Banner Archive for January 2016
 

Important voting information

As you likely know, 2016 is a significant election year for local, state, and federal government.

The voter registration deadline in Pennsylvania for the April 26 is March 28.   The last day to request and return an absentee ballot is April 25,  2016.  Be sure to allow plenty of time (more than 14 days) to process a mail-in absentee ballot.

If you want to register to vote, you can visit FVAP.gov now to complete a registration application and request your absentee ballots for the presidential primaries (P) and State primaries (S).  Upcoming elections:

  * New Hampshire: February 9 (P, Tentative)

  * South Carolina: February 20 (P, Republican Primary Only)

  * South Carolina: February 27 (P, Democratic Primary Only, Tentative)

States Scheduled for Primary Elections on 1 March 2016:

  • Alabama
  • Arkansas
  • Georgia
  • Massachusetts
  • Oklahoma
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Virginia
  • Vermont

Please note that dates are subject to change for each of the 50 States. 

The General Election date is November 8, 2016

It only takes a few quick steps to make sure your vote is counted no matter where you are in the world.

Please see attached Federal Post Card Application (FPCA) for your use.  Or, you can register and request your ballots, complete the Federal Post Card Application (FPCA) using the FPCA online assistant (fvap.gov/military-voter/registration-ballots), or fill out the attached PDF file, or go on-line: (fvap.gov/uploads/FVAP/Forms/fpca2013.pdf), or pick up a hardcopy version from your Installation/Unit Voting Assistance Officer.

If you do not have access to a computer you are more than welcome to stop by Bldg 22, Room 108 to utilize a dedicated computer just for voters.

Not voting in these States? Find your State’s primary election dates at FVAP.gov: Select the State you want to register to vote in from the drop-down menu at the top left-hand side of the home page. To find your State's election website for specific information on candidates, elections, contact information, and links to your local election offices, visit FVAP's contact page (fvap.gov/info/contact).

You can always get more information on the Federal Voting Assistance Program and help with the absentee voting process, by going to FVAP.gov or call FVAP at 703-588-1584 (toll free 1-800-438-VOTE or DSN 425-1584) or email (vote@fvap.gov).

If you need more information, please do not hesitate to contact the Installation Voting Assistance Officer or either of the two available Unit Voting Assistance Officers:

Installation Voting Assistance Officer:

Frederick J. Gleave

Installation Voting Assistance Officer (IVAO)

U.S. Army Garrison, Carlisle Barracks, PA

Bldg 22, Room 108

Phone:  717-245-3688, DSN 242-3688

Carlisle Barracks, PA 17013

e-mail:  usarmy.carlisle.usag.mbx.voting-assistance-office@mail.mil

 

U.S. Army War College, Unit Voting Assistance Officer

Donald S. Travis

Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Army

Voting Assistance Officer (VAO)

U.S. Army War College Carlisle Barracks, PA

Bldg 650, Room B113

Office:  717-245-4527

Cell: 703-853-9170

e-mail:  Donald.s.travis.mil@mail.mil

 

Dunham Health Clinic Unit Voting Assistance Officer

Jared J. Chumley

SSG, USA

Unit Voting Assistance Officer (UVAO)

Dunham Army Health Clinic

Bldg 450, Room 605

Phone:  717-245-3756

e-mail:  jared.j.chumley.mil@mail.mil


College Prep Program to offer expert advice for military families

All college-bound military teens are invited to the College Preparation Program, Feb. 1 at 6:30 - 8:30 pm at Wil Washcoe Auditorium in Root Hall, Carlisle Barracks; question-and-answer period is 8:30 - 9:30 pm. 

Subject matter experts will give advice and answer all of your questions about --

o The college admission process

o ACT/SAT prep with Tutor.com

o Post-9/11 GI Bill & Yellow Ribbon program

o TRICARE for College Students

o A special video presentation: College Advice from Military Dependents.

Got questions? Call the School Liaison Office, program sponsor, at 717.245.4555.


Free tutoring now available

Check out the age-appropriate sessions for hands-on clinics.

All clinics are free, sponsored by Carlisle Barracks Child & Youth Services.


Military Family Life Counselor Program is here to help you

Need to talk to someone?  The Carlisle Barracks Military and Family Life Consultants can help.

