Banner Archive for December 2009
 

Officials seek feedback on Family programs

 Elaine Wilson, American Forces Press Service

WASHINGTON, Dec. 15, 2009 – Defense officials have launched virtual “listening sessions” in hopes of gaining more insight into the effectiveness of military family programs, a Pentagon official said today.

The anonymous, online survey solicits feedback from servicemembers and their families on the military’s educational programs, support networks and other services.

“We hope to hear from a tremendous number of people and have the opportunity to hear from people with wide-ranging issues,” said Cathann Kress, program lead for partnerships within the Pentagon’s office of military community and family policy. “Whether you’re a brand-new military family with no children or a military family with many years in with several children, we want to hear from you.”

Servicemembers and their families are invited to participate in the survey at https://survey.vt.edu/survey/entry.jsp?id=1253631402808.

The online component is an addition to the face-to-face listening sessions already being conducted on military installations throughout the world. The Defense Department and U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture began conducting these discussion groups in October to help in determining the best way forward for military family programs, Kress said.

“We needed to hear from the people invested in the programs,” she said. Past sessions have included leadership directly responsible for family programs and policies and frontline professionals who provide support at the local level, she added. Future sessions will focus only on servicemembers and their families.

Virginia Tech University faculty members have been conducting the face-to-face sessions. “It helps to have a neutral, third party so people can have a relaxed conversation,” Kress noted.

Both the online and face-to-face listening sessions will wrap up in April. Officials will analyze the feedback and create a report that outlines trends and program gaps and offer future recommendations.

The report also will highlight the good-news stories, Kress said. “We’d like to know what programs families have used and are using, what have been helpful and how have they been helpful,” she said. Finding out what’s working can be just as beneficial as finding out what isn’t, she added.

“This information will help us know what direction we need to go in,” she said.

Officials will share the report with each service and their partners, Kress said. “We’ll use it to help determine our priorities for the future, such as where to put resources.”

The feedback also will be invaluable for officials who hear of issues through word of mouth, but don’t have a concrete way of pinpointing the “big picture” problems, she said.

“We’re hearing that there are a lot of programs out there, but those programs aren’t communicated to the people who need them,” Kress said. “Or, people are overwhelmed by information on programs and aren’t sure which program to use when there’s a need.

“We’ve heard this anecdotally, but don’t actually know,” she continued. “We hope we can gain a better understanding of what the issues really are. That understanding will enable us to better serve families.”

Whether feedback is gained online or in person, “The goal is to hear from whoever wants to share,” Kress said. “This is a wonderful opportunity for hear from our servicemembers and their families.”

 


Holiday Message from Maj. Gen. Robert Williams

 

Dec. 23, 2009 -- Military people have an intriguing relationship with holidays – when we are home with family and friends, it is truly a joyous occasion and yet our thoughts inevitably go to those who are serving our nation a long way from home.

    We are grateful for the honor and virtue that compels Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Marines to volunteer to serve our nation regardless of personal hardship. We value their sacrifices. We salute their commitment. And we feel the strength of commitment and sacrifice more keenly when they are absent at holiday celebrations.

    Whether we celebrate a holy season, a holiday season, or the measure of a year as we turn the calendar, this is a time for taking stock of what we treasure, to include our country, our families, our faith, our profession, our integrity, and our contributions to national security. Quiet, selfless contributions to our neighbors’ holiday cheer remind us all that small gestures, tasks and words can have enormous power this time of year 

    A Carlisle area resident said it best when he wrote to us on behalf of his mother who enjoyed a memorable afternoon at one of the Seniors Holiday Parties last week. He wrote, “It is both heartwarming and commendable that, at this busy time of year, many people helped make this event the success it was [and] took the time to help others have a better holiday season. It is an honorable undertaking and a high point of the holiday season.”

    As you treasure shared moments with friends and family, respect yourself; drive safely in adverse weather conditions; do your part as a leader to prevent private motor vehicle accidents; drink responsibly at holiday celebrations, and stay vigilant to those who would do you and our nation harm.

   As Secretary Robert Gates urges, “This holiday season, we must remember our obligation to look out for one another. We owe our attentiveness and care to those with whom we share a bond of trust, and we cannot falter our shared responsibility for their health and well-being.”

    As we begin this holiday season Deb and I extend our thanks for your attentiveness and care as well as your commitment to defend our country. Enjoy this well deserved time with your families and thank you for your service. Happy Holidays.

 

 

 

MWR activities holiday hours

 

***ACS***

24-25 Dec - Closed

31 Dec thru 1 Jan - Closed

 

**Bowling Center**

24 Dec - Close at Noon

25 Dec - Closed

1 Jan - Closed

 

**CDC**

23 Dec - Close at Noon

24-25 Dec - Closed

30 Dec - Close at Noon

31 Dec thru 1 Jan - Closed

 

**Golf Course**

25 Dec thru 1 Mar – Closed (Standard Closure dates)

 

ProShop (Closed during inclement weather)

 

**LEISURE TRAVEL SERVICES**

22 Dec thru 4 Jan - Closed

 

**ODR**

23 Dec thru 3 Jan - Closed

 

**LVCC**

21 thru 30 Dec - Closed

31 Dec - New Year's Eve Party (1900-0100)

1-3 Jan - Closed

 

**Root Hall Joint Deli**

24 Dec thru 3 Jan - Closed

 

**Dunham Clinic Snack Bar**

19 Dec thru 3 Jan – Closed

 

**Joint Pub**

21 Dec thru 3 Jan - Closed

 

**Lodging**

24 Dec - Open 0800-1600

25 Dec - Front Desk Open 0800-1100

 

**Skills Development Center (Auto and Framing & Engraving Studios)**

24 Dec - Close at 1300

25 Dec thru 2 Jan - Closed

 

**Youth Services**

24-26 Dec - Closed

31 Dec thru 2 Jan - Closed

 

**Root Hall Gymnasium**

21 Dec thru 4 Jan - Closed

 

**Thorpe Fitness Center**

24 Dec Closes at noon

25 Dec - Closed

31 Dec Closes at noon

1 Jan - Closed

 


Recognizing problem biggest step toward fixing suicides

C. Todd Lopez, Army News Service
Dec. 23, 2009 -- In 2008, the Army experienced for the first time, suicide rates higher than the civilian population. In the same year, the Army entered an agreement with the National Institute of Mental Health to find out why.

While the NIMH study will take five years to complete, the institute recently met with Army leaders to provide some preliminary insights, said Brig. Gen. Colleen McGuire, director, Suicide Prevention Task Force.

One finding was that some 53 percent of the American population that replicated the Army population has had some level of mental or behavioral illness, McGuire said. That includes such things as alcohol problems, eating disorders, depression or anxiety.

"We can probably assume that's the same in our own population," she said.

Additionally, McGuire said, NIMH has said those with post traumatic stress disorder are six times more likely to commit suicide -- and those individuals, she said, often take as many as 12 years before seeking help.

"Unfortunately, in that period of time, before they finally recognize they have PTSD and seek treatment, there has probably been some attempts at self medication," she said.

In November, the Army experienced 12 potential suicides. That's two less than in October -- and while McGuire said the monthly suicide rate for the Army has trended down since the beginning of the year, 2009's number are expected to be even higher than 2008's numbers -- coming in at 156.

The exact causes of suicide in the Army are numerous and hard to pin down -- and it's not just Soldiers that have deployed. Some 30 percent of Army suicides are those that have never deployed, McGuire said. There's also relationship issues, financial issues, substance abuse issues and UCMJ problems.

"All of these things spiral to the point where they are trying to find some emotional relief," she said. "And that comes in the form of flawed thinking that results in their own death. It's hard to label any one variable as the cause."

McGuire said the Army isn't waiting for the results from NIMH or the 2009 suicide numbers to start attacking the problem.

"Probably the most important step the Army took this year was the recognition by the Army leadership that we did in fact have a problem," she said.

Getting leadership involved, from the top level down to NCOs at company level is also important McGuire said.

"The one thing we need to do is empower the noncommissioned officers and our young leaders, particularly at the company level, to really know their Soldiers, but then also to inform them of the resources available to them," McGuire said.

And there's a lot of resources, McGuire said, more than 400 programs Army-wide designed to help stressed Soldiers, family members and civilians. In fact, there may be so many it's overwhelming, and the Army is going to fix that.

"What they would like ideally is to have somebody with a laser pointer and point a direction -- you go this direction or you go to this office and this is what you need," she said. "Instead, what we have done in the Army and even with non-profit organizations, everybody else that wants to help -- is we provide a flood light. And they are blinded by the opportunities and resources available to them."

The Army has queried installations about their programs, asked about funding, effectiveness, etc. When installations meet the response deadline for the query, a report detailing the programs and their effectiveness will be generated, sometime in March 2010, to ensure effectiveness and eliminate redundancies, McGuire said.

Also standing in the way of preventing suicides in the Army -- convincing Soldiers that it's okay to say they need help.

"Soldiers learn best by what they see," McGuire said. "And until they see leadership seeking help, or if they see some of their peers seek help, and there appears not to be retribution or negative effect with that, then we will turn that corner."

 


  

Local residents to receive information on local EMS Membership Drive

  Residents of Carlisle Barracks, Carlisle and other Townships serviced by Cumberland Goodwill EMS will soon be receiving information in their mailboxes on the annual ambulance membership drive.

  According to Robert Pine, EMS chief, membership prices are $65 for an individual and $80 for families.  The membership covers whatever ambulance costs insurance doesn't pay.  Some healthcare plans pay only 80 percent of ambulance fees, so it pays to check out the policy.

  If you are a TRICARE beneficiary and have any questions, contact Barbara Coons or Teresa Henry, Dunham's Health Benefits Advisors, at 717-245-4112.


Anne Wolf, Army Substance Abuse Program 

Don't be that guy – drinking facts

 What is alcohol?

Alcohol is a depressant, which means it slows your central nervous system. However, it speeds up how fast you become That Guy. This makes women nervous and will leave you depressed and alone with a depressed central nervous system which is even more depressing.

 

What happens when i drink alcohol?

