Banner Archive for November 2012
 

Santa makes a stop at the holiday concert

The U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Band performed a free holiday concert that featured a variety of holiday-themed music for the Carlisle Barracks community on Nov. 29.

Over 400 people attended the concert, including Lt. Col. Orhan Akdogan, a U.S. War College international fellow from Turkey.  Akdogan said his family enjoyed the concert. “It was amazing,” Akdogan said.

“They are very professional musicians. I liked them very well,” he said.

The band performed 16 songs, and Santa Claus stopped by to greet the audience.

Lt. Col. Patrick Morrow, an Army War College student said it was a fun way to start the holiday season.  “The kids really enjoyed it; they liked the sing-a-long. It was a good mix of songs that they knew and some songs that they didn’t know. It was great,” Morrow said.

View more photos at: http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10151205367908682.474047.113116603681&type=1#!/media/set/?set=a.10151205367908682.474047.113116603681&type=1.

 


Army releases Doctrine 2015

What is it?
Doctrine 2015 creates a top-to-bottom hierarchy of publications, beginning with the top-level, easy-to-read doctrinal principles called Army Doctrine Publications,or ADPs. They are 10-15 pages long and easily accessible to Soldiers through technology. The lower level publications, called Army Techniques Publications,or ATPs, will likely change the fastest. The Army can update these more rapidly without having to change the whole body of information on a specific subject.

What has the Army done?
A 2009 doctrine conference recognized the Army had too many field manuals - about 550 - and it was time to look at how to best develop, update and deliver doctrine. U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command created a task force focused on making fewer doctrine publications that would be shorter, more collaborative and more accessible. Besides dramatically changing the doctrinal structure itself, the resulting Doctrine 2015 program leverages emerging technology to accelerate and modernize the entire doctrine development and delivery processes.

What continued efforts does the Army have planned for the future?
Nearly all of the Army's ADPs and Army Doctrine Reference Publications,or ADRPs, were published Aug. 31, 2012. Field manualswill be published by Dec. 31, 2013. All remaining knowledge will transition to ATPs by Dec. 31, 2015. Through mobile devices, such as tablets, Soldiers can now access unrestricted, unlimited-distribution doctrinal publications without the use of a common access card directly from the Army Publishing Directorate'spublic website.

Doctrine's enduring value is truly realized only to the extent it is inculcated across the Army. The implementation plan guides the incorporation of Doctrine 2015 through education and training lanes, including conferences, curriculum, CTCs and warfighter exercises.

Why is this important to the Army?
Clear, concise, current and accessible are the trademarks of Doctrine 2015. The publication of the ADPs and ADRPs marked the first time all of the Army's senior manuals were released at nearly the same time, synchronized and integrated internally and linked to the same fundamental concepts in ADP 3-0, Unified Land Operations.

According to Army Chief of Staff Gen. Raymond T. Odierno - Doctrine 2015 is our way to directly shape what the doctrine process of the future will look like. This is the first comprehensive review of our doctrine structure that is based on the impact that an evolving operational environment and technological advances have in how we collect, display and disseminate information.


 Tammy Reed, Defense Commissary Agency

2013 Scholarships for Military Children opens Dec. 3

More than $10 million in scholarships were awarded to 6,742 students from around the globe in 2012 - a major milestone for the Scholarships for Military Children Program, sponsored by the Defense Commissary Agency.

Applications for the 2013 Scholarships for Military Children Program will be available starting Dec. 3 at commissaries worldwide. You can also find them online through a link at http://www.commissaries.comand directly at http://www.militaryscholar.org.

Scholarship awards will be based on funds available, but the scholarship program awards at least $1,500 at each commissary. If there are no eligible applicants from a particular commissary, the funds designated for that commissary will be awarded as an additional scholarship at another store.

The scholarship program was created to recognize military families’ contributions to the readiness of U.S. armed forces and to celebrate the commissary’s role in the military community.

“DeCA is focused on supporting a good quality of life for our military and their families,” said Defense Commissary Agency Director and CEO Joseph H. Jeu. “We do that by delivering a great commissary benefit, while our industry partners and public donations help the scholarship program provide money for higher education to many worthwhile students.”

To apply for a scholarship, the student must be a dependent, unmarried child, younger than 21 — or 23, if enrolled as a full-time student at a college or university — of a service member on active duty, reservist, guardsman, retiree or survivor of a military member who died while on active duty or survivor of a retiree. Eligibility is determined using the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System database.

Applicants should ensure that they, as well as their sponsor, are enrolled in the DEERS database and have a current military ID card. The applicant must also be planning to attend or already attending an accredited college or university, full time, in the fall of 2013 or be enrolled in a program of studies designed to transfer directly into a four-year program.

Applicants must submit an essay on a topic chosen by the Fisher House. The essay topic will be available Dec. 3 on http://www.militaryscholar.org. Applications must be turned in to a commissary by close of business Feb. 22, 2013.

The scholarship program is administered by Fisher House Foundation, a nonprofit organization that provides assistance to service members and their families. Scholarship Managers, a national, nonprofit, scholarship-management services organization, manages and awards these military scholarships. If students have questions about the scholarship program application, call Scholarship Managers at 856-616-9311 or email them at militaryscholar@scholarshipmanagers.com.

No government funds are used to support the Scholarships for Military Children Program. Commissary vendors, manufacturers, brokers, suppliers and the general public donate money to fund the program. Every dollar donated goes directly to funding the scholarships.


Military Family Month: Military spouse-volunteers join the Hurricane Sandy recovery effort

If you’ve got a job to do, ask a busy person or -- better yet -- a busy military spouse. How apt that Army War College student spouses would carve time out of the Month of the Military Family to contribute volunteer work to Hurricane Sandy victims in Far Rockaway, Queens.

Several dozen student spouses invested a day of dirty, difficult work on behalf of the easternmost residents of the Rockaway Peninsula in the New York borough. They left behind a host of inviting activities in Manhattan to donate hundreds of pounds of donated food, shovel sand, clear debris, scrub surfaces, and add their disaster-aid efforts to those of Team Rubicon.

The military veterans group that has been made famous by its disaster assistance efforts incorporated The War College volunteers into the big effort, armed them with Home Depot-donated gloves and respirators, and delegated them to move wheelbarrows full of tools to their assignments.

In two groups over many hours, the volunteers shoveled out a house that had been literally buried in sand while another group tackled a house for which the basement had been completely filled with surge waters.

“I’ve never seen a war but this was a mess,” said volunteer Erika Snyder. “They shoveled sand off the porch because they couldn’t even open doors into the homes. They were finding the owner’s belongings in the sand.”

The homeowner’s arrival created an emotional moment, said Snyder.

“These women were on their hands and knees. The more crowbars and hammers, the more they got into it – ripping, using anything available, even a snowscraper, to take the muck from a window. She couldn’t thank us enough,” said Snyder.” Almost three weeks after the storm, and here she is with everything she owned dumped in the street.”

It takes a volunteer to appreciate others’ volunteer efforts.

Team Rubicon was great, coordinating groups from Lawrence, Kansas, and Houston, and across the United States, said Snyder. “They’ve so young! They’re wonderful people and they’ve been doing this all along, living in an unheated warehouse with two or three food wagons.”

Taking part in the academic field trip to New York City, the spouses intended to learn alongside the colonels and lieutenant colonels of the class in small group visits to international missions to the United Nations, among others. When some NYC organizations curtailed visits, these spouses elected to leverage their volunteer spirit for Sandy victims. Yet another spouse-volunteer group sorted and distributed materials at the Goodwill in Queens.


Be prepared when winter weather comes

   While it's only a small amount of snow in the forecast, it's never too early to plan for winter weather. Wondering where to go for information about post closures, delays?

   The best place to check for all official post operations is the information line at 245-3700. Updated at least daily, this number always has the latest on post operations.

Also check the USAWC Facebook page at www.facebook.com/usawc and the Banner at www.carlisle.army.mil/banner

    Preparing your home

    Start to prepare your home for the winter cold, snow and ice now so it will be ready when the bad weather arrives. There are several things a person can do to make sure their home is ready for winter weather.

    Ready.gov recommends that dead branches should be removed from trees.  Ice and snow could cause weak branches to break and cause damage to structures. Also, as days become shorter, make sure your outdoor lighting is in good working order.  Good lighting can protect you against crime and falls.

   You should check smoke and Co2 detectors to make sure they are working properly. Replace the batteries if they are not hard-wired to your electrical system.

    "It's a good idea to get into the habit of changing your smoke detector batteries when the time changes for daylight savings," said Jim O'Connell, Carlisle Barracks fire department. "When you change your clocks, just make a point to change the smoke detector batteries, too."

    Always make sure you have a snow shovel and salt on hand to keep your sidewalks clear of snow and ice. This can prevent injury from falls, says the FEMA website.

    If you have a weather related emergency this winter contact the Carlisle Barracks Fire Department at 245-4419.  For all other issues call the Department of Public Works order desk at 245-4019.

             Home preparation check list

  • Make sure exterior vents are clear.
  • Remove exterior garden hoses and shut off faucets.
  • Remove weak trees and branches.
  • Check outdoor lighting.
  • Check and change batteries in fire and Co2 detectors.
  • Make sure you have a snow shovel and salt for sidewalks.

Preparing your car

    A well running car in the winter can be the difference between making it home and sitting in the cold.

   You should place a winter emergency kit in each car, which should include a shovel, windshield scraper, battery powered radio, extra batteries, water, snack food, extra hats and mittens, a flashlight, chain or rope, road salt and sand, booster cables and emergency flares.

 

            Car preparation check list

  • Keep oil changes up to date.
  • Check radiator fluid/flush.
  • Check fluid levels.
  • Check all belts.
  • Check all hoses.
  • Check or replace wiper blades.
  • Check tire tread.
  • Check or replace battery.
  • Check or replace thermostat.
  • Lubricate working parts.
  • Make sure you have an emergency kit.

Winter driving tips

    Ice, snow and slush on the roads in the winter can create a very hazardous situation. Planning ahead can make your road trips much safer. You should always plan ahead with safety in mind.  Be sure to check the forecast; if a winter storm is predicted for the area in which you will be driving, think twice, (or) ask yourself if the trip is necessary.  Also, check road condition reports on the television, radio or Internet.

    When driving in the winter, always wear your seatbelt; remove ice and snow from windows, license plates and lights; reduce your speed while driving; watch for slick spots under bridges and on overpasses and keep your gas tank at least two-thirds full to prevent the vehicle's fuel line from freezing.

            Winter driving check list

  • Watch weather reports.
  • Watch road condition reports.
  • Wear seatbelts.
  • Clear ice from windows and lights.
  • Reduce your speed.
  • Watch for slick spots on the road.
  • Keep gas tank at least two-thirds full.

 

    Start preparing for the winter months now so you're ready when harsh weather strikes.


Art Powell, Strategic Communication Directorate, U.S. Army Combat Readiness/Safety Center Fort Rucker, Ala.
Deer Hunting Season Safety

Who’d have known — deer are the most hunted animal in the United States. According to most recent National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation, more than 10 million deer hunters applied for hunting licenses during 2006. That figure is nearly four times greater than that for turkey, the second most-hunted species. In terms of population, approximately one in every 25 Americans over age 16 and eight in 10 registered hunters look for deer every year.

With that many firearms in the woods, safety in the field is critical.

"Soldiers who hunt need to treat their hunting weapons the same way they're trained to handle their service weapons," said Col. Kenneth Biland, deputy commander, U.S. Army Combat Readiness/Safety Center. "Those of us who enjoy hunting understand negligent discharges with a hunting rifle can be just a deadly as one with a service rifle."

Data supplied by the National Shooting Sports Foundation indicates hunters do recognize the importance of safety. Hunting is third on the top 10 list of safest sporting activities, bested only by camping and billiards.

Deer also present a real hazard on the road.

“Deer-car collisions are a serious threat to motorists throughout the United States,” said Fred Harders, acting director, Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries Division, Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. “Based on information supplied by State Farm, Alabama motorists are involved in more than 20,000 deer versus car collisions each year. These accidents not only cause significant property damage, but can also result in serious injury or even death.”

The estimated number of deer strikes in Georgia and Alabama, about 70,000 combined, pale in comparison to some other states. State Farm estimates a total 101,299 deer versus car incidents occurred in Pennsylvania during the second half of 2010 and first half of 2011. Nearly 2 percent of West Virginia drivers collided with deer during the past year, almost four times the national average.

Deer are most active at dawn and dusk, when visibility is limited or impaired due to the rising or setting sun, Harders said. The risk of deer-car collisions increases during late winter and early spring, which mark breeding season and the times of year when food supplies run low.

More information on winter safety is available at https://safety.army.mil.

For PA state game information checkout http://www.pgc.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt/community/pgc/9106


Former graduate talks about South Asian security

Gen. (Ret.) VK Singh meets with Maj. Gen. Tony Cucolo, Army War College Commandant, after delivering a lecture on South Asian security on Nov. 20, 2012. Photo by Tom Conning.