Come learn more about the Military Family Life Counselor Program during a special presentation  Jan. 28. MFLCs provide anonymous and confidential assistance to Soldiers and their Families in problem solving issues resulting from deployment, reunions, reintegration, and/or other times of change.

The Military and Family Life Counselor (MFLC) Program is designed to provide support and assistance to active duty Soldiers, National Guard & Reserves, military Family Members and civilian personnel. Military and Family Life Consultants can help people who are having trouble coping with concerns and issues of daily life.

MFLC is available Monday to Friday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., and is located at 632 Wright Ave, in the ACS area.  To reach the MFLC, call 717-205-9048.

All counselors are masters and PhD clinical counselors that are trained to offer help in many areas:

  • Children and adolescents
  • Couples and families
  • Grief and loss
  • Veterans or Veteran Affairs
  • Military personnel and families
  • School systems
  • Work in various environments
  • Rapid assessment and problem resolution

How the MFLC Program Helps

The MFLC program provides counseling services to military families for the following reasons:

  • Relationships
  • Crisis intervention
  • Stress management
  • Occupational
  • Other individual and family issues

The program also offers psycho-educational presentations to units on many different topics such as:

  • Deployments
  • Grief/Loss
  • Reunion/Reintegration
  • Stress and Coping

How Consultants Help

Services provided by MFLC are short-term and non-medical.  If it is determined that the patient needs more than 12 sessions, the consultant will then refer them to long-term counseling. All information is confidential, no records are made and information is not shared, unless there is a legal duty to warn.

Counseling is informal and guide individuals through the effects of military life and provide support through the many tribulations. They do not diagnose mental disorders or provide psychological treatment.

Some of the main ways counselors help are:

  • Use techniques to improve problem solving process
  • Provide insight to increase individual and family competency
  • Empower with information and coping skills to increase confidence in handling military life stressors
  • Ensure that personal issues do not hamper operational readiness

Jessica Ryan, U.S. Army Installation Management Command
Mentors, mentees seek 'lollipop moments'

The mentors and mentees meet in-person at the College of Installation Management, January 12-15, to learn about the mentoring process and develop capstone projects. The program, which consists of 43 mentors and 36 mentors, supports the U.S. Army Installation Management Command 2025 and Beyond Campaign Plan’s Line of Effort 1 as it gives an opportunity for senior leaders to build the bench for junior to mid-level employees. (U.S. Army photo by Jessica Ryan.)

FORT SAM HOUSTON, TEXAS (January 26, 2016) – Karen Perkins, human resources director of U.S. Army Installation Management Command, posed an intriguing question to 43 mentors and 36 mentees as they met in-person for the first time during the Headquarters Centralized Mentoring Program orientation January 12 at the College of the Installation Management on Joint Base San Antonio, Texas.

She asked: “Did you know that you could have a big impact on someone’s life without even realizing it?” then showed them a video entitled “TEDxToronto – Drew Dudley ‘Leading with Lollipops’” (available online on YouTube).

Dudley, the video’s speaker, told a story about the remarkable impression he left on a college peer after he persuaded another student to give her a lollipop during a campus registration event.

“How many of you guys have a lollipop moment, a moment where someone said something or did something that you feel fundamentally made your life better?” said Dudley.

“We need to redefine leadership as being about lollipop moments, how many of them we create, how many of them we acknowledge, how many of them we pay forward, and how many of them we say thank you for.”

The command’s mentoring program provides an opportunity for employees to find and give those lollipop moments. It is designed to build the bench for junior to mid-level civilian employees to become future leaders and future mentors that influence and shape the future workforce.

“The year-long program is comprised of unique developmental experiences,” explained Amanda Rodriguez of IMCOM G1’s Workforce Development team. “It includes an orientation phase and a job-shadow week, then culminates in a group project capstone event—all of which are aimed at building a multi-skilled and adaptive workforce.” 

New to the program this year is an active-duty Soldier pairing, according to Perkins.

Sgt. Maj. Lon Culbreath, of IMCOM G1, agreed to mentor Sgt. 1st Class Sherri Queen, a detachment sergeant at U.S. Army Garrison Japan, after reviewing her application. Although the program was initially opened to only civilian employees, the IMCOM G1 staff believed that active-duty Soldiers assigned to the command should participate.

“We all have a common mission to take care of Soldiers, Families and civilians,” said Culbreath. “As we move forward into the future, it’s important that we [Soldiers and civilians] are integrated together.”  