When you have a drink, alcohol is absorbed into your bloodstream from the stomach and enters tissues in the body. The effects of alcohol depend on a variety of things, such as:

  • Your size, weight, body fat and sex
  • Amount of alcohol consumed
  • Amount of food in your stomach
  • Use of medications, including non-prescription drugs

In general, it takes the average drinker about one hour to metabolize one drink. When you drink more than that, your blood alcohol concentration (BAC) rises, and you start to feel the effects of intoxication. You may start to think that women are only joking when they say, "Leave me alone, your drunk," which will only make you seem more like That Guy when you continue to talk to them.

 

What is alcohol?

Alcohol is a depressant, which means it slows your central nervous system. However, it speeds up how fast you become That Guy. This makes women nervous and will leave you depressed and alone with a depressed central nervous system which is even more depressing.

What happens when I drink alcohol?

When you have a drink, alcohol is absorbed into your bloodstream from the stomach and enters tissues in the body. The effects of alcohol depend on a variety of things, such as:

  • Your size, weight, body fat and sex
  • Amount of alcohol consumed
  • Amount of food in your stomach
  • Use of medications, including non-prescription drugs

In general, it takes the average drinker about one hour to metabolize one drink. When you drink more than that, your blood alcohol concentration (BAC) rises, and you start to feel the effects of intoxication. You may start to think that women are only joking when they say, "Leave me alone, you drunk," which will only make you seem more like That Guy when you continue to talk to them.

Short-term effects of alcohol

Alcohol can have significant short-term effects. Many of these can seriously impair physical and mental abilities and cause other problems:

·         Lowered inhibition; increase in risky behavior

·         Dizziness

·         Talkativeness

·         Slowed reaction times and reflexes

·         Poor motor coordination

·         Altered perceptions and emotions

·         Blurred vision

·         Slurred speech

·         Less ability to reason; impaired judgment

·         Memory loss

·         Confusion, anxiety, restlessness

·         Slowed heart rate; reduced blood pressure

·         Slowed breathing rate

·         Heavy sweating

·         Nausea and vomiting

·         Dehydration

·         Disturbed sleep

·         Bad breath/hangovers

And…

  • Drunk Dialing
  • Stupid Tattoos
  • Becoming That Guy

 

Dangers of alcohol poisoning

 

    One of the most dangerous short-term consequences of binge drinking is alcohol poisoning, which can lead to irreversible brain damage or even death.

Excessive drinking depresses nerves that control things like breathing or the gag reflex.  Drinking too much in too short a time can lead to slow or stopped breathing; irregular or stopped heart beat; choking on vomit; severe dehydration; low body temperature; or too little blood sugar.

    Don't ever let someone "sleep it off."  Blood alcohol levels continue to rise in the body even when someone is passed out and no longer drinking.  Watch for these signs of alcohol poisoning and get help immediately:

  • Mental confusion, stupor or coma
  • Passed out and difficult to wake
  • Cold, clammy, pale or bluish skin
  • Vomiting
  • Seizures
  • Slow or irregular breathing
  • Hypothermia (low body temperature)
  •  

Long-term effects of alcohol

    Over time, long-term alcohol use can cause permanent damage to the body and the brain, putting drinkers at serious risk of many health problems, including:

  • Physical dependence on alcohol
  • Liver disease, including alcoholic hepatitis (inflammation of the liver) and cirrhosis (scarring of the liver)
  • Heart disease, high blood pressure and some forms of stroke
  • Brain damage
  • Cancer of the head and neck, the digestive tract and the breast
  • Pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas)
  • Mental disorders, including increased aggression, depression and anxiety
  • Birth defects in children born to women who drink during pregnancy
  • Sexual problems and decreased fertility
  • Bone damage
  • Immune deficiency, causing increased susceptibility to certain diseases
  • Permanently becoming That Guy
  • Having an entire Web site named after your negative behavior:  www.thatguy.com

National Weather Service issues a Winter Storm Warning

 

Dec. 18, 2009 -- The national weather service in state college has issued a winter storm warning for snow which is in effect from 4 am Saturday to 7 am Sunday.

    Remember, for post closures or delay information call the operations line at 245-3700.

    Snow will overspread portions of the Susquehanna River valley early Saturday morning. Snow could become heavy at times around daybreak Saturday and continue through Saturday evening before tapering off early Sunday morning.

    Snowfall totals between 6 and 8 inches are likely...with locally higher amounts. Snow could fall heavy at times and combine with northeasterly wind gusts between 15 and 25 mph, creating blowing and drifting snow.

    This could at times reduce visibilities to near zero creating dangerous travel conditions Saturday.

    If you must travel...keep an extra flashlight...food...blanket and a cellular phone in your vehicle in case of an emergency.

    Additional details can also be found at www.weather.gov/statecollege.


Anne Wolf, Army Substance Abuse Program
Be smart --
Don't be 'that guy'

    So, who is That Guy?

    Dec. 17, 2009  -- Each night he's on display somewhere, but makes his most frequent appearances on the weekends. He's a regular guy, but when he's had a few too many drinks, it shows. That Guy loses control, and he may not remember it in the morning. That Guy applies to anyone who, because of excessive drinking, behaves in a manner that others do not want to emulate or be around. In fact, women can be That Guy too.

    Society sends mixed signals to That Guy. He's just letting off some steam after a hard day or week, right? Sometimes his friends and strangers encourage his behavior. Maybe, in the moment, he feels like he's funny or  popular. Sometimes he's the life of the party.

    But is the crowd at the party, in the bar, or on the town laughing with him or at him? Are people cutting their eyes to the floor when he rambles on? Are they finding excuses to move elsewhere in the room? Is he embarrassing himself and others?

    When we see him in action, or see the consequences he faces, he's a reminder to all of us: "Don't let me be That Guy." The day after, when everyone's talking about his antics, we're so glad we weren't That Guy. If we become That Guy on occasion, we regret it. If we're That Guy all the time, we need help. But the truth is, no one wants to be That Guy.

    That Guy is a multi-media campaign that uses online and offline communication with the goal of reducing excessive drinking among young servicemen. The campaign encourages young enlisted personnel to reject binge drinking because it detracts from the things they care about: family, friends, dating, sex, money, and reputation. The campaign uses humor to deliver a serious message and provides viral tools so you can be part of the effort to eradicate That Guy. The campaign is a reminder to everyone: Don't Be That Guy!

    That Guy is funded by the Department of Defense.

    If you think you have a problem with alcohol, getting help is an important first step.

How do I know if I need help?

If you think you might have a problem, ask yourself the following questions:

  • Have you ever felt you should cut back on your drinking?
  • Does your drinking ever make you late for work?
  • Do you ever forget what you did while you were drinking?
  • Do you ever drink after telling yourself you won't?
  • Have people annoyed you by criticizing your drinking?
  • Have you ever felt bad or guilty about your drinking?
  • Have you ever had a drink first thing in the morning to steady your nerves or get rid of a hangover?

    If you answered "yes" once it's possible you may have a problem. More than one "yes" means it is highly likely that there's a problem.

    If you're worried about a friend or loved one, the best thing you can do for them is to take action right away.

How do I know if my friend or family member needs help or if they are That Guy?

Here are some important alcohol warning signs to watch for:

  • Neglecting major work or family responsibilities
  • Missing work, poor performance reviews and/or disciplinary actions
  • Getting drunk regularly
  • Lying about how much he/she is drinking
  • Believing that alcohol is necessary to have fun
  • Having frequent hangovers
  • Having blackouts
  • Getting in trouble with the law because of drinking
  • Changing moods, such as temper flare-ups, irritability or defensiveness
  • Becoming That Guy

    Keep reading to get the facts and learn more about how you can help.

If you're worried about a friend or loved one, the best thing you can do for them is to take action right away.

How do I know if my friend or family member needs help or if they are That Guy?

Here are some important alcohol warning signs to watch for:

  • Neglecting major work or family responsibilities
  • Missing work, poor performance reviews and/or disciplinary actions
  • Getting drunk regularly
  • Lying about how much he/she is drinking
  • Believing that alcohol is necessary to have fun
  • Having frequent hangovers
  • Having blackouts
  • Getting in trouble with the law because of drinking
  • Changing moods, such as temper flare-ups, irritability or defensiveness
  • Becoming That Guy

Keep reading to get the facts and learn more about how you can help.

Taking Action: A How-To Guide

    Talking to a friend or family member about his drinking is not easy, but it's the right thing to do. Here's some advice:

Step 1: Prepare

Get educated about the serious risks and consequences of binge drinking. Review this Web site www.thatguy.com and others for more information. Think carefully about your concerns and what you want to say.  Be prepared to offer specific examples of how his/her drinking has affected you or your family, the person's career or health. Practice the conversation in advance. It will help you stay focused and anticipate issues that might come up. You should also gather information and be prepared to offer help.

Step 2: Have the Conversation

Now here's the hard part. Sometimes it helps to have the conversation shortly after an alcohol-related problem has occurred, such as an argument or trouble at work.

Give an example of when this person has become That Guy. Be supportive. Tell him/her what you want him/her to do, whether it's cutting down on binge drinking or entering a treatment program. Be loving and kind. Stay calm and remain supportive even if he gets defensive.

Tell your friend:

  • You love and care about him/her
  • You want him/her to be part of the solution
  • How his/her drinking makes you feel
  • What you will do to help

Step 3: Get Support

If appropriate, you may want to involve trusted friends or other family members. You can also consult with your health care provider, a professional counselor, chaplain or a support group to gather information and advice.

Step 4: Seek Help

It's important for the person to see a health care provider or other professional to evaluate the seriousness of the problem. In some cases, he/she may just need to cut back on drinking. In others, counseling or treatment may be needed. For more information on finding a treatment center near you, click here.

Tips for Cutting Back

If the person needs to cut down on drinking, you can support him/her by providing healthy alternatives and by working together to practice moderation. You should also share these important tips to help them cut back:

  • Set limits and stick to them
  • Keep alcohol out of your home
  • Drink slowly on a full stomach
  • Stick to one drink per hour or less
  • Take regular breaks from drinking
  • Learn how to say no
  • Stay active and find other interests
  • Get support from family and friends

Contact the Army Substance abuse for additional information at (717) 245-4576.

 

 

 


Elaine Wilson, American Forces Press Service
Officials seek feedback on family programs

WASHINGTON, Dec. 15, 2009 – Defense officials have launched virtual “listening sessions” in hopes of gaining more insight into the effectiveness of military family programs, a Pentagon official said today.

     The anonymous, online survey solicits feedback from servicemembers and their families on the military’s educational programs, support networks and other services.

