Act implications of federal agencies' use of official social media accounts.

The Hatch Act: Frequently Asked Questions on Federal Agencies and the Use of Official Social Media Accounts

The U.S. Office of Special Counsel (OSC) recently issued comprehensive Hatch Act guidance specific to federal employees and the use of social media and email, which may be found here. Additionally, OSC receives many questions from federal agencies regarding the Hatch Act and the use of official social media accounts.

The following is a list of commonly asked questions about agencies’ use of official social media accounts. Please note that although OSC refers to Facebook and Twitter, the advice provided is applicable to any social media platform.

(1) Q: May a federal agency have a Facebook or Twitter account that includes information or links to information about a partisan group or candidate in a partisan race?

A: No. A federal agency’s Facebook or Twitter account, like its official website, should be limited to official business matters and remain politically neutral. Thus, an agency’s social media account should not "friend," "like," "follow," "tweet," or "retweet" about a partisan group or candidate in a partisan race or link to the social media accounts of such entities.

(2) Q: May a federal agency post a news article about the speech of an agency official (e.g., Secretary or Administrator) at a political event for a candidate in a partisan race on the agency’s Facebook or Twitter account?

A: No. Any information or links to information about a federal agency official’s attendance or speech at a political event for a candidate in a partisan race should not be posted on the agency’s Facebook or Twitter account.

(3) Q: May a federal agency continue to "friend," "like," or "follow" an official social media page of a government official after he has become a candidate for reelection?

A: Yes. For example, a federal agency may continue to "friend," "like," or "follow" the official Facebook, Twitter, or other social media page of the President or Member of Congress, even after the President or Member begins his reelection campaign.

The U.S. Office of Special Counsel (OSC) routinely receives questions from federal employees and others about when the use of social media and email could violate the Hatch Act.

Social media and email—and the ease of accessing those accounts at work, either on computers or smartphones—have made it easier for federal employees to violate the Hatch Act. Yet there are many activities employees can do on social media and email that do not violate the law. OSC has created this Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) page to help employees understand what the Hatch Act does and does not allow when using social media and email.

In general, all federal employees may use social media and email and comply with the Hatch Act if they remember the following guidelines:

(1) Do not engage in political activity while on duty or in the workplace.

• Federal employees are "on duty" when they are in a pay status, other than paid leave, or are representing the government in an official capacity.

• Federal employees are considered "on duty" during telecommuting hours.

(2) Do not engage in political activity in an official capacity at any time.

(3) Do not solicit or receive political contributions at any time.

"Political activity" refers to any activity directed at the success or failure of a political party or partisan political group (collectively referred to as "partisan groups"), or candidate in a partisan race.

In addition, some federal employees are considered "further restricted," which means they are prohibited from taking an active part in partisan political management or partisan political campaigns. Thus, they may not engage, via social media and email, in any political activity on behalf of a partisan group or candidate in a partisan race. Most further restricted employees work in law enforcement or intelligence agencies.

These rules have some very limited exceptions. When in doubt, federal employees should consult OSC or their agency ethics officers.

The following list of questions is not comprehensive, but answers many of the most commonly asked questions regarding the Hatch Act and the use of social media and email. Please note that although the FAQs refer to Facebook and Twitter, the advice provided is applicable to any social media platform. If federal employees have further questions, they should email OSC at hatchact@osc.gov

Social Media

(1) Q: May a federal employee engage in political activity on Facebook or Twitter?

A: Yes, federal employees may express their opinions about a partisan group or candidate in a partisan race (e.g., post, "like," "share," "tweet," "retweet"), but there are a few limitations. Specifically, the Hatch Act prohibits employees from:

• engaging in any political activity via Facebook or Twitter while on duty or in the workplace;

• referring to their official titles or positions while engaged in political activity at any time (note that inclusion of an employee’s official title or position on one’s social media profile, without more, is not an improper use of official authority); and

• suggesting or asking anyone to make political contributions at any time. Thus, they should neither provide links to the political contribution page of any partisan group or candidate in a partisan race nor "like," "share," or "retweet" a solicitation from one of those entities, including an invitation to a political fundraising event. An employee, however, may accept an invitation to a political fundraising event from such entities via Facebook or Twitter.

Further Restricted Employees: Yes, further restricted federal employees also may express their opinions about a partisan group or candidate in a partisan race (e.g., post, "like," "share," "tweet," "retweet"), but there are a few limitations. In addition to the limitations above, the Hatch Act prohibits further restricted employees from:

• posting or linking to campaign or other partisan material of a partisan group or candidate in a partisan race;

• "sharing" these entities’ Facebook pages or their content; and

• "retweeting" posts from these entities’ Twitter accounts.

(2) Q: May a federal employee engage in political activity on Facebook or Twitter if she is "friends" with or has "followers" who are subordinate employees?