Even though the pair are stationed in different countries, they plan to regularly communicate through phone and email.

Culbreath’s focus will be developing Queen’s promotion eligibility for her next grade. She hopes to eventually become a sergeant major like him.

“I think it’s critical for senior noncommissioned officers to have a mentor who can show them the path to achieving their goals,” said Culbreath. “There are certain steps that she needs to get done in order to accomplish those goals, and I’m excited to help her reach them.”

In the year ahead, the mentors and mentees will be seeking to give and receive those lollipop moments as they build a strong relationship which will hopefully last beyond the program.

 “Although this is a year-long program, it doesn’t mean that the mentor-mentee relationship ends then,” said Rodriguez. “Mentoring can last a lifetime.”

For more information about the Headquarters Centralized Mentoring Program, contact the IMCOM G1 Workforce Development at usarmy.jbsa.imcom-hq.list.g1-workforce-development-owner@mail.mil.


Celebrating Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

"Remember, Celebrate, Act! A Day On, Not a Day Off!"

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., challenged the Nation to recognize that our individual liberties rely upon our common equality. The passage of time has only served to deepen our understanding of the importance of Dr. King's words and of his life's work.

 Today, we honor Dr. King, remembering the strength of his leadership, the power of his words, and the inspiration of his call for justice. We celebrate his legacy of freedom and equality for all.

Guest speaker at this this year event was retired Maj. Gen. Bagby.  Bagby  served over 32 years in the U.S. Army and received the Distinguished Service Medal, the Army's highest peacetime award. His long and distinguished military career has included service as Commandant of the Joint Forces Staff College, Director of Operations for the Allied Join Force Command of NATO and Director of the Combined Joint Staff for the Combined Joint Task Force in Afghanistan.

We ask our entire Army Family to use this opportunity to recommit ourselves to achieving Dr. King's dream: an America where every person is treated with dignity and respect. By living our Army Values, we embody all those ideals advanced by Dr. King's ideals and continue to be Army Strong!

 

View the Army senior leaders tri-signed letter: Celebrating Martin Luther King Day


Carlisle Barracks Spouses’ Club calls for Scholarship applications

The CBSC Scholarship Program offers scholarships annually to deserving students and spouses who have committed to continuing their education beyond high school. CBSC Scholarships are merit-based and may be used for college-related expenses. Scholarship checks will be sent directly to your institution via certified check in U.S.Currency. For additonal information: http://cbspousesclub.org/community-outreach/scholarships

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

1. Be a CBSC member or their dependent. Membership must be current as of 30 October 2015, or within 60 days of report date on official orders. Orders must have arrival after 1 October 2015.

2. Be a high school senior, home-schooled equivalent living within 50 miles of Carlisle Barracks, spouse or dependent enrolled in an accredited college/university or certification program.

3. High School Seniors within a 50 mile radius of Carlisle Barracks whose custodial, non-membership eligible parent is stationed at Carlisle Barracks or surrounding military posts,

4. Applicant must enroll as a matriculated student as defined by the college/university or certification program during the 2016-17 academic year.

Applicants must submit all of the following by the deadline, 15 February 2016, in order to be considered qualified for an award. For more information please call: 717 706 5140.


Members1st Credit Union closing post branch April 1

The Carlisle Barracks branch of Members 1st, located near the Commissary, will close April 1. It is expected that the ATM near the Exchange will remain.

The post will explore contracting with another bank or credit union to replace Members 1st.


TRICARE Pharmacy copays change Feb. 1

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Jan. 7, 2016) -- Military pharmacies and TRICARE Pharmacy home delivery will remain the lowest cost pharmacy option for TRICARE beneficiaries when some TRICARE pharmacy copays change in 2016. On Feb. 1, 2016, most copays for prescription drugs at home delivery and retail network pharmacies will increase slightly.

The 2016 National Defense Authorization Act, or NDAA, requires TRICARE to change its prescription copays. All drugs at military pharmacies, and generic drugs through home delivery, are still available at no cost to beneficiaries. Copays for brand name drugs through home delivery increase from $16 to $20, for up to a 90-day supply. At retail pharmacies, generic drug copays go from $8 to $10, and brand name drug copays go from $20 to $24 dollars, for up to a 30-day supply. Copays for non-formulary drugs and for drugs at non-network pharmacies will also change.