    “We hope to hear from a tremendous number of people and have the opportunity to hear from people with wide-ranging issues,” said Cathann Kress, program lead for partnerships within the Pentagon’s office of military community and family policy. “Whether you’re a brand-new military family with no children or a military family with many years in with several children, we want to hear from you.”

    Servicemembers and their families are invited to participate in the survey at https://survey.vt.edu/survey/entry.jsp?id=1253631402808.

    The online component is an addition to the face-to-face listening sessions already being conducted on military installations throughout the world. The Defense Department and U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture began conducting these discussion groups in October to help in determining the best way forward for military family programs, Kress said.

    “We needed to hear from the people invested in the programs,” she said. Past sessions have included leadership directly responsible for family programs and policies and frontline professionals who provide support at the local level, she added. Future sessions will focus only on servicemembers and their families.

    Virginia Tech University faculty members have been conducting the face-to-face sessions. “It helps to have a neutral, third party so people can have a relaxed conversation,” Kress noted.

    Both the online and face-to-face listening sessions will wrap up in April. Officials will analyze the feedback and create a report that outlines trends and program gaps and offer future recommendations.

    The report also will highlight the good-news stories, Kress said. “We’d like to know what programs families have used and are using, what have been helpful and how have they been helpful,” she said. Finding out what’s working can be just as beneficial as finding out what isn’t, she added.

    “This information will help us know what direction we need to go in,” she said.

    Officials will share the report with each service and their partners, Kress said. “We’ll use it to help determine our priorities for the future, such as where to put resources.”

    The feedback also will be invaluable for officials who hear of issues through word of mouth, but don’t have a concrete way of pinpointing the “big picture” problems, she said.

    “We’re hearing that there are a lot of programs out there, but those programs aren’t communicated to the people who need them,” Kress said. “Or, people are overwhelmed by information on programs and aren’t sure which program to use when there’s a need.

    “We’ve heard this anecdotally, but don’t actually know,” she continued. “We hope we can gain a better understanding of what the issues really are. That understanding will enable us to better serve families.”

    Whether feedback is gained online or in person, “The goal is to hear from whoever wants to share,” Kress said. “This is a wonderful opportunity for hear from our servicemembers and their families.”



2009 Holiday safety message from IMCOM commander

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays to all!  Sarah and I extend our warmest greetings to each one of you and your families.  This season of celebrations is a time of eager anticipation, joyful get-togethers, and being with loved ones.  It is a holy period for many.  The start of the New Year is a time of reflection, revelry and renewal.  May your holidays be filled with the cheer, spirit of giving and hope that should be part of this season.  Please know that each one of you is important -- to your Family, to the Army, to IMCOM /ACSIM and me.

 

Remember our Soldiers and civilians who will not be with their loved ones.

Remember those who valiantly defend our nation against threats and go into harm's way to protect our freedoms.  Consider participating in programs established to honor our Soldiers and Families, giving to a local charity, or simply offering a prayer of thanks.  Reach out to those who may be experiencing pain during the holidays.

 

Make safety a part of all you do.  Be cautious when driving in ice and snow.

Be mindful of the dangers of fire and carbon monoxide.  Be extra careful when consuming alcohol, driving after partying, driving without adequate rest, and using lighted candles for decoration. 

 

Give the gift of life by following and sharing the safety information in our IMCOM Fall/Winter Safety Brochure available at http://www.imcom.army.mil/hq/officecom/staff/safety/  to plan and enjoy your seasonal celebrations safely. 

 

The Travel Risk Planning System (TRiPs) at http://combatingaggressivedriving.com/trip%20planning.html helps identify travel risks and reduce the chance of an accident. 

 

On behalf of Sarah and I, CSM Ciotola and his wife Beth, and the entire command leadership team, I wish you a safe, enjoyable holiday season and a prosperous New Year. 

 

Thanks for all you do. We are making history together.

 

Support and Defend!

Lt. Gen. Rick Lynch, Commanding General, U.S. Army Installation Management Command

 


New traffic lights to be installed Dec. 17 at Claremont Road gate

Dec. 16, 2009 –  A short traffic disruption will help make the Claremont Road gate safer Dec. 17.

   Two new overhead traffic lights and electrical feeds will be installed Dec. 17 from 9 to 11 a.m. at the intersection. The post will remain open for entering and exiting traffic. Emergency Service personnel will direct traffic as necessary.  

    “The old traffic light did not meet new standards.  The old lights were smaller and were hung over the intersection by cables,” said Greg Shade, DPW. “The new traffic lights are bigger and they are on substantial metal cross arms.  They will be equipped with the new sensors that allow emergency vehicles to change the light to green for them and red for oncoming traffic.”

  The new lights will also make crossing safer for residents and visitors.  

  “Currently there are old overhead electric feeds to the area lighting that was hastily installed after 911,” said Shade. “All new feeds are underground, the overhead feeds will be removed for a much cleaner look and the lighting has been upgraded.”

  

 


Lt. Col. Ricky Emerson, President, ROCKS MG Charles C. Rogers Chapter
ROCKS helps students partner with community

The Carlisle Barracks County Fair ROCKS booth taken during Class 2010 orientation week. ROCKS concentrates on identifying mentorship opportunities in the community and providing mentorship and education through guest speaker programs focused on schools and organizations throughout the community. courtesy photo.

    Dec. 15, 2009 -- A group of Army War College students is working to make a difference in the Carlisle community.

    The local chapter of ROCKS Inc.'s mission is to promote mentorship, education/awareness, networking, leadership, and outreach support to the Army War College and Carlisle Barracks and the community.

  ROCKS concentrates on identifying mentorship opportunities in the community and providing mentorship and education through guest speaker programs focused on schools and organizations throughout the community.

  To date, the ROCKS have supported community outreach initiatives including:

·         American Legion,

·         United Way,

·         Carlisle Victory Circle for Youth outreach

·         Local high school and middle schools  

  Currently ROCKS is supporting Project Share through the monthly distribution of food to needy members of Carlisle. Volunteers bag fruit and vegetables, man distribution stations for foodstuffs, and stock shelves in the food bank warehouse.  This effort is in collaboration with other volunteer groups, local churches, civic organizations, and consumers.

  Other initiatives planned include reading assistance for elementary school children, mentorship to prospective ROTC students from Dickinson College and the awarding of two scholarships to 2010 graduates from local high schools.

  Over the next few weeks, ROCKS will support various community outreach programs to include the Carlisle Barracks Senior Holiday Social honoring the elderly from local nursing homes, the celebration of Dr. Martin Luther King's birthday in January and the February celebration of Black History Month.

  Additionally, the chapter will finalize plans to award monetary scholarships to two 2010 local high school graduates prior to the end of the 2010 school year.


Erin O. Stattel, Army War College Public Affairs Office

FLAGS graduates are ready to lead

    (Dec. 15, 2009)--As many as 14 spouses participated in and completed the FLAGS facilitator training, culminating in a graduation ceremony held Dec. 15 at the Letort View Community Center.

    FLAGS, or the facilitating leadership and group skills workshop, is a five-day, experience-based, strategic leadership seminar for spouses and develops skills that are applicable to all aspects of life.

    Led by program facilitator Lisa Towery, the group successfully completed facilitator training, which began in October, and is preparing for the two five-day sessions to be held in January and February. Photo by Megan Clugh.

    "This workshop provides these spouses with the skills to become strategic thinkers," Towery said. "And the skills they take away are not limited to military life, but are applicable to all aspects of life."

    Spouses interested in signing up for the sessions should contact Joe York, director of military family programming at 245-4787.


Erin O. Stattel, Army War College Public Affairs
54th annual holiday social a true 'family affair'

 

Air Force Lt. Col. Shaun McGrath, USAWC student, talks with his guest Bill Stamm, during the 2009 Senior Citizens Holiday Social Dec. 10 in the Letort View Community Center. Photo by Thomas Zimmerman.

want more photos?

Dec. 10, 2009 - The Letort View Community Center was full of smiles, holiday cheer and family Dec. 9 and 10 during the 54th Carlisle Barracks Senior Citizens Holiday Social.

     On both days as many as 300 guests from area nursing homes are accompanied by nearly 400 volunteers including Army War College students, faculty and other Carlisle Barracks community members, as they enjoy the talents of local acts such as the Carlisle High School flute and saxophone ensembles, the Hamilton Elementary School 4th and 5th grade choir and the Coyle School of Irish Dance, in addition to other entertainment provided by the Carlisle Barracks Child Development Center and many more.  Guests also enjoy special appearances by Santa and Mrs. Claus, and the time-honored tradition of an Army War College student "Elvis" performance.

WWII vet, wife attend first Holiday Social

    Two of the guests were Emery and Kathleen Roe who have been married since February 14, 1942 and now live in Chapel Pointe at Carlisle. The couple has been together ever since except the time spent apart when Emery was sent to Italy with the 5th Army during World War II.

    "We were married on Valentine's Day, before he went to war," said Kathleen.  

    "I was with the combat engineers and spent three years in Germany and Italy where we landed in Naples," recalled Emery. The Roe's were escorted by student Col. Rob Timm and his wife, Teri.

    "I remember being camped outside the Pisa Tower when I was serving in Italy and that was in 1945. It certainly was an interesting time in my life."

    After leaving the Army in 1945, Emery made a living as an upholsterer and "spitting tacks," but both Emery and Kathleen agreed it was nice to be back with "family."

    "It is just so nice to be back among so many people in uniform and their families," Kathleen remarked. "There is a feeling of home among Army people and our escorts are wonderful, this is just wonderful."

    After living most of their lives in Iowa, the Roe's moved to Carlisle to be closer to their three daughters.

    "All three of our daughters live in the Carlisle area, so we have been here for the past nine years," Emery said. "This is our first year coming to the Holiday Social and it is really nice, what a great thing to go to."

Other vets, local residents attend

    Guest Ken Walters said he served in the Air Force for 10 years and enjoyed the afternoon with his escort, student Col. Greg Wilcoxon.

     "I like watching the little ones performing all their songs, it is very cute," he said.

    Student Col. Michael Fleetwood escorted Kathryn Sheaffer, who worked in the Army War College Department of Academic Affairs for 24 years.

    "This was my first year coming here and it was absolutely wonderful," Sheaffer said. "I liked the Irish dancers and the Elvis performance, it was all great. I liked everything."