 

 

 

U.S. Army War College graduate, Indian Army Gen. (Ret.) VK Singh visits with Professor Doug Lovelace, SSI, after he gave a lecture on South Asian security on Nov. 20, 2012. Photo by Tom Conning.

 

 

 

 

 



Army War College grads in the news

Secretary of Defense Leon E. Panetta announced today that the President has made the following nominations for Army War College graduates:

Army Lt. Gen. John F. Campbell, for appointment to the rank of general, and for assignment as commanding general, U.S. Army Forces Command, Fort Bragg, N.C.  Campbell is currently serving as deputy chief of staff, G-3/5/7, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C.

Army Reserve Brig. Gen. David G. Clarkson, for promotion to the rank of major general, and for assignment as assistant deputy commanding general for reserve affairs, Army Materiel Command, Redstone Arsenal, Ala.  Clarkson is currently serving as commander, Army Reserve Sustainment Command, Birmingham, Ala.

Army Reserve Brig. Gen. Karen E. LeDoux, for promotion to the rank of major general, and for assignment as commanding general, 88th Regional Support Command, Fort McCoy, Wis.  LeDoux most recently served as commanding general, Army Materiel Command-Southwest Asia/G-4, U.S. Army Central (Forward), Camp Arifjan, Kuwait.

Army Reserve Col. Peter A. Bosse, for promotion to the rank of brigadier general, and for assignment as commander, 87th U.S. Army Reserve Support Command, Birmingham, Ala./deputy commander, U.S. Army Reserve Support Command, First Army Division East, Fort Meade, Md.  Bosse is currently serving as commander, Training Group 1, 75th Training Division (Battle Command), Arlington Heights, Ill.

Army War College Fellow Army Reserve Col. Joseph E. Whitlock, for promotion to the rank of brigadier general, and for assignment as deputy director, J-5, U.S. Northern Command, Peterson Air Force Base, Colo.  Whitlock most recently served as deputy commander, Joint Base McGuire-Dix, Lakehurst, N.J.

 

 


Claims announcement

Anyone with debts owed to or by the estate of Colonel Jerry Cashion must contact COL Sam White, the Summary Court Officer. Call COL White at (717) 245-4518 or email samuel.r.white4.mil@mail.mil



Army National Cemeteries Executive Director visits the Indian School Cemetery

 

Kathryn A. Condon, the Executive Director, Army National Cemeteries, visits the Indian School Cemetery and evaluates its' management on Nov. 16, 2012. Photo by Tom Conning.


By IMCOM Public Affairs
 
IMCOM Looks to Expedite Hiring at Garrisons
 
 
  Garrison commanders are recruiting for about 2,000 job openings, and while the competitive process can be time-consuming, exceptions to the process allow for noncompetitive selection of current IMCOM employees, transitioning soldiers, disabled veterans, and certain others.
 
  At the same time, the Army still faces a new fiscal environment that could require more civilian workforce reductions in the future, so the headquarters will continue to closely oversee the filling of critical vacancies to ensure the command stays within sustainable end strength numbers.
 
  IMCOM started FY12 facing a mandatory reduction of more than 4,000 civilian positions including the headquarters, the regions and the garrisons.  In the interest of retaining a highly experienced and specialized workforce, the command approached the necessary reduction with a commitment to meet the end strength target through attrition and judicious filling of critical vacancies. 
 
  This proactive approach to human resources management has succeeded to the extent that IMCOM has exceeded its reduction target through voluntary separations, retirement, and cross-leveling through reassignment.  The new personnel outlook is good news for protecting the workforce, but the garrisons are now anxious to fill these nearly 2,000 openings to sustain their operations.
 
  “It’s great to see that we could continue to meet our mission requirements while still taking care of our civilian workforce,” said IMCOM commander Lt. Gen. Michael Ferriter.
 
  The federal hiring system is a competitive process, designed to evaluate applicants fairly, but not necessarily quickly, especially in recruiting from outside the government.  But federal regulations allow for noncompetitive consideration of the very populations IMCOM seeks to help—including current employees, transitioning soldiers and disabled veterans.
 
  “As we look at ways to expedite the approval process, there are steps the garrisons can take to speed the process, including streamlining the recruiting process, working in advance with the CPAC on determining the level of competition, getting job assessments ready, considering noncompetitive selections of the current IMCOM workforce, and hiring veterans and family members,” said IMCOM Director of Human Resources (G1) Karen M. Perkins.
 
  Most hiring actions still must go to the HQ IMCOM Human Resources Management Board (HRMB) for initial screening and a recommendation to the commanding general.  When the commander approves a hiring request, he specifies whether a vacancy must be filled by a current IMCOM employee or whether it can be recruited outside the command and even outside the federal workforce.
 
  The first step remains the IMCOM Enterprise Placement Program (IEPP), which may provide a reassignment opportunity for a potentially vulnerable IMCOM employee who is willing to relocate.  While the IEPP process is working, managers can begin their recruitment process to be ready to select if IEPP does not provide an eligible candidate.
 
  If managers want to consider using one of the special hiring authorities laid out under Title 5 of the Code of Federal Regulations, there are many ways to hire transitioning soldiers, disabled veterans and persons with disabilities noncompetitively.
 
  “These are excellent ways to select qualified people noncompetitively, and they help disabled veterans and transitioning soldiers, which we want to do anyway,” said Lois Keith, chief of Civilian Personnel in the IMCOM G1.
 
  One such authority is the Veterans’ Recruitment Authority (VRA), which allows for noncompetitive appointment to positions in grades up to GS-11 of disabled veterans or veterans who served on active duty during a war, a recognized campaign or expedition, or certain other military operations.  The VRA also extends to recently separated veterans.
 
  Another opportunity is to appoint a veteran retired from active duty with a disability rating of 30 percent or more.  These appointments are 60-day temporary or term to start with, but may be converted to career or career-conditional at any time.  There are no grade limits with a 30 percent disability appointment, as long as the applicant meets all qualification standards.
 
  Another talent resource is Army spouses, who normally won’t qualify for noncompetitive appointment, but often come with wide experience and varied skill sets that might not be readily available in the local talent pool.  And former government employees eligible for reinstatement can be selected noncompetitively in any grade up to their former highest grade, as long as they meet qualifications.
 
  The installation Civilian Personnel Action Center (CPAC) is the local resource for all civilian hiring, but especially when trying to expedite hiring through the use of noncompetitive appointments, so every action should be in consultation with them.
 
  With the need for balance between expedited hiring and sustainable end strengths, garrison commanders need access to more than one option when filling a critical vacancy.  The headquarters will likely stay very involved in the hiring process for the foreseeable future in the interest of sheltering the workforce from future adverse actions due to civilian reductions.
 
  Options do exist, however, and using the hiring authorities provided can help garrisons fill their critical vacancies while also providing opportunity for some very deserving candidates.

                                                                                                                      Carlisle Community Hurricane Sandy Relief Effort   

Donations can be dropped off at the following locations between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday:

 

John Gleim, Jr. Excavating Company

625 Hamilton Street, Carlisle, PA

   717-243-7160, Ext. 235

Cumberland Goodwill EMS

519 South Hanover Street, Carlisle, PA 17013

 (717) 249-0012

Manpower

950 Walnut Bottom Road, Carlisle, PA  17015

717-258-1945

Campus Door

1415 Ritner Highway, Carlisle, PA   17013

717-249-1405

Rear of the building

Carlisle Barracks Firehouse

through Nov. 28

 

Playhouse Cafe

1 Lemoyne Square, Lemoyne, PA 17043

717-612-1234

Requested items include(Please note that this list continues to evolve---warm clothes are no longer a priority item, but, if donated, a needy recipient will be found, either in NJ /NY or Central PA.  Gently used clothes are accepted, as long as they are clean and serviceable.)

 

  1. Personal Care/Toiletries:  Tooth Brushes, Tooth Paste, Deodorant; Sanitary Hand Wipes/Adult Diapers/Towels/Wash Cloths/Sanitary Napkins/Bars of soap/Q tips

2.  Infant care items (Diapers--Infant—2 yrs, etc.)

3.  Non-perishable food (Canned and dry--such as cereal, rice & pasta)

4.  Bottled Water

5.  Household cleaning supplies

6.  First Aid Supplies

7.  Laundry Detergent, Toilet Paper, Paper Towels, Tissues  

8. Pet Supplies

9. Flashlights, Batteries (especially “D” batteries)

10. Children’s toys

11. Brooms, Mops, Rakes, Shovels

12.  Bedding- sheets, pillowcases, blankets, pillowsBlankets & Sleeping Bags

13.  Shop vacs and portable generators

14.  Tarps

(No Glass Items Please)

Monetary Donations will also be accepted.  Please make checks payable to “Carlisle Rotary Club Foundation” (which is a 501 (c3) corporation): please note“Hurricane Sandy Relief.”  Checks can be mailed to: Carlisle Rotary Club, P.O. Box 301, Carlisle, PA 17013.

All items collected will be for distribution throughout areas in New Jersey and New York affected by Hurricane Sandy.  Collection of relief goods will be coordinated by the Carlisle Rotary Club, transport of the goods will be provided by the John Gleim, Jr. Excavating Company, distribution of the goods will be coordinated by Rotary Clubs in the affected areas and other 501 (c3) corporations such as local churches and the Red Cross.  The first tractor trailer load of relief goods was delivered in Toms River NJ on Nov 9th.  The next load will tentatively depart early morning Friday, Nov. 16th.  The final routine delivery will likely be made late during the week of Nov 26th.   The recipients of these relief goods are already telling us, as simply and sincerely as possible,

       “Thank You!!”                               Updated Nov 13, 2012


   

Carlisle Barracks introduces Fitness Campus

 Updated Nov. 19 -- As part of the latest phase of the Fitness Campus Initiative, the redesign of Multipurpose Room 1 on the second floor of the Thorpe Fitness Center has been completed.

Family and MWR can now train up to 20 people on the TRX at a time and up to 30 for Boot Camp Classes.

For more information about operations and hours at the Fitness Campus centers, contact Don Watkins, Sports Director, at 717.245.4343.

The opening of the Indian Field Fitness Center at 119 Forbes Avenue, across from the Root Hall Gym, marks the first phase of expanded fitness opportunities for the Army War College and Carlisle Barracks community.

This phase of the USAWC Comprehensive Fitness Campus emphasizes traditional fitness, with equipment such as treadmills, elliptical machines, and stationary cycles on the right side of the building; and various strength equipment such as barbells, dumbbells, and machines, on the left side as you enter.

Hours are identical for Thorpe and Indian Field Fitness Centers: Monday through Friday, 5 a.m. to 8:30 p.m., Saturday 7 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sundays 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. [closed on Thanksgiving]

Women-only hours at Indian Field Fitness Center:   Monday through Friday, 9-11 am, in a section of the Indian Field Fitness Center.

As the Fitness Campus evolves, Thorpe Hall will be reconfigured to create dedicated space for TRX training, combatives, functional fitness, group exercise classes, as well as maintain space for treadmills, ellipticals, and indoor cycles.

Equipment deliveries throughout the month of November will transform Thorpe Hall with an improved area for free weights, as well as a dedicated cardiovascular machines area.  The select equipment for this first floor cardio area will include 8 treadmills, 6 elliptical machines, 4 recumbent cycles, and 2 upright cycles.

Portions of Thorpe will be temporarily unavailable for use during equipment deliveries and renovations. The 3rd floor exercise room, 2nd floor track, and locker rooms will be available for use during this transition. The second floor exercise room and first floor will have limited access at various times.

Stay up-to-date on changes with MWR staff and posted signs.  For more information about operations and hours at the Fitness Campus centers, contact Don Watkins, Sports Director, at 717.245.4343.

  

Fitness Classes at the Jim Thorpe Fitness Center

TRX BOOT Camp Workout

The TRX Boot Camp Workout is a fun and dynamic 40 minute workout. The TRX Basic Training workout builds strength, flexibility, and endurance while burning calo­ries and strengthening your core. TRX Suspension Train­ing harnesses the way your body naturally moves. Reg­ular training on the TRX will improve your performance in daily activities, recreation, and sports.

TRX Ropes and Straps

A blend of TRX and jump rope intervals that builds total-body strength and cardiovascular conditioning. It will make you stronger, leaner, and more agile – a better performer in sports and in life. This class takes 50 min­utes to complete, including a jump rope warm up, high intensity workout, and a cool-down stretching routine on the TRX.

TRX Performance

Build pro-level core strength and endurance, cultivate agility and flexibility, and generally take your fitness from average to elite. We will take you through the training regimen that professional athletes use to per­form their best, game in and game out. It’ll have you ready for peak performance in your next competition.