Beneficiaries can save up to $208 in 2016 for each brand name prescription drug they switch from retail pharmacy to home delivery. Home delivery offers safe and convenient delivery of your prescription drugs right to your mailbox.

To see the new TRICARE pharmacy copays, learn more about the TRICARE Pharmacy benefit, or move your prescription to home delivery, visit www.tricare.mil/pharmacy.


Be prepared for Winter Driving

Police said a winter whiteout, ice and speed were factors in a massive, chain-reaction pileup in Michigan on Jan. 9, 2015. The sights and sounds of the nearly 200 vehicles – reportedly 76 semi-trucks and 117 passenger vehicles – crashing on both sides of the highway were horrific, according to 911 calls. The crashes killed one person and injured many others.

Driving in the winter can be harrowing, especially where blizzard and icy conditions crop up seemingly out of nowhere. Midwesterners may be used to heavy snow, but residents of states as far south as Georgia and Texas are seeing ice and snow more often. Driving can be even more treacherous in these areas because drivers are not accustomed to it.

Drivers can take precautions to ensure they will arrive safely at their destination.

Check the Weather Before You Go

If the weather is frigid, you're going to want to warm up the car before you drive it. To prevent carbon monoxide poisoning, never leave a vehicle running in an enclosed area, such as a garage. In fact, the Consumer Product Safety Commission warns that a car running in an attached garage is never safe, even with the garage door open.

If the forecast looks iffy, wait out the storm if possible. But if you must travel make sure you share your travel plans and route with someone before you leave.

If you become stranded in an unfamiliar area, do not leave your car. Light flares in front and behind the car and make sure the exhaust pipe is not blocked by snow, mud or any object.

Prepare Your Car for Winter

Besides checking the weather, it's important to have a mechanic check the condition of the following vehicle systems before heading out on the road:

  • Ignition
  • Brakes
  • Wiring
  • Hoses and fan belts
  • Spark plugs
  • Air, fuel and emissions filters, and PCV valve
  • Distributor
  • Battery
  • Tire wear and air pressure
  • Antifreeze level and freeze line

Know What to Do to Avoid a Crash

You've done all you can to prepare your car, you've checked the weather, but suddenly you find yourself driving in a slippery mess. If visibility is severely limited due to a whiteout, pull off the road and don't even attempt to drive farther until conditions improve.

But sometimes water or ice on the road can surprise drivers, even with little to no precipitation. Do you know how to prevent a skid? Would you know what to do if you ended up sliding toward another vehicle or fixed object? If you don't want to end up in a crash like the one in Michigan, AAA offers some winter driving tips.

  • Never mix radial tires with other types of tires
  • Avoid using your parking brake to slow or stop
  • Do not use cruise control in wintery conditions
  • Look and steer in the direction you want to go
  • Accelerate and decelerate slowly
  • Increase following distance to 8 to 10 seconds
  • Know whether you have antilock brakes, which will "pump" the brakes for you in a skid
  • If possible, don't stop when going uphill
  • Keep your gas tank at least half-full
  • If you do get stranded, don't try to push your vehicle out of snow
  • Signal distress with a brightly colored cloth tied to the antenna or in a rolled up window

Don't Leave Home Without These

In an emergency situation, in addition to a full tank of gas and fresh antifreeze, National Safety Council recommends having these with you at all times:

  • Properly inflated spare tire, wheel wrench and tripod jack
  • Shovel
  • Jumper cables
  • Tow and tire chains
  • Bag of salt or cat litter for better tire traction or to melt snow
  • Tool kit
  • Flashlight and extra batteries
  • Reflective triangles or flares
  • Compass
  • First aid kit
  • Windshield cleaner
  • Ice scraper and snow brush
  • Matches in a waterproof container
  • Scissors and string or cord
  • Nonperishable, high-energy foods like unsalted, canned nuts, dried fruits and hard candy
  • Blankets, mittens, socks and hats

Winter road trips — even short ones — are a great way to celebrate with family and friends. Being prepared can ensure a safe and happy time is had by all.


Discover Your Genealogy: Twentieth Century Military Records!