    Bob Brown, from Claremont Nursing and Rehab Center, has been coming to the social for 10 years and always looks forward to this event.

   "This is the best part of the holidays for me," he said. "I love seeing the kids sing and the music really gets me into the spirit."

    In addition to receiving an escort all afternoon, each guest receives a gift bag of homemade treats and a framed photo to remember their visit.  Following the event, cookies and poinsettias are delivered to the area nursing and retirement homes for residents who are not physically able to attend.

      Sue Frederick, a certified nursing assistant from Manor Care, called the event a nice opportunity for the home's residents.

    "This is my first year coming to this and it is really nice that they do this for all these people," she said.

    Sharon Horn, activities coordinator for Manor Care, echoed Frederick's sentiments.

    "This is a really nice thing to do for the community, and clearly, you can see how happy everyone is to get to spend the afternoon with the officers and people here at Carlisle Barracks. The residents look forward to coming every year."

    Guest Sue Hoffman said she comes for the cookies and the music.

   "I've always loved the holidays since I was a little girl," she said. "This reminds me of the holidays as a kid when the whole family would get together."

Volunteers enjoy event as well

    "We always have a fantastic time in the cookie room," said Linda Davis, operations assistant, directorate of plans and operations. "This year we had 1,300 cookies."

    For some, the holiday social reminds volunteers they are a part of the post "family." Michele Pritchard's husband, Col. Jack Pritchard, was president of last year's academic class, but is deployed in Iraq this year.

    "I baked last year, but I decided to volunteer and hostess this year," she said as she served cookies. "I just love doing this. My husband is away this year and so I thought this would be a great way to give back to this generation. I just love seeing their faces light up."


 

Carlisle Barracks retail area news

·         Reminder—the Class VI will stay open until 8 p.m. on Friday for a 90-day trial period

·         Commissary will be open on Dec. 21, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

·         Commissary also has self-checkout register now available

·         A Saturday matinee at 2 p.m. will be shown every other week at Reynolds Theater in addition to the regularly scheduled weekend movies.  84 people attended the most recent one


Thomas Zimmerman, Army War College Public Affairs Office

Alumni honored during 108th USAWC birthday celebration

 

Maj. Gen. Robert Williams, USAWC Commandant, presents retired Brig. Gen. Jerry Neff with his Outstanding Alumni Award Dec. 7 in Bliss Hall as part of the Army War College 108th birthday celebration. Photo by Megan Clugh. 

see the video


MWR Fitness 2010

    Dec. 9, 2009 -- Time to get in shape!  A new year, new you? Free classes from January 4th-15th

    Indoor Cycling, Pilates, Zumba, Cardio, Core and Strength and Strength and Step.

    Join us at 6am, 9am, Noon or 5pm at Thorpe/Root Hall Gym and resume your journey to being trim.

    For more information on classes call (717) 245-3387.

 


Erin O. Stattel, Army War College Public Affairs

Van pool reduces Army ‘bootprint,’ adds co-worker camaraderie

 

Members of the Carlisle Barracks van pool get ready to go home on Dec. 4. There are two vans for pickup and drop-off services for employees who live as far as Shippensburg. Photo by Megan Clugh.  


Dec. 4, 2009 -- The commute to and from Carlisle Barracks has become a fun time that is environmentally friendly thanks to a van pool run through an Army-sponsored transportation program.

    The Mass Transportation Benefit Program, a Department of the Army-sponsored program, is run by van pool company VPSI, INC. of Richmond, Va., and provides Carlisle Barracks with two vans for pickup and drop-off services for employees who live as far as Shippensburg.

    While workers appreciate the cost savings, they are also mindful of their contribution to reducing Carlisle Barracks’ carbon footprint, or bootprint, in the Army’s case.

    “This is the best thing we could have done for the environment,” said Ed Wenger, head carpenter for commercial buildings and van pool participant.

    “It certainly cuts down on my fuel budget, and the camaraderie between all of us is great,” said John Bonitz, of the Transportation Office, as he prepared on Thursday afternoon to leave post for the day. “This is really a very efficient “green” way to get to and from work.”

     “The Carlisle Barracks vanpool program [reduces] more than 14 tons of CO2 emissions and [eliminates] nearly 900 commute trips from the roads,” said Jesse Kafka, business development executive for VPSI, Inc. “Since the inception of the program last December, total CO2 emissions have been reduced by 158 tons, and 9,521 commute trips have been eliminated from the roads.”

    Carlisle Barracks’ first van pool was started one year ago on December 3, said Donna Horton, management analyst for the Directorate of Resource Management.

    The initiative takes approximately 20 cars off the highway on a daily basis as well as frees up an equal number of parking spaces across the installation, said Lynn Snyder, director of Resource Management.

    “Not only is this initiative saving those employees money, but it is also providing a green initiative for the post and reducing the traffic on the local highways, a driving factor behind the MTBP,” Snyder said. “Due to the program’s success, a second van pool was initiated and started March 1.”

     “We currently have two full vans with 27 employees, nine from Chambersburg and 18 from Shippensburg, [who] commute daily on the van pools,” Horton explained. “Currently, we have two employees who are on the stand-by list.”

    Another van could be added to the fleet in response to additional riders expressing interest. People wishing to participate in the Carlisle Barracks van pool should contact Donna Horton in the Resource Management Office at donna.horton@us.army.mil.


Army vs Navy football game at Joint Pub Dec. 12

 

    Dec. 8, 2009 -- Don't have tickets or can't get away for the Army vs. Navy football game? 

    Join us upstairs in the Joint Pub in the LVCC for the Army vs. Navy game Sat. Dec 12 from 2-8 p.m. We'll have the game on all the Flat Panel TV's and snacks.

 


Jim Garamone,  American Forces Press Service

Officials announce first Afghanistan surge units

WASHINGTON, Dec. 7, 2009 – About 16,000 Marines and soldiers have been notified they will deploy to Afghanistan as part of President Barack Obama’s new strategy.

Obama announced his decision to deploy 30,000 U.S. troops to Afghanistan in the first half of 2010 on Dec. 1.
    The troops in today’s announcement primarily will come from Camp Lejeune, N.C.; Fort Drum, N.Y.; and Camp Pendleton, Calif., Pentagon officials said today. More notifications will be made in the weeks and months ahead, Pentagon spokesman Bryan Whitman said.
    These initial deployments will join the 68,000 American troops already in the country. At the end of the effort, about 100,000 U.S. troops will be deployed to Afghanistan.
    About 1,500 Marines from Camp Lejeune will deploy later this month. In addition, 6,200 Marines of Regimental Combat Team 2 at Camp Lejeune were alerted for deployment early in the spring, Whitman said.
    The 1st Marine Expeditionary Force at Camp Pendleton will deploy 800 Marines in the spring, Whitman said.
    The 1st Brigade Combat Team from the Army’s 10th Mountain Division at Fort Drum will deploy 3,400 Soldiers in early spring to train Afghan forces.
    Additionally, 4,100 support personnel will deploy at various times through the spring, Whitman said. Military officials call these personnel “enablers” who do essential missions and bring extra value to the counterinsurgency effort. These include military police personnel, engineers, civil affairs personnel, route-clearance teams, explosive ordnance demolition personnel and experts in intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance.

 

 


(Dec. 4, 2009)--In support of the Senior Citizens' Holiday Social, parking lot 314/315 is temporarily unavailable from 9 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 8 until 4:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 10. Adjacent street parking along Pratt and Lovell Avenues is also limited to residents only during this time. Thank you for your cooperation.


Carlisle Barracks responds to 'tighter belt':  Ashburn gate to close in off-duty hours

December 3, 2009 -- As of Monday, Dec. 7 until further notice, the Ashburn gate on Route 11 will be open 5:30 am to 8:30 pm weekdays and training holidays. It will be closed weekends and federal holidays.  The Claremont gate remains open every day, 24 hours a day.

Carlisle Barracks is one of the worldwide installations that will operate at reduced funding levels in fiscal 2010.  The IMCOM/ACSIM commander, Lt. Gen. Rick Lynch, laid out his priorities. "Our challenge is to ensure those key, higher priority programs across  to ensure that key, higher priority programs across all installations do not suffer. Lynch pledged commitment to full support to life, health and safety programs, and the Army Family Covenant. He directed commanders and leaders across the installations to become better stewards of resources and to do business smarter and more efficiently without sacrificing quality of service. [The full text of Lt. Gen. Lynch's column is below.]

For small installations, belt-tightening is a tough task. Already efficient, almost 94 percent of base operations budget here is fixed for civilian pay, utility payments and the DPW basops contracts, according to Lynn Snyder, director of Resource Management for both college and garrison. "It's already working on a shoe string."

 "We are very frugal. There is not much wasteful spending going on here and so trying to find ways to save money is even more challenging than on a larger installation," said garrison commander Lt. Col. Jan Holliday. "We will not cut any services that would impact life, health or safety such as police or fire."

The garrison instituted a hiring freeze several weeks ago, and is making a further effort to save money by eliminating guard shifts at Ashburn Gate.

 "Closing the Ashburn gate on Route 11 for nights and weekends allows us to better use our guard force without spreading them too thin and also allows us some flexibility in force protection.  No guard will lose a job. This will allow us to reduce costs through attrition.

 "We realize that the closing of Ashburn gate is an inconvenience to many people," said Holliday. "We are looking into the feasibility of a CAC-access pedestrian gate and MWR will begin running a shuttle soon that will circulate in a five-mile radius around post on the weekends for those who use the Ashburn pedestrian gate. Should money become available, we will definitely relook the gate closure. 

 "Programs covered by the Army Family covenant, such as school-age services, the Child Development Center, MWR, etc., will be fully supported," she added.

Every person who lives and works on the installation can do his or her small part to be a better steward – for the environment and for the bottom line. "There are a number of small things that we, working together, can turn into big cost savings," said Holliday.

  • Turn off lights in quarters or office when not using them.
  • Turn off computers.
  • Watch the thermostats.
  • Network printers to avoid using unnecessary power.
  • Think about whether or not you really NEED two computer monitors.
  • Use energy-efficient light bulbs.
  • Don't print multiple copies of power point slides when you could just email them.