Basic Army Combatives Course

An eleven week (40 instructor hours) course designed to teach basic Combatives techniques. A Level 1 quali­fied instructor can teach the basic Combatives drills and tasks. The United States Army Combatives program has adapted to integrate the most current techniques. Lev­el 1 is now the Basic Army Combatives Course and now includes post, frame, hook, and employing secondary weapons (pistol or bayonet).

Teen Combatives

Combatives for teens will teach the children funda­mental techniques for escaping pins, which are the basic platforms of self defense. Teens will learn two judo throws during the course; and their confidence and self esteem will be increased. Other techniques that will be taught include; the triangle choke, rear naked choke, and the Guillotine Choke. Children must be at least 9 years of age and registered with Youth Services. Special equipment required: mouth piece and groin protection.

 Piloxing

This incredible program uniquely mixes Pilates and boxing into a fat blasting and muscle toning workout guaranteed to whip you into shape. PILOXING blends the power, speed and agility of boxing with the beauti­ful sculpting and flexibility of Pilates. Very high cardio workout!

Cardio Kickboxing

Cardio Kickboxing is the first fitness program based on professional kickboxing disciplines, coaching science, and mixed Martial arts training concepts. It is kickbox­ing for fitness using sports specific techniques with and without equipment and is the top calorie-burning workout at an average of 1000 calories per hour. Cardio Kickboxing is the fitness kickboxing program endorsed by the Intl Kickboxing Federation (IKF) and does not contain any of the elements found in karate, Traditional Aerobics class. It is not Tae Bo, Cardio Karate, or Karate and Aerobics choreographed to music, or a step bench trampoline, or swimming pool, ball, Dance moves with kicks and punches.

Body Blast

This high powered, total body, conditioning workout set to music works all major muscle groups of the body using some of the following, dumbbells, boby bars, re­sistance tubing,the resist-A-Ball the step platform, the core Board and your own body weight. This workout will build your endurance and speed your Metabolism for increased fat burning. All fitness levels are welcome.

Zumba Toning

When it comes to body sculpting, Zumba Toning raises the bar (or rather, the toning stick). It combines tar­geted body-sculpting exercises and high-energy car­dio work with Latin-infused Zumba moves to create a calorie-torching, strength-training dance fitness-party. Students learn how to use lightweight, maraca-like Ton­ing Sticks to enhance rhythm and tone all their target zones, including arms, abs, glutes and thighs. Zumba Toning is the perfect way for enthusiasts to sculpt their bodies naturally while having a total blast.

Family Zumba

Ditch family movie night and join the party! Your en­tire family will be able to engage in an exhilarating, ef­fective, easy-to-follow, Latin-inspired, calorie-burning dance fitness party. Children must be 9 years of age and registered with Youth Services in order to partici­pate.

Family Yoga

Join us for a Family bonding experience! Yoga is pre­sented in a fun and dynamic way to keep the atten­tion of all family members. The whole family will learn strength, balance, and focus in a fun, healthy, and sup­portive environment. The family yoga class is a way to bond with your family and help your loved ones balance their bodies and mind. This class will help improve all areas of life, both mental and physical. Children must be at least 9 years of age and registered with Youth Ser­vices.

Power Yoga

Power Yoga is a dynamic Vinyasa style yoga, the focus is on core strength, balance and flow to build a solid practice for the beginner to the advanced practioner. Power Yoga heals, detoxifies and exhilarates the body and mind with emphasis on breathing, movement, bal­ance and intention.

Pilates

Pilates is a method of body conditioning based on using positioning and gravity to work the muscles.Pilates workouts focus first on developing strength through the core of the body--the back, abdomen and hips. This provides a foundation to continue working the rest of the body. The concentration is not only on strength but also flexibility and coordination.

Indoor Cycling

Indoor Cycling is a group exercise class done on sta­tionary bikes. During the class the instructor simu­lates a ride. Together, you travel on flat roads, climb hills, sprint and race! It is truly a fantastic cardiovas­cular class. The beauty of indoor cycling is that you can do it even when its raining or snowing outside. You are kept motivated by the instructor, the people around you and by the music.

Aikido

Aikido, a Japanese Martial Arts, is performed by blending with the motion of the attacker and redi­recting the force of the attack rather than opposing it head-on. This requires very little physical strength, as the aikid?ka (aikido practitioner) “leads” the attack­er’s momentum using entering and turning move­ments. The techniques are completed with various throws or joint locks. There are both physical and mental aspects of training. The physical training in ai­kido is diverse, covering general physical fitness and conditioning, as well as specific techniques. Because a substantial portion of any aikido curriculum consists of throws, the first thing most students learn is how to safely fall or roll. The specific techniques for attack include both strikes and grabs; the techniques for defense consist of throws and pins. After basic tech­niques are learned, students study freestyle defense against multiple opponents as well as techniques with weapons.

Mother and Daughter “Quick Six” Self Defense Course

“Quick Six” Self Defense Course teaches six life saving techniques every woman should know. The class will enable women to escape from a number of grips and holds from an attacker. Mothers and their daughters will learn different techniques to allow them to break away from hand grips, chokes, attacker holds, hold downs, and knife and gun attacks. Daughters must be 9 years old and registered with Youth Services prior to attending.


Veterans Day in Carlisle, Nov 12:  U.S. Army War College Commandant, Maj. Gen. Tony Cucolo is guest speaker

  The Joint Veterans Council of Carlisle will conduct the annual Veterans Day Ceremony in the Courtroom of the Old Courthouse, 2nd Floor commencing at 10:30 a.m.  The Cumberland County Honor Guard is providing the firing squad and bugler.  Maj. Gen. Tony Cucolo, Commandant of The U.S. Army War College, is the guest speaker.

  Army War College students and staff will be featured speakers at multiple Veterans Day events around the greater Carlisle area.  Additionally, 12 students will speak at local area schools, six students will participate in events at retirement homes, one student will address audiences at an out-of-state event and several members of the USAWC community will join veterans from the Lebanon VA Medical Center at the annual Carlisle Elks Club Veterans Dinner, Nov. 15.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

Boiling Springs – Boiling Springs High School Interact Club will host their eleventh annual Veterans Day Breakfast at 9 a.m. The guest speakers are Lt. Col. William D. Conner and Lt. Col. Yi Se Gwon, U.S. Army War College Class of 2013.

Chester – Widener University will host an event honoring our Veterans.  The guest speaker is Col. Timothy F. Kehoe, U.S. Army War College Class of 2013.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2012

Camp Hill – Chapel Life Assembly will host a Veteran’s Day event featuring a breakfast, a program and guest speaker starting at 8 a.m.  The guest speaker is Col. Kelso W. Horst, U.S. Army.

Camp Hill – The West Shore Elks lodge No. 2257 in Camp Hill will hold its second annual Walk for Veterans in Hampden Township Recreation Park, on Park Street just off Sporting Hill Road at 11 a.m.

Carlisle – Carlisle Vietnam Veterans will have their annual all-night vigil at 11 p.m. on the steps of the Old Courthouse in honor and remembrance of all POW-MIAs. Contact Bob Hinkle at 776-4777 for more information.

Hanover – Mt. Olivet Cemetery will hold a Veterans Day program at 9 a.m. The guest speaker is Col. Tom L. Clady, U.S. Army War College Class of 2013.

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012

Camp Hill – Chapel Hill United Church of Christ will host a Veterans Day breakfast at 8:45 a.m. in the Fellowship Hall.  The guest speaker is Lt. Col. Jerry L. Morrison, U.S. Army.

Carlisle – First Lutheran Church will hold a Veterans Day program at 9 a.m. The guest speaker is Lt. Col. Stephanie W. Williams, USAFR, U.S. Army War College Class of 2013.

Chambersburg – The Annual Community Veterans Day Service will be held at 3 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 11 at the Letterkenny Chapel at the Letterkenny Army Depot. The service is jointly sponsored by the United Churches of the Chambersburg Area and the Joint Veterans’ Council of Chambersburg. The event will feature guest speaker Chaplain Ret. Maj. Gen. David H. Hicks, and a major feature of the service will be the dedication of the Navy Flag and 29 new memorial pavers at the Veterans’ Memorial on the chapel grounds. The service is open to all, and veterans are encouraged to attend in uniform. For more information, contact the Rev. Ray Kauffman at 267-3336 or the Rev. Dr. William Harter at 264-3828.

Dillsburg – Bible Crossroads Church will hold an event honoring our Veterans at 10:30 a.m. The guest speaker is Mr. Terry J. Robinson.

Greencastle – Greencastle’s VFW Post 6319, American Legion and Chamber of Commerce will host an evening tribute to Veterans at 7 p.m. at the Greencastle High School auditorium. The guest speaker is Lt. Col. Joseph V. Ignazzitto, U.S. Army War College Class of 2013.

Harrisburg American Legion Post 1001 will hold a Veterans Day Program at 2 p.m. at the Post.  The guest speaker is Lt. Col Michael S. Brooks, U.S. Army War College Class of 2013.

Matamoras – Matamoras Community Church will hold a Veterans Recognition Banquet for their area Veterans at noon in the Family Life Center. The guest speaker is Col. Janell E. Eickhoff, U.S. Army War College Class of 2013.

Mechanicsburg – Lower Allen VFW Post 7530 will hold a Veterans Day Program at 11 a.m. outside the Post at 4545 Westport Drive, Mechanicsburg.  The guest speaker is Lt. Col. Richard A. Fromm II, U.S. Army War College Class of 2013.

Mt. Holly Springs – Mt. Holly Springs American Legion 674 will hold a Veterans Day Ceremony at 1 p.m. at Trine Park. Refreshments will be served at the VFW Post 7343 at 424 N Walnut St, Mount Holly Springs. The guest speaker is Lt. Col. Jennifer Piolo, U.S. Army War College Class of 2013.

Newville – Big Spring United Methodist Church will hold its annual Veterans Day Service at 10:30 a.m.  The guest speaker is Col. Jennifer P. Sovada, USAF, U.S. Army War College Class of 2013.

Newville – There will be a Veterans Day Service at the fountain in Newville at 1 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 11. The guest speaker will be Ret. Capt. Robert Hamer, who served in World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War. He currently lives with his wife in Green Ridge Village. In inclement weather, the service will be held at the Big Spring Event and Activity Center on 2 Chestnut St.

Shippensburg – Oakville United Methodist Church will hold its annual Veterans Day Service at 9 a.m.  The guest speaker is Lt. Col James J. Gallivan, U.S. Army War College Class of 2013.

Shippensburg – The Joint Veterans Council of Shippensburg (American Legion Post 223 and VFW Post 6168) will host its annual Veterans Day parade. The parade will start at 2 p.m. and form at King and Prince Streets, and it will end at King and Morris streets. The parade will be cancelled if there is adverse weather. Contact Wendy Tomczak at 360-3706 for more information.

Silver Spring Township – The Silver Spring Township Veterans Memorial Committee will host a Veterans Day ceremony on Sunday, Nov. 11 at 1 p.m. in Willow Mill Park. The public is invited to attend. The ceremony will last approximately 45 minutes and honor all veterans and currently active military. It will include a brief speech and homage to veterans with brick donations. Guided tours will also be given of the memorial, and there will be a Central Pennsylvania Blood Bank hosted by the Ahmadiyya Women’s Muslim Group from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Seating is limited, so bring lawn chairs. In case of rain, the ceremony will be held at a nearby covered pavilion in Willow Mill Park, 80 Willow Mill Park Road. More information can be found at www.sstveteransmemorial.com.

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2012

Carlisle – The Joint Veterans Council of Carlisle will conduct the annual Veterans Day Ceremony at the Old Courthouse in the second-floor courtroom 10:30 a.m. The Cumberland County Honor Guard will provide a firing squad and bugler. The guest speaker is Maj. Gen. Tony Cucolo, Commandant of The U.S. Army War College.

Red Lion – Red Lion VFW will host a program honoring our veterans at 7:30 p.m. The guest speaker is Lt. Col. Paul D. Baker, USMC, U.S. Army War College Class of 2013.

McConnellsburg – McConnellsburg VFW Post 655 will host an event honoring our Veterans at 11 a.m. at the County Court House in McConnellsburg.  The guest speaker is Col. Robert C. Campbell, USAF, U.S. Army War College Class of 2013.

Mechanicsburg Mechanicsburg Area Veterans Council (American Legion Post 109 and Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 6704) will conduct Veterans Day ceremonies at the GAR Monument, located in the Mechanicsburg Cemetery at the corner of Frederick and Marble Streets beginning at 11 a.m. In the event of adverse weather, the ceremony will be held at the American Legion Post 109, located at 224 W. Main St. in Mechanicsburg. The guest speaker is Lt. Col Mark D. Stimer, U.S. Army War College Class of 2013.


Public Affairs staff report
Legacy of 1912 Army vs. Carlisle football game endures

 

The powerhouse Army football team was dealt a defeat by the Jim Thorpe-led Carlisle Indians in a historic game more than 100 years ago. Many members of the team can be seen in this photo of the 1911 team.