On November 11, 1918, world leaders signed an armistice ending one of the bloodiest conflicts in human memory. Like other major military events in the twentieth century, this moment has been immortalized in popular culture, but there’s more to this story, and it is in the letters, diaries, and journals of Soldiers, and the U.S. Army’s records. Did you know these items can be the key to unlocking your family’s history and can be found at the U.S. Army

Heritage and Education Center in Carlisle, Pennsylvania? On Saturday, January 23, 2016 at 10:30 a.m., USAHEC invites you to join us for our annual Genealogy Workshop, which includes a presentation and hands-on workshop about using the USAHEC Collection to discover genealogy through twentieth century military records.

The winter history program will feature an in-depth presentation by esteemed researcher and USAHEC Collection expert, Mr. Marty Andresen. A hands-on workshop will follow the presentation, focusing on how to begin researching your family’s history using World War I and World War II records from the

USAHEC Collection. These records include a multitude of primary sources, such as unit histories and records, photograph Collections, newspapers, and numerous manuscript collections. While this event focuses on twentieth century records, it is perfect for genealogists, researchers, and students of all experience levels and periods of interest.

This program kicks off USAHEC’s Winter History Series, which highlights different eras and topics in U.S. Army history, through special lectures and hands-on workshops.  The next event in this series is the 5th Annual USAHEC Re-enactor Recruitment Day, on Saturday, February 20, 2016.

The “Twentieth Century Military Records and Genealogy” event begins at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday, January 23, 2016 and is open to the public and free to attend. Participants must register to attend the event and can do so by calling: 717-245-3218 or sending an email to: usarmy.carlisle.awc.mbx.ahec-ves@mail.mil

USAHEC’s exhibits, to include the “Cook Pot and Palette” art exhibit, “Treasures of USAHEC,” and the Soldier Experience Gallery, will be open. Don’t forget to grab lunch at Café Cumberland from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., and feel free to browse the museum bookstore. Parking is free and the USAHEC facility is handicapped accessible. For more information about this and all other events, please visit the website: www.USAHEC.org


New Year brings new opportunities for “Strength for Wisdom”

We’ve all made the resolution at one time or another to get back into shape and take better care of ourselves in the New Year. Well here is your chance to make good on that promise to yourself – the Army War College Strength for Wisdom Program.

By bringing together all of the physical fitness activities available to the U.S. Army War College community, the campaign serves as an easy to follow roadmap for improved fitness for folks of all fitness levels and abilities. 

The “Strength for Wisdom” challenge offers a variety of training programs and challenges to achieve your specific goals and to find an enjoyable way to overall fitness. You can use the program to get back in shape, check your fitness level, overcome your personal stumbling blocks or compete against others.

Keep in mind that you don’t have to take part in the full Strength for Wisdom Challenge program; you can just participate in the programs of your choice.

January

Weekly Performance Fitness Classes

6- 7 a.m., Thorpe Hall Gym, 1stFloor

February

Weekly Performance Fitness Classes

6- 7 a.m., Thorpe Hall Gym, 1stFloor

March

SLDR Run Science #4 – Stamina and Recovery

March 15, 11:45 a.m. – 12:45 p.m. in the Wil Waschoe Auditorium  in Root Hall.

This class will be in a lecture format that address the concepts of stamina and recovery as it relates to running. Other topics of discussion will include endurance for sustained movement, mental resolve and intrinsic motivation. The class will also address ideas for future run program planning.


Army Wellness Center focused on helping you get healthy

Did you know that you can find all of the tools to help you keep those New Year’s resolutions to get healthy by visiting the Carlisle Barracks Army Wellness Center?

Matt Zlogar, the Carlisle Center’s director, said that the Wellness Center takes a big-picture look at health for their clients and build a customized program based on their goals.

“At the Wellness Center folks have access to top notch health education to prevent chronic illness and to improve personal wellness,” he said. “These services combined could be a couple thousand dollars but it is free to a variety of individuals.  We want to help people reach their goals and change their lives.”

Army Wellness Centers complement care of primary care physicians at installation medical treatment facilities, according to the U.S. Army Public Health Command.  The centers provide health promotion services and education tailored to meet individual patient needs. Army Wellness Center programs and services are available to all Army personnel. This includes active-duty soldiers and retirees, their family members, DoD civilians, and Reserve/National Guard components.

“This opportunity is a perfect combination for what I want to do, which is help people find that perfect balance with exercise a nutrition to improve their quality of life,” he said.

A key component of their program are the follow-up consultations, which he said would be a major focus for his team.