 Lt. Gen. Rick Lynch, IMCOM commanding general and ACSIM

Resourcing the Army Home: Installation Funding Levels on the Decline

  In recent years, the Army and its Installations have enjoyed unprecedented levels of funding. In fiscal year 2008, the Army hit a high water mark in its fiscal history with a total annual budget exceeding $250 billion –three times more than FY2001 funding level.

Much of this growth is attributed to funding the war, rebalancing our Army through investments in Army's force structure, equipment, infrastructure, and key Soldier and Family programs.

Funding levels of this magnitude are unsustainable year after the year, and as the country faces some stiff economic challenges, we are forced to reduce funding and exact a greater level of stewardship over our resources. 

The Installation Management Command – like other commands throughout our Army – will operate at reduced funding levels. This means that starting in 2010, performance levels for some installation services will be notably less than what we have had in recent years and will remain at that level for the foreseeable future.

Our challenge is to ensure those key, higher priority programs across our installations do not suffer. We will maintain our full support to Life, Health and Safety programs, the Army Family Covenant and those services that prepare our Soldier and their Families for deployment in support of the Army's Force Generation model.

These are non-negotiables that will remain fully funded. This is our commitment; we will not depart from it. However, there will be other installation services that will clearly be reduced.

We have grown accustomed to some very high levels of service across the board in recent years and we all need to be forthcoming with the expectation that things will be different in some areas. Help manage this expectation across your garrisons. Educate everyone as to which changes they can expect to see. A simple explanation can go a long way to helping understand the changes some of our installation services will undergo.

Across the Army's installations, we can do much to help ourselves by becoming better stewards of our resources. It starts with the individual; everybody has a role. Simple things like turning the lights off, powering down your computer at night, driving tactical vehicles instead of TMP vehicles or conducting a VTC instead of traveling to a distant site unnecessarily all save money – and no savings is too small to forego.

Commanders and leaders across the installation have a key role and are responsible for the efficient use of our resources. Costs should be an inherent consideration in your every decision.  We too often marginalize this key factor in making good, resource-informed decisions but we can no longer afford to do so.

As I travel throughout the Army community, I carry the message that we can do business smarter and more efficiently without sacrificing the quality of service that our Soldiers and their Families so richly deserve.

I challenge everyone to do the same; to work together to ensure that those key installation programs that mean so much are well resourced and operated; that we do away with wasteful and unnecessary spending.

Every person – whether you are a Soldier, Family member, one of our great DA Civilians or a contractor serving our Army – is needed and can make a difference.

Ask yourself if you are doing the right things and then, are you doing them right.  Doing things right means doing them in the most cost efficient way without sacrificing effectiveness. 

Army Strong


BOSS gift-wrapping benefits Soldiers

     The Better Opportunities for Single Soldiers will be wrapping gifts on Dec. 7-12 and 14-17 from noon- 6 p.m. in the PX Main Lobby. All donations will benefit Soldier programs.

 


Security Exercise planned for Dec. 8, 14

Security Exercises scheduled for Dec. 8, 14 Please follow posted signs and instructions.

 


Thomas Zimmerman, Army War College Public Affairs Office
Guards help keep Carlisle Barracks residents, employees safe

A guard inspects a vehicle during a training exercise Nov. 23. The guards perform an important mission protecting the residents and employees of Carlisle Barracks. Photo by Thomas Zimmerman

Dec. 1, 2009 -- You may not always see it, but every day the guards at Carlisle Barracks train and work hard to keep the post, its residents and employees safe.

    These men and women are the first lines of defense and security at the gates to ensure only those that are authorized to enter the installation have access. These measures include mandatory and random vehicle and personnel inspection measures and identification checks.

    They also serve another important role according to Victor Riddick, midnight shift supervisor.

“As ambassadors we are the first to greet each and every person as they enter Carlisle Barracks and usually the last to bid you farewell as you depart,” he said. He has been at Carlisle Barracks for four years and has the responsibilities of the “guard mount”-- initial information briefing, duty assignments, and uniform inspections and also monitors and assists during vehicle inspections and provides guard post relief.

    Training is one of the most important missions according to Riddick.

    “We work very hard to ensure training tasks are to recommended standards and that it’s understood and accomplished,” he said. “We provide realism and performance feedback for all levels of training, ensure all shift members are involved in the training, provide input to how training was conducted, and applied to mission requirements.”

    One of the most experienced members of the guard force is Daniel Drummer, swing shift supervisor.   The 20-year security vet and Navy retiree joined Carlisle Barracks in Dec. 2003.

    “My day to day responsibilities are to provide what we call force protection at DES, for all personnel and their families 24 hours a day.”

    Drummer is charged with making sure the guards are kept up-to-date on the changing environment and receive realistic training.

    “I have to keep abreast of current events around the post, getting the word out to the guard force that I’m responsible for, as well as keeping my peers and superiors involved through role playing and training exercises.”

    Training new guards for any situation is a matter of great importance for Andrew Madison, day shift supervisor.

    “All new security guards perform their OJT training on day shift,” he said. “The new security guards are assigned to an experience guard who then reviews and monitors how the new security guard handles verifying an individual coming onto post.”

    After they complete their training Madison makes sure they keep learning.

    “I have to monitor my staff performance and make sure they follow the SOP procedures and keep the Desk Sgt and Police patrols aware of all situations we may encounter at entry points to Carlisle Barracks.”

    Lee McClure, captain of the guards, said that training is important because they are charged with such an important mission.

    “Our number one priority on the guard force is Force Protection. We have a tough job but it is rewarding in many ways,” he said. “The guard force interacts with a very diversified group of personnel entering Carlisle Barracks on a day to day basis. Maintaining a rigid security posture in order to keep the personnel on Carlisle Barracks safe is tough but we always accomplish our mission.”

    The success of the guards is a direct reflection of their hard work according to Bob Suskie, head of the directorate of emergency services.

    “These gentlemen are the heart and soul of the guard force and the three men instrumental in training and leading the guard force on a daily basis,” said.

    There’s nothing else he’d rather do said Riddick.

“There is no greater joy than having the continued opportunity to provide security service for some of the most delightful people that I have come to know, the Carlisle Barracks community. Each individual – military, dependent, and civilian employee – makes coming to work worth coming to work.”

 


Thomas Zimmerman, Army War College Public Affairs Office
Hard work pays off as YS has flawless accreditation evaluation

Dec. 2, 2009 -- After 14 months of hard work and preparation, the Carlisle Barracks School Age Services Program has received the highest score possible by the National After School Association.

    “We go through accreditation through an outside national organization every four years,” said Bob Salviano, YS director. “Getting accredited by NAA is not an automatic thing for before- and-after school programs. Their guidelines are very stringent.” The centers are also accredited separately by the Department of the Army.

    The Carlisle Barracks program passed with flying colors.

    “I am happy to report that not only did we have no deficiencies in a list of 144 Standards that were checked during the endorser visit, but out of 432 possible points we were awarded 430 points - the highest this endorsement team has ever given,” he said. “I was confident that we would do well because I knew we were extremely well prepared, and we have an outstanding staff at Carlisle Barracks, but I never expected such a high score and overwhelming comments.”

    There high scores were the result of a lot of hard work, according to Salviano.

   “The staff has gone through a great deal of additional training from January to October to be better prepared and to better provide and improve exceptional programs in the School Age Program,” he said. “The center has undergone significant renovations of each of our classrooms and of course a total remodel of our new Café. We have provided many new educational games, educational toys, equipment, and supplies for the SAS Program to enhance the activities and learning potential for the children we serve.”

 


Erin O. Stattel, Army War College Public Affairs Office
Think twice about where you throw out that trash

Dec. 3, 2009 -- An average American produces 56 tons of trash per year, the Clean Air Council states, but Carlisle Barracks and the U.S. Army War College are striving to reduce the amount of waste carried off post to the local landfill through increased recycling and awareness.

   

    Believe it or not, all waste is not equal in Carlisle Barracks buildings. Cans, glass bottles and plastic containers can be recycled in various locations in Root Hall and other buildings while white office paper and corrugated cardboard can be placed in recycling bins in seminar rooms and offices.

   

    “Cardboard and white office paper are what goes into the blue cans that you see in each seminar room and in offices,” clarified Donna Swauger, Environmental Management System coordinator. “Comingled, or cans, glass bottles and “1” and “2” plastics, can be recycled in properly marked receptacles.”

   

    Swauger noted that plastic should not accompany paper recyclables and should be removed from cardboard and paper products before they are tossed in bins.

   

    “As a first step we have added recycle bins near the soda machines in Root Hall and we have also added additional collection points behind Root Hall and pulled the green toter reserved for comingled recyclables forward near the other dumpsters,” Swauger said.

   

    Some employees said they don’t separate their recyclables because it has long been believed that they all go to the same place, but this is not the case.

   

    “The trash should be separated from the recyclable paper in the blue bins,” said Linda Etter, supervisor for Prestige Maintenance in Root Hall. “Trash also should not be placed in the recycle bin in the Joint Deli because if it is, our cleaning crew can’t put that bag in the recycling bin out back.”

   

    Trash is not supposed to be placed in the cafeteria’s recycle bin, which is reserved for aluminum cans, glass bottles and plastics “1” and “2.”

   

    “We are hoping that our new waste removal contract will include single-stream recycling that will allow us to throw all recyclables into the blue bins, but until then we want to strengthen our current recycling practices,” Swauger said. “For instance, newspaper is not recycled under the current contract. It will be with implementation of the Environmental Management Program which includes switching to single stream recycling with Waste Management.”

   

    On the residential side of post, Balfour Beatty Communities offers recycling to residents, courtesy of services provided by York Waste Disposal. Items such as aluminum cans, glass bottles, newspapers, white paper, corrugated cardboard, magazines and phone books are carted off post and recycled regularly through the disposal company’s single-stream recycling program.

   

    Swauger offered some environmentally friendly tips that fall under the “reduce, re-use, recycle” mantra and can serve as a good first step for those looking to help with Carlisle Barracks’ efforts to improve environmental stewardship.

   

    “Purchase items with less packaging than traditional, don’t buy bottled water - fill your own bottles,” Swauger suggested. “Don’t throw away good, still serviceable items, but rather donate them to charity or sell them in consignment shops; we even have a thrift shop on post.” Environmental questions can be posed to building environmental points of contact. Each building is equipped with a designated EPOC who can help direct environmental inquiries or answer questions about building recycling practices.