Jim Thorpe, Dwight Eisenhower, Glenn “Pop” Warner, Omar Bradley are iconic names associated with athletic, military and leadership excellence. One hundred years ago, before their histories could be imagined, they met in a hard-fought football game between two highly-ranked teams on The Plain at West Point.

A write up of the contest in the New York Times captured the magnitude of the game.

“WEST POINT, Nov. 9. -- Jim Thorpe and his redoubtable band of Carlisle Indian gridiron stars invaded the plains this afternoon to match their prowess against the moleskin gladiators of Uncle Sam's Military Academy, and when the two teams crossed the parade ground in the semi-darkness of late afternoon the Cadets had been shown up as no other West Point team has been in many years.”

"The Cadets of West Point took the field on November 9, 1912, aiming to avenge their 1905 loss to Carlisle Indian School in the two schools’ only previous battle," according to prominent author Thomas Benjey, who has published extensively about Indian School football.

The 1905 game was a surprising defeat of Army.

The 1912 game was memorable in large part because of the players involved.

“The Cadets, who had the best defense in the nation, had lost only once, to Yale 6-0,” wrote Sally Jenkins in her book “The Real All Americans.” “With a win over Carlisle, they had a chance to be No. 1 in the year-end rankings. While the Indians had the best offense in the land, commentators suggested they had run up their extravagant scores against weaker competition. A defeat of gritty Army would end all argument and establish them as front-runners for the title of best team in the country.”

 

Jim Thorpe was one of the most well-known members of the Carlisle team.

“Ominous clouds filled the sky, and a cold wind blew across the field, making passing and punting risky businesses,” said Benjey. “Both sides’ emotions ran high as the combatants craved a victory. Carlisle arrived undefeated, the only blemish on their record a scoreless tie with Washington and Jefferson College a month earlier. Army was 3-1 with a 6-0 loss to Yale. Holding the Eli of Yale to only four first downs and a low score gave the Cadets hope for success over the Indians.”

Newspaper accounts after the game never considered its outcome in doubt, but those looking only at the scoreboard, at least for the first half, may have thought otherwise, according to Benjey. “The Indians bested the Cadets for most of the first half but didn’t score due to errant forward passes in the end zone. The turning point of the second quarter came when Carlisle fullback Stancil “Possum” Powell was expelled from the game for punching Army quarterback Vern “Nig” Prichard. The 27-yard penalty combined with Powell’s ejection dampened the Indians’ spirits. Army then moved the ball forward the remaining 27 yards with fullback Geoffrey Keyes pushing the ball across the goal line. Prichard missed the kick after the touchdown.”

Momentum shifted in the Indians’ favor on the kickoff opening the second half when All-America tackle and team captain Leland Devore jumped on Joe Guyon, who had been getting the better of him all day, getting himself thrown out of the game, according to Benjey. “Army defensive backs Dwight Eisenhower and Charles Benedict knocked each other out of the game for the rest of the quarter in a failed attempt to sideline Thorpe. The Indians scored 27 unanswered points to lick Army worse than any opponent had beaten them in many years.”

Today, the history of the Carlisle Indian Industrial School is honored in the National Landmark campus at the center of Carlisle Barracks. The Indian School photo collection of almost 1,000 rare photos is preserved by the Army Heritage and Education Center are shared online at http://www.ahco.army.mil/site/index.jsp

update 11/9/2012 to correct errors of fact and attribution.

 

 

 

 

 



President proclaims Nov. 11 as Veterans Day

American Forces Press Service

WASHINGTON, Nov. 7, 2012 - "Our men and women in uniform have taught us about strength, duty, devotion, resolve -- cornerstones of a commitment to protect and defend that has kept our country safe for over 200 years. In war and in peace, their service has been selfless and their accomplishments have been extraordinary," President Barack Obama said in his proclamation issued today declaring Nov. 11 as Veterans Day.

The proclamation reads:

"Whether they fought in Salerno or Samarra, Heartbreak Ridge or Helmand, Khe Sanh or the Korengal, our veterans are part of an unbroken chain of men and women who have served our country with honor and distinction. On Veterans Day, we show them our deepest thanks. Their sacrifices have helped secure more than two centuries of American progress, and their legacy affirms that no matter what confronts us or what trials we face, there is no challenge we cannot overcome, and our best days are still ahead.

"This year, we marked the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812. We began to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War. We welcomed our veterans back home from Iraq, and we continued to wind down operations in Afghanistan. These milestones remind us that, though much has changed since Americans first took up arms to advance freedom's cause, the spirit that moved our forebears is the same spirit that has defined each generation of our service members. Our men and women in uniform have taught us about strength, duty, devotion, resolve -- cornerstones of a commitment to protect and defend that has kept our country safe for over 200 years. In war and in peace, their service has been selfless and their accomplishments have been extraordinary.

"Even after our veterans take off the uniform, they never stop serving. Many apply the skills and experience they developed on the battlefield to a life of service here at home. They take on roles in their communities as doctors and police officers, engineers and entrepreneurs, mothers and fathers. As a grateful Nation, it is our task to make that transition possible -- to ensure our returning heroes can share in the opportunities they have given so much to defend. The freedoms we cherish endure because of their service and sacrifice, and our country must strive to honor our veterans by fulfilling our responsibilities to them and upholding the sacred trust we share with all who have served.

"On days like this, we are called to reflect on immeasurable burdens that have been borne by so few. We pay tribute to our wounded, our missing, our fallen, and their families -- men and women who have known the true costs of conflict and deserve our deepest respect, now and forever. We also remember that our commitments to those who have served are commitments we must honor not only on Veterans Day, but every day. As we do so, let us reaffirm our promise that when our troops finish their tours of duty, they come home to an America that gives them the benefits they have earned, the care they deserve, and the fullest opportunity to keep their families strong and our country moving forward.

"With respect for and in recognition of the contributions our service members have made to the cause of peace and freedom around the world, the Congress has provided that November 11 of each year shall be set aside as a legal public holiday to honor our Nation's veterans.

"NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim November 11, 2012, as Veterans Day. I encourage all Americans to recognize the valor and sacrifice of our veterans through appropriate public ceremonies and private prayers. I call upon Federal, State, and local officials to display the flag of the United States and to participate in patriotic activities in their communities. I call on all Americans, including civic and fraternal organizations, places of worship, schools, and communities to support this day with commemorative expressions and programs."


Community recognizes top Soldiers and Army Civilians

Maj. Gen. Anthony Cucolo, Commandant of The U.S. Army War College presided over Carlisle Barracks’ semi-annual installation award ceremony Mon. Nov. 5, 2012.

Cucolo thanked the awardees and said that everyone deserved the recognition. “This needs to be an outpost of pride and military tradition. And quite frankly excellence in customer service and you do provide that,” he said. “Thank you so much for everything you’ve done to make Carlisle Barracks and Fort Indiantown Gap a better place.”

Selected for Soldier of the Year and NCO of the Year are Spc. Brigetta Fisher and Staff Sgt. Charles Posey III who excelled in a 3-day selection process that included common task training, weapon qualification, highest APFT scores, recurring service on the Carlisle Barracks Color Guard, completion of numerous volunteer hours and a grueling selection board that challenged them on knowledge, presentation and representation of the best attributes of Army Soldiers.  

Rachel Hey, was selected as the 2012 Civilian Employee of the second quarter and is an exhibit specialist at the Army Heritage and Education Center. Her work is visible across the post: in the Hessian Powder Magazine, the Army Heritage Trail, in the Commandant’s anteroom, at special events like the TRADOC Senior Leader Conference and the AHEC Conservation Facility.

She has touched every part of the Army War College and makes the Army look good, according to her boss, John Leighow, the Army Heritage Museum director. “Rachel Hey is a ‘one-person’ shop but both the quality and quantity of work she accomplished is beyond expectations,” said Leighow.  

James McNally was selected as the 2012 Civilian Employee of the third quarter and is the AHEC curator of arts. His work has helped educate the hundreds of distinguished visitors to the Army War College, providing both the artwork and the education to make it speak to guests about the history of the Army, and the history of Carlisle Barracks.

“Few take more initiative than Mr. McNally. Jim worked multiple critical priorities for education and strategic communication – and did so while balancing competing demands for his talent,” said Leighow.  

Awardees included:

-Civilian Employee of the Quarter, 2nd Qtr CY 12:  Rachel Hey, Exhibit Specialist – AHEC

-Civilian Employee of the Quarter, 3rd Qtr CY 12:  James McNally, Curator of Arts – AHEC

     -Both Ms. Hey and Mr. McNally received an 8-hour Time-Off Award, an Achievement Medal for Civilian Service, Commanding General and Garrison Command coins and a Garrison Commander’s Clock

-Soldier of the Year, FY 12: Spc. Brigetta Fisher, U.S. Army Medical Command (not pictured)

-NCO of the Year, FY 12:  SSG Charles Posey III, U.S. Army War College

     -Both Spc. Fisher and Staff Sgt. Posey received Army Commendation Medals

-25 Years Length of Service Award: Marlene Quinn (not pictured)

-15 Years Length of Service Award: Chadwick D. Johnson (not pictured)

-10 Years Length of Service Award: Mary N. Jordan

-10 Years Length of Service Award: Mark H. Olley

-2011 Maj. Gen. Keith L. Ware Award – First Place for website: Tom Zimmerman

-2011 Marcom Award – Gold Winner – Historic Walking Tour Guide: Suzanne Reynolds

For photos please visit: http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10151173642718682.469315.113116603681&type=3.


Carlisle Barracks to recognize Military Families Nov. 30

Army Community Services will set aside Friday, November 30 to recognize Military Families' contributions and commitment to family, community, and nation.

From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., at 632 Wright Avenue, ACS will offer to military spouses their thanks, camaraderie over refreshments, and ACS representatives will introduce families to family resources --

O ACS Master Resiliency Trainer will help spouses use and understand the Global Assessment Tool

O ACS financial counselor will pull free credit report and free score

O ACS employment counselor will offer tips and leads for holiday employment

O AND, enjoy friendship over pulled pork, chili, hotdogs, soda, and coffee.


Dee Connelly, RN, Dunham US Army Health Clinic
Nov. 15 is the ‘Great American Smokeout’  

The American Cancer Society is marking the 37th Great American Smokeout on November 15 by encouraging smokers to use the date to make a plan to quit, or to plan in advance and quit smoking that day. By doing so, smokers will be taking an important step towards a healthier life – one that can lead to reducing cancer risk.

Tobacco use remains the single largest preventable cause of disease and premature death in the US, yet more than 45 million Americans still smoke cigarettes. However, more than half of these smokers have attempted to quit for at least one day in the past year. As of 2010, there were also 13.2 million cigar smokers in the US, and 2.2 million who smoke tobacco in pipes.

Quitting is hard, but you can increase your chances of success with help. Dunham Army Clinic offers Smoking Cessation classes.  The next class will be held 12 December from 1500-1600.  Please call 245-3630 to register. This class will include information on medication support.  The Army Wellness Center also offers Tobacco Awareness Classes.  Please call 245- 4004 for more information.

 The American Cancer Society can also tell you about the steps you can take to quit smoking and provide the resources and support that can increase your chances of quitting successfully.

For more information visit  the American Cancer Society at  www.cancer.org


Post Chapel community host Soldiers' Thanksgiving lunch

 

 Maj. Gen. Tony Cucolo, USAWC Commandant, visits with Dunham U.S. Army Soldiers during the annual Soldiers' Thanksgiving lunch, Nov. 5, Post Chapel Assembly room.

   Photos by Suzanne Reynolds

           

      

 

 

 

 

To show appreciation and support of Soldiers, the Protestant and Catholic Chapel community hosted the annual Soldiers' Thanksgiving lunch on Nov. 5 in the Post Chapel Assembly room.

 

 

 

 

                                                                                        Post Chapel volunteers serve guests at the annual Soldiers Thanksgiving lunch.


Veterans Day in Carlisle, Nov 12:  U.S. Army War College Commandant, Maj. Gen. Tony Cucolo is guest speaker

  The Joint Veterans Council of Carlisle will conduct the annual Veterans Day Ceremony in the Courtroom of the Old Courthouse, 2nd Floor commencing at 10:30 a.m.  The Cumberland County Honor Guard is providing the firing squad and bugler.  Maj. Gen. Tony Cucolo, Commandant of The U.S. Army War College, is the guest speaker.

  Army War College students and staff will be featured speakers at multiple Veterans Day events around the greater Carlisle area.  Additionally, 12 students will speak at local area schools, six students will participate in events at retirement homes, one student will address audiences at an out-of-state event and several members of the USAWC community will join veterans from the Lebanon VA Medical Center at the annual Carlisle Elks Club Veterans Dinner, Nov. 15.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

Boiling Springs – Boiling Springs High School Interact Club will host their eleventh annual Veterans Day Breakfast at 9 a.m. The guest speakers are Lt. Col. William D. Conner and Lt. Col. Yi Se Gwon, U.S. Army War College Class of 2013.