“Follow ups are by far the most crucial component of our services,” he said. “It’s vital for the participant to see their progression and what works for them personally.”

Located at 315 Lovell Avenue the Center is one of 24 open in the United States, Europe, and Asia.  Working with primary care managers, the staff offers advice on preventive care based on a patient’s environmental and genetic risk factors to develop comprehensive care plans, and wellness centers will help patients make healthy lifestyle decisions by providing access to resources through state-of-the-art fitness testing, healthy nutrition advice, stress reduction using biofeedback, fitness programs and health education. 

Available individualized health promotion services include:  

  • Health Assessment ReviewProvide a quick analysis of health status and risk for disease to determine if an increase in physical activity is safe.
  • Physical Fitness:  Use advanced technology to assess current fitness levels and generate information to customize exercise programs meeting needs and goals.
  • Health Nutrition:   Conduct metabolic testing to enhance healthy eating by synchronizing resting metabolic rate and providing tailored strategies for weight management.
  • Stress Management:  Conduct biofeedback and education in stress relief techniques, and positive coping skills.
  • General Wellness Education:  Teach healthy lifestyles, increased resiliency, and preventing chronic disease through healthy living, self-care and creating good sleep habits.        
  • Tobacco EducationAssess readiness to change, discuss options for becoming tobacco-free, and recommend or provide appropriate tobacco cessation education programs.

For more information or to make an appointment call 245-4004.

Meet the staff

Eden Dehart – M.H., CHES

Eden graduated from Penn State with a Bachelor’s degree in Nutrition and recently completed her coursework at Penn State for a Master’s degree in Health Education. Eden is an American Council of Exercise Certified Personal Trainer and Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES).

She is certified to teach Les Mills group exercise classes including Body Pump, Combat, Step, and Flow. Her work experience consists of providing nutrition education for the WIC program and a group fitness instructor.

Eden’s interests include tennis, cooking, and exercise.

 

 

 

 

 

 Dorothy “Dottie” Wilkinson M.P.H., AAAI-ISMA

Dottie graduated from West Chester University with her Masters of Public Health with a concentration in Integrative Health and health promotion. She has experience working with Holcomb Behavioral Health which includes expertise in tobacco prevention and nutrition education.

Dottie became very interested in health and exercise in High School as she played field hockey and lacrosse.  This developed her interest and passion to become a health professional and pursue the healthcare field to help people.

Dottie enjoys instructing group fitness classes at the YMCA and backpacking and hiking.

 

 

 

 

Tessa Brophy - BA, Exercise Physiology

Tessa is a recent graduate from Washburn University in Topeka, Kansas.  While attending school she played volleyball for Washburn.  Tessa’s passion for fitness began at a young age, but being a collegiate athlete made her more aware of the importance of healthy nutrition and physical activity.   

She graduated in August 2014 with her Bachelors in Kinesiology with an emphasis in Exercise Physiology.  She has recently obtained her American College of Sports Medicine Exercise Physiologist certification this year.    

Tessa became interested in the Army Wellness Center while she was doing an internship in Kansas at Fort Leavenworth’s AWC.  As an intern she was able to assess biometrics and assist the Health Educators in their daily operations.  Observing how the Educators were making a positive difference in their client’s life was how she knew being a Health Educator was what she wanted to pursue.  Tessa also has experience in sports performance training and coaching.

Tessa’s interests are participating in and watching sports, spending time with her son, coaching volleyball, and being active.

 

 

Tiffany Waardenburg - RD, LDN, ACSM-CPT

Tiffany is a Registered Dietitian with a diverse professional background including culinary arts, nutrition, weight management and exercise.

She graduated magna cum laude from University of Wisconsin-Stout with a Bachelor’s degree in Dietetics and with honors from The Culinary Institute of America with an Associate’s degree in Culinary Arts. Tiffany is also a member of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and Pennsylvania Dietetics Association. She holds a Certificate of Training in Adult Weight Management to better serve her clients and more recently, has expanded her knowledge of exercise by achieving the ACSM Certified Personal Trainer certification.

Tiffany’s work experience spans over several foodservice settings including a Forbes Four-Star, AAA Four-Diamond Award winning hotel and a local, organic-based restaurant. Her time in the culinary field has provided her with a strong knowledge base of a variety of foods, cooking methods and making nutritious, delicious meals for all types of eaters.