A: Yes, but subject to the limitations described in other related questions and the following guidelines. If a supervisor’s statements about a partisan group or candidate in a partisan race are directed at all of his Facebook friends or Twitter followers, e.g., posted on his Facebook page, then there is no Hatch Act violation. Such statements would be improper if the supervisor specifically directed them toward her subordinate employees, or to a subset of friends that includes subordinate employees. For example, a supervisor should not send to a subordinate employee a Facebook message or "tweet" that shows her support for a partisan group or candidate in a partisan race.

(3) Q: May a federal employee use a Facebook or Twitter account in his official capacity to engage in political activity?

A: No. Any social media account created in a federal employee’s official capacity should be limited to official business matters and remain politically neutral. Any political activity must 3

be confined to the employee’s personal Facebook or Twitter account, subject to the limitations described in other related questions.

(4) Q: May a federal employee become a "friend," "like," or "follow" the social media page of a partisan group or candidate in a partisan race?

A: Yes, but not while on duty or in the workplace.

(5) Q: May a federal employee use an alias to "friend," "like," or "follow" the social media page of a partisan group or candidate in a partisan race?

A: Yes, but be advised that federal employees remain subject to the Hatch Act even when they act under an alias. Therefore, the advice provided in response to other questions applies regardless of whether or not the employee is acting under an alias.

(6) Q: May a federal employee continue to "friend," "like," or "follow" an official social media page of a government official after he has become a candidate for reelection?

A: Yes. For example, a federal employee may continue to "friend," "like," or "follow" the official Facebook, Twitter, or other social media page of the President or Member of Congress, even after the President or Member begins his reelection campaign.

(7) Q: What should a federal employee do if an individual posts or "tweets" a message soliciting political contributions to a partisan group or candidate in a partisan race, or a link to the political contribution page for such entities, on the employee’s social media page?

A: Although the Hatch Act prohibits federal employees from soliciting or receiving political contributions at any time, employees are not responsible for the statements of third parties, even when they appear on their social media page. Thus, if an individual posts a link to the political contribution page of a partisan group or candidate in a partisan race, or otherwise solicits political contributions, the employee need not take any action. The same advice applies to any "tweets" directed at the employee. However, the employee should not "like," "share," or "retweet" the solicitation, or respond in any way that would tend to encourage other readers to contribute.

(8) Q: If a federal employee has listed his official title or position on Facebook, may he also complete the "political views" field?

A: Yes. Simply identifying one’s political party affiliation on a social media profile, which also contains one’s official title or position, without more, is not an improper use of official authority. 4

(9) Q: May a federal employee display a political party or campaign logo or candidate photograph as her cover or header photo on Facebook or Twitter?

A: Yes, federal employees may display a political party or campaign logo or candidate photograph as their cover or header photo on their personal Facebook or Twitter accounts. This display, usually featured at the top of one’s social media profile, without more, is not improper political activity.

(10) Q: May a federal employee display a political party or campaign logo or a candidate photograph as his profile picture on Facebook or Twitter?

A: Yes, but subject to the following limitations. Because a profile picture accompanies most actions on social media, a federal employee would not be permitted, while on duty or in the workplace, to post, "share," "tweet," or "retweet" any items on Facebook or Twitter, because each such action would show their support for a partisan group or candidate in a partisan race, even if the content of the action is not about those entities.

Email

(11) Q: What is a partisan political email?

A: A partisan political email is an email that is directed at the success or failure of a partisan group or candidate in a partisan race.

(12) Q: May a federal employee—while on duty or in the workplace—receive a partisan political email?

A: Yes. Simply receiving a partisan political email while at work, whether to a personal or government email account, without more, does not violate the Hatch Act. However, federal employees must not send or forward partisan political emails to others while on duty or in the workplace.

(13) Q: May a federal employee—while on duty or in the workplace—forward a partisan political email from her government email account to her personal email account?

A: Yes. If a federal employee receives a partisan political email in his government email account, she may send that email to her personal email account while at work. Simply forwarding such an email to one’s personal email account, without more, does not violate the Hatch Act. 5

(14) Q: May a federal employee—while on duty or in the workplace—send or forward a partisan political email from his government email account or his personal email account to others?

A: No. A federal employee cannot send or forward a partisan political email from either his government email account or his personal email account (even using a personal device) while at work.

(15) Q: May a federal employee—while on duty or in the workplace—send or forward an email about currents events or matters of public interest to others?

A: The Hatch Act does not prohibit federal employees from engaging in non-partisan political activities. Accordingly, employees may express their opinions about current events and matters of public interest at work so long as their actions are not considered political activity. For example, employees are free to express their views and take action as individual citizens on such questions as referendum matters, changes in municipal ordinances, constitutional amendments, pending legislation or other matters of public interest, like issues involving highways, schools, housing, and taxes. Of course, employees should be mindful of their agencies’ computer use policies prior to sending or forwarding any non-work related emails.

(16) Q: May a federal employee send or forward a partisan political email to subordinate employees?

A: No. It is an improper use of official authority for a supervisor to send or forward a partisan political email to subordinates, at any time.

(17) Q: May a federal employee send or forward an email invitation to a political fundraising event to others?

A: No. The Hatch Act prohibits federal employees from soliciting o