Chester – Widener University will host an event honoring our Veterans.  The guest speaker is Col. Timothy F. Kehoe, U.S. Army War College Class of 2013.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2012

Camp Hill – Chapel Life Assembly will host a Veteran’s Day event featuring a breakfast, a program and guest speaker starting at 8 a.m.  The guest speaker is Col. Kelso W. Horst, U.S. Army.

Camp Hill – The West Shore Elks lodge No. 2257 in Camp Hill will hold its second annual Walk for Veterans in Hampden Township Recreation Park, on Park Street just off Sporting Hill Road at 11 a.m.

Carlisle – Carlisle Vietnam Veterans will have their annual all-night vigil at 11 p.m. on the steps of the Old Courthouse in honor and remembrance of all POW-MIAs. Contact Bob Hinkle at 776-4777 for more information.

Hanover – Mt. Olivet Cemetery will hold a Veterans Day program at 9 a.m. The guest speaker is Col. Tom L. Clady, U.S. Army War College Class of 2013.

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2012

Camp Hill – Chapel Hill United Church of Christ will host a Veterans Day breakfast at 8:45 a.m. in the Fellowship Hall.  The guest speaker is Lt. Col. Jerry L. Morrison, U.S. Army.

Carlisle – First Lutheran Church will hold a Veterans Day program at 9 a.m. The guest speaker is Lt. Col. Stephanie W. Williams, USAFR, U.S. Army War College Class of 2013.

Chambersburg – The Annual Community Veterans Day Service will be held at 3 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 11 at the Letterkenny Chapel at the Letterkenny Army Depot. The service is jointly sponsored by the United Churches of the Chambersburg Area and the Joint Veterans’ Council of Chambersburg. The event will feature guest speaker Chaplain Ret. Maj. Gen. David H. Hicks, and a major feature of the service will be the dedication of the Navy Flag and 29 new memorial pavers at the Veterans’ Memorial on the chapel grounds. The service is open to all, and veterans are encouraged to attend in uniform. For more information, contact the Rev. Ray Kauffman at 267-3336 or the Rev. Dr. William Harter at 264-3828.

Dillsburg – Bible Crossroads Church will hold an event honoring our Veterans at 10:30 a.m. The guest speaker is Mr. Terry J. Robinson.

Greencastle – Greencastle’s VFW Post 6319, American Legion and Chamber of Commerce will host an evening tribute to Veterans at 7 p.m. at the Greencastle High School auditorium. The guest speaker is Lt. Col. Joseph V. Ignazzitto, U.S. Army War College Class of 2013.

Harrisburg American Legion Post 1001 will hold a Veterans Day Program at 2 p.m. at the Post.  The guest speaker is Lt. Col Michael S. Brooks, U.S. Army War College Class of 2013.

Matamoras – Matamoras Community Church will hold a Veterans Recognition Banquet for their area Veterans at noon in the Family Life Center. The guest speaker is Col. Janell E. Eickhoff, U.S. Army War College Class of 2013.

Mechanicsburg – Lower Allen VFW Post 7530 will hold a Veterans Day Program at 11 a.m. outside the Post at 4545 Westport Drive, Mechanicsburg.  The guest speaker is Lt. Col. Richard A. Fromm II, U.S. Army War College Class of 2013.

Mt. Holly Springs – Mt. Holly Springs American Legion 674 will hold a Veterans Day Ceremony at 1 p.m. at Trine Park. Refreshments will be served at the VFW Post 7343 at 424 N Walnut St, Mount Holly Springs. The guest speaker is Lt. Col. Jennifer Piolo, U.S. Army War College Class of 2013.

Newville – Big Spring United Methodist Church will hold its annual Veterans Day Service at 10:30 a.m.  The guest speaker is Col. Jennifer P. Sovada, USAF, U.S. Army War College Class of 2013.

Newville – There will be a Veterans Day Service at the fountain in Newville at 1 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 11. The guest speaker will be Ret. Capt. Robert Hamer, who served in World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War. He currently lives with his wife in Green Ridge Village. In inclement weather, the service will be held at the Big Spring Event and Activity Center on 2 Chestnut St.

Shippensburg – Oakville United Methodist Church will hold its annual Veterans Day Service at 9 a.m.  The guest speaker is Lt. Col James J. Gallivan, U.S. Army War College Class of 2013.

Shippensburg – The Joint Veterans Council of Shippensburg (American Legion Post 223 and VFW Post 6168) will host its annual Veterans Day parade. The parade will start at 2 p.m. and form at King and Prince Streets, and it will end at King and Morris streets. The parade will be cancelled if there is adverse weather. Contact Wendy Tomczak at 360-3706 for more information.

Silver Spring Township – The Silver Spring Township Veterans Memorial Committee will host a Veterans Day ceremony on Sunday, Nov. 11 at 1 p.m. in Willow Mill Park. The public is invited to attend. The ceremony will last approximately 45 minutes and honor all veterans and currently active military. It will include a brief speech and homage to veterans with brick donations. Guided tours will also be given of the memorial, and there will be a Central Pennsylvania Blood Bank hosted by the Ahmadiyya Women’s Muslim Group from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Seating is limited, so bring lawn chairs. In case of rain, the ceremony will be held at a nearby covered pavilion in Willow Mill Park, 80 Willow Mill Park Road. More information can be found at www.sstveteransmemorial.com.

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2012

Carlisle – The Joint Veterans Council of Carlisle will conduct the annual Veterans Day Ceremony at the Old Courthouse in the second-floor courtroom 10:30 a.m. The Cumberland County Honor Guard will provide a firing squad and bugler. The guest speaker is Maj. Gen. Tony Cucolo, Commandant of The U.S. Army War College.

Red Lion – Red Lion VFW will host a program honoring our veterans at 7:30 p.m. The guest speaker is Lt. Col. Paul D. Baker, USMC, U.S. Army War College Class of 2013.

McConnellsburg – McConnellsburg VFW Post 655 will host an event honoring our Veterans at 11 a.m. at the County Court House in McConnellsburg.  The guest speaker is Col. Robert C. Campbell, USAF, U.S. Army War College Class of 2013.

Mechanicsburg Mechanicsburg Area Veterans Council (American Legion Post 109 and Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 6704) will conduct Veterans Day ceremonies at the GAR Monument, located in the Mechanicsburg Cemetery at the corner of Frederick and Marble Streets beginning at 11 a.m. In the event of adverse weather, the ceremony will be held at the American Legion Post 109, located at 224 W. Main St. in Mechanicsburg. The guest speaker is Lt. Col Mark D. Stimer, U.S. Army War College Class of 2013.


November is Military Family Appreciation Month

What is it?


Military Family Appreciation Month (MFAM) is a campaign designed to communicate the Army's recognition and appreciation for Army families and to fulfill the Army Family Covenant - provide them a quality of life commensurate with their service. The result is families feeling important, supported and connected to the Army and the nation.

What has the Army done?

MFAM provides an opportunity for Army leaders to raise awareness about the importance and sacrifices of our military families. The strength of our Soldiers comes from the strength of their families. The Army encourages senior mission commanders, garrison commanders, National Guard and Army Reserve commanders, and family programs staff to work together to conduct MFAM events and awareness campaigns in their community throughout November.

Why is it important to the Army?

The Army recognizes the commitment and sacrifice families make every day. The Army knows the strength of Soldiers comes from the strength of their families, which means providing a strong, supportive environment where Soldiers and their families can thrive. To do this, the Army is committed to building a partnership with families that enhances their strength and resilience to face an environment of full tempo operations.

What continued efforts does the Army have planned for the future?

The Army will continue to provide families a strong, supportive environment and has an extensive network of programs and services to strengthen the resiliency and readiness of Army families. This is in keeping with the Army's commitment to support Army families, improve their well-being and provide them communities of excellence in which to thrive.

The Army is dedicated to improving family readiness through funding of programs, better health care, housing, schools, youth services, child care, education and employment opportunities, and we will continue to build upon and improve the tenets of the Army Family Covenant.

The Army Family Covenant is the Army's commitment to provide Soldiers and their families a quality of life that acknowledges their service, sacrifices and dedication to our nation.

The Army Family Action Plan helps leaders address the needs and concerns of the entire Army family. AFAP enlists representatives from around the world to identify, prioritize, and elevate quality of life issues to senior leaders for resolution.

The Army will encourage media to provide accurate and informative reports highlighting Army family sacrifices, contributions and the commitment the Army is making to families.
 


By Tom Conning

Teen memoir on war shocked, awed, won awards

 Her mom was proud and excited on the drive to Carnegie Hall to see her daughter honored for her award-winning writing. And, just before Michaela's memoir would be read to an audience of strangers in New York City, she read the gold-medal entry and was flooded with memories of her own life as a military child.

Michaela Coplen was about to be celebrated for her personal memoir that had earned a gold medal in the national Scholastics Arts competition and would then be selected for publication. But the emotions and detail of the memoir created a particularly personal reaction in her mother. Col. Lorelei Coplen, deputy director of The War College's Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute described a flashback to her own experience when her father deployed to Vietnam, as she read her daughter's words:

    "For the first six months, you pray every night. It's not until month seven that you realize no one is listening."

    "You wonder why war exists. You can’t fathom why a human being would seek to hurt another human being, to push a button or pull a trigger and kill without honor. At month eight you discover the horrible, selfish, animal blackness within your soul when you realize that you could care less who wins and who suffers and who is hurt and who dies, as long as your mom comes home.”

    "... You hate your mom for leaving you alone and you hate yourself for hating her. So you blame the army that has pulled you around like a marionette since before you were born. Your path was chosen for you, and you are helpless to change it. You can either adapt to this life, or end it."

     "You never mention any of this in your correspondence to your mom. In fact, you never mention it to anyone. Remember, you’re ten years old. It’s your job to be sunny and happy and tell cheesy jokes and make everyone laugh so that they’ll please just stop yelling at each other. You get really good at acting in front of a crowd. When you’re alone in your room, you teach yourself to cry without making any noise."

Michaela Coplen wears her national Scholastic Art and Writing gold medal that she won for her memoir "Fourteen Months on the Home Front.”  Michaela travelled to Carnegie Hall in New York City to accept the award in June.

Michaela's story was her mom's story. It could be the story of many military kids.

“I started writing this story and it was alright, but it wasn’t very honest,” she said, describing what started as a creative writing assignment last year at Carlisle Area High School.  "So when I went back to revise it, I was, like, let’s stop kidding myself, it’s about my life. So I revised it so that it was more of a memoir.”

Michaela said she was grateful for the opportunity to share insights about military children. “Just the fact that people think it’s worth reading and publishing -- and I’m definitely grateful that I’m getting the message out to a broader audience,” she said.

Writing is fun and therapeutic, according to Michaela.  “It’s really a defining issue for me and while I don’t want to write the same thing over and over again, I do think that what I write is colored by my experience,” she said.

“For a military child, of a military family, this is probably not all that unique," said dad Rick, a professor of Economic Development at the Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute.  "It’s just exceptionally well expressed” he said.

A 16-year veteran of the military family, Michaela is a writer, an actor, a soccer player, and horseback rider.

Michaela appears in  the play “Bye, Bye Birdie” at Carlisle Area High School in March 2012.

Michaela stays busy with extracurricular activities because they help military children through transitions, she said. “If you’re moving from place to place, usually every school has a sports team that you can join and every school has a debate club or quizbowl team,” she said.

“So if you focus in those areas, then you have something no matter where you move.”

Her mom’s deployment made her more independent and that has helped in school and other activities, said Michaela. “It gives you an edge in having a crazy life and trying to find success in that chaos.”

Michaela controls the ball during the spring 2012 soccer state championships.  She was a team captain for the fall 2012 season.

The award ceremony for Michaela’s memoir, "Fourteen Months on the Home Front," won a Gold Medal in the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards national competition. Her memoir was one of 70 selected for publication from 200,000 submissions of art and writing; it will appear in the book, "The Best Teen Writing of 2012."


WW II diarist, resource for Pulitzer Prize winner, dies at 95

A man whose writings about World War II were featured in a Pulitzer Prize winning book and can be found at the Army Heritage and Education Center has died at the age of 95.

Chester Hansen, was assigned to Gen. Omar Bradley during the war during his time in North Africa and the invasion of Sicily. His writings totaled more than 300,000 words in multiple volumes, and were used as a resource for the 2003 Pulitzer Prize winning book “An Army at Dawn” by Rick Atkinson.

"He was a meticulous note-taker and a keen observer," Mr. Atkinson said in an interview. "For someone trying to understand the nuances of the war and how personalities interacted or didn't interact, he is invaluable."

About the Army Heritage and Education Center

The U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center (USAHEC) is the United States Army's preeminent museum and research complex. We are dedicated to educating and preserving the legacy of the men and women who have served their nation as Soldiers.