In her spare time, Tiffany meal plans and cooks dinner for an after-school ministry at her church and enjoys spending time outdoors with her husband.

 

 

Shana Blaney - Health Promotion Technician – BA, Sports Management

Shana has more than ten years of experience working in a physical fitness setting. Her experience ranges from working as a personal trainer’s assistant designing and implementing programs to helping manage facility operations. 

She graduated with her Bachelors in Health and Physical Education from Marywood University in 2013 and is currently pursuing her Master’s Degree for Counseling.

Shana’s interests and hobbies include participating in ultra-marathons and half-marathons, playing kickball and softball, and volunteering at church.

 


Post information line, Facebook official sources for closures, delays

It's never too early to plan for winter weather. Wondering where to go for information about post closures, delays?

The best place to check for all official post operations is the information line at 245-3700. Updated at least daily, this number always has the latest on post operations. You can also register for AtHoc, the posts official mass notification tool. Find out how at http://www.carlisle.army.mil/banner/article.cfm?id=24037  

Also check the USAWC Facebook page at www.facebook.com/usawc and the Banner at www.carlisle.army.mil/banner

DPW plowing priorities

The main snow removal priorities for post are the main thoroughfares (Claremont Gate to Ashburn Gate) in order to facilitate emergency vehicles. After that, roads around Dunham Clinic, Root Hall, Collins Hall and the post retail areas are cleared. Housing and secondary roads, parking lots and the rest of post will be plowed.  

 

Preparing your home

Start to prepare your home for the winter cold, snow and ice now so it will be ready when the bad weather arrives. There are several things a person can do to make sure their home is ready for winter weather.

Ready.gov recommends that dead branches should be removed from trees. Ice and snow could cause weak branches to break and cause damage to structures. Also, as days become shorter, make sure your outdoor lighting is in good working order. Good lighting can protect you against crime and falls.

You should check smoke and Co2 detectors to make sure they are working properly. Replace the batteries if they are not hard-wired to your electrical system.

"It's a good idea to get into the habit of changing your smoke detector batteries when the time changes for daylight savings," said Jim O'Connell, Carlisle Barracks fire department. "When you change your clocks, just make a point to change the smoke detector batteries, too."

Always make sure you have a snow shovel and salt on hand to keep your sidewalks clear of snow and ice. This can prevent injury from falls, says the FEMA website.

If you have a weather related emergency this winter contact the Carlisle Barracks Fire Department at 245-4419. For all other issues call the Department of Public Works order desk at 245-4019.

Home preparation check list

  • Make sure exterior vents are clear.
  • Remove exterior garden hoses and shut off faucets.
  • Remove weak trees and branches.
  • Check outdoor lighting.
  • Check and change batteries in fire and Co2 detectors.
  • Make sure you have a snow shovel and salt for sidewalks.

Preparing your car

A well running car in the winter can be the difference between making it home and sitting in the cold.

You should place a winter emergency kit in each car, which should include a shovel, windshield scraper, battery powered radio, extra batteries, water, snack food, extra hats and mittens, a flashlight, chain or rope, road salt and sand, booster cables and emergency flares.

 

Car preparation check list

  • Keep oil changes up to date.
  • Check radiator fluid/flush.
  • Check fluid levels.
  • Check all belts.
  • Check all hoses.
  • Check or replace wiper blades.
  • Check tire tread.
  • Check or replace battery.
  • Check or replace thermostat.
  • Lubricate working parts.
  • Make sure you have an emergency kit.

Winter driving tips

Ice, snow and slush on the roads in the winter can create a very hazardous situation. Planning ahead can make your road trips much safer. You should always plan ahead with safety in mind. Be sure to check the forecast; if a winter storm is predicted for the area in which you will be driving, think twice, (or) ask yourself if the trip is necessary. Also, check road condition reports on the television, radio or Internet.

When driving in the winter, always wear your seatbelt; remove ice and snow from windows, license plates and lights; reduce your speed while driving; watch for slick spots under bridges and on overpasses and keep your gas tank at least two-thirds full to prevent the vehicle's fuel line from freezing.

Winter driving check list

  • Watch weather reports.
  • Watch road condition reports.
  • Wear seatbelts.
  • Clear ice from windows and lights.
  • Reduce your speed.
  • Watch for slick spots on the road.
  • Keep gas tank at least two-thirds full.
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