   

    Marianne Barrick, Root Hall EPOC, has already started strengthening the building’s recycling program by placing additional bins for cans and glass bottles and plastics throughout central areas in the building and spreading recycling awareness.

   

    “I placed some additional bins outside the B-wing elevators on the second and third floors and a receptacle is also beside the vending machine on the second floor,” she said. “We need a few more and I put an order in for some so we can have more in places like the cafeteria.”

 

Thomas Zimmerman, Erin O. Stattel, Army War College Public Affairs Office
Africa symposium shines light on regional challenges, opportunities

Maj. Gen. William Garrett III, commander, U.S. Army Africa spoke about the mission of U.S Army Africa and the strategic challenges and opportunities in the region during the Africa Regional Symposium that brought together members of military, government, non-governmental organizations and regional college faculty at the Army War College Nov. 24-25. Photo by Thomas Zimmerman.

Dec. 1, 2009 -- The Africa Regional Symposium brought together members of military, government, non-governmental organizations and regional college faculty at the Army War College Nov. 24-25.

    The symposium provided an overview and baseline understanding of the relationship between issues affecting Africa’s security situation and their linkage to US National Interests.

    Guest speakers and classroom discussion highlighted the growing importance of Africa to US National Interests. Divided into three sections, the symposium focused on the African Security Environment and the International System; Governance, Political Development, Cooperation and Conflict; and the US Army and Africa.

    One of those speakers was Dr. William Reno, Northwestern University, discussed Conflict drivers, security challenges and the U.S. role in the 21st century in Africa, in Bliss Hall Nov. 24.

    “This symposium sounded like an excellent education initiative and at the sister war college, we don’t have anything like this,” said Amb. David Dunn, Deputy Commandant and International Affairs Advisor, National War College. “Dr. Reno’s presentation was very interesting and he mainly focused on countries in conflict, whereas earlier today we had a more general overview but this has been quite an interesting analysis of the current state of affairs in Africa.”

    Dan Pike, Office of the Secretary of Defense’s Africa Policy, said Reno’s presentation was representative of a new focus on the region.

    “This event is huge if you compare it to attention paid to Africa by war colleges in the past,” Pike said. “These 21st century issues are being presented to the right audience to address this because they are going to be the leaders to deal with those issues.”

    USAWC student Helen Lardner said the symposium helped educate her about the region.

    “I enjoyed listening to information about the different African regions and the different resources available,” she said. “It was interesting to hear how he related a COIN strategy for the different problems and how it could be applied in certain areas and situations.”

    By bringing together so many diverse backgrounds the symposium inspired discussion among the participants.

    “We didn’t just get a State Department or DoD perspective,” said USAWC student David Jenkins. “It was an interesting mix.”

    “The African perspective tends to be underplayed in military studies but it is growing in importance,” said Jennifer Cooke, director of the Africa Program for the Center for Strategic and International Studies.     “I was happy to share my perspective. This seminar has helped give others a completely different take. It’s fun to engage about these issues.”

    “We are hearing distinctly different views from what we get from the open media,” said USAWC student Tom Pagan. “This is very beneficial to many of us in dealing with what will come in the future.”

    Amb. Donald Yamamoto spoke about the challenges and dramatic changes his embassy faces while tackling sub-Saharan issues in Ethiopia.

    “I have been in Africa for the past 14 years and there have been dramatic changes,” he said. “Things in Africa are dynamically changing, and we need to be a part of that.”

    USAWC student Lt. Col. Tarn Warren said he found Yamamoto’s comments gave him a clearer picture of the issues and challenges of the region.

    “This was certainly insightful and interesting and his way of describing the vast differences in military expenditures and the state department’s efforts to do work was great. He hit all the right notes and with a bit of humor,” Warren said. “My takeaway today is the importance of interagency operations and why it needs to be flatter. We can’t wait for things to come down the stovepipe, we won’t get anything done.   Trust and cooperation from an interagency point of view is really key.”

    Another guest speaker for the symposium was Maj. Gen. William Garrett III, commander, U.S. Army Africa. Garrett spoke about the mission of U.S Army Africa and the strategic challenges and opportunities in the region.

    Education really seemed to be a vital part of the symposium according to Col. Stephen Mariano, Army Africa Assistant Chief of Staff.

    “This is a whole new way of thinking,” he said. “This command is less than two years old and we want to help educate people on what’s going on and how they may fit it.”

 


Carlisle Barracks responds to 'tighter belt':  Ashburn gate to close in off-duty hours

As of Monday, Dec. 7 until further notice, the Ashburn gate on Route 11 will be open 5:30 am to 8:30 pm weekdays and training holidays. It will be closed weekends and federal holidays.

Carlisle Barracks is one of the worldwide installations that will operate at reduced funding levels in fiscal 2010.  The IMCOM/ACSIM commander, Lt. Gen. Rick Lynch, laid out his priorities. "Our challenge is to ensure those key, higher priority programs across  to ensure that key, higher priority programs across all installations do not suffer. Lynch pledged commitment to full support to life, health and safety programs, and the Army Family Covenant. He directed commanders and leaders across the installations to become better stewards of resources and to do business smarter and more efficiently without sacrificing quality of service. [The full text of Lt. Gen. Lynch's column is below.]

For small installations, belt-tightening is a tough task. Already efficient, almost 94 percent of base operations budget here is fixed for civilian pay, utility payments and the DPW basops contracts, according to Lynn Snyder, director of Resource Management for both college and garrison. "It's already working on a shoe string."

 "We are very frugal. There is not much wasteful spending going on here and so trying to find ways to save money is even more challenging than on a larger installation," said garrison commander Lt. Col. Jan Holliday. "We will not cut any services that would impact life, health or safety such as police or fire."

The garrison instituted a hiring freeze several weeks ago, and is making a further effort to save money by eliminating guard shifts at Ashburn Gate.

 "Closing the Ashburn gate on Route 11 for nights and weekends allows us to better use our guard force without spreading them too thin and also allows us some flexibility in force protection.  No guard will lose a job. This will allow us to reduce costs through attrition.

 "We realize that the closing of Ashburn gate is an inconvenience to many people," said Holliday. "We are looking into the feasibility of a CAC-access pedestrian gate and MWR will begin running a shuttle soon that will circulate in a five-mile radius around post on the weekends for those who use the Ashburn pedestrian gate. Should money become available, we will definitely relook the gate closure. 

 

 "Programs covered by the Army Family covenant, such as school-age services, the Child Development Center, MWR, etc., will be fully supported," she added.

Every person who lives and works on the installation can do his or her small part to be a better steward – for the environment and for the bottom line. "There are a number of small things that we, working together, can turn into big cost savings," said Holliday.

·         Turn off lights in quarters or office when not using them.

·         Turn off computers.

·         Watch the thermostats.

·         Network printers to avoid using unnecessary power.

·         Think about whether or not you really NEED two computer monitors.

·         Use energy-efficient light bulbs.

·         Don't print multiple copies of power point slides when you could just email them.

 

 

Lt. Gen. Rick Lynch, IMCOM commanding general and ACSIM

Resourcing the Army Home: Installation Funding Levels on the Decline

  In recent years, the Army and its Installations have enjoyed unprecedented levels of funding. In fiscal year 2008, the Army hit a high water mark in its fiscal history with a total annual budget exceeding $250 billion –three times more than FY2001 funding level.

Much of this growth is attributed to funding the war, rebalancing our Army through investments in Army's force structure, equipment, infrastructure, and key Soldier and Family programs.

Funding levels of this magnitude are unsustainable year after the year, and as the country faces some stiff economic challenges, we are forced to reduce funding and exact a greater level of stewardship over our resources. 

The Installation Management Command – like other commands throughout our Army – will operate at reduced funding levels. This means that starting in 2010, performance levels for some installation services will be notably less than what we have had in recent years and will remain at that level for the foreseeable future.

Our challenge is to ensure those key, higher priority programs across our installations do not suffer. We will maintain our full support to Life, Health and Safety programs, the Army Family Covenant and those services that prepare our Soldier and their Families for deployment in support of the Army's Force Generation model.

These are non-negotiables that will remain fully funded. This is our commitment; we will not depart from it. However, there will be other installation services that will clearly be reduced.

We have grown accustomed to some very high levels of service across the board in recent years and we all need to be forthcoming with the expectation that things will be different in some areas. Help manage this expectation across your garrisons. Educate everyone as to which changes they can expect to see. A simple explanation can go a long way to helping understand the changes some of our installation services will undergo.

Across the Army's installations, we can do much to help ourselves by becoming better stewards of our resources. It starts with the individual; everybody has a role. Simple things like turning the lights off, powering down your computer at night, driving tactical vehicles instead of TMP vehicles or conducting a VTC instead of traveling to a distant site unnecessarily all save money – and no savings is too small to forego.

Commanders and leaders across the installation have a key role and are responsible for the efficient use of our resources. Costs should be an inherent consideration in your every decision.  We too often marginalize this key factor in making good, resource-informed decisions but we can no longer afford to do so.

As I travel throughout the Army community, I carry the message that we can do business smarter and more efficiently without sacrificing the quality of service that our Soldiers and their Families so richly deserve.

I challenge everyone to do the same; to work together to ensure that those key installation programs that mean so much are well resourced and operated; that we do away with wasteful and unnecessary spending.

Every person – whether you are a Soldier, Family member, one of our great DA Civilians or a contractor serving our Army – is needed and can make a difference.

Ask yourself if you are doing the right things and then, are you doing them right.  Doing things right means doing them in the most cost efficient way without sacrificing effectiveness. 

Army Strong

 

 

 

 

 


Erin O. Stattel, U.S. Army War College, Public Affairs Office

AAFES to add matinee to Saturday movie theater schedule

    November 6, 2009— Beginning November 21, a Saturday matinee will be shown every other week at Reynolds Theater in addition to the regularly scheduled weekend movies.

    During the Oct. 22 garrison town hall meeting residents asked AAFES management if more show times and children's movies could be added to Reynolds Theater's lineup. Management was listening.

    Doors will open at 1:30 p.m. every other Saturday for 2 p.m. showings of movies generally geared towards children, Reynolds Theater manager Deb Snouffer said.

    "Starting Nov. 21, we will have a 2 p.m. matinee and will have one every other weekend," she said. "We want the matinees geared towards children and will pick up G-rated movies when they are made available."