Learn more about the collection at http://www.carlisle.army.mil/AHEC/index.cfm

 

 

 


Breast cancer awareness:  Carlisle Barracks community to learn, laugh, lean on each other 
 

Army Wellness Center is making its mark on the military community at Carlisle Barracks. 

Walk through the Commissary and you'll see the "Army Wellness Center' tip cards, suggesting the healthy selections on the shelves.

And, they've collaborated with Balfour Beatty Communities to offer a light-hearted yet smart, informative event for Breast Cancer Awareness at the Delaney Center.  Friday, November 9 from 4 to 6 p.m. is the new date for a new idea in health awareness, according to BBC Lifeworks Coordinator Helen Widdowson.

Join the group who'll gather to learn, laugh and lean on each other about how to prevent, detect, and respond to breast cancer. The Pennsylvania Breast Cancer coalition, a Susan G. Komen representative, an educational resources table, local vendors, information about the mammogram service at Dunham Army Health Clinic, and light refreshments.

"We are hoping this will be a fun but different awareness event for post," said Natalie White, health educator with the Army Wellness Center at Carlisle Barracks.

And, it's time for nonpartisan voting -- for BBC's 'bling the bra' contest. It's a light-hearted way to focus attention on a serious matter.

Army Wellness Center commissary shopping tips offer guide for healthy weight and cancer prevention.

Six Steps to Preventing Cancer 

  1. Don’t Smoke: If you already smoke, quit for good as soon as you can. Smoking is linked to lung, throat, pancreas, kidney, bladder, cervix, prostate, colon, rectum cancer.
  2. Maintain a Healthy Weight: Being overweight increases risk for caners of the colon, rectum, uterus, and breast. Talk to a health professional about what a good weight is for you and a healthy way to lose those extra pounds.
  3. Be Physically Active: Make sure to get at least 30 minutes of daily physical activity. Being physically active can lower the risk of colon cancer and may lower the risk of breast cancer.
  4. Eat a Well Balanced Diet:Eat a healthy diet with lots of vegetables, fruits, whole grains and limited amount of red meat. A healthy diet reduces the risk of prostate, breast, lung, colon, rectum, stomach, and pancreas cancers.
  5. Limit Alcohol: Limit yourself to one drink per day. One drink equals one glass of wine, one bottle of beer, or one shot of hard liquor. Alcohol causes cancer of the breast, colon, rectum, mouth, throat, and esophagus.
  6. Protect Yourself from Too Much Sun: Use hats, shirts, and sunscreens that are 15 SPF or higher. Excessive sun exposure can cause melanoma and other skin cancers.

 Harvard Center for Cancer Prevention and American Cancer Society

 

 

Program

Organization

 

Reach to Recovery

American Cancer Society - Cumberland/Dauphin/Perry Unit

 

Contact with a woman facing a diagnosis of breast cancer by a breast cancer survivor. All volunteers are trained and certified by Reach to Recovery standards.

American Cancer Society - Cumberland County

Lemoyne

(888) 227-5445

American Cancer Society - Dauphin County

Lemoyne

(888) 227-5445

American Cancer Society - Perry County

Lemoyne

(888) 227-5445

Reach to Recovery - Male Breast Cancer

American Cancer Society - Philadelphia Unit

 

Contact with a man facing a diagnosis of breast cancer by a breast cancer survivor. All visitors are trained and certified by Reach to Recovery standards.

American Cancer Society - Philadelphia

Philadelphia

(888) 227-5445

Support - Breast

Breast Friends of Pennsylvania

 

 

Offers individual support to those affected by breast cancer either through one-on-one contact via phone, or in person, as well as support groups customized to meet the needs of participants.  Provides First I Cry packets that includes a Welcome to the Sisterhood message, a handkerchief silk-screened with a sweet logo to remind you that when ...

Breast Friends of Pennsylvania

Effort

(321) 236-3721

Support - Breast

Penn State Hershey Medical Center

 

 

Offers two support groups for individuals with breast cancer and long time survivors of breast cancer. Family and significant others are welcome to attend.

Giant

Harrisburg

(717) 531-0003

Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center

Hershey

(717) 531-7492

Support - Breast

Pennsylvania Breast Cancer Coalition

 

 

Friends Like Me offers support to individuals diagnosed with breast cancer within the last six months by providing a complimentary care package that contains educational publications, books and information, as well as some soft touches like a pink ribbon pin and donated gifts and cosmetics. This care package helps newly-diagnosed Pennsylvanians by ...

Friends Like Me

Ephrata

(800) 377-8828

Support - Breast

Pinnacle Health Hospitals

 

 

Pinnacle Health is hosting a support group designed especially for young women facing breast or ovarian cancer called Young Cancer Survivor Group for Women. The group plans to discuss topics that affect younger women, from taking care of kids, to decreases in sexuality, to working while going through treatment, etc. Women will have an opportunity ...

Pinnacle Health Community Campus

Harrisburg

(717) 231-8900

Support - Breast

Summit Health

 

 

Offering support to individuals with breast cancer through the Breast Cancer Support Group.

Breast Cancer Support Group

Chambersburg

(717) 217-6747

Support - Breast

YWCA of Carlisle

 

 

Offers a monthly support group to individuals affected by breast cancer.

YWCA of Carlisle

Carlisle

(717) 243-3818

       

 

 

Resources with are provided by the American Cancer Society.                             

 


November spot-light on War College alumni

The October edition of Military Training Technology magazine featured a question and answer interview with Col. Matthew Clarke, a 2006 U.S. Army War College graduate.

 Training Innovators - Q&A

     Colonel Matthew Clarke currently serves as the commander of the Sergeant First Class Paul Ray Smith Simulation and Training Technology Center (STTC) in Orlando, Fla., a subordinate organization under the U.S. Army Research Laboratory’s Human, Research and Engineering Directorate. He assumed his duties in June 2012, after serving as the assistant to the director – Missile Defense Agency for the European Theater.

    Clarke served in numerous program management and contracting positions. Previous assignments include deputy director, Systems Integration and program chief training officer for the Future Combat Systems Program Office; product manager, Individual Weapons within Program Executive Office (PEO) Soldier; and the direct commercial contracting officer for the Defense Security Cooperation Agency. Clarke began his career as an acquisition professional in 1995.

    Clarke grew up in an Army family. He was born in Groton, Mass., and lived in numerous locations within the United States, in addition to Europe and Panama. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree in bio-medical engineering at the University of Pennsylvania and holds Master of Science degrees from both the Naval Post Graduate School and the U.S. Army War College.

    His decorations include the Bronze Star Medal, the Distinguished Meritorious Service Medal, the Meritorious Service Medal, and other service related awards.

 Q: What work is performed at the STTC?

 A:The technology center researches, develops and transitions innovative technologies to enhance warfighter training and effectiveness. We strive for creative, out of the box solutions that not only provide great utility but also are also affordable to get to the largest number of soldiers as possible. To be clear, we are not program managers, we are science and technology researchers and developers. We don’t produce systems for fielding. We develop the research and technology building blocks for those systems as part of their initial development or lifecycle improvement.

    The goal is to develop technologies that demonstrate great application not only in the training domain but in the tactical or operational, and others as well. We want technologies that can transition to multiple program managers or PEOs. It’s also a great plus when we develop technologies that link to and advance other research efforts, achieving complementary research synergy. It’s all about training and simulation technology for today and the future—we want to satisfy current warfighter training requirements in addition to those five to 10 years down the road. The emphasis is enduring relevance and utility.

    STTC provides an excellent government/contractor workforce combined with a great facility that includes classified work space; we can do quality in-house research. However, we want the best technology to benefit our end-user—soldiers, so we leverage the commercial markets, academia and other government research facilities as a routine practice.

    Today, the STTC is actively pursuing research and development in the areas of intelligent tutors, immersive learning environments, human agent teaming, dismounted soldier training, virtual world technologies, mobile applications [apps] and medical simulators and simulations.

 Q: If sequestration goes into effect and the Department of Defense’s budget is drastically cut, how will that impact the STTC?

 A:Every military organization in the research and development business places great emphasis on achieving the most efficient means of executing their programs while continuing to provide quality; the STTC is no different. If sequestration goes into effect it becomes somewhat of a Hobson’s choice, only we won’t have the leave it option. We are already a very lean organization. A large portion of our funding is customer provided. The key to success in maintaining our customer base is to adhere to the same formula we follow today: provide technology products of enduring value and utility to soldiers and create technology that improves the quality and effectiveness of training.

 Q: How important is the STTC’s relationship with its sister services, academia and industry to meet your objectives?

 A:Establishing strong relationships is a key part of our strategy and our success. The list you referenced represents our customers, our research partners and our technology providers. While an individual research effort may take years to complete, the overall pace of technology change is extremely quick. Networking and teamwork are crucial to learning about new technology possibilities and solving complex problems. So yes, external relationships are very important and we maintain them at several levels.

    We have a very close and positive relationship with the Program Executive Office for Simulation, Training and Instrumentation [PEO STRI]. They are our primary technology development and transition partner. PEO STRI is the major conduit to soldiers for our technology capabilities.

    We have a long-standing partnership with the University of Central Florida’s Institute for Simulation and Training where we do great work in robotics, human robot interaction, dismounted soldier simulation and medical simulation. We also have a strong relationship with the University of Southern California Institute for Creative Technologies [ICT], a U.S. Army-sponsored University Affiliated Research Center. The ICT brings film and game industry artists together with computer and social scientists to study and develop immersive media for military training, health therapies, and training.

    In addition, we are a strong member participant in Team Orlando, a collaborative association of the U.S. Department of Defense and other government agencies, academia and industry, as well as state and local government organizations with the mission to research, develop, test, evaluate, acquire and support simulation and training systems for the armed forces.

 Q: What are the top challenges the STTC is facing today?

 A:We continuously deal with a long list of challenges on a daily basis—that’s the nature of our business. One enduring organizational challenge for us as a science and technology developer is the ability to transition technology into the next phase of the acquisition life cycle, i.e., programs of record. At its best it is complicated and the level of difficulty increases from there. Technology transfer is not a single organization effort. It requires an early and enduring partnership between the developer and the receiver. Like many areas in research and development it is easy to conclude that this is something the government just does not do well. We underestimate the complexities involved. I don’t necessarily agree. Often it is a function of resource application. Requirements always outpace resources.

 Q: Can you discuss the importance of using intelligent agents in training?

 A:Intelligent agents are one of the most critical emerging training technologies; they include virtual humans [VH] and adaptive computer-based tutoring systems [CBTS]. Both VH and CBTS are essential in supporting learning as required by the Army Learning Model [ALM], but have the added bonus of reducing human resources needed to conduct training by taking the place of human role-players and instructors during self-development and other training.

    The ALM describes a learner-centric career long process that meshes self-development with institutional instruction and operational experience. For the self-development process, soldiers interact with CBTS intelligent agents that fill the gap traditionally occupied by human instructors in institutional training. VHs act as friendlies, adversaries and neutral role-players and are a primary mechanism to present information and feedback to trainees, test trainee knowledge, and challenge their creativity and adaptability in solving problems. Tutoring agents runningin the background assess the progress of the trainee, ensure trainees are sufficiently challenged by assessing their physiological and behavior measures in near real time, and also determine when they have mastered essential concepts so they can move on to the next level.

    Currently we are involved in two primary programs of research to enhance the realism and responsiveness of VH, and make CBTS adaptable, easy and affordable to build/modify/support, and responsive to the individual learner’s requirements. Two products of this research include the Virtual Human Toolkit [VHT] and the Generalized Intelligent Framework for Tutoring, known as GIFT. Both the VHT and GIFT provide authoring capabilities to lower the entry cost of developing VHs and CBTS. GIFT also provides a developing set of best instructional practices, and templates for integrating sensors, developing domain content and creating/modifying surveys.

 Q: How do you see advances in real-time distributed simulation for analysis and experimentation evolving over the next few years?

 A: Distributed simulations operating in real time generate extremely large amounts of data traffic. One can easily argue that as simulations become more complex, their associated challenges—data management, the ability to provide services, etc.—increase in complexity as well. We are researching ways to meet these challenges.

    Utilizing the capabilities of cloud computing, as is done in the emerging commercial infrastructure, may enable us to eliminate or at least reduce the use of expensive computing facilities. Through the use of virtualization and resource time-sharing, clouds can serve as a single set of physical resources to accommodate analysis and experimentation needs. They have the potential to provide the benefits of economy of scale and, at the same time, become an alternative for scientists to solve challenges through the use of clusters, grids and parallel environments.

    However, this concept presents its own set of issues. The systems must be secure while at the same time allow large numbers of participants from virtually any location. In addition, the efficiency of the management of the data sent and received is critical to ensure acceptable levels of service. Finally, preservation of the “real-time” facade to maintain the coherence of the simulation is critical.

    In addition to cloud computing, the simulation community is moving to leverage multiprocessor systems as well as adopting the new general-purpose programming of graphics processors. The proliferation of virtualization and cloud based approaches to software services will allow for an exponential expansion of capability.

 Q: How is the STTC working to improve advanced distributed simulation?

 A:The STTC has a long history of pushing the limits of science and technology in the area of advanced simulation. Distributed simulation is one part of our diverse research portfolio. Continuously improving existing models and simulations to interoperate towards an end—analysis, experimentation, testing, training, etc.—is a requirement that will not go away.

    In turn, we are focusing research into how we can better provide interfaces to complex simulations. Our goal is an interface that is intuitive to a diverse set of users while providing a robust methodology for turning models and simulations into configurable building blocks. This is linked to our research in “cloud” and virtualization technologies, systems engineering and human systems integration. The concept is to understand the functionalities required by our users, then develop those models and simulations and their associated interfaces that perform those functions.

    While we have an eye on existing architectures, we are also researching methodologies for the future of simulation. We are pushing the limits of next generation architectures for modeling and simulation. There have been many advances in computer science in recent history, such as hybrid computing architectures [CPUs/GPUs], self-forming systems, etc., that we are bringing into the simulation domain. The goal will be to determine where simulation can go in the future and then work with our user community to achieve that future.

    The Army is moving training toward a concept they are calling the ALM for 2015. To facilitate this, we are researching methods to develop and assess an integrated, technology-enabled learning environment as well as prototype training materials to provide integrated training support across multiple platforms, e.g., personal computer, mobile device, virtual worlds, etc. Sometimes it is a function of applying the technology from other research areas, such as data-driven systems, to the training domain in novel ways.

    For instance, our sister divisions in our higher headquarters at HRED do fantastic research into the human dimension. We leveraged some of this work over the years. In partnership with other elements of HRED, we are researching a distributed soldier representation that will provide a soldier-focused service-oriented distributed modeling and simulation architecture supporting the development and evaluation of large scale distributed system of systems applications.

 Q: How does the STTC determine what to research?

 A:We are constantly exploring, researching and attempting to create new training technologies that satisfy today’s requirements and maintain their value over time. Our funding, the color of our money, allows us to work basic, applied and advanced technology development research. We work projects with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency as well as working with program managers, and in some instances directly with an operational unit. The challenge is to find the right balance within that research spectrum as we determine our future investments.

    STTC has a very educated and knowledgeable workforce with years of experience. In terms of early research, they have an excellent view on what areas of research we should pursue in a specific technology. They understand where research in a specific area is going or not. We also have a great relationship with our Training and Doctrine Command [TRADOC] and acquisition partners who clearly understand the needs of the Army and their current programs. Bringing these groups together sets the conditions to really synchronize the requirements of the day and the art of the possible. Without a doubt, collaboration is a predominate driver in our decision making process. We meet formally with our partners several times a year to discuss near and far future efforts. We collaborate informally even more.

    Our collaboration efforts do not focus solely on future efforts. We also constantly review our current works searching for those specific technology efforts that are not just demonstrating success but are truly ground-breaking and potentially cross domain contributors.

 Q: Is there anything new on the horizon at the STTC that is planned to be implemented in the near future?

 A:We have a lot of great research and technology efforts in the works. But, in this case, I want to highlight just a couple of things we are doing on the medical and immersive sides. The quality of the medical training research and associated technologies at the STTC is outstanding and significantly improving the standard for medical training in the Army. The STTC continues to research the development of synthetic tissue as a way to reduce the reliance on live tissue for training and the creation of wounds that accurately depict battlefield injuries right down to the feel and smell.

    Our medical simulation team provides unparalleled research and innovations that really have revolutionized battlefield trauma care and increased warrior survivability. Hemorrhage control is still the single most important lifesaving aspect in battlefield trauma medicine. Over the past few years, the STTC in cooperation with industry developed an award winning prototype system known in the medical community as MATT, short for Multiple Amputee Trauma Trainer. This system consists of two lower amputations with animatronics technology that provides natural limb movement. Human patient simulators or human actors can wear it to support realistic hemorrhage control training. We continuously receive extremely positive feedback from soldiers returning from deployments on this system’s ability to prepare them for both the physical and emotional requirements of events involving traumatic medical situations.

    In addition to the medical items, STTC is working closely with the TRADOC on a low-cost, government-developed, massively multiplayer online environment called the Enhanced, Dynamic, Geo-Social Environment, or EDGE for short. EDGE can be accessed anywhere in the world through any open internet connection, allowing soldiers to enter the persistent environment that mirrors the real world in avatar form; whether they are at home, work or deployed. Soldiers reach out virtually to train and leverage expertise from other warfighters at different locations around the world, familiarizing themselves with the operational environment, rules of engagement, negotiation, and cultural and interrogation skills.

    We are also developing apps for both the iPhone and Android operating systems to include: game-based language training, immersive and interactive equipment sustainment trainers, end-to-end classroom content delivery software, basic training concepts, digital field manuals and live terrain tools.

This question and answer interview came from Military Training Technology’s October issue. Please visit http://www.military-training-technology.com/military-training-technology/for a complete PDF or digital copy.


Exercise your right: VOTE!

Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012 is Election Day.

Pa. Polls will be open from 7 a.m. - 8 p.m. and Pa. voters can find more information at http://www.votespa.com/portal/server.pt/community/home/13514.

If you have not yet returned your voted ballot, please do so immediately. Ballots must be postmarked and received by specific State deadlines to be counted. You can find your State deadline at http://www.fvap.gov/map.html

If you have not received your requested State ballot, complete the Federal Write-in Absentee Ballot now at http://www.fvap.gov/FWAB/index.html. The backup ballot must still be received by your local election office by your State's deadlines.

Voters display their purple finger tips after casting ballots at an elementary school in Nasiriyah March 7, 2010. The heavy purple dye reduced attempts of double-voting fraud. Photo by: 4 Brigade Combat Team, 1 Armored Division  

Tracking Your Ballot:

Military personnel in APO/FPO locations: Track your ballot back to the U.S. by adding the Express Mail Label 11-DoD to your absentee ballot. Go to https://www.usps.com/  to track your ballot. This label is available at any overseas military post office. Questions regarding your tracked ballot should be directed to vote@fvap.gov or 1-800-438-8683. 

For all absent military and overseas civilians, state and local election offices can also confirm if they received your absentee ballot. For election office contact information, check: http://www.fvap.gov/reference/links.html.

If you have questions or problems with the subscription service, please contact support@govdelivery.com. This service is provided to you at no charge by the Federal Voting Assistance Program.

 

 


Eric Desveaux and Lt. Col. William McDonough
Update on The Exchange projects

We wanted to provide an update to the Carlisle Barracks Community regarding several projects your Exchange is working on.

In February 2012, we were on schedule to execute several projects on Carlisle Barracks to enlarge the Class Six store, overhaul the Entertainment Zone, renovate the post theater, expand the main store’s floor space, and increase the Clothing and Sales selection. Unfortunately, the Army and Air Force Exchange Service (AAFES), like all Department of Defense activities, had to relook and reprioritize all projects given current fiscal constraints. This has delayed the execution of these projects.

Class Six store – Your Exchange completed the first phase in January 2012 with the move of the Class Six into the Main store. This was supposed to be a temporary location. Your Exchange is working on funding to complete the Class Six move. If funding is approved, and the second part of this project is completed, the Class Six store will be located in the current garden section with a separate external door. The new location will permit the exact same stock assortment, allows for growth for new warm sold beverages, and doubles the amount of cold beverages available for sale. Completing the Class Six store renovation is the number one priority.

Entertainment Zone – Your Exchange has already begun moving some items around and procured materials from other stores. Even though this is the second priority, patrons may see progress here prior to the Class Six store work. Your Exchange was fortunate enough to locate some items that we did not have to pay for and was able to bring them to our store for use. If funding is approved, we will complete the overhaul the Entertainment Zone.

Post Theater – originally, the renovation project was going to upgrade only the ticket/concession area within this historic building. However, this is no longer the case. AAFES was compelled to shut down approximately 60% of all installation theaters in the AAFES Eastern Region. There are only nine installation theaters remaining open to include Carlisle Barracks. Also, beginning in 2013, the movie industry will no longer be producing 35mm movie film prints. As a result, AAFES has set aside funding to upgrade these nine theaters. Starting on 30 October until up to 31 December, your post theater will receive a new digital projection system, a new screen, and new sound system, and a ticket/concession area renovation. This means the post theater, instead of getting films weeks after they hit the local “first run” theater, can now contend for films as a first run theater or with less time between a new local release and a film playing on post. The theater will also be 3D capable. There will be no price increase to tickets due to the renovation costs. Finally, we are looking at more matinees and more showings than two times a week if demand increases. While the Class Six store renovation is the priority one project, a separate funding stream will make the post theater the first project completed.

Military Clothing Sales Store (MCSS) – Your Exchangeis already moving some items in the store in order to create more space for military items as well as increase the selection of insignia, rank, badges, medals, ribbons, and awards. Establishing a MCSS remains the fourth priority. If the funding is approved for a MCSS, we will work with the US Army Garrison – Carlisle Barracks to officially establish a MCSS, which requires some garrison funding to establish and run.

Finally, we are still working to bring in a coffee concessionaire. There was a local vendor that expressed interest in opening up a coffee shop in the Exchange mall area but then backed out later.

Mr. Eric Desveaux is theGeneral Manager for the Carlisle Barracks Exchange.

LTC William McDonough is the Garrison Commander for Carlisle Barracks.


Suzanne Reynolds, Public Affairs
 
Partnerships create bright future for Carlisle food and beverage activities
 
  Partnerships with nearby government facilities and restructuring were key to taking finances for food and beverage activities from red to black on the Carlisle Barracks Family Morale, Welfare and Recreation books.
 
  The beneficiaries are Soldiers and Families.
 
  “In this economy you have to be able to take risks,” said Liz Knouse, director of FMWR for Carlisle, Letterkenny Army Depot and Fort Indiantown Gap.
 
  Risks and partnerships introduced costs savings associated with bulk purchasing and shared staff across the retail food, beverage and entertainment services at Letterkenny, Fort Indiantown Gap – as well as Café Cumberland at the Army Heritage and Education Center.
                                                                                                                   Root Hall Joint Deli      Photo:  Suzanne Reynolds
                                              
 
   “The economy affects everyone,” said Knouse.  “We have a stable workforce with years of experience, low turnover because of cross training and great teamwork which has allowed us to become more creative.”
 
  “Having a professional at the helm with 30-plus years of restaurant experience has been a great asset,” said Knouse about Michelle Bitetti, hired in Oct. 2011 as the food and beverage director for Carlisle Barracks and Fort Indiantown Gap.
 
  “The Root Hall Deli was losing money so bad they were thinking of closing it down,” said Bitetti.  “We went in there over Christmas break and restructured.  Management, menus and prices all changed.”   
 
  “Now it is in the black and we have saved jobs,” she said.
 
  “We are adding a sit-down restaurant at Fort Indiantown Gap to engage more people from the surrounding areas,” said Bitetti.  “Since the post is open to the public and has no gate, it will help sustain us during the slow months,” she said.
 
   “Every dime we make goes back into Soldiers’ and Family programs,” said Knouse.  "The program closed fiscal 2012 at $65,900 to the good,” she said.
 
  “It is great working for a place that puts every dollar we make back into the Barracks,” said Bitetti. 
 
Fort Indiantown Gap
  A National Guard Training Center located in Annville, Pa., trains more than 100,000 troops each year.  It is also the home of the Pa. Department of Military and Veterans Affairs which oversees both the Army and Air National Guard and the state’s programs for serving the needs of Pennsylvania’s 1 million veterans.
 
Letterkenny Army Depot
  The premier DoD Center of industrial and technical excellence for air defense and tactical missile ground support equipment, mobile electric power generation equipment, and PATRIOT missile recertification, is the largest employer in Franklin County with over 3600 employees.
 
Carlisle Barracks FMWR is responsible for many activities:
*Child Development Centers here and at Letterkenny Army Depot
*Youth Services
*Auto Center
*Arts and Craft Shop
*Leisure Travel Services here, Fort Indiantown Gap and Letterkenny Army Depot
*Community Centers here and at Fort Indiantown Gap
*Three Cafes
*Bowling Center
*Golf Course
*Marketing
*AHEC Visitor’s Center and Catering Center
*Outdoor Recreation
*Pool here and Fort Indiantown Gap
*Sports Office here and at Fort Indiantown Gap

Israeli National Defense College leaders visit with expert War College faculty

Maj. Gen. Yossif Baidatz, Commandant of the Israeli National Defense College, talks with Col. Richard Lacquement, Dean of the School of Strategic Landpower, during a visit to the Army War College Oct. 25.  

Oct. 25, 2012 -- Leadership from the Israeli National Defense College came to the Army War College Oct. 25 to meet with expert War College faculty and discuss leadership, educating leaders in national security and strategy and the challenges of cyberspace.