    AAFES management hopes to receive more G-rated movies for youngsters to enjoy during new matinee times. Photo by Erin O. Stattel, Public Affairs Office.

    The movie kicking off the matinee series is Disney and Pixar's "Up," a story about a young adventurer who is whisked away in a flying house he is visiting when the senior citizen home owner decides to uproot his dwelling with helium balloons.

    Snouffer said she is hoping AAFES headquarters will send Reynolds Theater more G- and PG-rated movies.

     "Our prices are less than outside movie theaters and we try to have enjoyable movies to make a nice atmosphere. Reynolds is convenient for those who live on post and the money generated goes right back into MWR," she said. "We get a lot of R-rated movies, but we have made the recommendations to AAFES headquarters and are hoping to get more children's movies to add to our new matinee times."


Town Hall Meeting:  You asked, they listened

 The Class Six store will remain open on Fridays until 8 p.m. for a ninety-day period at which time the hours will be reevaluated.


U.S. Army War College Library to hold Book Talk

  The USAWC Library will host a Book Talk on Tuesday, Dec. 1 from 11:45 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. in the Library. 

  Retired Col. Don Helin, USAWC Class of '81 will discuss his recent novel, "Thy Kingdom Come," which tells the story of a white supremacist militia plot, set in Central Pa., to steal nuclear material and build dirty bombs.

  Bring your lunch and enjoy the presentation.  Copies of the book will be available for purchase.

  For more information contact the Library at  245-4259 or visit the author's website at:  http://www.donhelin.com

 


Suzanne Reynolds, Public Affairs Office
Carlisle Barracks to host first Christkindlemarkt Holiday Crafts Bazaar

  On Saturday, Dec. 5 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Root Hall Gym, here, the Carlisle Barracks Directorate of Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation will host its first Christkindlesmarkt Holiday Crafts Bazaar.

  Dating back to medieval times, Christkindlemarkts are festive outdoor markets held each Christmas season in towns, villages and cities throughout Germany.  Featured at these markets are food and drink, holiday ornaments and handcrafted gifts.

  Even though this event will be held indoors, the festive nature will abound with over 50 vendors, seasonal music, door prizes and more to include free admission --

  Vendors interested in reserving a booth call 717-245-4069 by Nov. 25.

  If you do not have a Department of Defense vehicle decal, enter Carlisle Barracks through the Claremont Road Vehicle Access Center, signs are posted.  Drivers will show a driver's license, vehicle registration and proof of insurance; passengers will show photo ID.  On post, follow the signs for event parking.

 

 


Carlisle Barracks Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony

  The annual Carlisle Barracks Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony will be held on Thursday, Dec. 3 at 4:30 p.m. in front of the Post Chapel.  Along with a visit from Santa, there will be refreshments and free carriage rides.

  The carriage rides will depart from the Post Chapel from 5 to 8 p.m.

  Road Closure information:  On Dec. 3 all entrances to Mara Circle will be blocked at 1 p.m.  Traffic will be rerouted away from the event site beginning at 4:20 p.m.


 Certified Babysitter List available through CYSS

   Parents, are you looking for a night out?  Well, Child, Youth & School Services may have the answer for you--a certified babysitter! 

  Carlisle Barracks Youth Services and the Moore Child Development Center maintain a list of certified babysitters who have completed more than 16 hours of training during a two-day course taught each summer at Carlisle Barracks. 

  The trained and certified babysitters are ages13 to18 and have earned certification in both, the American Red Cross First Aid and Infant/Child CPR.

  Topics covered in the two-day training course include:  Babysitter Basics, Age Appropriate activities, Storytelling, Principles of Discipline, Nutrition and Appropriate snacks, Fire safety, Drug and Alcohol guidelines, Child Abuse guidelines, Children of Deployed Soldiers, Safety and Emergency procedures.

  "I highly encourage families to try the CYSS certified babysitters," said Liz Knouse, acting director, Directorate of Family Morale, Welfare, and Recreation.  "These teens have taken the first step in improving their employment skills—training.  Many have several years experience and stand ready to take care of your child," said Knouse.

  To obtain a copy of the certified babysitter list, contact Youth Services at 717-245-4555.


Thomas Zimmerman, Erin Stattel and Carol Kerr, Public Affairs Office
USAWC students hit the streets of New York to see lessons in action

During the first day of the New York City academic trip, the students broke into 29 small groups to visit more than 30 different organizations. 

This group visited Dow Jones. Photo by Thomas Zimmerman. 

want more photos? 

 

Nov. 23, 2009 -- Nearly 350 Army War College students invaded New York City for four days Nov. 18-21 to seeapplications of strategic leadership they have been learning about in seminar since August.

    “There are several learning objectives that are accomplished by taking the students to New York City,” said Dr. Jim Helis, chairman of the Department on National Security and Strategy. “The first is exposure to senior leadership in a non-military or civilian organization that is either government run or private. That complements their course on strategic leadership. Students can develop an appreciation for domestic issues and participate in urban affairs that affect strategic development by seeing all the complexities of running a city.”

    Seeing the lessons in action and how to apply them in their own careers is one of the focal points of the trip.  

    “The learning occurs there in New York, but part of the experience also occurs here when they share their experiences with the rest of their seminars.  We really want them to take advantage of what strategic opportunities there are out there and capitalize on the opportunity to speak with civilian leaders on behalf of the military,” said Helis.

    During the first day, the students broke into 29 small groups to visit more than 30 different organizations.

    “The visits were outstanding and relevant to what we are studying,” said Lt. Col. Mark Towne, who visited the NYPD Counterterrorism Division and the Dow Jones.  “The intent of this trip is to see how these organizations fit into national strategy and the two visits I had today showed how they fit into the national commitment to counterterrorism and the role of the media in covering strategic issues. I think we accomplished our intent.”

    Czech Republic Col. Vladimir Barca also went on the visit and agreed.

    “It was very interesting overall,” he said. “With globalization all democratic countries are potential targets for terrorism so there was a lesson for everyone in the room.”

    Another small group visited the Office of Emergency Management.

    “There were some similarities to my job, for instance, complications of dealing with various offices and coming up with creative solutions to problems,” said Air Force Lt. Col. Hector Cruz.

 

Another group visited the NYPD Counterterrorism Department.

 

    The application of DIME, or the four elements of national power, was a common theme during the visits.

 

    Lt. Col. Jonathan McColumn visited Patriotic Partners, a company that specializes in assisting small businesses.

    “One of the best parts of the visit was that the CEO sat with us and gave us advice and tidbits from her time as a strategic leader for her company,” he said. “She stressed that the moral aspects of the decision making process at the strategic level is vital, which very clearly applies to those in the military. Until we can clearly define the problem we can’t find a solution.”

    “My visit to the Port Authority really showed me how important the economic factor of DIME is,” said Lt. Col. Sergio Dickerson. “It helps give us a strategic perspective on how vital shipping and commerce are to not only New York but the rest of the country.”

    Lt. Col. Carla Campbell visited the US mission to the United Nations to get a better perspective on the diplomatic element.

    “It was a unique experience. I had never been exposed to the UN and how the US fits into that mission,” she said. “This really culminates on how we play in a larger political arena in a global environment which fits very nicely into our curriculum.”

    A visit to Columbia University provided a different viewpoint for Col. Jan Apo.

    “Our speaker was a professor from Columbia University and he was very critical of the current strategy in Afghanistan, but it was good insight to see from his perspective and his point of view.”

    Lt. Col. Rhonda Smillie visited the Environmental Protection Agency sewage treatment center and new water filtration site.

    “There's tremendous strategic vision required to serve a city of this size, dealing with interagency coordination, federal regulations, state regulations and the politics of where to put a sewage treatment center,” she said. “We saw the application of what we're learning in class about dealing with the complexity of regulations, politics, expenditure of dollars, and security involved for protection of the infrastructure.”

     On day two a panel made up of Amb. Roseanne DiCarlo, U.S. Alternative Representative for Special Political Affairs to the United Nations, His Excellency Philip J. Parham, United Nations Ambassador and Deputy Permanent Rep. for the United Kingdom, and Kiplin Perkins, UN Department of Field Support, discussed the United Nations.

    Some of the topics were peacekeeping operations, environmental concerns and the role of the UN today.

    “The experience with the UN is a close encounter with the diplomatic community and an appreciation for the UN can factor into different jobs,” said Helis. “I hope they take away an appreciation for contemporary domestic issues and can fit that into their thinking of National Strategy so they have a better appreciation of the role of the UN and our allies' views,” he said.


Carol Kerr, Army War College Public Affairs Office
Theater of War reproduces the Greek citizen-warrior community forum

Story-telling addresses human response to war

Charles S. Dutton, of 'Roc,' 'Rudy' and dozens of film & TV credits, portrays Philoctetes, Nov. 23 in Bliss Hall as part of the Theater of War presentation. By presenting these plays to military audiences, our hope is to demystify and de-stigmatize psychological injury and to facilitate open dialogue about the challenges faced by Service members, Veterans, and their families today, said Theater of War director Brian Dorries. Photo by Megan Clugh. 


Nov. 30, 2009 -- The Theater of War will tour military communities in 93 performances this coming year – and the Army War College was selected as one of the first, as well as the first to feature well-known actor Charles Dutton.

    He was joined by three actors of the stage and screen whose performance surprised those – most of us – not familiar with Greek plays. They are readings, and yet they are highly dramatic: “inspiring performances” according to USAWC Commandant Maj. Gen. Robert Williams. Bill Camp created the character Ajax, who finds himself dishonored after years of committed service.  Elizabeth Marvel played several roles, as did Adam Driver, who is both a former Marine and a Julliard graduate.

    “We’re excited to go where the leadership convenes to address ethical points,” said director Brian Doerries who translated the seldom-seen plays from 5th century Greece.  I don’t think they’ve had audiences that understand them, but you do, he said to the largely military audience.

    Sophocles was a general in the Greek military during the long years of the Trojan Wars. He crafted plays about Soldiers – for Soldiers – to help the community address the human responses of betrayal, disappointment, pain, and the stress of enduring conflict. 

    “Today, I was struck by what it was that inspired Gen. Sophocles to write these stories. I wonder if Sophocles found himself thinking, “Who among us fully knows the heart of another human,” asked Brig. Gen. Loree Sutton, director of the Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury, the DoD office that sponsors Theater of War.