“We have graduates from here so we know of the excellence of the curriculum and faculty,” said Israeli Maj. Gen.  Yossif Baidatz, Commandant of the INDC. “We wanted to come here to learn more about and explore different techniques of leader education, especially in the area of national security and strategy.”

Both schools can learn from each other he said.

“It’s important for schools like ours to talk and see how we educate leaders,” he said. “The challenges that our militaries face are similar in many instances and by sharing ideas and techniques, we can all be more successful.”

The group also met with leaders at the National Defense University as part of their Near East South Asia Center for Strategic Studies program.  The INDC is working to complement the writing of an Israeli National Security Strategy by creating the forum for educating the critical strategic thinkers across various government agencies so they are intellectually equipped to lead Israel in the 21st Century.


Smurf phase-out begins

The project to construct 56 modern family homes on Carlisle Barracks is poised to start with a series of safety actions. The first section of fencing went up today, signalling the beginning of a demolition-construction project.

The new homes will start coming ‘on line’ during the December 2013-July 2014 time frame, at a pace of about a building a week, according to BBC project manager Ty McPhillips. The homes -- similar to those in the Meadows and Heritage Heights -- will be available for families arriving at Carlisle Barracks during Summer 2014.

McPhillips focused on safety and community expectations, while meeting recently with the key players on post responsible for safety, security, planning, public works/ utilities, and Army housing.

What can residents expect?

Safety is critical -- and that will drive the fencing and traffic plan.

The construction team started installing fences today, will add signs, and soon will close and lock gates into the construction zone.

Demolition is expected to take about 90 days, depending on weather. Construction of the new homes is now slated to start in March 2013 for July 2014 availability.

All construction vehicles will cycle through the Access Control Point at the Main/ Claremont Gate, following a traffic pattern that guides them away from current residential areas, and exit post at the Route 11 Gate.

School bus routes have been moved, already, to avoid the construction area. No youth will need to walk through the construction zone to get to a bus stop.  Barry Farquhar, post planning officer, has coordinated with the Carlisle School District’s transportation manager to ensure that school bus drivers fully understand the construction zone -- and the fact that their routes will safely 'steer clear.'

During the summer 2013 period when surrounding homes are temporarily empty, the construction team will work curbs and roads.

'Smurf' houses, renowned for small size and family togetherness will be remembered fondly, according to former residents, but future residents will find modern layouts and energy efficiencies.  


American Forces Press Service
President Obama proclaims November as Military Family Month

WASHINGTON, Nov. 1, 2012 - "In our military families, we see the best our country has to offer. They demonstrate the virtues that have made America great for more than two centuries and the values that will preserve our greatness for centuries to come," President Barack Obama said in his proclamation issued today declaring the month of November as Military Family Month.

The proclamation reads:

"Since our Nation's earliest days, courageous men and women of all backgrounds and beliefs have banded together to fight for the freedoms we cherish. Behind each of them stands a parent, a sibling, a child, a spouse -- proud family members who share the weight of deployment and make profound sacrifices on behalf of our country. During Military Family Month, we honor our military families and recommit to showing them the fullest care and respect of a grateful Nation.

 

"In our military families, we see the best our country has to offer. They demonstrate the virtues that have made America great for more than two centuries and the values that will preserve our greatness for centuries to come. With loved ones serving far from home, military spouses take on the work of two. Their children show courage and resilience as they move from base to base, school to school, home to home. And even through the strain of deployment, military families strengthen the fabric of each community they touch and enrich our national life as shining examples of patriotism.

 

"We each have a solemn duty to serve our Armed Forces and their families as well as they serve us. Through First Lady Michelle Obama's and Dr. Jill Biden's Joining Forces initiative, we have worked to fulfill this obligation by mobilizing all Americans to give service members and their families the opportunities and support they have earned. Last year, we challenged American businesses to hire or train 100,000 veterans and military spouses by the end of 2013. To date, they have already exceeded that challenge, hiring over 125,000 veterans and military spouses. From helping military children succeed in the classroom to increasing support for those who care for our wounded warriors, Joining Forces will keep fighting to ensure the well-being of our troops and their families.

"When a young woman signs up to defend our Nation, her parents are enlisted as well. When a father deploys to a combat zone, his children are called to serve on the home front. And when the men and women of our military serve far from home, their families feel the strain of their absence. In that absence, let us stand together as one American family. Let us honor the brave patriots who keep our country safe, and let us forever hold close the memories of those who have perished in the line of duty. This month, we reaffirm that we will always lift up our military families -- not just when their loved ones are away, but also long after the welcome home ceremonies are over.

"NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim November 2012 as Military Family Month. I call on all Americans to honor military families through private actions and public service for the tremendous contributions they make in support of our service members and our Nation."


USCIS honors Veterans during naturalization Ceremony at U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will honor our nation’s veterans Thursday, November 8th during a special naturalization ceremony at the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center, Carlisle Barracks, Pa. at 1:30 p.m. Of the 35 citizenship candidates, four are veterans of the U.S. armed forces, one of which is in the Army National Guard.

Welcoming the citizenship candidates and their guests will be U.S. Army War College Deputy Commandant, Colonel Bobby Towery. During the ceremony, USCIS District Director, Tony Bryson will administer the Oath of Allegiance, after which the candidates become citizens and will receive their Certificate of Naturalization.

U.S. Navy Commander Arthur Fong, a naturalized citizen and a U.S. Army War College student, will address the new Americans.

The 35 candidates originate from the following 23 countries: Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, China, Colombia, Czech Republic, Egypt, Ghana, Haiti, India, Iraq, Italy, Jordan, Kenya, Liberia, Mexico, Moldova, Pakistan, Panama, Philippines, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, and Trinidad and Tobago.

USCIS will conduct 37 special Veterans Day naturalization ceremonies from Nov. 6 to Nov. 16, naturalizing approximately 3,700 individuals.

USCIS expedites the application and naturalization process for members of the U.S. armed forcesregardless of where they serve. Our support to the armed forces resulted in nearly 8,700 noncitizens serving in the military realizing their dream of U.S. citizenship in fiscal year 2012.


Leadership resolves to find 'right' family programs

Gen. Raymond T. Odierno, Army chief of staff, told Army spouses at the Association of the Unites States Army Annual Meeting and Exposition in Washington, D.C., last week that he would continue to ask for input from garrison commanders on which family programs work and which don't work.

WASHINGTON (Army News Service, Oct. 31, 2012) -- In a town hall meeting with Army spouses, Chief of Staff of the Army Gen. Ray Odierno reiterated the Army's commitment financially to do everything possible to find the right programs to help families deal with the complexities of Soldier life.

"We're still going to invest a lot of money in our family programs -- it's a high priority -- that's not going to change, but we need to do better and be more efficient in the dollars that we have," he said to the predominantly female audience at the annual meeting of the Association of the United States Army Annual Meeting and Exposition, last week.

"We have to eliminate programs that aren't efficient enough and aren't gaining enough for our families and invest in the programs that are truly making a difference," Odierno said, adding he needed input from spouses on the programs that work and don't work.

He also said the Army needed to look at many programs that were funded with wartime funding, such as the child care subsidy program. That program was put in place because leadership knew there would be many parents deployed.

"As we move to the future, is this (funding) still necessary when parents are no longer deployed? We'll have to make those decisions as we go forward," Odierno said. "I don't want to paint a picture that we're funding everything. We've gotten additional monies from our operational funds because we were fighting wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, but that will begin to go away after 2014."

Odierno made it clear that no family program would arbitrarily be discontinued. He stressed that garrison commanders will have to determine their particular family program needs and possible solutions to problems since every post has different quality of life issues.

"I don't want to respond to problems, although we'll still be able to do that," he said. "I want us to build programs that make us better as individuals, make us better as families and make us better as an Army community."

Odierno spoke briefly about two programs the Army would soon be launching. The first is the "Ready and Resilient Campaign," which is tied to the Comprehensive Soldier and Family Fitness program.

"People can define resiliency in a lot of different ways, but there are a couple of things that we know for sure," he said. "We know that as you're able to enhance performance and capabilities, you build resiliency in individuals. It's about developing physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually."

The second new program is the "Soldier for Life Campaign." Odierno said this program was about Soldiers and families making transitions, whether the Army becomes a career or not.

"This is about bringing Soldiers into the Army, having them continue to improve themselves during their time in the Army, then when they leave the Army we're going to assist them so they're ready and prepared to move on to the next stage in their lives," he said.

Thomas R. Lamont, the assistant secretary of the Army for manpower and reserve affairs, said the transition program leverages what he calls the "whole of government approach" and included both the Department of Veteran Affairs and the Department of Labor.

"We're in the process of improving integration and synchronization of all our Soldier and family quality of life programs," he said. He noted that the Army had spent $600 million in support of family programs in 2008 and that had grown to roughly $1.3 billion for fiscal year 2013. Lamont didn't say what funding for fiscal year 2014 is anticipated to be.

"We are beginning a drawdown of our forces as directed by the DOD in support of the new national defense strategy, and we recognize that this drawdown may stress our Army," Lamont said. "But we are committed to ensuring that sustaining the all-volunteer Army remains our top priority and supporting our families is the key element of that focus."


David Vergun, Army News Service

Leader development top among Army priorities

 

 

  • Soldiers, having experienced the “crucible” of the last 11 years of an Army at war, where “discipline, initiative, freedom of action, adaptability and decentralization” have been the norm, are today “professionally advanced (in leadership) way beyond their years in any grade — noncommissioned officer and officer,” said retired Army Gen. Frederick M. Franks Jr.

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  • “The challenge facing us today as we transition is how does the Army keep that goodness (in its leaders) as we deploy less and make do with less resources,” he said.

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    That question framed the discussion that followed, during the Association of the United States Army’s Institute of Land Warfare’s “Developing Leaders: The Key to Readiness, Sustaining the Profession, and Ensuring our Legacy” forum Oct. 24.
     

     

     

  • Franks, who is chair of the Simon Center for the Professional Military Ethic at the U.S. Military Academy, was one of eight panelists.

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    Developing and nurturing good leaders is not just about sending them to leadership courses, Franks said. Though retired, the general has been listening to leaders throughout the Army.

    “Roughly 80 percent of leaders — NCOs and officers — say they learn best by experience, even as they acknowledge the value of institutional and self-development approaches,” Franks said.

     

     

  • Brig. Gen. Gordon B. Davis Jr., deputy commandant or the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, and deputy commander, Leader Development and Education, U.S. Army Combined Arms Center, said Soldiers learn the art and science of war through education, training and experience, with the goal of preparing them for the next rank or position of responsibility.

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    Davis said leader development has many goals. Included among those goals is teaching Soldiers how to analyze and solve complex problems, how to better collaborate with other services and multinational partners, how to be better communicators and negotiators, and how to be better leaders and managers.

    The general added that leadership development “allows us to inject the latest concepts, doctrines, policies, best practices, and emerging ideas into the graduates, who then take that new knowledge and inject it back into the Army, thus allowing us to institutionalize and operationalize change.”
    The Army invests heavily in military education, much more so than businesses and other government agencies, he said.

    “Private-sector leaders I’ve spoken with are surprised (at) and envious (of) the Army’s time and effort (spent) in developing leaders for future responsibilities,” Davis said.

    Leadership education and development outside the classroom is occurring all the time, according to Maj. Gen. Joseph Anderson, commander, 4th Infantry Division (mechanized).

    He said such education takes place during physical fitness and battle skills training, in competitive team-building events, and in many other venues, which can take place even when troops are deployed.

    He suggested too that Soldiers be rotated — given a variety of tasks and responsibilities — so they don’t become stale.
     

    Maj. Gen. Anthony A. Cucolo III said there are two essential elements to leader development while in an operating force environment.
     

    The first of those, Cucolo said, is identifying the sphere of influence — deciding who will develop the leader and have the discussion with him or her.

    Secondly, he said, is articulating an end state. That means knowing ahead of time, before the officer leaves a command, what the leader wants that officer to know about, know how to do, or understand.

    “In other words, you start with the end state, then build the program,” Cucolo said.

    Cucolo, who is commandant of the U.S. Army War College, said that end state can’t just be driven by a list of events. He said the plan has to include “personalized development sessions” that are discussed one-on-one, not just top-down driven.

    All in all, the Army is doing a pretty good job at developing its leaders, said retired Col. Joseph N.G. LeBoeuf, professor of the practice of management, Fuqua School of Business and Coach K Center on Leadership and Ethics, Duke University.

    Many who are in charge of leadership development at the best business schools and Fortune 500 companies are former Soldiers, he said.
    One of the reasons Soldiers do so well, he suggested, is that they practice transformational leadership as well as transactional. He defined transactional leadership as simply using people to accomplish tasks and transformational as getting stuff done in the right way — using tasks as leadership development opportunities.

     

     

  • These opportunities could be anything from providing constructive feedback and rewards to self-assessment and reflection.

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