   “By witnessing these stories, maybe this was his way of showing that the human heart can be led or inspired,” said Sutton.

    British Fellow Col. Phil Sheridan joined in the ‘townhall’ style discussion to describe the British Army’s “Decompression” program following deployment.

    “I could relate to this,” said Sheridan. “These are things that are happening to Soldiers now. The quiet irony now is that the British drop soldiers on a Greek island now for three days of ‘decompression.” On the first day they want merely to leave and get back to family, he said. By the third day, they tend to ask for another 24 hours.

    “Even if they don’t get it fully out of their system, they’ve cried and they know who [of their fellow soldiers] they can go to in the next six months.”

    “I wish this had been presented to my class,” said Air Force Lt. Col. David Bolgiano, now a USAWC faculty member. “Having been deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan, it resonates with me.”

    Audience member John Frewen identified himself as having PTSD from the Vietnam War. “For me, reunions with troops who served with me in Vietnam are very helpful,” said Frewen, who served in Vietnam with the Australian Army.

    “Everybody there knows what you did and share the same experiences. It is easier to discuss things,” he said – echoing the community-focus of the Theater of War experience.

 


Carol Kerr, Public Affairs Officer
Dunham taking care of healthcare business

Pharmacy staff will review medication lists and answer questions about medications at the new Refill Pick-up Site at the PX Mall. Hours are Monday thru Friday, 10 am to 2 pm, a good opportunity when the main clinic  closes for Thursday afternoon training. Photo by Erin Stattel.


Nov. 30, 2009 -- While pundits and politicians debated healthcare policies, the folks at Dunham Army Health Clinic here were executing new services to better serve the military TRICARE community.  In addition to the 6000 doses of seasonal flu shots, clinic personnel gave 1300 H1n1 flu shots to TRICARE beneficiaries.

The new PX pharmacy refill pick-up site has captured the attention of Dunham pharmacy clients. The refill pick-up site near the Optical Center in the PX mall averages 50-60 people daily. They find no crowds, no lines, and convenience if there’s shopping to do. The clinic noted that 30-50 percent of call-in refills are requesting the PX now – and the site will easily handle more.

A special refill pick-up site day, Thursday Dec 10 from 10 am to 2 pm, will feature –

  • Pharmacy staff to review your medication list and answer questions about medications
  • Two formulary diabetes monitoring devices for teaching technique
  • Demonstration inhalers available to guide those with asthma or COPD.

The next set of scheduled H1N1 clinics will be for active military and DoD civilians upon receipt of the DoD supplies. To date, a limited number of DoD supplies was used to vaccinate healthcare workers and CYS childcare workers: DoD top priorities.

    After several weeks of scheduled H1N1 clinics for large groups of people, December will mark a move to H1N1 flu shots on a walk-in basis at the Dunham immunization clinic. Hours are weekday mornings from 7:30 am to noon; and M,T,W,F from 1 to 4:30 pm.  Children who need a 2nd dose can get the shot on a walk-in basis – with at least 28 days between shots. The clinic recommends that children who received the first dose at school get the 2nd one at school as well.

    The clinic does not have the Glaxo-Smith-Kline vaccinations that have been question in the news, according to Maj. Christopher Lindner, deputy commander for allied services.

    Lindner credits the clinic Soldiers and the lead NCO for nursing services, Sgt. Brandon Gilbert, for the patients’ good experience with efficient flu clinics. “We sent him to a chemical-biological casualties course, and the immediate pay-off was his ability to apply what he learned about setting up a mass medical site when he set up the H1N1 clinics at Thorpe Gym,” said Lindner.

    Patients only see the 5 minutes to get the shot, but we have folks coding and documenting in two systems – the Pennsylvania database and the patients’ electronic records.

 

College-age social planned for Dec. 20

Nov. 30, 2009 -- All college age students who will be "Home for The Holidays," come join us at our Annual College Age Social sponsored by the Carlisle Spouses' Club. 

    Set your calendars for Friday, Dec 20 from 7 – 9 p.m. at Quarters 2 for social time with fun, food, games and more.  RSVPs by Dec. 18 are greatly appreciated to Ann Buran at aeburan@gmail.com. 

 

Child, Youth Services upcoming events

Stained glass ornament making

Tuesday, December 1, 2009

Ages 9-18

4:30 - 5:30 pm

Cost $10 per student

Come to the SKIES Classroom and make three beautiful stained glass ornaments wrapped in copper.

Instructor:  Nancy Stamm

 

 

Tree lighting ceremony

Thursday, December 3, 2009

In front of Post Chapel

Ceremony begins at 4:30 pm

Cookies, punch, hot chocolate and coffee provided.

FREE carriage rides from 5-8 pm depart from Chapel

Visit from Santa Clause

 

 

Youth basketball 

**REGISTER NOW!!!***

Registration: Nov 2 - Dec 4, 2009

Ages 6-17

Cost $40

League Play begins: Jan 6 - March 20, 2010

 

Mini-camp

 - Dec 1-3 (free with registration) all players must attend assessments on Dec 3, 2009

 

4:30 pm Bantam (1st-2nd co-ed)

5:30 pm Elementary (3rd-5th co-ed)

6:30 pm MST Girls (6th-12th)

7:30 pm MST Boys (6th-12th)

 

Sports registration must be accompanied by a recent (less than a year old) physical.  It can be Sports, School or SAS generated.

 

 

Holiday shopping trip

to the Gettysburg Outlets

Saturday, December 5, 2009

11 am - 4 pm

Youth in Grades 6-12

Meet at Youth Services

Cost:FREE to registered YS Members

 

 

Clay tile candle holder craft

Tuesday, December 8, 2009

Ages 9-18

4 pm - 6 pm

Cost $20 per student

 

Come to the SKIES classroom and make a beautiful Clay Tile Candle Holder.  Design, hand-craft and paint!  Artwork will be back in time for Christmas.

 

Snowboarding @ Ski Roundtop

December 12, 2009 (Snow make-up date: January 9, 2010) 10 am - 5 pm

Ages:  Youth Grades 6-12

Cost: $45

Special Group Rate includes lift, lesson and rentals.

Meals on your own

Sign up at YS

Bring payment along on day of trip - cash or check made payable to Ski Roundtop.

This holiday season, if you catch a buzz, catch a ride
Designate a Sober Driver Before Every Holiday Party

Nov. 30, 2009 -- The holiday season is supposed to be time for family, friends, and festive celebrations, but it is unfortunately also a time when there is a tragic jump in the number of alcohol-related highway fatalities each year between Thanksgiving and New Year’s.

    That is why Carlisle Barrack’s Army Substance Abuse Program is joining with other national, state and local highway safety and law enforcement officials to remind everyone this holiday season to always designate a sober driver before each holiday party or event involving alcohol.

    Nationally, more than 17,000 people died in alcohol-related highway crashes during 2003. Every 30 minutes, nearly 50 times a day, someone in America dies in an alcohol-related crash. Hundreds of thousands more are injured each year. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), about three in every ten Americans will be involved in an alcohol-related crash at some point in their lives.

    Remembering to designate a sober driver before the party begins is just one of several, simple steps to help avoid a tragic crash or an arrest for impaired driving during the holiday season. Other reminders include:

  • Never get behind the wheel of your vehicle if you’ve been out drinking;
  • If impaired, call a taxi – use mass transit if available – or call a sober friend or family member to come and get you;
  • Or, just stay where you are and sleep it off until you are sober;
  • If you are hosting a party this holiday season, remind your guests to always plan ahead to designate a sober driver, always offer alcohol-free beverages during the event, and make sure all of your guests leave with a sober driver; and
  • Friends Don’t Let Friends Drive Drunk. Take the keys and never let a friend leave your sight if you think they are about to drive while impaired.

    Since 1981, every President of the United States has proclaimed December “National Drunk and Drugged Driving (3D) Prevention Month” to help underscore the public’s commitment to preventing impaired driving and promoting the use of designated drivers and sober ride programs. The month of December and the New Year’s Eve holiday are also often highlighted by significant increases in state and local law enforcement efforts to combat impaired driving such as the use of sobriety checkpoints and saturation patrols.

    Driving impaired or riding with someone who is impaired is simply not worth the risk. The consequences are serious and real. Not only do you risk killing yourself or someone else, but the trauma and financial costs of a crash or an arrest for driving while impaired can be really significant and not the way you want to spend your holiday season.

    So remember, this holiday season, if you catch a buzz, catch a ride.


The Designated Driver Program on Carlisle Barracks: “You Drink – You Drive – You Lose”. LVCC and The Strike Zone support the Designated Driver Program.

  • A designated driver is a person in a group of two or more drinking adults who agrees not to drink any alcoholic beverages and to safely transport the other group member’s home.
  • If it is a large group, more than one Designated Driver may be needed.
  • Designated Drivers should not drink any alcoholic beverages and are therefore never the person least drunk.
  • Designated Drivers are also important if someone is taking medication that makes them drowsy or otherwise impaired.

 LVCC - inform the bar tender that you are the designated driver and you will receive FREE non-alcoholic soft drinks or water throughout the event. They will give you a sticker that will identify you as such. (Wear it proudly).

 

STRIKE ZONE BOWLING CENTER – inform the staff that you are the designated driver and you will receive FREE non-alcoholic soft drinks or water throughout the event. You will receive a sticker that will identify you as such. (Wear it proudly).

 

     Additional information, contact the Army Substance Abuse Office at 245-4576.

 

 

 

 

Dec. Campaign Analysis Course schedule

 

The AY10 Campaign Analysis Course is offering an optional Strategic and Operational Art Film and Discussion Program. The program offers interested students insight into selected episodes in the evolution of warfare from antiquity to the present. A series of films addressing strategic and operational themes will be shown throughout the academic year on Tuesday evenings, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., in Wil Waschoe Auditorium. A discussion period moderated by a faculty instructor familiar with the period and issues addressed will follow each film. The films showing in October are listed below.

 

Date Showing               Title  / Issues                                                                                             Moderator

 

Dec. 1                         Zulu Dawn / Diplomacy, Strategy, Leadership                                         Col. Tom Dempsey

 

Dec. 8                         Zulu / Leadership, Ethics                                                                       Dr. Jerry Comello

 

Dec. 15                      Khartoum / Leadership, Strategy, Diplomacy, Ethics                               Col. Tom Dempsey